Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 10 December 2022), January 1882, trial of THOMAS NELSON (18) (t18820109-199).

THOMAS NELSON, Violent Theft > robbery, 9th January 1882.

199. THOMAS NELSON (18) , Robbery with violence on John Holliday, and stealing 3s.

MR. FOSTER REID Prosecuted; MR. LEVEY Defended. JOHN HOLLIDAY. I am a cabdriver, and live at 7, Cleveland Road, Islington—I was on the rank at Kingsland Green, Hackney, on Thursday, 29th December—I was taking the nosebag off the back of the hansom, about 1.35 a.m., when I was knocked across the kerb; I fell in the gutter—I saw the prisoner run across the road, but did not think he was running after me—another man was with him—I was hit on the back of my head when I fell—I received a blow in the mouth when I was on the ground—the prisoner got on the top of me when I was on my back—I knew him before—I called for help—there were three cabs on the rank—I lost 3s. out of my pocket—I saw the other man when I was down—I do not know what he did—I felt my right-hand trousers pocket being rifled—one of the men was pulled off by my brother—my lip and nose bled, and it went on my scarf—the prisoner was given into custody.

Cross-examined. I am a night cabman—I came out between 8 and 9—I had 8s. 6d. at Shoreditch Church, and I had earned 1s.—I had two half-crowns, three shillings, and 1s. 6d.—I was on the ground about four minutes—I was sober.

Re-examined. I have no doubt it was the prisoner—I feel the pain row—I have not been to a doctor.

WILLIAM HOLLIDAY . I am a cabman—I was on the same stand—I am the prosecutor's brother—I heard a cry for help—I saw the prisoner on the top of my brother and another one run away—I got off my cab and held the prisoner till a policeman came—they were lying on the ground—I saw some blood as if my brother had had a knock on the nose—I don't think it was a great deal, but there was blood on his nose and mouth—the greatest affair was his fall across the kerb—he was sober.

Cross-examined. I know nothing of any quarrel; I had not seen my brother previously that night—there was a quarrel with another man who was pulled out of a cab—my brother was not on the rank then—it had nothing to do with my brother.

Re-examined. I could recognise the man who ran away—I have seen him many times—mine was the last cab—there had been four cabs, one went away.

RICHARD FLETCHER (Policeman N 185). On 29th December, about 1.30 a.m., I was called to the prosecutor—he gave the prisoner in charge—I first saw William Holliday struggling with the prisoner—the prosecutor

was getting up off the ground; he was bleeding from the nose and mouth—he charged the prisoner with assaulting him and attempting to rob him—at that time he did not know he had been robbed—I told the prisoner I should take him to the station—he said, "All right; I am going quietly; I can do six b—months"—the prosecutor examined his pockets after the charge was taken.

Cross-examined. The prisoner was not drunk.

Witness for the Defence.

SAVILLE ALDRIDGE . I am the wife of George Aldridge, a carman, of 16, Gillet Street, Kingsland—on Thursday night, 29th December, between 1 and 1.30, I was at Highgate, and going home in the direction of Kingsland—I remember being near the cab rank at Kingsland Green about 1.30—I saw a row with the prisoner and a cabman—not William Holliday, but the prosecutor—I saw a young man come up and lay hold of the prisoner and try to get him away—he said," Come on away"—the cabman said, "I have got you, and I will make you pay for it"—I saw no scuffle on the ground—the young man got away—the prisoner was caught hold of.

Cross-examined. I had my baby with me—it was six weeks old—I had been to my sister's at Highgate, and had missed the train—I saw no one lying on the ground—I saw a little blood—I saw both cabmen there—the prosecutor was there first—I saw a constable come up just as my baby began to cry, and I went in and undressed it—I did not know the prisoner was locked up till the afternoon—he lived with my neighbour—I have known him over four years—I heard of his being locked up the next afternoon—his mother nursed me in my confinement—he is no relation.

Evidence in reply.

JOHN HOLLIDAY (Re-examined). I did not see the last witness—she was not there—I am quite certain—there was no woman—there were only three cabs.

Cross-examined. Mrs. Aldridge said the same at the police-court as she has said now—I knew the other cabman—he is not here.

WILLIAM HOLLIDAY (Re-examined). There was no woman there at all, I assure you.

RICHARD FLETCHER (Re-examined). I found 8 1/2 d. on the prisoner—I saw no female about whatever—there were a few people some distance away.

GUILTY *.— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour.