Old Bailey Proceedings.
23rd August 1841
Reference Number: t18410823

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Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numberf18410823

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CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

SESSIONS PAPER.

JOHNSON, MAYOR.

TENTH SESSION, HELD AUGUST 23RD, 1841.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

WILLIAM TYLER, PRINTER, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1841.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Held on Monday, August 23rd, 1841, and following Days.

Before the Right Honourable THOMAS JOHNSON , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Taylor Coleridge, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Queen's Bench; the Right Honourable Thomas Erskine, one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas: Sir Matthew Wood, Bart.; Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq.; Sir Peter Laurie, Knt.; Charles Farebrother, Esq.; William Taylor Copeland, Esq.; Thomas Kelly, Esq.; Sir John Cowan, Bart; and Samuel Wilson, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City: Thomas Wood, Esq.; John Lainson, Esq.; John Humphery, Esq.; John Johnson, Esq.; and Sir James Duke, Knt; Aldermen of the said City: John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

Richard Target Taylor

Edmund Tisdale

John Vincent

Stephen John Russell

Benjamin Steel

Jacob Edmonds

William Vinter

Edward Weston

William Webster

Benjamin Weir

Isaac Salamons

Richard Spencer

Second Jury.

Richard Day

Thomas Slark

William Tarrant

Frederick William Thorn

James Shearer

Robert Showier

Adam Young

James Sims

William Wallace

George Sabine

William Wilmore

William Joseph Sears

Third Jury.

Charles Weatherley

William Leary

William Salmon

Henry Skipper

William Young

Isaac Watt

James Scott

John Sharp

Joseph Worrell

George Salmon

John Roberts

James Walking

Fourth Jury.

William Smith

George Paile

Richard Sullivan

Richard Simmons

Samuel Skelton

James Smith

Samuel Steer

Samuel Osmond

Elgar Frebble

William Thomas White

Robert Goodson

James Walton

Fifth Jury.

William Webb

James Watmore

James Frederick Weedon

Thomas Bruce

Simeon Shoal

Thomas Chinnery

Samuel Dixon

James Tarleton

Edward Taylor

William Taylor

Thomas Steel

Thomas Henry Waldon

Sixth Jury.

John Robert Taylor

Thomas Turpin

John Wheeler

Caleb Tibbett

Richard Ward

William Sharp

James Watts

Henry Vernon

James Murcur

William Power

James Webster

Robert Tate

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

JOHNSON, MAYOR. TENTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—Two stars (**), that they have been more than once in custody—An obeliskthat a prisoner is known to be the associate of bad characters.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, August 23rd, 1841.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN MAYNE, JEREMIAH DONOVAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1952
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment; Miscellaneous > sureties

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1952. JOHN MAYNE and JEREMIAH DONOVAN were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Storey and Edward Furnell, police-constables, in the execution of their duty; to which they pleaded.

GUILTY .— Confined One Month, and to find Sureties.

JOHN DESMOND.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1953
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment; Miscellaneous > sureties

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1953. JOHN DESMOND was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Summerfield, a police-constable, in the execution of his duty; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY .— Confined One Month, and to find Sureties.

PETER DURKAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1954
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1954. PETER DURKAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Homewood.

NOT GUILTY .

JAMES DUBOCK, WILLIAM HAYWARD, THOMAS GRAHAM.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1955
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

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1955. JAMES DUBOCK, WILLIAM HAYWARD , and THOMAS GRAHAM , were indicted for a nuisance; to which they pleaded.

GUILTY.— Judgment Respited.

DENNIS DENNY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1956
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1956. DENNIS DENNY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Jenks, a police-constable, in the execution of his duty.

GUILTY .* Aged 20.— Confined Twelve Months.

PHILIP TURNER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1957
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1957. PHILIP TURNER was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Vicarey, with intent, &c.

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined Eighteen Months.

NEW COURT.—Monday, August 23rd, 1841.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin,

WILLIAM ACTON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1958
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1958. WILLIAM ACTON was indicted for breaking and eatering the dwelling-house of Thomas Courtenay, on the 25th of June, at St. Paul, Shadwell, and stealing therein 2 jackets, value 3l.; 1 coat, value 2l.; 2 pairs of trowsers, value 3l.; 3 waistcoats, value 2l.; 1 watch, value 1l.; and 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; his goods.

THOMAS COURTENAY . I live in Monmouth-street, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell. On the 25th of June I left home about a quarter before twelve o'clock in the day-time—I left no person at home—I fastened the house up with the exception of a back window—I returned about a quarter before one in the day—I found the street-door open—I had the key in my pocket—I missed the articles stated—about 11l. worth altogether—the handkerchief produced was taken off Harris's neck at the station four days after the robbery—he was convicted last Sessions—my wife hemmed this handkerchief for me—I have seen the prisoner about where I live.

MARY ANN BATT . On the 25th of June I saw the prisoner with another man come from the prosecutor's house with a bundle under his arm, which, it appeared, had been brought out of the house—they were on the flap of the door—they ran away as fast as they could.

WILLIAM NICOL (police-constable K 177.) I received a description of the persons, and took Harris on the 29th of June—Harris and the prisoner were acquainted.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN RIGBY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1959
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1959. JOHN RIGBY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 1 poker, value 3s. 9d.; 1 shovel, value 3s. 9d.; and 1 pair of tongs, value 7s. 6d.; the goods of John Cutler; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM POCOCK (police-constable F 81.) I was on duty in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-Inn-Fields, at eight o'clock in the morning of the 23rd of July—the prisoner passed me, and went in front of a couple of shops, near the door, and all of a sudden I saw him walk from the shop, carrying something under his coat—I followed, and took him into custody—as I was following him he dropped the fire-irons from under his coat—when I took him, he said, "I have not taken the fire-irons; they were given me by another person to take care of for an hour or two"—no other person had come near him.

EDWARD ROBINSON . I am manager to John Cutler, an ironmonger. These irons are his property—they were inside the shop, a considerable distance from the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man the previous evening; he said he could often put me in the way of a job to earn 6d.; he told me to meet him next morning in Queen-street; he said he worked at an ironmonger's; I went, and he gave me these irons; I went on with them as he told me; I heard a cry of "Stop thief;" I looked, and saw the policeman running after me; I dropped the irons, and tried to make my escape.

WILLIAM POUND (police-constable S 291.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Transported for Ten Years.

CHARLES HORE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1960
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1960. CHARLES HORE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 13oz. weight of otto of roses, value 8l., and 1 wooden box, value 4d., the goods of James Drew and another, his masters; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Twelve Months.

GEORGE DODD.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1961
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1961. GEORGE DODD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Muloch, from his person; to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

THOMAS HALLING.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1962
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceTransportation

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1962. THOMAS HALLING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August, 6 handkerchiefs, value 16s., the goods of John Harvey and mother.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

PATRICK FOY . I am a private watchman. I was called into Mr. Harvey's shop between eight and nine o'clock in the evening of the 17th of August, and Davis gave the prisoner into my custody—I searched him, and found this handkerchief on him, which Davis identified—I saw some other handkerchiefs at the station in another policeman's hand.

JAMES DAVIS . I am in the employ of John Harvey and Son, on Lugate-hill. The prisoner came into the shop between eight and nine o'clock—he told me he was waiting for his mother—at the end of the counter near where he stood were some boxes containing dresses and a quantity of loose handkerchiefs—I saw him leave his seat and approach these boxes, and raise the lids—I had Foy called in, and in the prisoner's pocket was found one silk handkerchief—at the station I saw five more found in his hat—he was asked if he stole them—he said he would confess to having stolen one—he gave no account of the others—these handkerchiefs are my master's, and have his private mark on them.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are there any other partners but Mr. Harvey and his son? A. No; and Mr. Harvey has no other name but John—there are five handkerchiefs in one piece, and one separate.

GUILTY. Aged 13.—(Recommended to mercy by the Jury.)

Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

WILLIAM BRITTON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1963
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1963. WILLIAM BRITTON. alias John Hughes, was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July, 10 cigars, value 10d., the goods of Richard Alexander Stow; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ELIZABETH STOW . I am the wife of Richard Alexander Stow, who keeps a cigar shop in Barbican. About a quarter before three o'clock in the after-noon of the 24th of July, the prisoner, with two others, came into the shop—they purchased one pennyworth of tobacco—there was a contention which should make use of it—I turned my back, and the prisoner lifted up the lid of a box, took some cigars out, and put them into his pocket—I turned, and asked him to take them from his pocket, which he did, and said, did I mean to say they belonged to me?—I said, yes, I did, as I saw him take them—he said, "I know the lady will forgive me, as I took them through dis-tress"—I called ray husband, who was in the parlour—he came out and took hold of him—he sent for a policeman—the other two had left previous to the prisoner's taking the cigars.

Prisoner. Q. Do you mean to say you saw me take them? A. Certainly I do—I could not swear to the cigars.

RICHARD ALEXANDER STOW . I keep this shop. About a quarter before three o'clock, on the 24th of July, I was sitting in my parlour—the prisoner and two others came into the shop—I heard the lid of the cigar case lifted up as my wife was coming into the parlour—I heard her accuse some one of taking some cigars—I went into the shop, and saw the prisoner—he said, "Do you mean to say these are yours?"—she said, "Yes,

I saw you take them"—I said, "This is not the first time; I shall make an example of you"—he said, "Don't be so hard, I am a poor lad"—the prisoner made a desperate struggle to get away, and threw the officer on the ground—it was as much as we could do to take him—I believe they were my cigars—I had been to the case a short time before.

JOHN BALL . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM JOHNSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1964
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1964. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August, 37lbs. weight of sugar, value 12s., the goods of Thomas Chown.

JAMES STOCKFORD (City police-constable, No. 442.) At half-past ten o'clock on the 7th of August, I went into a coffee-shop in Great Distaff-lane—the prisoner was detained there on suspicion of having stolen this loaf of sugar—the prisoner said two gentlemen gave him 1s., to carryy it to a cab in Cheapside—I was not satisfied—I took the prisoner, and found the owner in the afternoon.

MARTHA CHOWN . I am the wife of Thomas Chown, a ships' carpenter, now at Jamaica. I am book-keeper at the New Inn, Old-change. There were ten loaves of sugar their from Mr. Dickson—they were to go to Dorking—they came at nine o'clock in the morning—we missed one of them at ten, when the carrier came to load them—I should have had to pay for it if it had not been found—I know it by the mark on it, "C. C. D," and it answers to the weight and mark of the one missing.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday I was in Fresh Wharf—two gentlemen asked me to take it to the coach-stand in Cheapside, and they would give me 1s.—I took it, and they went off—I do not know who they were, but I have since heard they were regular cart robbers.

GUILTY .* Aged 21.— Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, August 24th, 1841.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

WILLIAM KING.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1965
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1965. WILLIAM KING was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Christopher Walton, on the 16th of August, at St. Gregory by St. Paul, and stealing therein, 1 watch, value 105l., and 1 watchguard, value 6l.; his property; and that the prisoner bad been before convicted of felony: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 36.— Transported for Ten Years.

JOHN CARR.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1966
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1966. JOHN CARR was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, at St. Mary-le-Bow, 7 robes, value 100l., the goods of Rebecca Corrock, in the dwelling house of Edward Holmes.

JAMES WATKINS (City police-constable, No. 429.) On the 15th of July, at eight o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in King-street, Cheapside, and saw the prisoner standing at the corner of Prudent-passage, with an empty black bag on his arm—I did not watch him then—a few minutes after I saw him with a full bag over his shoulder—I went after him, and stopped him near the corner of Old Jewry, in Cheapside—I told him I did not feel satisfied about the contents of his bag, and I wished to know what lie had in it—he said it was work belonging to his brother, and he was going to take it home for him—I asked where his brother worked—

be said be did not know, it was not his business to ask him—I said I should make it my business to detain him till I was satisfied—I took him to the station, and found the bag contained these seven Alderraanic robes, with the name of "R. Corrock" on them.

REBECCA CORROCK . I have a warehouse at No. 39, King-street, in the house of Edward Holmes, it is in the parish of St. Mary-le-Bow. I looked over my warehouse on the 15th of July, in consequence of information I had received, and missed these seven robes, which are worth 100l. or 100 guineas—I am in the habit of supplying the Aldermen with robes at Guildhall, and at this Court—I am the owner of them—I also lost some broad cloth, which has not been found—my warehouse is on the first floor—the person must have gone up stairs to get the robes—they were lying on the counter—I saw them safe there on Tuesday night.

Prisoner's Defence. On Thursday morning I met my brother in Threadneedle-street—he asked if I wanted a job—I said I did not care—he took me down Ironmonger-lane way, and said, "Wait here till I come back"—I waited—he came, and gave me these things, and said, "Take them home"—I asked where he lived, as I had not seen him for a good bit before—he said, "At No. 2," or "No. 16, Old Street-road," and as I was going along the policeman stopped me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

EMMA WALMSLEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1967
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1967. EMMA WALMSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of Jane, in the dwelling-house of Harriet Penfold Young, 1 sovereign, 1 10l., and 2 5l. Bank-notes, the moneys of Charles Victor Givry.

CHARLES VICTOR GIVRY . I now live in Little Britain, before that I lodged at Mrs. Young's, No. 7, Poland-street; die prisoner was servant at the house. On the 27th of June, I missed a 10l. note and two 5l. notes from a pocket in the lid of my trunk, and a sovereign from a little brass box—I immediately called Mrs. Young—she called the prisoner—I told her what I had lost—she said she knew nothing of it—I pressed her to tell about it—Mrs. Young told her to kneel down, and say before God, that she knew nothing about it—we both said so to her—my money has not been found—I said she had better tell the truth.

WILLIAM RUSSELL (police-constable C 113.) I went to Mrs. Young's, in Poland-street, and saw the prisoner—Mrs. Young said, in her presence, "There has been a robbery of some notes in the house," and pointed to some gowns and other articles on a chair, belonging to the prisoner—I asked the prisoner where she bought them—she told me different places—I have a bundle of clothes and two work-boxes belonging to the prisoner—she said she bought the work-boxes at Tales', in Cambridge-street, and several articles of apparel at the same place—no money was found on her.

HARRIET YOUNG . I live in Poland-street, and am a widow. The prisoner was my servant of all work—I proposed that I should kneel down and declare before God that I had never seen the notes, and that she should do the same—I did not send her to Mr. Webber's to change a 10l. note.

JOHN WEBBER . I am a cheesemonger. I changed a 10l. note for the prisoner, on Tuesday, the 29th of June—I cannot say to whom I paid it—it was a Bank of England note—I am certain it was the 29th of June.

CHARLES VICTOR GIVRY re-examined. I missed my money on the 3rd of July—I had seen it safe last on the 26th of June.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS Q. Are you sure you did not see it after the 26th? A. I am sure all my money was safe on the 26th—I did not count it after that, nor touch it after, till the 3rd of July—I will not swear I did not count it after the 26th of June, but have no recollection of doing so.

MRS. YOUNG re-examined. I do not know what these clothes are worth, part of them are new, but most of them are second-hand—her wages were 5l. a-year—I suppose the clothes are worth 5l.—I had not paid her wages—she had received about 30s. from the people in the house—before the loss was discovered, things were brought from time to time to the house for her—I asked her about it—she said her father had married a cook, which her family were much displeased at, and would not look upon him in consequence of it—she asked my leave to go to see her aunt, to my she was doing well—I gave her leave, and some time after a lady called, who said she was her aunt Napp, who had called to ask her to come for some things she would give her—I let her go, and she brought some article, and said she was to go when her aunt had more things for her, and she brought several articles—I said, "What use are these to you?"—she said her aunt used to give the things to her father till he married, and now she gave them to her—I said she had better name it to her father—she said they were so at variance she dared not—she afterwards produced a large bundle of things, which she said a boy had brought from her grandmother, Mrs. Edwards, with a note, which she showed me; it stated that if she was good, and conducted herself well, she would be a friend to her—she never, till after this charge was made, told me where the things really came from—when the prosecutor said he was. robbed, I said, "This gentleman has lost some money, did you see it or touch it?"—she said, "No"—I urged her very much to tell the truth, and said I considered my respectability at stake, and it would be better to tell the truth.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prosecutor say it would be better for her to tell the truth? A. He told her she had better not kneel down, and say she had not touched it, if she had done so—I said she had better own it, it would be better to own the truth if she took it—I said she had better own it if she, bad done it—I asked her to own whether she took it—I said, "Are those clothes right which you have brought here?"—she said, "Yes, and you may send to Mrs. Edwards, if you like"—she denied taking the money till the constable came—the prosecutor said she had better tell the truth, not that it would be better for her.

NOT GUILTY .

HENRY CRANE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1968
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1968. HENRY CRANE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Walter Carruthers, about two o'clock in the night of the 13th of August, at Staines, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 work-box, value 5s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 2s.; 1 spoon, value 9d.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 6d.; and 1 knife, value 3d.; his property.

EDWARD WALTER CARRUTHERS . I am a shoemaker, and live at Staines, Middlesex. The prisoner was in my service, and left on the Tuesday before the 14th of August—he worked in my shop, which is part of the dwelling-house, and in the parish of Staines—on the 13th of August, I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock at night—every thing was safe, and the house fastened up—on coming down in the morning, the

blind of the back window was on one side, half a pane of glass removed, and the window open—I missed a watch—a decanter and several glasses had been removed—I missed the articles stated—the caddy and work-box are here.

EDMUND BURTON (police-constable T 25.) On the 14th of August I examined the prosecutor's premises—I received a description corresponding with the prisoner, and the articles missing—I dispatched a man on horseback—I received information at twelve o'clock about a watch at Brent-ford —I went with a policeman to Chobham, and found the prisoner at his father's house—he went with me to the Horse Shoe beer-shop, and I asked where he had been the day before—he said in the neighbourhood of Kewbridge, looking for work—I asked if he had been at Brentford—he said he passed through Brentford—I asked if be went to a pawnbroker's there—he said not—I said, "I suspect you of a burglary"—I found the duplicate of a watch, pawned in the name of Spencer, for 1l., on him, and another for a silver watch, pawned at Windsor, and a coat at Jones's—I said I should search his father's house—he replied, "Don't do that, I am the thief, and when you get to Staines I will tell you where the missing property is"—when he got to Staines he desired us to go to a place in a field belonging to Mr. South, where we should find the property, and there we found the tea-caddy and box produced—I compared some marks in the leaden casement with a knife I found on him, it appeared to correspond, and to be the instrument used to remove the lead from the glass—there were impressions of the round point of this knife, which fitted exactly.

JOHN WILLIAM JONES . I am a pawnbroker. On the 14th of August I received a watch in pawn from the prisoner, in the name of William Spencer, housekeeper, Brentford-end, for 1l., and gave him the duplicate found on him, which is in my own handwriting.

Prisoner. I did not tell him I was a housekeeper.

CHARLES BUTLER (police-constable T 194.) I found some decanters and glasses, and several ornaments outside the prosecutor's house.

MR. CARRUTHERS re-examined. This is my watch, tea-caddy, and box, and this small knife is mine.

Prisoner. I hope you will pass as light a sentence as possible on me.

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Ten Years.

SAMUEL WHITLEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1969
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1969. SAMUEL WHITLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Dorchester, on the 11th of July, at Ealing, and stealing therein, 6 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, 10 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and 4 sixpences, her monies.

JAMES HENRY DORCHESTER . I live in the parish of Baling, Middlesex, with Ann Dorchester, my mother, who is a grocer, she keeps the house. In consequence of missing money I gave information to a policeman, and had one watching for three Sundays, and another for two—on returning on Sunday, the 11th of July, I found a policeman there—I heard the prisoner was in custody—he lived next door to us—I had marked some money, and the policeman some, which was in a bureau up stairs, in my mother's bed-room—there was 23l. 0s. 6d. in the bureau—on the 11th of July 8l. 10s. was missing—I saw 8l. 10s. found on the prisoner, all marked, and which I can swear to, some having been marked by me, and some by the officer in my presence; the money left in the bureau was 14l. 10s. 6d., making the exact amount left there on Sunday morning.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you in partnership with your mother? A. No, she has no partner; she lives in the house.

JOHN PASCOE (police-sergeant T 10.) On Whit-Sunday, the 30th of May, I marked a quantity of sovereigns, which were put in Mrs. Dorchester's bureau—I stopped there three Sundays, and nothing transpired—I afterwards sent a constable, and afterwards saw some sovereigns in his possession, five of which I had marked.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you seen the prisoner's father? A. Yes, I have known him some years, he is a constable of Baling parish—I never stated to him that I knew the putter-up of the robbery, but it was no use taking him now, nor any thing of the kind—the father stated he had received a letter, stating that a young man in Brentford was concerned with his son—I saw his mother, she said, "For God's sake what have you done?"—I said I understood he had robbed Mrs. Dorchester—I did not tell her to have none of her d—d palaver for she had had the handing of the money, nor any thing of the kind—she said it was a very bad thing—I said, "Yes, if you are concerned in it, it is very bad"—she made a deal of fuss—I did not see her in tears—she was in distress—she did not, in my hearing, ask the prisoner if she ever gave him any encouragement to act so.

COURT. Q. It was the prisoner's father suggested there was an accomplice? A. Yes, two or three days after he was in custody.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a policeman. I was ordered to attend at the prosecutrix's house, and remained there till between four and five o'clock on Sunday afternoon, the 11th of July, about twenty minutes before five I saw the prisoner come to the gate of the back-yard—he came up to the window, and with a wooden peg began to push at the screw which fastened the window—he could not get it out far enough—he then took a knife and shaved the peg, then threw up the window, got in, shut it down, and put in the screw as it was before, opened the staircase-door, went up stairs, and came down in a few minutes—I took him into custody, and found six sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, ten half-crowns, three shillings, and four sixpences, which I produce—I had noticed him in the yard before he came to the window—I noticed him cutting the peg—I was in the shop, which leads into the room he got into—the door was shut, but I was looking through a large keyhole, and could see right up the yard—he could go up stairs without coming into the shop, as the door is close to the window.

JOHN PASCOE re-examined. Here are five sovereigns, which I marked on Whit-Sunday.

JAMES HENRY DORCHESTER . Here is some of the silver, which I marked on Whit-Sunday—it is all marked.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

GEORGE DAY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1970
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1970. GEORGE DAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, 1 coat, value 2l. 10s.; 2 waistcoats, value 10s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 25s.; and 1 watch-guard, value 15s.; the goods of Benjamin Kitson Baldwin; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 24.— Confined Nine Months.

JAMES JOHNSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1971
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1971. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing 1 handkerchief, the goods of William Hoddle, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 20.— Confined Nine Months.

WILLIAM SHARP.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1972
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1972. WILLIAM SHARP was indicted for stealing, "on the 17th of July, at St. Andrew, Holborn, London, in the dwelling-house of William Wood, 1 dressing-case, value 1l.; 3 shirt-studs, value 1l. 10s.; 3 buckles, value 1l. 14s. 1 locket, value 10s.; 1 scent-bottle, value 5s.; 1 pencil-case, value 1s.; I coat, value 2l.; 1 shawl, value 5s.; 3 half-crowns, 10 shillings, and 1 5l. Bank-note; the property of Henry Hayne; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

HENRY FOX . I am waiter at Wood's Hotel, Furnival's Inn, Holborn. About half-past five o'clock, on the afternoon of the 17th of July, I was in the coffee-room, and observed the prisoner waiting outside the hotel door—Host sight of him for about a quarter of an hour—I went to look for him, but could not find him, and I put the alarm-bell on the hotel door, which rings when any one comes in or goes out—I afterwards heard the bell ring, and saw the prisoner leaving the door with a bundle under his arm—I followed him to No. 11 in the inn—I asked who he had been to see in the hotel—he said, "Mr. Reynolds"—we had a gentleman of that name in the hotel—I told him to follow me, and I would show him to Mr. Reynolds—I took him to him, and asked if he expected any clothes from the tailors—he said he did not, and he did not know the prisoner—I then brought the prisoner out of the room, and made him untie the bundle—it contained the articles stated, belonging to Mr. Hayne, of Southampton, who had come to the hotel that day—he claimed them—the hotel is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn.

Cross-examined by MR. PBENDEROAST. Q. It is in the county of Middlesex, is it not? A. Yes—Mr. Hayne is not here—the prisoner told Mr. Reynolds he had brought some clothes for. him, and he said he did not expect any—the prisoner did not then say it was a mistake—I brought him out of the room immediately—I did not hear him say a person he had seen in the inn had told him to take the clothes to Mr. Reynolds—he said he had been told by some person to take them.

HENRY ULUSIBOO . I am servant to Mr. Henry Hayne—he was lodging at Wood's hotel on the 17th of July—this dressing-case is his—I have packed it up many times, and also this shawl and coat—every thing here is his.

Cross-examined. Q. Has your master any other name besides Henry? A. No—I have known his name for these twenty years.

WILLIAM WOOD . My hotel is in Furnival's Inn, in the county of Middlesex, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn.

WILLIAM FINN (City police-constable, No. 276.) Part of Fnrnival's Inn is in the City, and part in Middlesex—the hotel is in the county—I took the prisoner, and have produced the property—there is a 5l. note, three half-crowns, and ten shillings in the dressing-case.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask him any thing? A. No—he did not say he was quite innocent—I am sure of that.

EDWARD BULPIN (police-constable K 125.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's conviction from Mr. Clark's office—I was a witness on the prisoner's former trial—I am sure he is the person to whom this certificate applies—(read).

Cross-examined. Q. You apprehended him, I suppose? A. I did.

GUILTY. Aged 42.—Of Larceny, and former Conviction.— Transported for Seven Years.

JOHN KRULL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1973
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1973. JOHN KRULL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July, 1 bag, value 6d., and 28lbs. weight of coffee, value 3l. 7s., the goods of William Bennett and another; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

BENJAMIN THOMAS CARTWRIGIIT . I am porter in the service of William Bennett and Mr. Brown, wholesale tea-dealers, in King William-street. On the 13th of July I had two chests of tea, a box, and a bag, to take to the Saracen's Head, Aldgate, in a truck—when I got near Aldgate pump I found the truck swerve round—I turned my head, and saw the prisoner at the tail of the truck, with the coffee in his hands—I pursued him down Leadenhall-street, calling "Stop thief"—I was close at his heels, and he threw the coffee into the road—I collared him in Black Raven-court, and gave him in charge to a policeman—I never lost sight of him.

WILLIAM SHEPPERSON (City police-constable No. 614.) I was on duty in Leadenhall-street—I saw the prisoner throw away the bag, and run up Black Raven-court, which is no thoroughfare—when I came up, Cartwrigbt had him by the jacket—I took him into custody, and received the bag of coffee.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along Leadenhall-street; there was a mob running; they hallooed out "Stop thief," and I ran as well as others; that is all I know about it; the man collared me.

WILLIAM CARR (police-constable H 109.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's conviction, which I got from the Clerk of this Court—I was present as a witness on the prisoner's former trial, and am certain he is the person mentioned in this certificate—(read.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Ten Years.

THOMAS EVANS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1974
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1974. THOMAS EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, one breast-pin, value 1l. 1s., the goods of George Tyler, from his person.

GEORGE TYLER . I am a watch-maker, and live in Holywell-street, Strand. On the evening of the 18th of July, I was in Fleet-street. near Farringdon-street—I saw the prisoner—he crossed from the opposite side of the way, and came in front of me—I went to the right, and he also went to the right—I then went to the left, to allow him to pass, and he again got before me—I then stood still, that he might pass which way he thought proper, and he made a snatch at my pin—I saw it in his hand—I caught hold of his hand—he tore it away from me, and endeavoured to pass the pin away to a second party—I caught hold of the second party's hand, considering he had the pin, and the prisoner ran away—a policeman went after him, and brought him back—I still held the other party, and he was taken to the station—the pin was afterwards produced—I made it myself—I saw something blue in the prisoner's hand, which I believed to be the pin—I caught his hand very near my face with it—when he obstructed me I looked in his face, to ascertain whether he was in liquor, previous to his taking the pin.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDEROAST. Q. You have not mentioned about seeing any thing blue before, have you? A. Yes—I told the Magistrate I saw the pin in his hand, or something which I supposed to be the pin—something of the same colour—blue—I may be mistaken as to seeing the pin, but the moment I took his hand, I said, "You have my pin," and I certainly did see something which I now believe to be the pin—this was about a quarter-past ten o'clock—I was going towards Farringdon-street—I

was in company with my father-in-law, and mother—they are not here—it was not considered necessary—I was told my evidence was quite sufficient without them—they saw nothing of the transaction—I was walking with my wife—she is not here—I was only going as far as the corner of Farringdon-street—I told the Magistrate I could produce further evidence if necessary, hut I was told it was not—I do not know that I told the Magistrate my wife was with me—I did not wish to bring her into a Court of Justice, it is not so very pleasant, but the inspector knew she was with me, and had it been necessary, of course he would have told her to attend—she was at the station—I think the prisoner was not in liquor—it was a very fine evening—there was plenty of light—I did not collar and detain him—he ran down Poppin's-court—I held the other person by the hand for about five minutes—a policeman came up and took him to the station—he has since been discharged, as the Magistrate said I could not prove that he ever had possession of the pin—I will swear that person did not put his hand upon me—it was the prisoner—I swear it.

HENRY PROWSE (City police-constable, No. 375.) On the 18th of July, about a quarter-past ten o'clock at night, I was passing by the corner of Poppin's-court, and saw the prisoner and prosecutor quite close together—the prosecutor said, "I have been robbed of a pin"—the prisoner immediately ran up Poppin's-court, up Harp-alley, and into Shoe-lane—I followed, and a brother officer stopped him in King's Head-court—on the following morning I found the pin lying in the carriage-way, about twenty yards down Poppin's-court, in the direction in which the prisoner ran, and about twenty yards from where it was taken from the prosecutor—it appeared to have been stepped upon.

Cross-examined. Q. What time did you find the pin? A. About half-past three o'clock in the morning—I was looking for it, knowing the prisoner had run that way—it was not pointed out to roe—I found it myself—no one else was present—when I first came up, the prisoner and prosecutor were standing at the corner of Poppin's-court—immediately the prosecutor told me he had the pin, he ran away down Poppin's-court, and up Harp-alley—I was close to him—I only lost sight of him in crossing Shoe-lane—he was stopped about five yards up King's Head-court, and I took him there—I only lost sight of him once, and that not for a minute—he only turned one turning—I can swear he is the same person I saw in Fleet-street—I noticed his face once or twice so as to know him again—I did not hear the prosecutor say he thought the prisoner had stolen the pin—he said he had robbed him of it.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

JOHN JONES, JOHN CLIBS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1975
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Transportation

Related Material

1975. JOHN JONES and JOHN CLIBS were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 29 yards of gambroon, value 2l. 16s., the goods of Samuel Ward; and that CLIBS had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM M'GAREY . I live in New-square. On the morning of the 23rd of July I was coming through Lillypot-lane, and saw the prisoner Clibs go into the prosecutor's house on tip-toe—I afterwards saw him come out with a piece of stuff on his shoulder—I saw Jones waiting at the corner of the street, about 100 yards from the shop, at the corner of Noble-street—Clibs was going towards Wood-street, when Jones gave a low whistle, and he turned back and went to the corner along with him—I afterwards saw Clibs hand the parcel to Jones—I told Mr. Ward, who

followed, and collared Jones, who dropped the parcel—a policeman handed it to me, and I carried it to the station—Clibs ran away, but was stopped and brought back.

SAMUEL WARD . I live in Lillypot-lane. This piece of gambroon is mine, and is worth 56s.—I ran out on the alarm, and saw Clibs with it—he gave it to Jones, and I collared him.

WILLIAM HENRY EDWARDS (City police-constable, No. 241.) I saw Mr. Ward stop Jones, who dropped the property—I laid hold of it, and took Jones into custody—Clibs was shortly afterwards brought to me—I gave the property to M'Garey, and conveyed them both to the station.

Jones. He never saw the cloth in my arms at all. Witness. I saw it on his shoulder, and saw him drop it.

Jones's Defence. I was going along Falcon-square, and saw a young man going along with the cloth on his shoulder—he dropped it—I picked it up, and before I had time to look round, the witness and two or three more came and took hold of me.

RICHARD BROMLEY . I am a City policeman. I produce a certificate, which I obtained from Mr. Clark's office—it relates to the prisoner Clibs—I was a witness against him when he was tried by the name of William Davis—(read)—I am satisfied he is the same person.

JONES— GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Yean.

CLIBS— GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Ten Years.

CHARLES DIGGLE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1976
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1976. CHARLES DIGGLE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August, 4 pieces of woollen cloth, value 6s., the goods of Henry Moses his master.

HENRY MOSES . I am a wholesale clothier. The prisoner has been in my employ for about six months—on the 13th of August he had a piece of cloth given him to cut certain garments from—in the course of the day I went to the board where he was at work, and saw his hat under the board close to his feet—I found it was heavy, and kicked it up, and in it was stuffed as hard as could be, some cloth, and a handkerchief placed at the top—I took it out, and asked the prisoner what it was—he said it was some bits he had left, off the last piece, which he thought was of no use—I took them up, opened them, and asked him if they were of no use—they were large enough to make a waistcoat, and are worth 5s. or 6s.—he was then at work at a piece of blue cloth—this is black—he had finished that job.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. When bad he the cloth given to him? A. In the morning, about ten or eleven o'clock—he usually went to dinner at one—it was about four or five o'clock that I found the cloth in his hat—he was at work at the time—these are the pieces—I think this piece would make a waistcoat—I would not be sure—there are four pieces—they are all the same size—they are too large to be taken from the premises.

COURT. Q. He had done the job from which these pieces were cut? A. Yes—he had cut them wrong, and had to cut fresh collars and lappels, for which this cloth would have done, but instead of taking this, be cut a yard of fresh cloth to do it—he had 5s. 6d. a-day—I had no character with him—it is not usual to have characters with men in his situation.

CALEB GROVES (City police-constable, No. 522.) I took the prisoner into custody, and received these pieces of cloth from the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 55— Confined Two Months.

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, August 24th, 1841.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

CATHERINE BRYAN, ELIZA BRYAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1977
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty; Guilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment; Transportation

Related Material

1977. CATHERINE BRYAN and ELIZA BRYAN were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 1 pewter-pot, value 1s., the goods of John Edmund Briggs: 1 pewter-pot, value 11d., the goods of Thomas Thornton: and 1 pewter-pot, value 10d.; the goods of Ambrose Everard; to which

CATHERINE BRYAN pleaded GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined Three Months.

ELIZA BRYAN pleaded GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

ROBERT BRYAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1978
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1978. ROBERT BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 1 basket, value 1s.; and 3 half-crowns; the goods of Henry Charles Davis, taskmaster; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Three Months.

CHARLES PRICE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1979
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1979. CHARLES PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 1 coat, value 2l., the goods of Charles Chatfield; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined One Year.

DAVID PHILLIPS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1980
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1980. DAVID PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July, 28 pictures and frames, value 1l.; 2 combs, value 6d.; and 2 razors, value 1s.; the goods of Thomas Gray, his master.

THOMAS GRAY . I met the prisoner at Staines—I delivered twenty-four prints of this size, and four others, and the razors and combs, to the prisoner to sell, he was to meet me the same evening, at a public-house at Hounslow—he did not come, and on Sunday I went to Staines—I took him—he had these four prints on him—he had made away with the others—these now produced are some I gave him to sell.

Prisoner. You told me not to come back unless I brought goods or money. Witness. I told him to meet me in the evening—I never saw him again till I saw him in custody, on the Sunday morning.

WILLIAM BURTON . I bought these three pictures of the prisoner, on the 6th of July, for 1s. 6d.—I gave him the money for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I got into a cart, and broke five or six of them, and was not to come back till I sold the whole; he told me to get goods or money for them; he had no license for selling goods.

GUILTY. Aged 34.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.— Confined Four Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner for embezzlement)

GEORGE FINCHLEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1981
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1981. GEORGE FINCHLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of William Adams, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM ADAMS . I am a surgeon, and live in Finsbury-square. At a quarter-past ten o'clock in the evening of the 15th of August I was coming by St. Paul's—I felt a jerk at my pocket—I turned round, and instantly seized the prisoner, who was behind me, almost touching me—he then produced my handkerchief from behind him, saving he had picked it up; that he saw a person pick my pocket, and throw it down—no one but the prisoner was within ten yards—no one but him could take it—he pretended to see some one running, but there was no one.

Prisoner. I saw a boy pick the gentleman's pocket, and take the handkerchief and chuck it down; he ran directly he threw it down; if the gentleman had not turned round I should have given it him.

CHARLES CHAMBERS (City police-constable, No. 523.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

GEORGE LONGLONS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1982
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1982. GEORGE LONGLONS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July, 1 pair of trowsers, value 4s.; and 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; the goods of Stephen Sewell.

STEPHEN SEWELL . I am a tailor, and live in Fetter-lane. About two o'clock in the afternoon of the 12th of July I was called, and saw the prisoner and another in the shop—the other asked the price of a waistcoat—I said it was not one they could afford to buy—they went out—I turned, and missed a waistcoat and trowsers—I followed them out, stopped the prisoner, and took these trowsers from under his left arm—I asked for the waistcoat—he denied having it.

EDWARD BIRKS . I live in Fleur-de-Lis-court. I saw the prisoner running, and throw down a waistcoat.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man I knew; he said he was going to purchase a jacket, and asked me to go; I did so; he asked the price of one in the window; we came out, and he gave me the trowsers to hold—I asked where he got them, and the man came and took me with the trowsers; he asked me about the waistcoat; I said I had not got it; I know nothing of the waistcoat.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

JOHN JONES.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1983
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1983. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July, 49 handkerchiefs, value 3l., the goods of Edmund Henry Abbott and another.

JOHN WILLIAM WEBB . I am a carpet-planner, living in Luke-street, Paul-street. A little before nine o'clock in the morning of the 27th of July I was standing in Aldermanbury, nearly opposite the prosecutor's—I saw the prisoner—I saw a young man, who appeared to be a companion of the prisoner, bring out a paper parcel from Mr. Abbott's—I gave information—the prisoner, who was there, and his companion, ran across Aldermanbury, up Love-lane—I and a young man that came out of the warehouse pursued them, and before we got to them, the prisoner had got the parcel underhis arm—they were walking—the other man started off when he saw us—the prisoner did not run—he had an opportunity of running as well as the other—if he had run very likely he would have escaped, but he would have dropped the goods—the other witness took the prisoner—I returned from going after the other, who escaped, and the prisoner said, "What it the matter? I will go quietly with you."

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How long did the other person remain in? A. Two or three minutes—I do not know whether I have said it was five or six—it did not appear to me to be so long—I first saw the prisoner come down on the other side and cross, and I saw him join the other when he came out—I did not see where the prisoner was when the other was in the shop—I saw him come across the street when the other came out—I had seen him there before.

COURT. Q. Did you see the other go in? A. Yes—I did not see the prisoner with him then—when I first saw the prisoner he was six or eight

doors before he came to Cateaton-street—it was after I saw the other go into the shop that I saw the prisoner first—he was then about five doors from the prosecutor's warehouse—I did not heed him then—I next noticed him nearly opposite when the man came out.

THOMAS SPECKLEY . I am warehouseman to Edmund Henry Abbott and another. I ran out on receiving information—I saw the prisoner with a parcel under his arm—I took hold of him, and took this parcel of shawls from his arm, and took him back—I believe he said it was a mistake—I said, "You must answer that before the Lord Mayor"—these are my masters' shawls.

(William Taylor, surgeon, Vine-street, Hatton-garden, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY.† Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy by the Protecutor.

Transported for Seven Years.

JOHN CHAPMAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1984
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1984. JOHN CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; and 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; the goods of Thomas Sparks, from his person.

THOMAS SPARKS . I am a boot-maker, living in Water-lane, Fleet-street. On Sunday evening, the 18th of July, about ten minutes after ten o'clock, I was coming down Field-lane—I felt something at my pocket—a woman gave me information, and took me back to Field-lane—I got a policeman—my handkerchief was not found.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What handkerchief was it? A. A red middle and a light coloured border round it.

CATHARINE SHEA . I am the wife of Thomas She a, and live in Field-lane. On Sunday evening I saw the prisoner following the prosecutor—he put his hand on his pocket—a man and woman passed between me and him—I saw no more for a minute—I saw the prisoner returning with the handkerchief in his hand—I could not see what sort of a handkerchief it was—the corner of it seemed red.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not a red ground and border with something like dark spots or flowers on it? A. I did not say so—I could not discover the colour—I have lived in Field-lane eight years—I keep no shop—my husband is a boot and shoemaker—I was at my door—I was close by the prisoner when I saw the handkerchief—I do not sell handkerchiefs.

THOMAS BRADLEY (City police-constable, No. 296.) I found the prisoner half an hour after at the foot of Holborn-hill.

CATHARINE SHEA re-examined. He was holding up the prosecutor's pocket with his right band, and his left was in his pocket—I was at my own door at the time—the prisoner had sat at my door. and I begged him to rise up—the prosecutor and his wife passed by me—when I had locked my door I followed them, and saw the prisoner still—I was quite close to him when he returned with the handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Nine Months.

DAVID CRANE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1985
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1985. DAVID CRANE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July, 2 saws, value 2s.; 1 plane, value 1s.; 1 hammer, value 6d.; 1 trowel, value 6d.; 1 bradawl, value 2d.; 2 keys, value 2d.; and 1 file, value 2d.; the goods of James Wilmott.

JAMES KERSEY (police-constable S 144.) On Sunday morning, the 4th of July, I met the prisoner in the fields, close to Mr. Perkins's yard, at Paddington—I took him to the station, put him in the cell, and went after

another who was in company with him—when I came back I searched the prisoner, but could find nothing on him—I lifted up the trap-door in the cell, and found these tools—I asked the prisoner if he knew any thing about them—he said, "Yes, I put them there, that you should not find any thing on me."

JAMES WILMOTT . I am a labourer. These are my tools—I saw them safe on Sunday morning, and missed them on Monday.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined One Month.

THOMAS ROGERS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1986
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1986. THOMAS ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of August, 1 pair of boots, value 9s., the goods of John Richard Hand.

JOHN RICHARD HAND , Jun. I am assistant to John Richard Hand, a boot-maker, in Cheapside. On the 3rd of August, at half-past one o'clock, I was in my father's shop, and saw the prisoner take a pair of boots from the door, and run away with them—I pursued, and cried "Stop thief—a policeman took him—he had these boots on his person.

JOHN BARKER (City police-constable, No. 419.) I found the boots on his person.

GUILTY .** Aged 30.— Transported for Seven Years.

CHARLES HARRIS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1987
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1987. CHARLES HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 bag, value 1l., the goods of William Garrett.

CHARLES DINGLE . I am shopman to William Garrett, of Comhill. On the 19th of July I saw the prisoner take a carpet bag from off a parcel of umbrellas at the door, and walk off—I followed him, and found it on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work at the time.

GUILTY .* Aged 30.— Confined Nine Months.

ROBERT DIXON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1988
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1988. ROBERT DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of June, 4 1/2 lbs. weight of bristles, value 14s., the goods of the St. Katharine's Dock Company, and that he had been before convicted of felony.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY POPE . I am gate-keeper in the service of St. Katharine's Dock Company, my station is at the principal entrance in East Smithfield. About four o'clock in the afternoon of the 30th of June, I saw the prisoner coming out of the Dock gate, I thought his pocket looked very bulky, I watched him across the road, and followed him about 100 yards—I never lost sight of him—I got up to him, and laid hold of his pocket—I said, "What have you got?"—he said, "Nothing"—I said, "I am satisfied there is, I must see"—he said, "You have no business with me, as I am outside the Docks"—I said he must come back with me to the Docks—he said he should not—I said, "Well, you must come in here"—I took him into a shop—he pulled the bristles out of his coat-pocket, in this handkerchief—I put my hand to his breast, and told him he had got something there—he immediately pulled out this other handkerchief of bristles, which was spread over his front—he unbuttoned his waistcoat, and pulled them out from between his waistcoat and shirt—I asked him where he got them—he said he had them given to him—I asked who by—he said, "I refuse to tell"—I told him to come over to the Dock—he said, "I shall not"—I said if he did not I should use force, and call assistance—he went over, I took him to the superintendent's office—here is 4 1/2 Ibs. of bristles—the superintendent asked him his name—he refused to tell—he asked where

he lived—he refused to tell, but after some time be said his name was Robert Dixon—he was asked where be got them from—he said he brought them out with him to sell—he was asked how he came to bring them into the Dock—he said he did not know he had got them about him—he was given into custody—in consequence of what I heard the next morning I searched a house in North-east-passage, Red Lion-square.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did not he tell you he had got something to do on board the Gladiator? A. Not to my knowledge—he said he had not been in the Docks, but in at the gate, but turned out again—this card of the Gladiator ship was in his pocket, it states its time of sailing—it has since sailed—there were no bristles on board her—it is my business to search the persons as they go out of the Docks if we have any suspicion—he left just before the workmen leave—they do not leave off till four o'clock—we search all our own people regularly, whether we have suspicion or not—a labouring man coming out with the labourers would be searched—he did not say any thing about the Gladiator—he did not tell me, that finding he had the articles about him he knew he should be troubled and detained, and therefore divided them.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am superintendent of the police at the Docks. Pope brought the prisoner to my office—he has stated truly what passed.

Grots-examined. Q. Did he tell you he bad been on board the Gladiator? A. No—he said be brought the bristles into the Docks with him, and after some time he said, "Indeed I was not aware that I had them"—he refused to give his name.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am warehouseman of the warehouse "D" at the St. Katharine's Docks. In September last there was a consignment of bristles from the Thetis to our Docks—they were put in the warehouse "D"—I have examined the bristles taken from the prisoner, and they correspond with the bristles from the That is—the casks were overhauled, they were covered with Russia mats, and roped over the mats—there had been no order to any one to examine that cask—when an order from the merchant comes, they cut open the mat, and the cooper attends, and takes the head of the cask out, to expose the whole—on going over the casks, I found the matting of one opened, not as if by authority—it was a very small space, that I could get my hand in—the head was broken, and some bristles gone, and some wrappers had no bristles in them—I found a difference in the weight to what the cask was when it was brought into the Dock—I weighed it after this discovery, it weighed 8cwt. 3qrs. 7lb.—here are a sample of bristles from the cask—they come tied in bundles of about 2lb. weight—I have a sample of bristles fit for shoemakers—I paid 1s., for half an ounce of them, and these the prisoner had are worth 3s. a pound —those that the prisoner had are not calculated to work shoes—Cox weighed the casks when they landed.

Cross-examined. Q. These are a much inferior kind? A. Yes—I cannot say whether there are bristles of this kind to be purchased at any shop in London—I am a tolerable judge of the article, but never bought any—a great quantity of this description come from abroad yearly—I did not weigh all the bristles there—all the bristles in that part of the Docks have not been weighed since this transaction—we have weighed three or four of the casks, but not all—seeing the others were quite perfect we did

not weigh them—we have found we have got the correct weight of bristles in the others as far as we have gone—it was not more than four or five days since I had examined all these casks, and there was none broken—I know this did not get broken by accident—there was no business carrying on near to where it was—a thump of the hand would have driven the head in, and it might have been done by any labourer—no person has been turned out of the Docks since, in consequence of this—no person has been suspended—I might select a few of these bristles to be used by a shoemaker, but they are not long enough or strong enough, they are used for paint brushes or dusting brushes.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was there a deficiency in this one cask? A. Yes, 28lbs.

GEORGE EDWARD LAUNDY . I am deputy warehouse-keeper—any order for inspecting these casks would go through my hands—there was none.

EDWARD HAMMART COX . I am clerk to the Dock Company. I was present on the 4th of September last, in the "D" Warehouse, where the casks of bristles were deposited—I saw the cask that Palmer weighed, after the discovery—it weighed, on the 4th of September, 9cwt. 0qrs. 7lbs. —which makes a deficiency of 28lbs. —I saw the same cask in the warehouse on the 16th of July.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure no one has been discharged since this? A. Not that I am aware of—I never noticed any of these casks being broken.

JOHN JAMES . I am extra labourer in the Docks. I have known the prisoner by the name of Lamson, four or five years—I formerly kept a beer-shop, which he was in the habit of frequenting—I saw him on the 29th of June, at the back of "C" Warehouse, in the Docks—I had some conversation with him.

MATTHEW BROWN . I am a brush-maker—I have examined the bristles found on the prisoner and those in the cask—they are of exactly the same description—they are not fit to be used by shoemakers—about two or three lbs. might be selected out of a cwt.

JAMES FOGG . I am inspector of the Thames police. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, about eleven years ago—I was present at the trial—(read)—the prisoner is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 44.— Confined One Year.

HENRY PIERARD.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1989
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1989. HENRY PIERARD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July, 3 halfpence, the moneys of William Ocock and another, his masters.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM OCOCK . I am in partnership with Mr. George Tern's Whelbourn, chemist and druggist, in Judd-street, the prisoner was in our employ. On the 7th of July I marked some halfpence, and put them into the till—I was the only person that had access to the till till the prisoner was taken up, on the 10th of July—I did not pay away any of the marked money—he had been out, and when he came home I asked if he had been to the till, he told me he had not—I said I missed some money, he said he had not taken any—I desired him to sit down, and a policeman was called—I was in the habit of giving the prisoner money in the morning to get milk for breakfast, but that morning I gave him none—he had not asked for any—my partner was not there.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. The parents of the prisoner are now in humble circumstances? A. Yes, his father was an officer in the army, and his grandfather a judge in India—the prisoner is my apprentice —I was to have had 40l. with him, if he remained four years with us, it was to be paid by instalments, if the grandfather lived, but he died, and his father was not able to make it up—I and my partner were taken to the police-office, for ill-using him—my partner was fined, 1l., I was not fined—I put twelve marked halfpence and one penny into the till—my partnership ceased about a fortnight since—the prisoner has been in prison since the 10th.

JAMES ANDERSON (police-constable E 123.) I was called in, and took the prisoner—I searched him, and found on him these two marked half-pence, and two penny-pieces not marked—I asked him if he was guilty of what he was accused of, he denied it—when I found the halfpence he owned to it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you propose to Mr. Ocock to send for his father? A. No—he did not desire me not to send for him.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN GREEN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1990
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1990. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July, 1 pair of shoes, value 5s., the goods of David Hartshorn.

DAVID HARTSHORN . I am a coach-smith, living in Drury-lane. On the 1st of July I slept in a three-bedded room at the Cock and Magpie public-house, Drury-lane—when I got up next morning my shoes were gone, and another pair left behind.

JAMES MORLEY . I am potboy there. The prisoner slept there that night in the next bed to the prosecutor—I went after the prisoner, and found him in the hands of the police—I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM MORRIS (police-constable C. 173.) I took the prisoner, and found the prosecutor's shoes on his feet—he said he had made a mistake.

Prisoner's Defence. I pulled my shoes off by the bed-side; when I got up in the morning I could not find them; I put on the others till I returned at night, but with no intention to steal them.

GUILTY. Aged 27.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Confined One Month.

RICHARD JEFFREYS, JOHN RILEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1991
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1991. RICHARD JEFFREYS and JOHN RILEY were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 1 scarf, value 1l., the goods of William Tent.

SAMUEL THOMAS . I am servant to William Tent, of Birchin-lane. On the 28th of July the two prisoners came to the shop—Riley asked to look at a pair of stockings at 1s.—I said we had none under 2s.—he said they would do—I showed them to him—he said they would do—I put them in paper—he gave me a half-sovereign to pay for them—I went to get change at the till—I saw Jeffreys move this scarf, which was on the counter, and put it into an umbrella—I said I had no change—they both said it was of no consequence, they would call for them as they came back—they both went out of the shop—I followed them, and asked them both to come back—I said I wanted to speak to them—they came back to the shop, put down the umbrella in the corner, sat down, and both said, "You can search me"—I took hold of the umbrella, and one took hold of it, then

both took hold of it—they wanted to turn it upside-down, and let the scarf out—I held the top of it tight till the policeman came and found it.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where were you? A. Behind the counter, and looking straight at them—I was quite close to them—I watched them.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. They came back quite willingly? A. Yes—I do not recollect which said, "Search me" first-Jeffreys had the umbrella all the while—Riley did not say, "Don't strike him, send for a policeman"—I will swear he said nothing of the kind—Riley came in first—the half-sovereign was found in his mouth at the station.

CHARLES JOHN CLAXTON . I am shopman at a shop there. I saw the two prisoners and Thomas struggling with the umbrella—I called the officer, and saw him find this scarf in it.

JEFFERYS**— GUILTY . Aged 29.

RILEY*— GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years.

ANN CHAMBERS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1992
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceImprisonment

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1992. ANN CHAMBERS was indicted for feloniously leading and taking away a child three years old, named Robert Newson, with intent to deprive James Newson and Ann his wife, the parents, of possession of the said child.—2nd COUNT, stating her intent to be to steal 1 hat, value 4s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; the goods of James Newson, from the person of the said child.

JAMES NEWSON . I am a sawyer, living in Finsbury-market. At half-past ten o'clock in the morning of the 21st of July, I went with my wife and child Robert to the Weaver's Arms public-house, in Crown-street, Finsbury—the child is three years old—when I went into the house, the prisoner was standing at the bar with a man who was intoxicated—I had been in the house a few minutes, and my wife came in—the prisoner asked my wife to drink some gin and peppermint with her—my wife said she would rather not—the prisoner said, "You look very bad, I will go and get you two ounces of ham"—my wife said, "I can't eat it"—she said, "Yes, it will do you good; I will take this child and get him a half-pennyworth of cherries"—she went out, and brought the child in again with the cherries, and said, "Where can I get the ham?"—I directed her where to get it—she was gone two hours, and did not return—I went out, and found her—I said, "What have you done with the child?"—she said, "I left it at the beer-shop in the market"—I brought her back, and said to the woman who keeps the shop, "Have you seen my child?" she said she had seen the prisoner with it, who said she had bought a new hat for it, and the body of a frock, and then the prisoner said it was left with a woman by the pump—I went there, and could not find the woman, and I gave her in charge—I did not find the child till between twelve and one o'clock at night, it was then in the workhouse, without its hat or handkerchief, which it had on when she took it—my wife's name is Ann.

AMELIA COOK . I am the sister of the prosecutor, and live in Skinner-street. I was passing through Finsbury-market, about ten minutes to eleven o'clock, and met the prisoner with the child—I said, "Well, Bobby, where are you going to?"—the prisoner said she was going to buy some sausages for the mother and father—I asked where the mother and father were—she said, at the Weaver's Arms, and the father was very tipsy and quarrelsome—she went away with the child.

HENRY SHERRIFFS (police-constable G 103.) I was on duty in High-street,

Shoreditch—on the 21st of June, about twelve o'clock, and my attention was drawn by a female to a little boy standing with a crowd round him—I took him to Featherstone-street station—he appeared quite deserted, and had neither hat nor handkerchief on.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating, that while she was out with the child, a woman, who she thought knew the child, came up and offered to take care of it while she went for the ham, and she left the child with her.)

GUILTY. Aged 28.—On the second COUNT.— Confined Nine Months.

JAMES THOMAS MYALL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1993
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1993. JAMES THOMAS MYALL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June, 3/4 of a yard of velvet, value 1l., and 3/4 of a yard of toilenet, value 6s.; the goods of John Clark, his master.

JOHN CLARK . I am a tailor, in Tottenham-court-road. The prisoner was my errand-boy—I saw him going out of the house on the 24th of Jane, and stopped him—I asked him what waistcoat he had on—he said, a new one his mother had bought him—I said it belonged to me—when I lost it it was merely three-quarters of a yard of velvet—he said his mother made it for him—when he was taken in charge he acknowledged having taken it from the drawer, to get it made up.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Supposing these spots were not on this, would it be velvet? A. Then it would be satin—it is called figured velvet in the trade—he said he was sorry for what he had done, he deserved punishment himself, and he hoped his parents would not suffer—he had been with me four or five months—I had a good character with him.

NOT GUILTY .

GEORGE TALKINGTON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1994
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1994. GEORGE TALKINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July, 4 sixpences, 2 groats, and 7 halfpence, the moneys of James Talbot, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

JOHN HAMILTON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1995
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1995. JOHN HAMILTON was indicted for embezzlement; to which be pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Four Months.

ANN WILLIAMS, MARY MELGROVE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1996
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1996. ANN WILLIAMS and MARY MELGROVE were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July, 1 table-cloth, value 4s., the goods of Thomas Packard Clements.

JAMES FAIRBAIRN . I am shopman to Thomas Packard Clements, of Judd-street. At half-past one o'clock in the afternoon of the 7th of July, the prisoners came, and Williams asked the price of some frock-bodies—I showed them some, and Melgrove bought one—she then bought a pair of gloves—after that they jointly purchased a remnant of Irish linen—they afterwards saw some table-cloths hanging on the top of the shop—Williams asked the price—I showed her one, and she thought it too high—I showed her some others—there was one that was soiled—Melgrove was sitting by her side—I then showed a table-cloth that was on the counter—I went to ask the least I could take for it, and as I was turning round I saw Williams take this table-cloth from the counter, and deposit it under her shawl—I told George Wilson she had taken it; and as soon as she saw me tell Wilson she appeared very much agitated, and left the shop—Wilson followed her, and took the table-cloth from under her arm, and she was brought back to the shop—Melgrove said to Williams, "Don't flurry yourself"—this is the table-cloth.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Of course you told the Magistrate how agitated Williams was? A. Yes—what I said was read out to me, and I signed it—I expressed the same thing before the Magistrate—I said she appeared moved—I believe that was in my deposition—I do not know that there was not a word about it—when Williams saw me speak to Wilson, she appeared agitated, and immediately went out—

(The witness's deposition being read, stated, "I then went and spoke to Wilson—returned to the prisoners—and Williams, in about two minutes, got up and went out.")

Witness. She sat about two minutes—I call that a very short time—she had paid 7s. or 7s. 6d. for what they had purchased, and that she left behind her—Melgrove's frock-body was done up with Williams's linen—I do not know that there was any thing to prevent her carrying them away—she had her child with her—I did not observe any thing the matter with it—she returned to the shop in about two minutes—I did not know her before.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not Williams leave her purse and some money in it? A. I did not see it—Williams bought and paid for the linen, and Melgrove said, "I should like to take a part of it"—that is what I mean by buying it jointly—when Williams was brought back by Wilson, she was in a flurried state, and Melgrove said, "Don't be in a flurry."

GRISMOND WILSON . I received a communication, I remained still in the centre of the shop till Williams walked out—she turned the next street—I said, "You have gone quite far enough"—I turned her shawl on one side, and took the table-cloth from under her arm—she begged and prayed of me to let her go for the sake of her family, and said the other prisoner had a sovereign she would give me to let her go.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate that? A. I do not know whether 1 did or not, I suppose what I said was taken down in writing, but I never heard it read—what I stated was the truth—(looking at his deposition)—this is my handwriting—I see by this that it was read over to me—I was not aware what you asked me before—I did not understand you—I am not aware that I told the Magistrate any thing about the sovereign—I do not recollect any thing of the kind—I did not consider there was any necessity—I named sufficient to the Magistrate to convict the prisoners—I believe Williams left some linen and various trifling things, which she had paid for, behind her in the shop—she did not leave a purse, that I am aware of, nor her child's shawl.

JOHN NORTH (police-constable E 90.) I took the prisoners into custody 3—they both declared themselves innocent—both had a child in their arms.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS, Q. Do you remember a purse and a child's shawl that were left behind by Williams? A. No—the shopmen did not show me any thing which they had left behind—they said they had purchased some things.

JAMES FAIRBAIRN re-examined. Q. What became of the things which were left behind? A. I believe Melgrove took them away.

(Both the prisoners received an excellent character.)

NOT GULITY .

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, August 23rd, 1841.

Third Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

HENRY SCHWEDER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1997
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1997. HENRY SCHWEDER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Henry Gibbs, about four o'clock in the night of the 10th of July, at St. George's Bloomsbury, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 coat, calue 15s.; 2 waistcoats, value 15s.; and 1 pair of breeches, value 10s.; his property; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

RICHARD ELLIS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1998
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1998. RICHARD ELLIS, alias Butler, was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August, 1 watch, value 6l., and 1 watch-guard, value 4l., the goods of William Scoones, in the dwelling-house of William Smart; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 17— Transported for Ten Years.

Before Mr. Justice Coleridge.

THOMAS COOPER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-1999
VerdictNot Guilty > no prosecutor

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1999. THOMAS COOPER was indicted for feloniously forging an acceptance on a bill of exchange for 34l., with intent to defraud Basil Montague, Esq.

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Erskine.

WILLIAM BECKWITH, HARRIET FOOT.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2000
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2000. WILLIAM BECKWITH and HARRIET FOOT were indicted for feloniously and falsely making and counterfeiting two counterfeit sixpences.

MESSRS. BODKIN and ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM PENNY . I am inspector of the D division of police. On Saturday, the 17th of July, about nine o'clock in the evening I went to No. 9, Plumtree-court, Shoe-lane, with Fink, Farrow, and Humphries, police-constables—the street-door was open—I went to the front room, second floor—the room-door was fastened by a small table being against it—I forced it open, went in, and the prisoners were there—Beckwith was sitting on a chair in front of a clear fire, with nothing on but his trowsers—he had no shirt on—he had what appeared to be a white mould in his left hand, made of plaster of Paris—immediately that I went in he threw it on the floor, jumped on it, and broke it into several pieces, then laid hold of an iron spoon which was between the bars of the fire, the bowl of which was red hot and full of white metal in a fluid state, he threw the contents all about the floor, and at the same time, with the other hand, swept a quantity of counterfeit sixpences off the table—part of the metal which was thrown from the spoon was picked up—I took up nine sixpences myself, two of them quite hot—I picked up several pieces of the plaster of Paris which he threw down, but they had no impression on them—the prisoner Foot was standing up, with her gown off, washing at the table—she cried out, "You b—r, Jack, you b—y b—, you have sold us, but we will tell, you b—, where you make"—she said this to several prostitutes, who were at the door, which was open—there was no man there—Jack is a man they know among themselves—Beckwith made use of similar language several times, saying, "It is that b—y b—r, Jack, that has sold us."

Beckwith. I was standing up when you came in, did you find the spoon in the fire? Witness. No, you pulled it out.

JOHN FINK . I am a policeman. I went with Penny—I entered the room at the same time as him, and saw Beckwith sitting in a chair in front of a very clear fire, about three feet from it—he had something white in his left hand, which he threw down, jumped on it, and broke it into several pieces—I laid hold of him—at the same time he took from between the bars of the grate an iron spoon with metal in a fluid state, and threw it up, the contents of which I took off the floor, and at the same time he swept off the table a quantity of counterfeit sixpences with his hand—he was sitting between the table and fire-place—I afterwards picked up some of the fragments of what he threw down—two of them have letters on them—I produce a counterfeit sixpence, and part of a get, separated from a sixpence, I have a sixpence which it fits—I took up the sixpence myself—it was quite hot, and so was the get—I picked up some of the white metal which he threw from the spoon, and produce it—I searched him, and found a knife in his trowsers' pocket—it has some white spots on it similar to plaster-of-Paris—when I entered the room, Foot was standing at a small table, washing—it was the same table as the sixpences were on—the tub was at one end, and the sixpences at the other—Foot said it was that Jack had sold them, and she would sell him, for she knew where he made them—Beckwith used similar expressions—they were both taken into custody.

BENJAMIN FARROW . I am a policeman. I went with the others officers to the prisoner's lodging—I produce a spoon—the bowl seems to be bent up for the purpose of pouring the metal out—it was quite hot when I took it up—I was obliged to drop it—I produce some white metal which I found quite hot on the floor, and a counterfeit sixpence, which was hot—a pair of scissors, a file, and part of a Britannia metal spoon.

DANIEL HUMPHRIES . I am a policeman. I went with the officers and searched a cupboard in the prisoner's room, and found some plaster-of-Paris in powder—I found a counterfeit sixpence on the floor close to the fire.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of counterfeit coin to the Mint. These pieces of plaster-of-Paris are fragments of a mould—I have examined them with a glass—here are two small pieces, which I believe to have formed part of a mould for casting sixpences—on one of them is a small portion of the wreath, on the reverse side of a sixpence—on the other piece there is still apparent some of the letters which I believe to have formed part of the legend of the obverse side—there is the letter A, which I believe ends Victoria, and "Dei"—here are some other pieces without impressions—here are almost sufficient to produce a mould—here is part of a Britannia metal spoon, similar to the metal counterfeit coins are generally made of—here is some small portions of the same metal, and a lump of metal, termed a get, which fills up the channel in the mould where it is poured down—it appears to have been broken off the coin, not cuthere are twelve sixpences, all counterfeit, which have all been cast in one mould, and are all Britannia metal, similar to the spoon—I cannot say which sixpence the get was broken from—here are scissors, a knife, and file, which are useful in coining—the file appears to have white metal in the teeth—it is usually applied to remove the surplus metal from the edge—here is plaster-of-Paris in powder—this iron spoon appears to have had fused metal in it—it is doubled up at the top to conduct the metal into the small channel.

WILLIAM PENNY re-examined. Some of the parts of the mould were left behind, being reduced to powder.

Beckwittis Defence. I got up about ten o'clock on Saturday morning, and was at breakfast, when a young man came into my room, called Jack—his name is John Edmonds—he had breakfast with us, left, and came back in about half an hour—we got talking—he asked if I was not at work—I said I could not raise money enough to go to work—he went away, brought some moulds and things in a handkerchief, and left them in the room—this young woman was in the room—I said, "Jack, what are these for?"—he said "There is no harm, let them be till I come back"—he said he should be about a quarter of an hour—I undid the handkerchief, and turned them out on the table—there were spoons and things, and I tried the experiment on them myself—just as I was doing that the policeman rushed in and took them away—I am quite innocent of knowing what they were at the time.

Foot's Defence. On Saturday morning, about ten o'clock, I was at breakfast with Beckwith, a young man came in, who he called John—he sat down and had breakfast—he got up and said, "I will come back in three or four hours"—I began to wash after he was gone, and about half-past three o'clock I was in the room, hanging clothes up—John came in and said, "I shall be back again in a quarter of an hour"—Penny and the officers came in.

ANN IVERS . The prisoners lodged together at my house—Foot took the room—I did not sec the male prisoner for two or three days—I know nothing of their general character—I did'not see a young man come in that morning.

BECKWITH— GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

FOOT— NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Coleridge.

JOHN HERRINGTON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2001
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceDeath

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2001. JOHN HERRINGTON was indicted for a rape.

GUILTY .— Death Recorded.

Before Mr. Justice Erskine.

MARK CARTER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2002
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2002. MARK CARTER was indicted for b—y.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Coleridge.

FREDERICK BARLOW.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2003
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2003. FREDERICK BARLOW was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling bouse of Thomas Wood, on the 25th of July, at St. Martin-in-the-Felds, about the hour of two in the night, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 18410 halfpence, his monies; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Twelve Months.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

Before Mr. Justice Erskine.

WILLIAM HEWETT.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2004
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2004. WILLIAM HEWETT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Watts, on the 9th of August, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 coat, value 7s. and 1 hat, value 5s.; the goods of William Watts: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Three Months.

"Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

WILLIAM THOMAS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2005
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2005. WILLIAM THOMAS, alias Randall, was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Brown, about three in the night of the 6th of August, at St. Luke, Chelsea, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 2 tops of candlesticks, value 5s.; 1 spoon, value 1s.; 1 pair of snuffers, calue 5s.; 1 snuffer-tray, value 5s.; his goods: 1 hat, value 1l., and 1 box of medals, value 5s., the goods of Robert Charles Brown: 1 sovereign; 1 ring, value 5l.; 2 seals, value 3l. 3s.; and 1 pair of boots, value 12s.; the property of George Brown, clerk; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

HARRIET ISBELL . I am housemaid to Mr. Robert Brown, of No. 68, Sloane-street, Chelsea. On Friday night, the 6th of August, I went to bed at ten o'clock—my mistress was up last, and she shut the street-door—before I went to bed I saw that the staircase-window was shut and fastened—I got up on Saturday morning about six o'clock, and went down with the cook—J noticed the staircase-window wide open—I went into the parlour, and found it all upset, and every thing turned out of the boxes—a pair of plated candlesticks, which had been left on the table over-night, were wrapped up in a neck-handkerchief on a chair—I found a pair of strange shoes just inside the parlour door—they did not belong to any of the family—I called my master up, and missed the snuffertray, snuffers, and several other things—the key of the study-door was gone—it had hung at the side of the study-door overnight—I have since seen it at Queen-square.

Rev. GEORGE BROWN. I am a clergyman, and live with my father in Sloane-street, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea. I was called up about half-past seven o'clock, on the morning of the 7th of August, by Isbell—I went immediately into my study, and found it in very great confusion—papers which I kept in my drawers were strewed about the floor—I had five or six desks in the study, all of which were broken open—a box of bronze medals, of the victories of the Duke of Wellington, was gone from my brother's desk, which was not locked—two gold seals were taken from my desk, which was broken open—a letter, which I had left sealed over-night, was broken open, and some money which it contained taken out—I also missed a pencil-case, a gold ring, and a pair of cloth boots which I had left at my bed-room door when I went to bed the night before—a pair of shoes were found near the parlour-door, which did not belong to any of the family—the value of the articles I lost is rather above 10l.—the tops of the candlesticks, the snuffers and tray, were gone from the parlour—they were not silver—they belong to my father, whose name is Robert—it is his dwelling-house—I do not pay the rent, but reside with him—a hat of my brother's, Robert Charles Brown, was also gone—I examined the staircase window, and it appeared to have been opened from the outside, at the bottom—it appeared to have had great force applied to it—a new brass fastening had been put to it a few days before, and that was broken short in the middle, without breaking the glass—I saw it fastened overnight, when I went to bed—I observed two clothes-props, one against the back door, and one above, as if they had been used to climb up by—I have since seen the boots and medals at Queen-square.

HENRY BAREFOOT . I am an inspector of the B division of police. I received information of this robbery—in consequence of something I learnt I went on Saturday morning, 14th August, at half-past sis o'clock, to a front room, first floor, at No. 9, in the Almonry, Westminster—I knocked at the door—the prisoner got out of bed and opened it—he was undressed—I told him I came there for the purpose of taking him into custody on another

charge, and told him to dress himself, and accompany me—while he was dressing I searched his clothes, and found in his waistcoat pocket this box of bronze medals, and in his trowsers pocket two duplicates, one for a hat, pawned at Mr. Roberts's, in York-street, Westminster—I found this pair of cloth boots by his bed-side—he said they were his—I looked into a drawer, and found several keys, and among them this, which I showed to Isbell—I examined the prosecutor's house on the Saturday morning, and found it had been entered by the staircase-window at the back—I have not the slightest doubt of that—some blunt instrument had been used to prize it up—it had broken the bolt—the back of the house looks into the New Road, Chelsea—there is a back wall, which can be got over—I received this pair of shoes, found in the house, from Isbell, and also a hat—I found some foot-marks in the garden at the back of the house, leading to the itaircase window—I compared the shoes Isbell gave me with those marks, and they exactly corresponded—I have not the slightest doubt those shoes made those marks—I afterwards showed these shoes to the prisoner, and he wore them from the station to the office, where he claimed them as hit own—he wanted the cloth boots to put on, which I would not permit, and he claimed these at the office—they appeared to fit him precisely.

Prisoner. He told me to put the shoes on, and I promptly said I never saw them before, which I never had—I said they hurt my feet, but I dare say I could walk to the station in them, and be took them away from me—I could take my oath they never belonged to me. Witness. He desired me to give him the shoes before the Magistrate—he said, "You have done with those things now, they are my own; give them to me."I said, "I have not done with them."

HARRIET ISBELL re-examined. This key which Barefoot has produced is the key of my master's study, and these are the shoes I found in the parlour.

WILLIAM EVERED . I am assistant to Mr. Roberts, a pawnbroker in York-street, Westminster; I produce a hat, which I received in pledge on Saturday morning, the 7th of this month, of a female. On the 13th the prisoner and another young man came and looked at the hat, paid the interest on it, and I gave a fresh duplicate for it, which is now produced by Barefoot, dated the 13th.

REV. G. BROWN re-examined. These cloth boots are mine, and were left outside my bed-room door—this hat is my brother's—the other property has never been found.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday night I was at the Victoria Theatre, from thence I proceeded straight home, and slept till about eight o'clock next morning—as to the charge now made against me, I deny it—on the following week I met with a person who had these boots to sell—I gave him, I believe, 3s. 6d. for them—the shoes produced by the inspector I can take my oath I never saw before he produced them for me to wear from the station to Queen-square—the box of medals I had given me for a keepsake, by a young man who has gone out of the country, but not as a convict—on Saturday morning last Inspector Barefoot came up to my bed-room, and took me in charge—he searched my clothes, and found 4s. in my trowsers' pocket, and a few halfpence, and in the drawer the duplicate of the hat, which I bought for 1s.—one day I went with a young chap I know to the pawnbroker's, to see whether the hat would fit me—I paid the interest of it, but it would not fit me, so 1 gave the ticket back, and got the 1s. back again—I afterwards bought the ticket of another person,

which he was to have back on the Saturday I was taken, but being taken I could not give it him back.

JAMES BRADLEY (police-constable B 134.) I have known the prisoner for seven or eight years—I was present when he was tried at the Westminster Sessions, in 1838, by the name of William Randall—I am sure he is the same man—I was the constable in the case—I produce the certificate of his former conviction, which I got from the Guildhall, Westminster—(read.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

JAMES EMBLETT.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2006
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2006. JAMES EMBLETT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Teighe, about the hour of twelve in the night of the 29th of June, at St. Ann, Limehouse, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 15 spoons value 2l. 18s. 1 snuff-box, value 3l.; 3 shirts, value 1l. 10s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s. 6d.; 1 scarf, value 4s.; 1 hat, value 10s. 1 penil-case, value 6s. 1 comb, value 2s. 6d.; and 50 cigars, value 5s.; his goods.

MARY ANN TYFIELD . I am single, and live with Mr. Charles Teighe, at No. 1, Jamaica-place, in the parish of St. Ann, Limehouse. On the morning of the 30th of June, when I came down stairs, I found the two parlour-doors wide open, the back-door open, and the back-kitchen window cut, unfastened, and pushed down—I had left every thing quite secure over-night—we were all in bed about half-past ten o'clock, and all was safe then—my master's mother was the last person up—several holes were bored in the kitchen shutter, and the shutter lowered down under the window—the shutter was secured with a bar inside—it was pushed down inside, and the bar taken out and removed into the garden—the pane of glass was cut—there was a hole large enough to admit a hand—I had fastened the shutter over night quite secure—I missed from the kitchendrawer six silver tea-spoons, two salt-spoons, and one caddy-spoon.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Have you a distinct recollection of putting up the shutter that night? A. Yes—I went to bed about half-past ten o'clock, leaving my master's mother up—the rest were all gone to bed—she always went down to see the house was secure the last thing—my master-went to bed before me.

CHARLES TEIGHE . I am a clerk in the City, and live at No. 1, Ja-maica-place, Limehouse. On the morning of the 30th of June I got up about half-past six o'clock, went into the kitchen, and found the house broken into, the pane of glass cut in the kitchen-window, about a dozen holes in the shutter, and the bar gone—I missed my silver snuff-box from the back-parlour, and about fifty cigars, a beaver hat from the passage, some tea-spoons from the front-parlour, and from the kitchen—three or four shirts, a black silk scarf, a diamond pin, and two handkerchiefs—I know this hat and shirt, now produced, to be mine, and this tortoise-shell comb I believe to be mine—I know the shirt by an alteration in the collar, it having been made rather too small in the neck.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you had the shirt? A. About a fortnight or three weeks, 1 had only worn it once—I had my name on it, but it is not there now—all my shirts are marked—I have a distinct recollection of this shirt by the alteration in the collar—the button is brought forward to enlarge the collar—I think it was the only one altered, but the other two might have been altered—I lost forty or fifty cigars.

WILLIAM HOLLAND (police-constable N 146.) On Monday, the 5th July, I went with Dubois to the Feathers public-house, between one and two o'clock in the morning—Dubois and an officer remained outside—I went inside, and saw the prisoner in the tap-room—I said to him, "Jem, you never speak to me now"—he said, "I did not see you"—I said, "I want to speak to you"—he came into the passage—I said, "Come to the door"—I then took hold of one of his arms, and Dubois the other—I said I wanted him for a robbery, but did not tell him for what—I took the hat off his head, and put it on again—Dubois went away, and the constable assisted me in taking him to the station—I there said, "I charge you with breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mr. Teighe, of Jamaica-place, and stealing several silver spoons, and other articles, and among other things, the hat you have on your head"—he paused a moment or two, and then said, "That hat I bought five months ago in the Lane, "Which means Petticoat-lane—I proceeded to search him—he said, "I will take the things out of my pocket"—I said, "I always like to do my own business"—I found the tortoise-shell comb in his pocket, and the sergeant took the shirt off his back—he said, "I bought that in the Lane too."

WILLIAM DUBOIS . I was present when the prisoner was apprehended, about one o'clock on Monday, the 5th of July, in the Feathers public-house, among a notorious lot of thieves—Holland brought him out, took off his hat, looked in it, saw the maker's name, and said, "That is all right, this is Mr. Teighe's hat"—Holland said to me, "Look at his shirt"—I looked at it, and saw a pin in it, which I took out—that does not apply to this indictment—he was taken to the station and searched—having heard Teighe had lost a shirt, I went to the station, and took a shirt off his back, which Mr. Teighe claimed.

MARY ANN TYFIELD re-examined. I got up at seven o'clock—I was the first person up—no one was up before six o'clock—I cannot tell how long it would take to make the holes and move the bar.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for Ten Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, August 26th, 1841.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

JAMES STRATFORD.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2007
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2007. JAMES STRATFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 wheelbarrow, value 20s., the goods of Daniel Gage; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 45.— Confined One Year.

MARY STOCK.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2008
VerdictsGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentencesImprisonment

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2008. MARY STOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June, umbrella, value 14s.; 1 bag, value 5s. also, on the 20th of July, 5 3/4 yards of silk, value 1l. 4s., the goods of Edward Bowra, her master, to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Four Months.

JOHN PILCHER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2009
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2009. JOHN PILCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August, 2 half-crowns, and 7 shillings, the monies of William Smith.

WILLIAM SMITH . I keep a shop in Ludgate-street. About eight o'clock, on the 17th August, I had 2l. of silver in my till—I saw the prisoner, who is my porter, walk round the counter, open the till, and take two half-crowns and seven shillings out—I called in a policeman, gave him in charge, and found the money on him—he had no business at the till.

WILLIAM STANTON (City police-constable, No. 336.) I took him, and found two half-crowns and six shillings in his left hand, and one shilling in his left-band pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to unscrew the bolts, and saw the till partly open; I went to shut it, and Mr. Smith accused me of robbing it; I saw my master get up from under the counter.

MR. SMITH re-examined. I was there watching him—there are no bolts behind the counter.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

ROBERT WILD.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2010
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2010. ROBERT WILD was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August, 1 coat, value 1l. 10s., the goods of James Edward Tillman.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am shopman to James Edward Tillman, a tailor, in Leadenhall-street. I hung this coat outside the door on the 6th of August—I heard a noise, looked out, and saw the prisoner walking down the street—I followed him—he began to run, and dropped this coat, which is my master's.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Three Months.

WILLIAM GEEVES.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2011
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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2011. WILLIAM GEEVES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 14lbs. weight of pork, value 10s.; 2 loaves of bread, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 basket, value 1s.; the goods of Joseph Smith.

MART SMITH . I am the wife of Joseph Smith, who lives at Bedford. I came to London on the 26th of July, about three o'clock in the morning, by the wagon, and coming along the road, I met a man, I cannot tell who—my niece had a basket containing some pork and bread—the man carried it, and ran away with it—the basket had two handles on it when he had it—it has only one now—I think this now produced is the basket, but I am not sure—it had two handles on it when I lost it—it has only one now.

CHARLOTTE BRYANT . I am the prosecutrix's niece. The prisoner does not look like the same young man who ran away with the basket—I do not know the basket.

JAMES FOX (police-constable N 196.) I stopped the prisoner, with a basket, a little before three o'clock in the morning, on the 26th of July—it contained a leg of pork, a cheek of bacon, a pig's face, and two loaves.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you let him go? A. Yes—I took him to his mother's—I have seen his brother—I had seen the prisoner in the street before, but I never spoke to him—when I saw the basket it had two handles—when I saw it next, about half an hour after, it had one, and a broken handle—my brother policeman, that it might appear the same basket, cut off the new handle which had been put to it—I was at Hatton-garden police-office—I saw the prisoner there the second day—I walked round the office, and saw him talking to two females—I did not ask any body if the prisoner was there, I swear that—I could swear I did not—I did not ask any body if he was there, and receive an answer that he was not far off—nothing of the kind—I waited in the passage for M'Laran—I saw M'Laran take the prisoner into the Magistrate's room—I did not then say, "Oh, is that him?"—I swear that positively—I went into the Magistrate's room, and identified him.

COURT. Q. Did you let him go the first time? A. Yes—I took him to his mother's—I went there again, and found the basket in the adjoining garden—I did not take him into custody—I am sure he is the man I found with the basket.

HENRY DEAN (police-sergeant G 86.) I went to the prisoner's father's house, in Graham-street, City-road, and found the basket thrown over the wall into the adjoining garden, and a leg of pork, a pig's cheek, and two loaves in it—the prisoner was not there—he had made his escape.

Cross-examined. Q. What did you do with that basket? A. I marked it that I might know it, and lent it to the prosecutrix to take the pork and things home—I saw it next at Bryant's, the prosecutor's brother, in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's—the prosecutrix sent it to the basket-maker's, and had a new handle put to it—I cut the handle off because it should be the same as it was.

COURT. Q. Are you able to swear it is the basket you found in the garden? A. Yes—here is a notch I cut in it that I might know it again.

DANIEL M'LARAN (police-constable M 119.) The prisoner came and delivered himself up to me for the robbery in the City-road—he said he had been drinking, and did not know what he was about.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you bring him through the passage at Hatton-garden? A. Yes—Fox was not there—I do not know whether he has always been quite clear about the prisoner's identity—he has never asked me any question about him.

MR. PHILLIPS catted

GEORGE GEEVES . I am the prisoner's brother. I saw him seated on a bench in the outer office at Hatton-garden—Fox came in after my brother was seated there—he asked me where my brother was—I said he was in the office, and my brother was sitting two persons from me—Fox walked all round the office apparently looking for him—he came to me a second time, and asked where he was—I said he was not far off—Fox could not have been off seeing him—I saw M'Laran lead the prisoner from the patsage into the office—Fox said, "Is that him," or, "Oh, that is him"—I went into the Magistrate's room, and Fox went in, and identified my brother directly.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 21.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.— Confined Ten Days.

JAMES RICE, JOHN HUGHES.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2012
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Transportation

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2012. JAMES RICE and JOHN HUGHES were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August, 2 pints of a certain medicine called concentrated compound decoction of sarsaparilla, value 1l. 6s.; and 8 glass bottles, value 2s.; the goods of William Henry Sutton and another, their masters: to which.

HUGHES pleaded GUILTY . Aged 55.— Transported for Seven Years.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE JONES . I am managing clerk to William Henry Sutton and another, patent medicine dealers, in Bow churchyard. On Wednesday evening, the 18th of August, some medicine being missed, I marked sixty-five bottles of preparation of decoction of sarsaparilla, and placed them in a box out of which I had taken them, and put it in the cellar—they were in bottles and papers like these—(looking at some)—Rice was a porter in the service—the box was not locked—Rice had access to the house and cellar—neither of these sixty-five bottles could have been sold without my knowing it—these produced are eight of the sixty-five I marked on that evening.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Where is the cellar? A.

Under the floor of the warehouse—I think there are twelve people in the prosecutors' employ—the cellar was not locked, nor the box—Mr. Collins and Lacy were present when I placed the box in the cellar.

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am warehouseman in the service of the prosecutors. I saw Mr. Jones mark sixty-five packages—these are eight of them—on the evening of the next day, Thursday, the 19th, the prisoner was at the house as porter—his usual time of going to tea was five o'clock—I saw him go to tea on the Thursday—as soon as he was gone I went into the cellar, and looked at the packages—there were only fifty-seven there, and eight were gone—I should say these are eight of those put in the box.

JOHN ROE . I am an officer of the City. In consequence of information, about five o'clock on Thursday, the 19th, I watched the back of the prosecutors' premises—I did not see Rice come out of the warehouse—I saw him at the top of Bow-lane, about forty yards off—he crossed to Lawrence-lane, and went up to Blossom's inn gateway, where there is a public-house, and I lost sight of him for five or six minutes—when he came back Hughes was in his company—they turned out of the gateway, and on the left hand there is a court which goes into Milk-street from Lawrence-lane—they went up there together—I ran round Milk-street, and came up the court—they were just entering a dark court called Mumford-court, which goes under a house—I passed them, and returned in about a quarter of a minute—as they stood in the court one said to the other, "We must have a drop of something"—I ran to Lawrence-lane, and saw Hughes in company with a young woman—I followed them to the end of Moorgate-street, where he put the young woman into an omnibus—I followed him—as he was coming back I felt his pockets, and felt something in both of them—I took him by the arm, and said, "What have you got here, you have got something weighty?"—he said, "No, I have not, who are you?" —I found three of these packages in each of his two hind pockets, and two in his waistcoat, making these eight—I after that took Rice at the warehouse—I asked him for the key of his lodging—he referred me to his sister—I went to the place where he told me, and his sister turned out to be the woman I saw go with Hughes to the omnibus.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you search Rice's lodging? A. I did, and found nothing against him.

WILLIAM COLLINS re-examined. I should say Rice's sister could not have access to the cellar.

GEORGE JONES re-examined. The sister could not have access to the cellar.

(Henry Harris Fox, upholsterer, Red Lion-street; Thomas Dunnage, lead merchant, Clapham;—Kennis, proctor's clerk; James Riley, publican, Coppice-row; William Francis Harrison, West Drayton; and—Hiscock, traveller; gave Rice a good character. Charles Lane, horse-hair manufacturer, Earl-street, Finsbury; James Riley, publican, Coppice-row; William Francis Harrison, West Drayton;—Bismore, silver-smith, Coppice-row; and Joseph Winter, furrier, Great Sutton-street; gave and Hughes a good character.

RICE— GUILTY . Aged 30.— Transported for Seven Years.

CHARLES GLADHALL, FREDERICK STANTON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2013
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2013. CHARLES GLADHALL and FREDERICK STANTON , were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 2 baskets, value 2d.; 2 yards of carpet, value 1s.; 2 yards of webbing, value 2d.; 1 plasterer's tool, called a hawk, value 3d.; and 4lbs. weight of paper, value 4d.; the goods of Charlotte Cook and another.

CHARLOTTE COOK .—I am a widow, in partnership with my sister, Margaret Cook—we live at Paddington. At a quarter-past twelve o'clock in the day of the 15th of July, I met Gladhall coming from my coal-cellar with one basket, and saw Stanton going down the garden with the other basket; one contained the piece of carpet, and the other the paper and other articles—they were mine and my sister's—I locked them both in the garden till I called the police, who took them.

Gladhall. I did not mean to take any thing; I saw the door open; I went into the dust-hole, and saw some bits of rag, and took them out.

Witness. I have no dust-hole.

GLADHALL— GUILTY .** Aged 13.

STANTON— GUILTY .** Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years. Convict Ship.

WILLIAM ARNOLD.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2014
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2014. WILLIAM ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 1 gelding, 2l. 7s., the property of John Gore.

JOHN GORE . I am a dust contractor—I lost a gelding, on the 4th of August, from a little field which 1 hire, near Paddington—I have seen it since—it is mine—the prisoner was in my service occasionally, for six or seven years; he left me seven months ago.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long bad you had it? A. About fifteen months—it was very lame—it went out with the dustcart—he had a bad foot, and I put him in the field to rest him—he was worth but little.

JAMES SMITH . I turned the horse into the field on Sunday—I missed him on Thursday morning, the 5th of August—I have seen it since at Sewell's—it is my master's.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any gate to the field? A. Yes; it was shut to, but not locked—I am sure I shut it—I saw it last safe on Tuesday afternoon—I know him by his lame foot, and am sure of it.

HENRY SEWELL . I bought this horse of the prisoner for 2l. 7s.; he said it was his; it was found with me.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to go to Clerkenwell-green? A. Burridge came to me, and I went with him—the bargain took about twenty minutes—I took particular notice of the prisoner—it was the full value for the horse—we slaughter horses.

JAMES BURRIDGE .—I was present when the horse was sold by the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you fetch Sewell? A. Yes; I first saw the horse on the 4th—the prisoner and another man was leading it—the prisoner was helping it on with a stick.

Prisoner's Defence. Two men asked me to sell it for them.

(John Buck, excavator, Earl-street, gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Transported for Ten Years.

THOMAS MICKLEROY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2015
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2015. THOMAS MICKLEROY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of the 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Augustus Littlejohns, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

JAMES MARSH.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2016
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2016. JAMES MARSH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, 15 shillings and 1 sixpence, the monies of John James Smith, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Three Months.

CHARLES BROWN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2017
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2017. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July, 1 pair of boots, value 3s. 6d., the goods of John Elliott; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

THOMAS WOODCOCK.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2018
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2018. THOMAS WOODCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July, 27 handkerchiefs, value 3l. 10s., the goods of Charles Chuney, and others.

WILLIAM NICHOLAS BEAUMONT . I am errand boy to Mr. Charles Chuney, and others, in Friday-street. About nine o'clock in the morning of the 13th of July, the prisoner came and took a parcel containing twenty-seven handkerchiefs, off the counter end, and walked off with it—I ran after him, and called, "Stop thief"—he threw it down in Bread-street—it contained these handkerchiefs, which are my master's.

JAMES BAKER (City police-constable, No. 449.) On the 13th July, I saw the prisoner drop this parcel—I ran and caught him—I saw Beaumont pick it up.

GUILTY .** Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

THOMAS PICKERING.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2019
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2019. THOMAS PICKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Charles Knox, from his person.

CHARLES KNOX . I am a land-surveyor, living in Grove-street, Hack-ney. At a quarter-past four o'clock in the afternoon of the 20th of August I was going by Aldgate church—I felt my pocket picked—I turned, and saw the prisoner endeavouring to hide something against a shop—he dropped my handkerchief—it was picked up and given to me.

Prisoner. Q. Did not a gentleman say you had no right to take me, that it was a boy who got under the cart, and got away? A. You said a great many things, but I saw you with it in your hand.

JOHN ROACH (police-constable D 23.) I was on an omnibus—I saw the prisoner struggling in the crowd of people, and took him.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

SAMUEL SUFFOLK.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2020
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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2020. SAMUEL SUFFOLK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, 7 pennyweights and 2 grains of gold, value 20s.; 16 rubies, value 10s.; 34 garnets, value 5s.; and 45 turquoises, value 10s.; the goods of Elijah Harrop and another, his masters.

ELIJAH HARROP . I am in partnership with my brother, and live near Northampton-square—the prisoner was my in-door apprentice—we have been robbed of gold, but were not aware we had been robbed of stones—I can swear to these garnets now produced—I believe the other articles produced to be ours.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. How long was he your apprentice? A. Four years and a half—I received 40l. or 45l. premium with him—his uncle apprenticed him—he was brought up at the British Orphan School, and the parties at the school gave him a good character—I had no reason to suspect him before this—we have from twelve to fourteen men in our employ, and five or six apprentices—I cannot identify the gold—I do not speak positively to the rubies, nor the turquoises—here are thirty-five garnets, they were found in his box in his bed-room, in my

house, where they had no business to be—I and my partner, and the policeman were present when they were found—the prisoner was then at the station—the bed-room door was not locked—his box stood against the fire-place—it was locked, and the policeman had the key of it—I know these garnets by the particular cut of them—they are a portion of what we bought two or three years ago—I have brought some of the remainder of them here—I swore to them before the Magistrate, and that I had no doubt about them—I swore to the garnets—I could not to the other part of the property—I said I believed the others to be mine—these stones are kept in tin boxes, and given out to a workman to work—I might see them perhaps two or three times a week—the box is not open to all the workmen—I believe these turquoises to be mine, by their size.

COURT. Q. Do you believe the gold to be yours? A. Yes—we had gold corresponding in every respect with this, and from the colour I believe it to he mine—I have no doubt about the garnets.

GUILTY. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor. Confined Three Months.

HENRY BROKER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2021
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2021. HENRY BROKER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July, 21lbs. weight of lead, value 2s. 6d. the goods of Henry Gurney, and fixed to a building.

HENRY GURNET . I have two cottages, called "Sun Cottages," at Lis-son-grove—Brown occupies one of them.—I went to the top of it, and the lead was gone from the chimney—I fitted this lead produced to it, and believe it came from there.

WILLIAM BROWN . I occupy that cottage. I was awoke about three o'clock in the morning, on the 12th of July, by a noise on the roof—I came out, and saw some one on the chimney of the next cottage—I said, "Hoy," and he let himself down, I suppose into the other yard—I went to bed again, and a little before four, heard a noise again—I got up and saw the prisoner down just by the privy—he ran away and left this lead, which I gave to the policeman—the lead was then on the ground, and the prisoner was treading on it, and the lead was gone from off the house—the prisoner is the same man.

Prisoner. I was in liquor.

GUILTY .* Aged 20.— Confined Nine Months.

FREDERICK JORDAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2022
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2022. FREDERICK JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 3 half-crowns, the monies of Joseph Jackson, his master.

JOSEPH JACKSON . I keep a carpet-warehouse in Shoreditch; the prisoner was in my employ. On the 8th of July, at half-past nine o'clock at night, I left my desk in the shop—I am not certain whether I left any half-crowns in it—the prisoner was brought to me by a person who told me something—I said to the prisoner, "What have you been doing at my desk?"—he said he went there for a pen—I said, "You must have gone for something else"—he said, "Only for a pen"—he began to pull his pockets out, and three half-crowns dropped from him—I said, "Fred, this tells what you are"—he began crying, and said he had taken them—I asked if this was the first he had taken—he said it was—I said, 4s. Then you have taken this"—he said, "Yes."

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you make him any promise? A. I said it might be better for him.

LANCELOT ROWLANDSON . I am in the prosecutor's employ. About nine or ten o'clock that evening, I was putting the goods in order, and

heard the chinking of money—I then saw the prisoner leaving the desk—I said, "Fred, you have been at the desk"—he said, "I have not"—I took him in my arms, and took him to his master, who sent me to bring up the remainder of the cash, which I did, and then he showed me the three half-crowns that fell from the prisoner's pockets—there was a quantity of gold and silver in the desk—I had put some half-crowns in it.

NOT GUILTY .

CATHERINE CAVANNAGH.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2023
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2023. CATHERINE CAVANNAGH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 1 shirt, value 1l.; 2 cravats, value 2s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; the goods of Frederick Alonzo Gomm.

FREDERICK ALONZO GOMM . I am waiter at the Craven-hotel. I went to the Grosvenor Arms public-house on the night of the 9th of July—I had a bundle, which contained the articles stated—the prisoner came in while I was there—I went out to get a cab, and left my bundle, when I came back, in about ten minutes, the bundle was gone, and the prisoner also—these produced are the articles I left there.

WILLIAM JAMES MURRAY . I was in the tap-room—the prisoner came in about ten o'clock that night—she was drunk—she staid about ten minutes—then went out again—the prosecutor came, and his articles were gone—no one had been there except the prisoner—I went out and took the prisoner with the articles.

Prisoner. He gave them to me at a distance from the house, and told me to take care of them—I have known him eight or nine years—he came to me again and said, "Give me the things I gave you"—I returned them the same as he gave them to me. Witness. I did not—I am a fishmonger—I was in the house when the prosecutor came back.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner—she said she took the things to take care of.

GUILTY . Aged 60.— Confined Four Months.

ANDREW JONES.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2024
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2024. ANDREW JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July, 6oz. of tobacco, value 3s., the goods of Henry Lake, his master.

HENRY LAKE . I live in Old-street, and am a cigar-manufacturer. The prisoner was in my service—I sent for a policeman on the 7th of July—I had the prisoner brought into my counting-house, and this tobacco was found on him, one pad of it on each shoulder, and one pad in each shoe—I am positive it is mine—there is about six ounces of it.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long had the prisoner been in your service? A. About two months—I have about sixteen persons in my employ—most of them are lads—I had a good character with him—it is the tobacco he was at work on—it is called "Columbian leaf"—I have no doubt of its being mine.

GUILTY . Aged 16— Confined Six Months.

GEORGE ARNOLD.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2025
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2025. GEORGE ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th "of July, 1lb. of tobacco, value 6s., the goods of Henry Lake, his master.

HENRY LAKE . This prisoner was also in my employ—he was brought to me by the officer at the same time with the other prisoner—he was searched in my presence, and one pound of tobacco found in his stockings, and the tail of his shirt—this is it—it corresponds in every respect with what I had—I believe it is mine.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Had you missed any tobacco? A. Yes, for some time—my business is rather extensive.

GUILTY . Aged 17— Confined Nine Months.

JOHN WOLFE WALKLATE, ELIZA WALKLATE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2026
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown

Related Material

2026. JOHN WOLFE WALKLATE and ELIZA WALKLATE were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March, 36 salt-cellars, value 9l.; 11 pairs of decanters, value 18l.; 18 wine-glasses, value 15s.; the goods of John Allsup, the master of the said John Wolfe Walklate.

JOHN ALLSUP . I am a glass and china-manufacturer, and live in St. Paul's Church-yard. The prisoner, John Wolfe Walklate, was my carman and packer for four or five months—I have lost these salts and other articles —they were found at different pawnbrokers—some have my private marks on them.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Has the decanter you have in your hand a private mark on it? A. Yes, and these salts also, which proves I had not sold them.

RUSSELL. I am a pawnbroker. On the 31st of July, the prisoner Eliza Walklate, offered these decanters to pledge—I questioned her about them—she said they were her own, and her husband was in the trade—I called the officer.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not she say she had been sent by her husband, and say where her husband would be found? A. Not in my presence.

COURT. Q. Was any property pawned by the man? A. I have a pair of salts pawned by a man on the 31st of May, in the name of John Walklate, for 2s.—I do not know by whom.

GEORGE KING (police-constable H 111.) I went and searched the box of John Wolfe Walklate—he was in the room, and stated that he lived there—I found these two duplicates in a drawer in the room—he said they were his own property.

JAMES MASTERS HOWIE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce some decanters and a pair of salts pawned by the female prisoner—the duplicates found at the prisoners' lodgings are what I gave her.

MR. ALLSUP. I never saw the female prisoner on my premises but once, when I gave her a part of his wages.

JOHN WOLFE WALKLATE— GUILTY . Aged 23.—

ELIZA WALKLATE— NOT GUILTY .

JOHN WOLFE WALKLATE, ELIZA WALKLATE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2027
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2027. JOHN WOLFE WALKLATE and ELIZA WALKLATE were again indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 1 pair of decanters, value 2l. 2s., the goods of John Allsup, the master of John Wolfe Walklate.

JOHN ALLSUP . I lost a pair of decanters—I believe these to be mine.

RUSSELL. I am a pawnbroker. The female prisoner brought these decanters to me to pledge—I gave her in charge.

GEORGE FREW (police-constable H 125.) I took the female prisoner—I asked her where she got them—she said her husband gave them to her—I apprehended the man, and asked him whose they were—he said they were his—I asked him where he got them—he said he should answer me no further questions—he asked where his wife was—I said she was in the station—he said, "I am sorry, she is innocent."

JOHN WOLFE WALKLATE— GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

ELIZA WALKLATE— NOT GUILTY .

JOHN SMITH.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2028
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2028. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, 2 coats, value 12s.;1 gown, value 2s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d.; 2 pinafores, value 6d.; 2 frocks, value 6d.; and 1 pair of trowsers, value 6d.; the goods of Thomas Walsh; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 16— Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

THOMAS FROGG.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2029
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

Related Material

2029. THOMAS FROGG was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 213 yards of lace, value 97l.; 145 yards of embroidered lace, value 106l.; 11 embroidered lappets, value 28l.; and 1 shawl, value 14l.; the goods of Fulgence Pigache.—2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Cyrel Videcoq and another.

FULGENCE PIGACHE . I am assistant to Cyrel Videcoq and another, dealers in lace, they live in the Rue St. Honore, Paris. On the 1st of June, I was at Ryder's Hotel—I had a box containing the lace stated in my care—I inquired for a porter—they brought me the prisoner—I think the waiter gave him the box, but I gave him directions to go to a house in George-street, Hanover-square, and wait for me there—it was about half-past eleven o'clock—I arrived about twelve—he was not there—I went back to the hotel to inquire, and gave information to the police—I have not found the lace—I am sure he is the man that had it.

HENRY GARDEN (City police-constable, No. 327.) I went after the prisoner, and found him at Ascot Heath—I said I wanted him for stealing a box of a French gentleman—he said he knew nothing about it—after that he said he sold it to a man who was a Jew—he gave me what account he could, but I could not find the Jew.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taking the parcel to George-street, and met the Jew; I had seen him once before; he asked what I had; I said I did not know; he said, "Come, and have something to drink. "I did so; it made me stupid. I did not sell the lace to the Jew; I did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY. Aged 35.— Judgment Respited.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

JOHN WILLIAMS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2030
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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2030. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 6 glass bottles, value 3s.; 2 drams of essence of roses, value 2s.; 1 gill of lavender water, value 1s. 6d.; 7 pots of pomatum, value 3s.; 1 pot of cold cream, value 3d. and 1 wooden box, value 5s.; the goods of Ashburn Forbes; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 31— Transported for Seven Years.

JANE ALEXANDER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2031
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2031. JANE ALEXANDER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, 2 spoons, value 10s., the goods of Robert Edward Phillips, and another.

MARIA JULIA PHILLIPS . I am sister to Mr. Robert Edward Phillips, and live in Wellington-road, St. John's Wood. The two spoons were his and mine. On the 14th of July the prisoner called, and asked a direction—she was a stranger to me—she went into the kitchen because there was a shower—she was there about a quarter of an hour—I missed the spoons next day—they were brought to me afterwards—this is one of them, the other is a tea-spoon—I have not seen it.

THOMAS HUGHES . I am a pawnbroker. I gave this spoon to the officer—the prisoner pawned it, and then came to redeem it.

JOHN EATON (police-constable S 193.) I took the prisoner—she said,

"I took the spoon, but intended to take it back again"—the other spoon has not been found.

GUILTY . Aged 43.— Confined Three Months.

JOHN NOREY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2032
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2032. JOHN NOREY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, 1 wooden bowl value 2d.; 10 pence, and 9 halfpence; the property of William Canavan; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 13— Confined Three Months.

JAMES MULLONEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2033
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2033. JAMES MULLONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 1 coat, value 19s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; the goods of Michael Mullony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .** Aged 18— Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

JOHN THOMAS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2034
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2034. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, 18lbs. weight of iron chain, value 4s. 6d., the goods of Elizabeth Farmer; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19— Confined Six Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

JOHN FORRESTER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2035
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

2035. JOHN FORRESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 11d.; and 1 neckerchief, value 1d.; the goods of Thomas Humphreys, from his person.

THOMAS KELLY (police-constable F 40.) I was acting as gaoler at the station-house on the 17th of June, at Bow-street—the prisoner was locked in the same cell with the prosecutor, for being drunk—in the evening the prosecutor beckoned me to a little wicket, and complained of being robbed of his shoes and neckerchief—I found the shoes on the prisoner's feet, and the neckerchief in his pocket, in the cell.

THOMAS HUMPHREYS . I came out of Lambeth poor-house that day for a holiday—I got drunk, and was taken up and put into the station—the prisoner was there, and almost strangled me before he pulled my handkerchief off.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM WAGER, CHARLES WALKER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2036
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2036. WILLIAM WAGER and CHARLES WALKER were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July, 2 chickens, value 3s., the property of Joseph Wiggett.

JOSEPH WIGGETT . I live at Islington, and keep fowls. On the 12th of July two were taken, between half-past four and half-past five o'clock in the morning—they were in front of the street—I found them in custody of the police at my door—on the previous Sunday morning I had lost one fowl—I know Wager to have been at my door on the Sunday morning previous—I do not know the other prisoner.

THOMAS HOBBS KING (police-sergeant N 22.) I was on duty on the 12th of July, between four and five o'clock in the morning—I saw the two prisoners in Thornhill-road, and by their manner I suspected they had stolen property—they were then about half a mile from the prosecutor's—they turned down a street towards Liverpool-road—I followed them—I got to Upper-street—I crossed and stopped them—I called a man to hold Wager while I searched Walker—I took one of these fowls from his side-pocket—Wager ran from the man that held him—I called "Stop thief"—two men stopped him, and he took two fowls from his pocket—in going to the station Wager got from the two men, and ran away, and then Walker pulled another fowl out of his pocket—I found in

his pocket bread, wheat, and oats—he said he met a man in Holloway-road who asked him to carry them to London, and he would give them a pot of beer.

Wager's Defence. We met a man at the Cock public-house, at Holloway, who gave these to us to carry.

Walker's Defence. I met a man who asked me to carry these down to Kingsland-gate, and said he would give me a pot of beer.

WAGER— GUILTY . Aged 19.

WALKER— GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoners.)

CHARLES SMITH, HENRY SMITH.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2037
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Imprisonment

Related Material

2037. CHARLES SMITH and HENRY SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Henry Parker, from his person; to which Charles Smith pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 17— Transported for Ten Years.

RICHARD MORE . I am beadle at Covent-garden market. On the 24th of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the two prisoners in company—I saw the prisoner Henry Smith put his hand into the prosecutor's right-hand trowsers'-pocket and sound it—I then saw Charles Smith lift up the tail of the prosecutor's coat, and take the handkerchief out, and give it to Henry Smith.

HENRY PARKER . This is my handkerchief—I was there that morning, and lost it—the handkerchief was in the officer's hand when I saw it.

Henry Smith's Defence. I stopped to see some persons buy some fruit, and a gentleman took me and my brother by the collar.

HENRY SMITH— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

OLD COURT.—Thursday, August 26th, 1841.

Third Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Ardbin.

CHARLES CAPLIN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2038
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2038. CHARLES CAPLIN was indicted for stealing, 3 yards of gambroon and 1 pair of trowsers, value 15s., the goods of John Rose and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 19— Transported for Ten Years.

WILLIAM WILKINS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2039
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2039. WILLIAM WILKINS was indicted for stealing 1 plane and 1 saw, the goods of Daniel Stammers; and 1 square, the goods of John Handy; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Three Months.

JOHN WOOD.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2040
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2040. JOHN WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August, 15 handkerchiefs, value 1l. 5s. the goods of Benjamin Prew.

PETER MURPHY . I am a scale-maker. On the 14th of August, about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Prew's door, in Aldgate—I saw him take the handkerchiefs from the shop-door, fold them up in his apron, and walk away—I went in and called Mr. Prew, and went in pursuit of him—I found him at last in a public-house—I accused him of having stolen the property—he said he had had them given to him—he was sitting down with them folded up in his apron.

BENJAMIN PREW . I am a haberdasher. Murphy came and told me what had occurred—I went to the public-house, and there found the prisoner

with the handkerchiefs in his apron—they are mine, and have my mark on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along Aldgate; a man came by and gave them to me, told me to go to the public-house, and wait, and to ask for Tom Smith.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

FREDERICK JOHN SLOUGH.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2041
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2041. FREDERICK JOHN SLOUGH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July, 3 spoons, value 2l.; and 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 11s.; the goods of James Baldwin.

JAMES BALDWIN . I am a paper-stainer, and live in St. John-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner was in my service about nine months—I discharged him on the 10th of July—next day I missed these spoons and sugar-tongs—I suspected the prisoner, and went to look for him—I found him in Old-street, and asked whether he had been past my house—he said he had not—I said, "Well, you will come home with me, my man"—he came home—I said, "Have you not any halfpence in your pocket?"—he said, "No"—I said, "Let me see"—he said, "No; I have not, only some silver spoons,"Which are my property, and which I missed—I must have lost them in the course of the night—I saw them safe at eleven o'clock, after the prisoner had left—I asked how he came into the house—he said he came in at the front-door, which was left open, but that was not true, for I had bolted and locked it, and it was safe when I got up—there is a work-shop down stairs, the window of which I found open—I believe he got in through the back-room first-floor window, which is very low—he knew the way to get in.

GUILTY .* Aged 10.— Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

JOHN BRIDGER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2042
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2042. JOHN BRIDGER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Joseph Sacre, about the hour of eleven in the night of the 17th of July, at St. Marylebone, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 4 coats, value 4l. 12s.; 1 waistcoat, value 8s.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 12s.; and 3 pairs of gaiters, value 18s.; his goods: 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 18d.; 2 gowns, value 3s.; 2 caps, value 1s.; 2 shawls, value 5s.; and 1 shirt, value 2s.; the goods of John Thomas Woods.

JOHN THOMAS WOODS . I am servant to Mr. William Joseph Sacre, who lives in Park-road. The stable is at the bottom of the garden—I left it all safe at eleven o'clock on the 17th of July—I returned in about an hour and a half, or three-quarters, and missed from it the articles stated—the parties must have got in at the loft-door, which had been shut—the bolt was slid in about an inch—they must have forced it open—nothing was broken—I went down to the station soon after, and there saw all the articles but two coats and a shirt—this now produced is my master's livery coat—I know nothing of the prisoner except seeing him about Lisson-grove.

JESSE CHESHIRE . I am a policeman. I was on duty that night, and met the prisoner in Alpha-road, a short distance from Mr. Sacre's stable, carrying this bundle under his arm—I suspected all was not right, and asked what he had got—he said, only a few old clothes which a servant had given him at No. 2, Alpha-road—I took the bundle from him, and found it contained livery and other articles—I tied it up again, took hold of him, and saidjie must go with me—he became very resolute, and tried

to get away by slipping his arms out of his coat—I kept hold of him—he said, "D—your b—eyes, if you don't let go of me I will knock your b—head off"—sergeant Grimwood came up, and assisted me in taking him to the station—the prisoner was asked there where he got the things from—he said a servant in Alpha-road had given them to him to carry to the Edgware-road—we examined the bundle, and, having been on the beat some time, I knew the livery, and went to the prosecutor.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not see a servant with me? A. I saw a servant a long distance before you, but I do not think he had any thing to do with you.

DANIEL GRIMWOOD . I am a police-sergeant. On the night in question I was on duty in Lisson-grove, and saw Cheshire struggling with the prisoner—the bundle was close to the footpath in the road—I scrambled it up as well as I could, and went to assist Cheshire to take the prisoner to the station—the bundle contained the articles stated, which the prosecutor's servant identified.

Prisoner's 'Defence—(written). "I was going across Boston-fields; when I got into the Alpha-road a groom came up, and asked me to carry a bundle into the Edgware-road, and he would pay me for it; and as I was going along I was stopped by a policeman; he asked what I had got; I said I did not know, but I was carrying it for the groom he saw before me; he saw him go away when he stopped me; he asked me to let him look at the bundle; I stood by him till he looked at it, and then he took me into custody. I was in liquor at the time."

GUILTY .** Aged 21.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Before Mr. Justice Coleridge.

WILLIAM CRADDOCK.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2043
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2043. WILLIAM CRADDOCK was indicted for feloniously uttering, on the 24th of July, a forged acquittance and receipt for 1s. 6d., well knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud Henry Sturt and another.

FRANCIS BARKER . I am a City carman. The prisoner was in my employ, and drove my cart—on the 24th of July my cart was hired by Sturt and Sharp, according to our books—I do not know of my own knowledge where he went—I met him in Thames-street, returning with the cart.

Cross-examined by MR. CHARNOCK. Q. How long has he been in your employ? A. About two months—I had no character with him—I knew him by sight, being in the trade before—I always found him sober—I have heard that he has not borne an honest character—we were short of a man, and I put him on.

AARON BROOKS . I am a packer to Henry Sturt, who has one partner, On Saturday, the 24th of July, the prisoner came with Mr. Barker's cart to our door in Wood-street to load—when loaded he was to go to different wharfs to deliver packages—he had a truss and a box to take to Hayes' Wharf—there was a direction on the box, "J. Footman and Co., Ips-wich" —he had another to deliver at Carpenter Smith's Wharf, to go to Penzance, and one at London-bridge Wharf—he was to pay the wharfage, and bring us back the receipts for it—he came back, and brought this shipping note from Carpenter Smith's Wharf, with a receipt on it for 1s. 6d., and this one from Hayes' Wharf, for 3s. 6d.

Cross-examined. Q. What is your duty? A. To pack goods, and send them out—I gave him the money to pay the wharfage—I gave him

about 8s. or 10s.—I will not be certain—he had more than he wanted, for he brought me change back—he charged me this 18d., because here it is on the bill—I am certain of it—(read)—"At Carpenter Smith's Wharf, for Penzance, 24th July, 1841, 1 truss, 1s. 6d., Received, G. H.

JURY. Q. Is it customary at your house to give the money for wharfage with all goods it that go out? A. Yes, always—I am sure I did it in this instance—we keep no cart of our own—we always hire, and always give the money to the men to pay the wharfage.

COURT. Q. You did not give the precise 18d.? A. No—it was to pay for all the others he had in the cart—he was to account to me, when he returned, for what he paid.

MR. CHARNOCK. Q. Who did the money belong to? A. To the firm—I drew it from the counting-house, to give him—I draw so mush at a time, and have to account for it on Saturday night—if I am short of money I go to the counting-house for it; if I pay it out of my own, pocket I get it again from the counting-house—I cannot exactly swear whether I do not sometimes pay my own money, because I keep it all in the same pocket; but when I am short of money I always go to the counting-house and draw—the money I gave the prisoner I drew from the counting-house.

GEORGE DARE . I am a wharfinger at Carpenter Smith's Wharf. I remember a truss being found on the wharf, for Penzance—I do not remember the direction on it—nothing had been paid for that truss, as no entry had been made in our books of it—I have he bottom was not written bill has come from our office, but the writing at the bottom was not written by any one authorised thorised by us—I am quite sure of that—there is no one in the concern whose initials are G.H.—it would appear that a blank bill was given to some person, and they have fabricated this recipt—any person could obtain one of these bills authorised applying at the wharf—I can say this is not the writing of any person authourised by us, from a knowledge of their hand-writing and signature—I think there are half a dozen persons authorised to sign receipts, clerks and pricipals—their names are, Richard Wilson, myself, Thomas Dare, Richard Martin Wilson, Thomas Wilson, and John George Dare—no one else is authorised to sign or such a receipt, and the money would in the regular course be paid to one or other of those parties, but to no one else—I found this truss in the warehouse—it might be deposited in the warehouse without its being perceived, or a carman might pitch it down and go away, and the men on the wharf might take it into the warehouse, expecting he would return to pay the wharfage—it is usual when men bring goods to have a note—the man on the wharf receives the package, and signs the note in pencil, the note is brought into the counting-house, and from note the wharfage is paid.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you at this wharf on the Saturday in question? A. Yes—I went there about nine the o'clock, and left about ten or eleven at night—I was there all day with the exception of going to my meals from one to two o'clock and from four to five—none of the other five persons who sign receipts are here—I am certain this "G H" Is not the singnature of any of those parties, from a general knowledge of their handwriting—every man writes differently at different times—I do and so do the persons at the wharf, but not so different as not to be able to distinguish their handwriting from this.

JURY. Q. Does Richard Wilson ever receive goods? A. Very seldom—he does occasionally, and so do the other parties, and give receipts—I think I have seen the prisoner before, but I do not know—we are in the habit of giving receipts on these bills—it is customary for the person to bring a note in which the goods are mentioned—if a truss was brought it would be put down "one truss."

AARON BROOKS re-examined. I gave the prisoner a note, one to each wharf—he did not bring them back—they ought to be left at the wharf, and he should bring the receipt back.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Two Years.

Before Mr. Justice Erskine.

WILLIAM BRADFORD.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2044
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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2044. WILLIAM BRADFORD was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Ann Bradford.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN FFELAN . I am a policeman. On Saturday, the 7th of August, between twelve and one o'clock, I took the prisoner into custody—I told him I took him in consequence of his usage to his wife, and was to detain him till the result of the Coroner's inquest—he said, "I supposed as much"—in conveying him to the station he said they were both drunk, and quarrelled, that he pushed her down, and she spoke no more.

MARGARET MILLER . I am servant at the Black Swan public-house, Rose-lane, Spitalfields. On Tuesday, the 3rd of August, I saw the prisoner at the house at four o'clock—he was drunk—he had a pint of beer there—his wife came into the house a few minutes after him—she was sober—she said to him, "Shall I take your beer home?"—he said, "Yes"—she then took the beer, and went out with it—he remained in the house, and after that he said to himself, "The good-for-nothing old woman, I will either murder or do for her"—there was no other person present—I left the bar, and when I came back he was gone out—I heard nothing more pass between him and his wife.

THOMAS MALIN (police-constable H 74.) On Tuesday evening, the 3rd of August, about half-past five o'clock, I was in Wentworth-street, and observed some persons ground the prisoner's house in Wentworth-street, nearly opposite Castle-street—he has a small shop and sells toys, and has a mangle—there was a crowd round the door—one female outside made more noise than the rest—the glass of the window was broken, and the shop goods rolling out of the window—I saw the prisoner inside, and asked if he knew the female outside—he said, "It is my wife, policeman"—I said, "Why don't you let her in?"—he said, "I dare not, for she has threatened to cut my head open with the tongs"—I said, "Nonsense, I will prevent all that, let her in"—he said, "With your request I will do so"—I asked the woman if she would be quiet—she made no answer—he opened the door immediately—she went in in a very violent manner, and was very drunk at the time—she appeared to have a black eye before she went in—it did not seem a new wound—the collector of the rents was present, and the shop was shut up—several persons went in—the door was closed—the prisoner appeared very much excited—he appeared to have been drinking—I cannot say he was drunk—Ball the officer came on the beat after me at nine o'clock that night—a little after nine next morning I met the prisoner in Wentworth-street, and asked him how he settled the

matter last night—he said his wife was very ill, he bad been and pawned two articles to get her a drop of rum, that she was in the habit of drinking rum—I said, "I hope you have not ill treated her"—(I had desired him not to do so the night before)—he said, "I am very sorry, policeman, I did strike her in the face in the night"—he said he did not think it would cause all that illness, he would not have her die for 1,000l.; if she did be should get hung for it—I asked if they had been to bed together—he said they bad—I said, "I understood your bed was pawned last night"—he said he took it to the pawnshop, but had no money on it—I told him if his wife was ill, to get medical assistance as quick as possible, that was much better than rum—he said he would do so, and I believe he started from me to fetch a medical man—I passed his house a few minutes after, and looked in at the door at the request of the neighbours—I saw the deceased sitting in a chair—she was the woman I had seen in the street the night before—I saw a mark on her face—it was the black eye I had observed the night before, but it appeared to have got much worse.

GEORGE BALL . I am a policeman—Wentworth-street is in my beat On Tuesday night, the 3rd of August, I went on duty there at nine o'clock after Malin, and at half-past nine I saw some persons standing opposite the prisoner's house—John Twomey, who lives next door, called me into his house—I saw the prisoner's wife there sitting in a chair—she was drunk—I had frequently seen her before, and knew she lived with the prisoner—she passed as Mrs. Bradford—I saw a mark on her left eye as if she had received a black eye, and a scratch on her nose—Twomey and his wife were with her—the prisoner was not there—I saw the prisoner come home about eleven o'clock that night—the witness Mrs. Thompson was with him—he went into his house with Thompson, who afterwards went into Twomey's house for a light—I afterwards saw Mrs. Bradford go into her husband's house with the assistance of Mrs. Thompson and Mrs. Twomey—I did not hear whether Mrs. Bradford spoke or not—after they had gone in, I waited outside for a few minutes, and heard words spoken loudly by the prisoner—what it was I could not say—it was loud talking—I went away—on the following evening I called at the prisoner's house, and saw his wife—he was there—I called frequently between that and his wife's death, and saw the prisoner on those occasions—he said he was very sorry for what he had done, he would not have her die for 1,000l.—he said that more than once—I had known them some time—they were neither of them of sober habits, but otherwise.

THOMAS CUMMINS (police-constable H 5.) Between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, on Tuesday, the 3rd of August, I was on duty at the station, in which section the prisoner's house is—I saw Mrs. Bradford and a young man at the corner of Rose-lane that night—(I did know her to be Mrs. Bradford before her death—I have seen her since her death, and it was the same person)—the young man said something to me, in consequence of which I turned my light on the woman's face—her left eye was black all round—the right side of her mouth was also black, and her nose was black—she appeared to have been very much ill used—she appeared about seventy years old—she went with me and the young man to the door of the prisoner's house, No. 29, Wentworth-street—the prisoner opened the door—the woman was not sober—she appeared to have been drinking—the prisoner was very much excited—I said, "You vagabond, how came you to use the

woman in this shocking manner?"—he said she deserved it, she had been pawning the things, and getting drunk—I said, "That does not justify you in ill using her; if you don't like her, why don't you get rid of her?"—he said it was her own fault, she had been getting drunk—I asked her if he had given her the black eye—she said, in his presence, that he did—I also asked if he gave her the mark on her mouth—she said, "Yes"—he was standing close by at the time—her hand was tied up with a green ribbon—I asked her if he gave her that blow on the hand—she said, "Yes"—(she had told me something coming along)—I observed that she seemed more ill used than I at first supposed—I turned the light on her again in the house, and observed she was very much bruised all over the face—I did not examine the back of her head—she had a bonnet on—she said, in his presence, she had a wound on her head, and that her collar bone was put out—I asked her, in his presence, if he inflicted the wound on her head, and if he put her collar-bone out—she said he did, and she knew it would be the cause of her death—he did not deny it, but admitted it—(he said repeatedly it was her own fault, in getting drunk—he kept on saying so, and was very violent)—I said, "No, it won't cause your death"—she said, "I am sure it will, I know it will," and repeated that several times—I said, if he ill used her any more in the course of the night, I would bring him out by the neck, and lock him up—I then left them—I saw them again in the house on Wednesday, at about half-past ten o'clock—the prisoner then appeared to be sorry for what had happened to her, and was apparently kind to her—she had the rattles in her throat that night, and could not speak—the prisoner said on the following night, Thursday, he would not lose his wife for 1000l., and seemed very sorry and very penitent.

MARY TWOMEY . I am the wife of James Twomey, a shoemaker, in Went worth-street, next door to the prisoner's house. I knew him and his wife—I have known him better than twelve months—her name was Ann Bradford—on Tuesday night, the 3rd of August, about nine o'clock, she came to my house—she was not very sober—I do not know that she appeared ill—Mrs. Thompson came in about eleven o'clock, and I took Mrs. Bradford to her husband's house—Mrs. Thompson took the light, and I led her out—she was able to walk—she appeared to have been beaten—I took hold of her arm, and helped her a little—when I took her to the house I put her on a chair—I left, leaving Mrs. Thompson there—as soon as I got out I heard the cry of "Murder"—to the best of my opinion, it was her voice—I went home, and went to bed, and went to Bradford's house next morning—he was not at home—he came in soon after—I asked him how he went out and left the door open, and leave bis wife so ill—he said he did not know she was so bad—she was then sitting on a chair in the room we were in—she appeared very low, and did not speak—Mrs. Parker and Mrs. Thompson then came in—I did not see her after her death.

COURT. Q. You say when she came into your house she appeared to have been beaten, what appearance did you see? A. The mark over the temple—it appeared to have been lately made.

JOHN TWOMEY . I am the witness's husband. I went to bed on Tuesday night about eleven o'clock—I heard a cry of "Murder" That night next door—it was Mrs. Bradford's voice.

JOHN PARKER . I live in Wentworth-court. I have known the prisoner and deceased many years—they were in the habit of getting drunk

and quarrelling very much—I found the window of the prisoner's house broken on this Tuesday night—there had been quarrelling there continually, from between five and six till eleven o'clock, on and off—next morning, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner with a tea-cup in his hand, with rum in it—I saw the deceased with a quilt round her—I said she was not in a fit state to have rum, and I took it out of his hand, as she was in a stupid state—she had a black eye, and a bruise across her lip—I helped to get her to bed—I told him to go and get the bed home as soon as possible from Dexter's, and to get a doctor—he said he should be hung, and he hoped she would not die, he would not have her die for 1000l.—he said he had not ill used her particularly; he had shoved her several times to keep her from knocking him down with the poker and tongs—when he said he should be hung for it, he said he wished she could speak once more, to clear him.

MARY THOMPSON . I am a widow, living in Rose-lane, Spitalfields. I went to the prisoner's house on Tuesday, the 3rd of August, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon—he and his wife were there—they were quarrelling—I saw her up with the poker to strike her husband, but I caught it away from her before she did—she then up with the tongs to strike him, but I caught them away before they got to him, and she said she did not thank me for it—she came to my house at half-past eleven that night—I saw her at Twomey's that night, and helped Mrs. Twomey to take her to her husband's, about eleven o'clock—I saw the prisoner when I took her home, and asked him why he should have words with his wife—I came out directly, and listened at the door till it struck twelve, but never heard a word.

Prisoner. Q. Was not her arm tied up Before that? A. Yes—above a fortnight before she hurt her arm with the mangle when I was there—I put a bit of strapping on, and tied her arm up—it was hurt about the middle—near the elbow.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Which arm was it she hurt? A. I hardly know, but think it was the right—I tied a ribbon round it with a little green in it—it was a figured ribbon—she used her arm as usual after that—she did not carry it in a sling—she did not complain that her shoulder was out.

HANNAH WILSON . My husband is landlord of the Red Lion and Spread Eagle public-houses, White Lion-street, Whitechapel—I knew the prisoner and deceased—the prisoner used our house—about two o'clock in the afternoon the deceased is said to have been ill-used, she came into the house—she was then perfectly sober, as far as I could see—the prisoner was there, and they quarrelled about a pawnbroker's ticket, both used very bad language to each other, and the deceased at last used a very disgusting epithet to her husband—he then pushed her with his hand on the breast, and said, "Keep away from me"—it was a gentle push, but she fell from it—I said, "You shan't ill-treat her in my shop, and if you want to quarrel, go home"—an old woman lifted her up, I think, but I will not be certain it was a woman—she then abused him again—I said, "Don't go on so, he is intoxicated, and perhaps he will lame you"—he then pushed her down again, and when she was lifted up I saw she had a scratch on the right eye—it appeared a mere scratch—I think there was no black about the eye before, but I had not noticed—there is a trap-door where she fell, and a very small iron hinge projects a little from the ground—it is about five inches

long, and the flap about a quarter of a yard wide—she fell the second time on the hinge—I remonstrated with him for ill-using her—she went outside the door with him, then came back and paid me 10 1/2 d.—the side of her head fell on the hinge—she was very old, and I should think very feeble—the push he gave her was a very gentle one—I was astonished to see her fall from it.

COURT. Q. Before he gave her the first push, had she done any thing besides abusing him—had she gone to him as if to push or strike him? A. No—she came close to him, and used very bad language indeed—I think she once put her hand on his coat to pull him, and said, "Come home"—that was before he pushed her down—she was not holding him, nor trying to strike him when he pushed her the second time—she was making use of very disgusting words to him—she was close to him—he was sitting on a cask outside the bar—she went up to him, but did nothing to show she intended to take hold of him or strike him—she was perfectly sober—he was very much intoxicated.

WILLIAM WAGG . I am shopman to Mr. Dexter, pawnbroker, Union-street—the prisoner was in the habit of pawning at our shop. On Tuesday afternoon, the 3rd of August, between three and half-past three o'clock he came alone, and offered a bed in pawn—he appeared sober—I offered him money on it, which he refused—I packed it up for him to take it away—he then said he would take the money, and an old woman came in—I do not know his wife—she said, "Don't take that bed in—it is my property—he is a rogue, and has robbed me"—she attempted to strike him, but he stepped back—he then struck her twice across the mouth, back-handed, with his open hand—her mouth appeared swollen—I sent for a policeman, who came, but the prisoner had left—he came next morning, between half-past nine and ten, for the bed, with a young woman—I gave it to him—after he struck the deceased, I perceived he had been drinking, but was not drunk—I am quite satisfied he knew what he was about.

JOHN WILLIAM FRYETT . I am a pawnbroker in Whitechapel-road, The prisoner came to my shop on the 3rd of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon—a woman came in close behind him—he was offering something in a pillow-case or bag in pawn—I do not know the contents, for the woman desired us not to serve him—they had a few words, and left the shop together—after they left I saw him several times spit in her face—he then wrung her nose, and after that went a few paces further, and she seized the bag on his shoulder—he struck her once or twice, and she fell—he appeared to have been intoxicated, but knew what he was about——I observed the woman's face—I did not see any mark on her eye—she was an old woman.

SAMUEL JESUP BURCH . I am a surgeon, and live in Church-street, Spitalfields. The prisoner came to me on Wednesday morning, the 4th of August, about ten o'clock, and said, "I wish you to come directly to my wife, for I think she appears to be dying."—I went; she was in bed at the house in Wentworth-street; I at first thought she was labouring under an attack of apoplexy—she was insensible—a bystander remarked, that her husband had been ill-treating her—I believe he was not present—that attracted my attention—I examined her head more minutely, and found a slight contusion over the right eye, and over the upper lip—on examining over the temple, there appeared contusions of a more severe

character, but the dark hair prevented my observing it so minutely as I did after death—I visited her from that time till Thursday evening, when she appeared dying—I saw her on Friday morning, and she died about two that afternoon—I made a post-mortem examination on Saturday—I examined the scalp—there were very extensive contusions over the left temporal bone; beneath the scalp there was extravasation of blood at the corresponding part to the contusions—there was a large clot of extravasated blood, beneath the dura mater, beneath the left temporal bone, where I had observed the contusions externally—on the Wednesday night, the prisoner requested me to do what I could for his wife; and, on one occasion, I asked him whether he had been beating her—he either said, "I pushed her or struck her against a mangle"—I cannot recollect which he said, pushed or struck—he said, "Do what you can for her for my sake"—he remarked, that he thought his wife had taken laudanum, but there were no symptoms of her having taken any—I examined her stomach after death, and found it healthy, the only matter in it was the remains of the medicine she had taken—when I first went to attend her I smelt her breath—there was a strong smell of alcohol—I infer from the account of the witnesses, that the wounds stated to have been inflicted were the cause of her death.

Q. What was the immediate cause? A. I should say the blow over the head causing the effusion of blood and serum on the brain, which was the immediate cause—I think the only cause of that effusion to have been the blow over the head, because the effusion which was seated over that part of the brain is very seldom extravasated in a case of apoplexy—I do not know of one case—the stomach and liver presented quite a healthy appearance, quite different to a person addicted to intemperance.

COURT. Q. You believe the only cause of effusion of blood was a blow on the head; by that I suppose you include a blow given by a fall on a hard substance? A. Yes—I believe it to be occasioned by some external violence over the right temporal bone.

SAMUEL BYLES . I am a surgeon in Church-street. I saw the deceased on Thursday evening, the 5th of August—she appeared to be dying from the effect of concussion of the brain—her breathing was uneasy, and the pupil was fixed—in consequence of what I heard, I made a particular observation of her head and face—I noticed a slight contusion on the outer angle of the right eye—the left eye was severely blackened—there was a bruise on the upper lip, and an extensive contusion on the left temple—she had a great deal of hair for an old woman, and it was difficult to ascertain the limits of it—the right side of the body was wholly paralyzed—there was no fracture or dislocation of either shoulder—I only saw her that evening—my impression was she would not live till the next morning—the prisoner was present—there were a great many people in the room—an observation was made in his presence, that she had been pushed down and fallen against the mangle—I cannot say who said that—I assisted at the post-mortem examination, and agree with Mr. Burch's evidence—the quantity of extravasated blood was very large—I suppose the clot of blood and the serum which had separated from it, must have been at least six ounces; and the clot of blood was so florid, and the separation so perfect between the solid and watery parts, that I think the effusion must have taken place very rapidly, and must have pressed so much on the brain as to put a stop to her power of speech and motion—the effusion on the brain

was undoubtedly the immediate cause of death, and that was caused by some external violence applied to that part of the head—the brain would not present that appearance by taking a quantity of laudanum—the appearances from taking laudanum is usually that of congestion, or an accumulation of blood in the veins of the brain—the prisoner appeared excessively anxious, and labouring under great despondency.

COURT. Q. Might the effusion on the brain be caused by excessive drink, or violent passion and exertion? A. I think it might be the exciting cause, but that would not produce the whole—I found no other appearance to account for her death besides what I have described.

MARY COLLINS . I am the wife of Joseph Collins, of 92, Wentworth-street. I was at Wilson's public-house on the 3rd of August, between one and two o'clock—the prisoner and his wife were there quarrelling about a hat—I saw her make a blow at her husband, and knock his hat off—she made use of very bad language—she appeared to have been drinking, but neither of them were to say tipsy—he went away from her into the back tap-room —she followed him—I followed, fearing they might have blows—she made an attempt at his face again, and his hat fell off—she then stumbled back and fell against the table—the kit side of her head, near the temple, fell against the table—she hit against the table—nothing more happened—she went home with the prisoner—I went to the house again between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, with my husband—the prisoner was then sitting alongside John Campbell, on a barrel, and in about ten minutes his wife came in—she flew at him again—he put his band to keep her away, and said "Take her away from me"—she made towards him again—he put his hand against her breast, and she fell on the floor—she was picked up by a man named Farmer—she was then senseless—it was full twenty minutes before she came to herself—she went away—I saw no more of her—I did not see Mrs. Wilson there at the time, but she might be there.

Prisoner's Defence. We were both tipsy—she was very quarrelsome, and used aggravating words—I pushed her away with my open hand, but used no violence whatever—she was drinking night and day—I am innocent of any thing of murder—I never intended to injure her.

GUILTY. Aged 56.—Strongly recommended to mercy on account of the provocation.— Confined Four Months.

Before Mr. Justice Coleridge,

JOHN PATTEN, WILLIAM TAYLOR.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2045
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment; Transportation

Related Material

2045. JOHN PATTEN and WILLIAM TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously assaulting Ann Harding, on the 15th of July, putting her in fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person, and against her will, 1 pocket, value 4d.; 4 shillings, 1 sixpence, 2 pence, and 4 halfpence; her goods and monies; and immediately before, at the time of, and after the said robbery, feloniously beating, striking, and using other personal violence to her.

ANN HARDING . I am single, and am an unfortunate woman; I lodge in Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's. On the 15th of July I was going home a little after twelve o'clock at night, and met three men—the prisoners are two of them—I do not know who the third was—I had never seen them before—I was close by a gas-light—they were coming up against me—I tried to pass them, but they would not allow me—one pushed the other up ngainst me—I do not know which it was—Patten laid hold of me with his

arm round my neck, and put my head under his arm, while the other two came behind me, pushed me into a court which was close by, and threw me down—they tore my gown, and took my pocket away with 4s. 6d. and 4d. in copper in it, and they took a piece of my gown away with them—they then dragged me outside the court again, and continued abusing me—they pushed me out, and Patten continued catching hold of me by the neck—I was down on the ground—they picked me up when they had got my pocket, and Patten put his arms round my neck—I cried out "Police," and the more I cried for the police, and prayed them not to strike me, the more they struck and ill used me—I was struck in a dreadful state—my face and lip was cut all to pieces, and my eye was blacked—I believe Taylor and the other man, struck me—Patten did not—they struck me with their fists—I was struck in several parts of my body, and was bruised from their kicks—I have a bad leg now—while I was down they kicked me about the hip, and knees, and several parts of my legs, to get at my pocket—they kept swearing to one another while doing this, and they called me a b—b—several times, when I called out for the police—they made use of very bad language to one another, encouraging each other to tear my things, and take my pocket away—one, I cannot say which, said, "B—your eyes, tear her pocket, tear her gown to get at her pocket"—I was quite sober—neither of them had asked me to go with them.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Before Patten put his arm round your neck, had you not spoken to him? A. No—I did not ask him to go with me—I never spoke to either of them—I tried to get by them, but they would not allow me—I swear I did not ask Patten to go home with me—there were very few persons passing at the time—I had no one with me.

Taylor. I cannot remember any thing about it—I was in liquor. Witnets. They were not drunk that I could see.

JOHN JAMES ALLEN (police-constable F 159.) On the night of the 15th of July, I was on duty in St. Giles's, and saw the prisoners a few minutes before twelve o'clock, and another young man with them—I was then at the corner of Bainbridge-street, and they were at the opposite side of High-street, near Crown-street—in consequence of something, I came towards Bain-bridge-street again sooner than I should have done—when I got near Laurence-street, I heard the screams of a female—I went towards them into High-street, and saw the two prisoners, and another not in custody, close on a female—Patten had his arms round her neck—he appeared to be trying to throw her down, from the distance I was off, I was in the middle of the road, but he let go—Taylor struck her in the face, and said with an oath, "Go on"—she fell down, and he kicked her in the body, about the hip—I took hold of Taylor, took out my rattle, sprung it, and seized Taylor and Patten at the same time—Taylor said with an oath, what did I stop him for, and directly struck me in the mouth—Patten stood by.—I did not allow him to depart—another constable came in a minute or two, and took him into custody—I told him not to go—he could not have gone, because I should have seized him—after great resistance we took Taylor to the station—I had seen Taylor strike the prosecutrix in the face once, or twice, or three times—his hand was moving—she went down in the struggle, and he kicked her—I do not know what became of the prosecutrix, but when we got to the station she was there—her face and head were cut dreadfully—her mouth was bleeding, and a little swollen, and

her clothes were torn—she said they had stolen her pocket and some money—I searched Taylor's person, and found a tobacco-box, some tobacco, sand a piece of gown similar to that which the prosecutrix was wearing, but I was not aware of it at the time—Taylor said it was an old handkerchief, and I returned it to him.

Cross-examined. Q. When you first saw the prisoners they were in High-street, St. Giles's? A. Yes, and when I saw them again, they were still in High-street, and Patten had his arm round the prosecutrix's neck—I was rather more than the distance across the road when I saw Taylor knocking her down—I had got closer when I heard what he said—when engaged with Taylor, I had not hold of Patten—he was standing close by our side—I did not hear Patten say he did not deny having his arm round her neck, but did not mean to do her any injury—lie said so at the police-court, but I did not hear it before.

JOHN DAVIS (police-constable F 98.) I assisted in taking the prisoners to the station—I have part of the prosecutrix's gown, which I found in Taylor's cell in the morning—he was there alone—he said nothing about it to me.

J. J. ALLEN re-examined. This is the same piece of gown which I found on Taylor, and which he said was an old handkerchief—it corresponds with the prosecutrix's gown—I can recollect it is the same, by the print—he took it out of my hand, and said, "It is only my old handkerchief"—I found 6d. on Patten, but no pocket on either of them.

ANN HARDING re-examined. This piece of gown is mine—I have the gown on now, but have sown it up since this happened—I have taken it in, and made it smaller—this piece was torn from the fathers—the pocket-hole is in the piece which was torn off.

Taylors Defence. The woman did not swear to me at the office—it was only the policeman swore I hit her—when he searched me he took a piece of cloth out of my pocket, and put it in again—in the morning he brought me out of the cell, and said he had found this in the cell, and I must have taken it in with me—I was intoxicated—I did not do any harm to the woman, to my knowledge.

(Patten received a good character.)

PATTEN— GUILTY of an Assault only. Aged 18.— Confined Six Weeks.

TAYLOR— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Before Mr. Justice Erskine.

JAMES EVANS, ROBERT LEWIS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2046
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2046. JAMES EVANS and ROBERT LEWIS were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Jones, on the 19th of July, putting him in fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person, and against his will, 1 handkerchief, value 7s.; and 1 glove, value 18d., his goods; and immediately before, at the time of, and immediately after the said robbery, feloniously beating, striking, and using other personal violence to him.

JOHN JONES . On the 19th of July, about twenty minutes to one o'clock in the night, I was in the City-road, going home—as I was coming by Windsor-terrace, towards the Angel, the prisoners met me—there was another in the gang—I only met two who I identify—I did not see any other person particularly—I saw nothing of them before they came up—they rushed on me momentarily, and Evans hit me a very powerful blow on my right hand, which was very bad with the gout—I had an opportunity

of seeing the person who struck me at the time—it was a very fine night—I swear it was Evans—I had never seen him before—I had a large silk glove on my hand, and a silk handkerchief lightly folded round it, and momentarily they were taken off my hand by Evans, and passed instantly over my right shoulder to Lewis, who stood behind me—I had no opportunity of seeing the face of the third person, but these two I saw—the instant my handkerchief was taken, I turned round, and being a very fine night, I then had the opportunity of seeing Lewis—Evans then seized me inside my neckcloth with one hand, and gave me a blow on the stomach with the other—I had a guard round my neck, with a gold eye-glass attached to it—the guard broke, and the glass fell between the waistband of my trowsers—I then hallooed as loud as I could, "Police, and thieves," and Hewitt came up to my assistance very readily—Evans had hold of me when I called out, and he said, "Now is the time to trip the b—r up"—when the police came up, the prisoners ran away—Lewis ran towards the Vinegar-yard, and Evans towards Crowley's wharf—the policeman tried to pursue Evans, but he could not run so fast—I saw him running after him—I did not see any one pursue Evans besides the policeman, at that time—the policeman sprung his rattle—a person named Daley saw the whole transaction—I first saw him when I turned round after I was nearly choked—he was behind me—he came up to me while the two prisoners were running away—he came before the policeman came up—he did not run after the prisoners—he stopped with me while the policeman was in pursuit of them—another policeman caught Evans, not ten minutes after he ran away from me—I have never seen my handkerchief and gloves since—it was a very'fine night—I cannot say positively that it was moon-light, but I think it was—there are plenty "of very large gas-lights just there—I swear positively that Evans is the one that struck me—Lewis did not strike me, but I am positive he is the person who was with Evans.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. I believe you told the Magistrate you were a professor of dancing? A. Yes—I had been to the Garrick theatre—I reside in the neighbourhood of Burton-crescent—the City-road was my nearest way home—I had not come straight from the theatre—I had called on a friend of mine in Liverpool-street, and there I had about three glasses of wine—a little affects me—I am obliged to be very careful, as I was very unwell, and every thing I took inflamed my hand—a little would affect me more then than at an ordinary time—it did not—I was perfectly sober, with the exception of taking the wine I have named—I was sober—I will not take my oath to it—perhaps I might be a little the worse for liquor, but that is all—I do not think I had had more than enough—I was not helped home by a policeman or any one—there were two gentlemen who wished to come against the prisoners, bat they said it would hinder their time, and they begged to lay hold of my arm—it was not to assist me to the station—I did not know either of them—they would not give me their address—I wished it—Daley was sober—I was just under a gas lamp when I caught sight of the prisoners—I do not know whether it was moonlight—it was so light that I could discover their visages—I was close by a gas-light—I did not see a third person—the two prisoners ran off—I can positively swear to them—I understand there was a third person, but I did not see him—Daley did—I never said I saw a third person—I was so frightened with the other two—I have spoken to Daley about this matter—he did not ask me whether I was quite sure of

Evans—the policeman asked me if I was quite sure, and I said yes—I was sworn before the Magistrate—my deposition was taken down and read over to me—(looking at his deposition)—this is my signature.

Q. Did you state before the Magistrate,"There was a third person with them—they all ran off?" A. Daley told me that, and that was stated before the Magistrate—I said there was a third person, but I did not say I saw him—I knew from Daley that there was a third person—I know nothing of the third myself—the handkerchief I lost I gave 7s. 6d. for only a week before, and 3s. 6d. for the gloves.

COURT. Q. Had you had any thing to drink before you had the three glasses of wine with your friend? A. Not any thing.

JOHN DALEY . I am a calenderer and packer. On the night of the 19th of July I was in the City-road, about half-past twelve or twenty minutes to one o'clock, and saw the prosecutor—I followed him nearly out of Finsbury-square—when near Windsor-terrace, I saw the prisoners go up to the prosecutor—I did not see them before they got up to him—I was not above two yards from the prosecutor at the time—I saw Evans twitch the handkerchief off the prosecutor's right hand, and throw it over his shoulder—Lewis took it, and ran towards the bridge—Evans ran across the road, and went down by the side of the wharf—he was stopped by Reeve—I did not see Evans strike the prosecutor—I ran after Evans, and sang out, "Stop thief"—I followed him about a dozen yards across the road, down by the side of the wharf—Reeve brought him back, and asked if that was the man—I said, "Yes"—the prosecutor was then across the road, standing just by the end of the toll-gate—I saw both the prisoners' faces perfectly—there was a gas-lamp, and a little moon-light besides—I saw their faces before they ran away—I swear positively to them—I had never seen either of them before.

Cross-examined. Q. What were you doing out at this time? A. I was at work till ten o'clock, and then I went to Mile-end to see my cousin, who was ill—I was coming home when I saw this—I was sober—we had had three pints of beer between three of us—the prosecutor did not appear to me as if he had been drinking, he appeared agitated after the robbery—there was a gas-lamp, which enabled me to see the prisoners' faces—it was about six yards from where the prosecutor stood, closes against the railing—it enabled me to see perfectly enough—I saw a third person, but not to swear to him—I did not tell the prosecutor I had seen a third person—I am quite sure of that—he knew there was a third person as well as me—he did not tell me there was a third—we have not talked about the third person at all—I said there were three in the robbery—I did not tell the prosecutor so—he said he knew himself there were three in the party—he said he had seen three—the third went right over the bridge, the same way as Lewis did—they all three started at one time—the third person had a coat on, but I cannot tell the colour—I had not the same opportunity of seeing him, because he started first—the only opportunity I had of seeing the prisoners' faces was while they were making the attack and running away, not before—I did not see Evans strike the prosecutor—(looking at his deposition)—this is my signature—this states, "I saw the prisoner Evans strike Jones on the hand"—I said, "Snap at his hand" at Worship-street—my deposition was read over to me—I did not notice that then, but that is what I said, I did not say "strike."

JOHN HEWITT . I am a policeman. On the 19th of July, about twenty

minutes to one o'clock, I was coining oat of Edward-street, and just turning the corner of Regent-street, towards the City-road, and about two minutes' walk from Windsor-terrace—I heard the cry of "Stop thief"—I looked round the corner, and saw a man running up Regent-street from the City-road towards me, hut seeing me he turned round, when about twenty yards from me, and ran back again towards the City-road—I pursued him, sprang my rattle, and called "Stop thief"—I lost sight of him for about half a minute, and then saw him in custody of Reeve, about one hundred yards from where he had turned back—I cannot swear positively to his being the same man I saw turn round, but he had on a similar dress, and similar to what Evans has on now—he had a cap on at that time—we met Daley, who said he was the man that had taken the prosecutor's handkerchief—Evans said it was not him, that he knew nothing about it—we then took him to the prosecutor—the prosecutor had certainly been drinking, and was very excited, but was not drank—I likewise observed that Daley had been drinking, but very slightly.

JURY. Q. What sort of a night was it? A. A very fine light night—I cannot say whether the moon was shining, but it was a very clear night, and the place is very well lighted.

STEPHEN REEVE (police-constable G 49.) I was on duty on the night of the 19th of July—I heard a rattle spring, and a cry of "Police" and "Stop thief" from the City-road—I went in that direction, and met the prisoner Evans running in the direction from the City-road—I stopped him, and said, "I suppose it is you they are calling after?"—he said, "No, they are gone up the City-road"—I took him towards the City-road, and showed Evans to the prosecutor, who said he was the thief that had stolen his handkerchief—I do not think the prisoner said any thing.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not what the prosecutor said, that he was one of them? A. No—I swear that he said, "That is the thief," or rascal, "That has taken my handkerchief"—I was examined at the police-office—what I stated was read over to me, and I signed it—this is my signature—(looking at his deposition)—this states, "The prosecutor said he was one of them"—I thought that was the same meaning—I remember the prosecutor saying, "That is the thief that took my handkerchief."

JAMES CLIFFORD (police-constable G 91.) On Monday, the 19th of July, I saw the prisoners both together, about ten o'clock at night, in Crown-court, Bell-alley, Goswell-street, and a female with them—on the 31st of July I took Lewis into custody—he came to the station respecting a watch which I had stopped when I had him in custody previously—I told him I wanted him for robbing a gentleman of his handkerchief in the City-road, in company with Evans, who was then in custody—he said he was not there—while conveying him from the station, he said he had heard it was Irish Mike and Evans that robbed the gentleman.

Lewis's Defence. Evans stated before that I had no part in it at all; that he was there himself, but T was not with him.

JOHN EVANS . I am the prisoner Evans's brother, and am a carpenter by trade, but am out of employ at present—when I have employment my brother works for me—I have his indentures in my pocket.

JURY. Q. Did he reside with you? A. Yes, in my house—I never allowed him to be out after ten o'clock at night—he was in the habit of keeping to that hour in general—he might be half an hour over sometimes.

Q. How came he to be out so late on the night in question? A. I

thought I had heard him go up stairs about eleven o'clock that night, but I would not be positive—I had not sent him out that night—if he did keep out, it was entirely without my knowledge.

(Two other witnesses deposed to Evans's good character.)

EVANS— GUILTY . Aged 18.

LEWIS— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months.

First Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

WILLIAM ASHMORE, ROBERT MATTINGLEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2047
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2047. WILLIAM ASHMORE and ROBERT MATTINGLEY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Gardener, about eleven in the night of the 19th of July, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 20 yards of oil-cloth, value 2l., his goods.

WILLIAM GARDENER . I am a broker, and live in Caroline-place, City-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Sboreditch; it is my dwelling-house. On the 19th of July, at half-past ten o'clock at night, this oil-cloth was safe in the back cellar, which could not be got at without going through the front cellar—it has an iron grating, which I saw down safe at half-past ten—nobody could get to it without removing that grating—about eleven o'clock, as I was going to bed, I looked out of window, and saw the prisoner Ashmore coming from the pavement up to the shop front—I looked through the window, suspecting him, shoved the window up, and saw him take this oil-cloth, which was handed up to him out of the cellar—he walked away with it—I am certain he is the man—I continued to watch, and saw Mattingley come out of the cellar, through the grating—I went down, got out at the first-floor window, and followed, but did not overtake them—I saw them both together next morning, in Sun-street—Ashmore had the piece of cloth now produced, which was safe in my cellar the night before.

Ashmore. Q. Did not you give an alarm? A. No—I thought I could catch you without, but I went up the opposite street—I swear it was my property—I swear to you by your face, dress, and jacket—there was a gas-light close by—I have lost about 20l. worth at different times—here is No. 206 on this, and I have a piece here which I cut off the same roll.

JANE DUDDING . I am servant to Mr. Gardener. On Monday evening, the 19th, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoners walking up and down by the house—I went for the beer about ten o'clock, and saw them both again, and as I returned with the beer I saw Ashmore there.

CHARLES BEAUMONT . I am a policeman. I took the prisoners, who the prosecutor was following—I found this piece of oil-cloth on Ashmore.

Mattingley. Ashmore asked me, the morning I was taken, to go with him to Petticoat-lane, to buy a pair of shoes, and not finding a pair to suit him, as we came away we met a man who asked us to buy a piece of oil-cloth for 9d., we gave him 8d. for it.

ASHMORE— GUILTY . Aged 19.

MATTINGLEY— GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Ten Years.

SAMUEL DEAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2048
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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2048. SAMUEL DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 24lbs. weight of brass, value 4l. 10s., the goods of Daniel Kitchen.

DANIEL KITCHEN . I am a gas-fitter, and live in Crawford-street, Marylebone. I have a stable which 1 lend to my brother—any one could get through there and get at my brass work—I lost the brass now produced

about the 9th of July—I have stamps on some of them by which I can say they are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Which piece has the stamp? A. Here is the better K—it is the pattern of a gas pillar—I know it to be mine.

ROBERT WARWICK . I know the prisoner—he had access to the stable under where the brass was kept, and slept there occasionally—he was there on or about the 9th of July.

Cross-examined. Q. He was a green-grocer's boy out of work, and allowed to sleep there? A. Yes.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am an officer. On the 9th of July I apprehended the prisoner at a marine-store dealers in the act of selling this brass, which was in the scale—I asked where he brought it from—he said from Mr. Taylor's.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any body else there? A. A woman behind the counter—nobody else was in the shop but a woman behind the counter—the shop is in East-street, Manchester-square—Mr. Spencer who was in the room, called out, "Who is that?"—the woman in the shop called out, "A man who brought brass to sell"—the prisoner went through the back room and escaped through the passage—I took him again on the Thursday night—I am certain of him—he was there three or four minutes—I knew him before—I took the brass out of the. scale—I never saw it in his possession—I asked what he had got there—he said, "Some perquisites belonging to the workmen"—the woman was committed, but the bill was thrown out.

(The prisoner received a good character.).

GUILTY. Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

WILLIAM BELCHER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2049
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2049. WILLIAM BELCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 pair of boots, value 17s., the goods of Henry Hussey.

HENRY HUSSEY . I am a shoemaker, and live in Greek-street, Soho. On the 16th of July, at eight o'clock in the morning, I placed these shoes partly outside and partly inside my door—I did not miss them till the policeman brought them at half-past eight—those produced are them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How do you know them? A. By their make—they are my own cutting Out—I made them for a gentleman—I will swear they are mine by the make, cutting, and every thing—there is a peculiarity about them—the binding of a button-hole was frayed, and I intended to send them back—I am certain of them.

ROBERT TAYLOR . I am a policeman. On the 16th of July, soon after eight o'clock in the morning, I found these boots under the prisoner's jacket in Queen-street, Seven Dials.

Cross-examined. Q. How came you to go to Mr. Hussey? A. He came in that direction, and it was the nearest shop—he was three or four hundred yards from there—he said a man had given them to him to carry.

GUILTY .** Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years—Ship.

WILLIAM ABRAHAMS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2050
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2050. WILLIAM ABRAHAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 basket, value 2s.; and 14 loaves of bread, value 14s. 8d.; the goods of John Seabert, his master.

JOHN SEABERT . I am a baker, and live in Duke-street, Lincoln's Innfields—the prisoner was my servant, and carried out bread to the customers. On the 15th of July I found some bread concealed behind some

flour sacks, which was not their place—next morning the prisoner had to take out some small bread to a coffee-shop in Holborn—I kept watch, and after he was gone I looked where the bread was concealed, and half of it was gone—I followed him out, came in sight of him in Holborn, and informed a policeman, who watched him—I do not deal with Mrs. Davis, and never knew her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it not the custom occasionally for journeymen to seek to increase their master's custom, and get remuneration for it? A. It may he sometimes—it was 2lb. loaves that were concealed—I found twenty-eight loaves concealed—he had no occasion to take out any thing but small bread that morning.

JANE DAVIS . I live in King-street, Drury-lane, and am married. On the 16th of July, at half-past six o'clock, the prisoner brought me seven quartern loaves—I did not pay him for them—he was to call again—I gave the constable the loaves he brought.

WILLIAM—I am a policeman. I followed the prisoner from Holborn with a basket of bread—I followed him to Mrs. Davis's, in King-street—he came out without it—I stopped him, and asked where he had left the bread—he said he should not tell me—I secured him, went into Davis's, and found the bread, which I produced to the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. How near was you to him when he went into Davis's? A. About two hundred yards—I saw him go in, but not come out, as I went into another street.

JOHN SEABERT re-examined. I examined the loaves, and have no doubt they were mine.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was he in your service? A. Three years and a half—I have only one other servant—he is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

JOSEPH CLARK, JAMES BRINKSWORTH.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2051
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Transportation

Related Material

2051. JOSEPH CLARK and JAMES BRINKSWORTH were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Lodwick Burchell, about ten o'clock in the night of the 12th of July, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 8 scent-bottles, value 5l., his goods; and that Brinksworth had been before convicted of felony.

PETER LODWICK BURCHELL . I live in Kingsland-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and am a surgeon. On Monday, the 12th of July, a little after ten o'clock, I was sitting in my shop, and saw two persons looking in at the window twice—I shortly after got up, put out two gas-lights in the window, went round the counter, and told the boy to put up the shutters—after he had put up two or three, and was gone down stairs for another, I heard something fall on the pavement—I went out, found a pane of glass broken, and some scent-bottles removed, and eight gone—I had looked at the window several times, and it was not broken before that—I had seen the scent-bottles there that evening—I looked round, and saw a policeman crossing the road with the prisoner Clark—the policeman had four bottles in his possession which were four of what I lost—I went to the station with the policeman, and found out where the prisoner lived —I accompanied him and another officer to his house—his brother and sister who he lived with were out—Sanders went away with me, leaving Edis to wait till they came home—next morning I found the other four

bottles at the station, and the other prisoner in custody at the station with the man and his wife who keep the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. What was the use of going to Clark's house to wait for his brother and sister? A. We wanted to find whether he lived there, whether he had given the proper address—I found nothing there—ray boy is not here—it was the pane of glass next the shutter that was broken—that could not have been done by the boy putting up the shutter, because it was on the opposite side to the shutter, and six inches from it—when I heard the crash the boy was down stairs—I swear these smelling-bottles are mine.

THOMAS EDIS . I am a policeman. On the 12th of July, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was on duty at the bottom of Hackney-road, near the prosecutor's house—I heard a crash of glass, and saw two persons crossing the road—Clark was one—I do not know the other—he was a short person, exactly of the same stature as Brinjcsworth—it was not a boy—I followed them in the direction of High-street, Shoreditch—when they got on the pavement, Clark stopped suddenly against the railings of the churchyard, and deposited something—he then turned back in a contrary direction, and I found these four bottles in the place where I had seen him deposit something—I secured Clark.

Cross-examined. Q. When you took Clark, and afterwards the bottles, did you not say, "What have you got here?" A. I did—he said he knew nothing about them—the road is very wide there—I was standing close upon him when I saw him deposit something—I could not take more than one—had they proceeded down High-street I should have taken both—I could not see what it was that Clark deposited, his back was towards me, and he turned in a contrary direction—there were persons passing at the time—I am quite certain I saw Clark deposit the things.

WILLIAM SANDERS . I am a policeman. On the night of the 12th of July, I received information, and about two o'clock in the morning I went to the prisoner Brinksworth's house—I know it was his house from information I received—I knocked at the door, and inquired if he was at home—a man put his head out of window, and said something—he let me in—I went up stairs and commenced searching, in company with my brother constable—I then went down stairs in company with the man and his wife who keep the house, and found in the second drawer of a chest of drawers four scent bottles, a nail, and a religious tract—I took the man and his wife to the station, leaving the other constable in charge of the house—I then came back again, and stopped for several hours—about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, a knock came to the door, and a female voice, as it appeared to me, asked me something—I answered her from within in a feigned voice, and she went away—about ten minutes after the prisoner Brinksworth came to the door and said, "You, Tom, is any body here?"—I answered, "No"—he said, "Are you sure there is nobody here?"—I said, "No"—he said, "Open the door"—I told him I could not, he had got the key—he did not speak for a moment or so—I then opened the door, seized hold of him, told him what he was charged with, and took him into custody.

GEORGE SMITH . I lodge at this house; Mrs. Brinksworth, the prisoner's mother, keeps it—the chest of drawers Sanders speaks of is hers—I went to bed at nine o'clock that night, and my wife about half-past nine—Brinksworth

was not in the house at that time—I used to leave the shutters shut, but the bolt undone, on purpose for the prisoner to come in through the window, as the key was so bad, it would not undo the door easily—he lodged there with his mother—near upon eleven o'clock I heard some one come through the window—I cannot positively swear it was him, as I did not see him, nor hear his voice—he sleeps in the room the policeman searched—the mother does not—she was out at service then—his two little brothers, one seven and the other eleven years old, slept with him—they were there in bed when the policeman came—there was no one in the house then but me, my wife, and the two children.

Brinksworth's Defence. I used to go to a public-house which this young man and a few friends used—I very often took them home to my house to sleep down stairs, and I told them any night if they had not money to get a lodging they could come in there—they knew the way as well as I did.

THOMAS MAILING . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of Brinks-worth's former conviction—(read)—he is the man.

CLARK*— GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

BRINKSWORTH*— GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

JAMES BENCE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2052
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2052. JAMES BENCE was indicted for stealing 10 cheroots, value 1s., the goods of Henry Wilkins Fox, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

JAMES ATKINSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2053
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2053. JAMES ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 1 petticoat, value 2s., the goods of Samuel Friend; and 1 petticoat, value 1s., the goods of Elizabeth Barry; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Three Months.

WILLIAM WOLSTONHOLME.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2054
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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2054. WILLIAM WOLSTONHOLME was indicted for embezzlement; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

SARAH DUDLEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2055
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

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2055. SARAH DUDLEY was indicted for stealing, 3 1/2 lbs. weight of bacon, value 1s., the goods of John Davies; to which she pleaded

GUILTY.* Aged 14.— Judgment Respited.

WILLIAM DEAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2056
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2056. WILLIAM DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 1 watch, value 29s.; 2 seals, value 36s.; 1 chain, value 1s.; and 1 ring, value 6s.; the goods of James Bamfield.

JAMES BAMFIELD . I live in Upper Park-place, Dorset-square, and am a pensioner. About half-past one o'clock on the 22nd of July, my watch hung over my mantel-piece—I missed it at half-past five—my parlour-door was open—I do not know the prisoner—the watch, chain, and seals produced are mine.

JOHN FOX . I keep a beer-shop in Middlesex-street, Somers'-town. About twenty minutes after four o'clock, on the 22nd of July, the prisoner called at my house to inquire if there was a tap-room—he was told not—he went away, and soon after two other persons called in, and one of them let in the prisoner—I heard somebody going up stairs—the other two were going to run away when I came from my parlour to see what was the matter—I seized them—my wife went and found the prisoner on the stairs—I seized him and gave him in charge—I saw the policeman take this watch

from his breeches pocket, and asked if it was mine—I said no—the prisoner said it was his own—he did not tell me how long he had had it.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Was there not plenty of time for the others to give him the watch? A. They might—I asked what he did there—he said he was taken ill, and wanted to go backward—the other two were waiting in front of the bar—the prisoner had the watch in his hand when I first saw him—he took something from his pocket—I did not see what it was—he was holding it out—after he was taken up he wished to go to the water-closet.

WILLIAM ELMER (police-constable S 187.) About seven o'clock this evening I was called into Fox's to take the prisoner for going up stairs, and understood he was trying to pass something to another man—I searched him, and found the watch in his trowsers'-pocket—he said he had bought it—I asked where—he said he could not tell, he should know the man again if he saw him—I searched him at the station, and found the gold chain, seals, ring, and key, twisted round his braces, separate from the watch—the swivel is off the watch.

Cross-examined. Q. Who did you take first? A. The prisoner—next morning, going to the station, he said he had given a man in Oxford-street another watch for it—the other two men were proved to be convicted thieves.

JOHN EVANS . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, by the name of Joyce, on the 17th of June—(read)—he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Fourteen Years.

NEW COURT.—Thursday, August 26th, 1841.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOSEPH ROLFE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2057
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2057. JOSEPH ROLFE was indicted for bigamy; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Six Months.

WILLIAM CONNOR.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2058
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2058. WILLIAM CONNOR was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June, 1 pair of shoes, value 6s.; and 1 snuff-box, value 1s.; the goods of George Thomas Harvey; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined One Month.

JOHN HUTTON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2059
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2059. JOHN HUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July, 3 pewter pots, value 4s.; 1 pewter measure, value 1s.; and 1 dram-glass, value 8d.; the goods of Job Thomas; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 52.— Confined Two Months.

JOHN WARD, CHARLES HORNE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2060
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited; Imprisonment

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2060. JOHN WARD and CHARLES HORNE were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 16 knives, value 6l.; 12 forks, value 2l. 14s.; and 2 cork-screws, value 15s.; the goods of George Blair and others, in a vessel in a port of entry and discharge; to which

WARD pleaded GUILTY. Aged 16.— Judgment Respited.

HORNE pleaded GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months.

GEORGE KALE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2061
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2061. GEORGE KALE was indicted for embezzlement; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined One Year.

WILLIAM BRIDGES.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2062
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2062. WILLIAM BRIDGES was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 41.— Confined One Year.

WILLIAM HALL, MOSES KEENS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2063
VerdictsNot Guilty > fault

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2063. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July, 1 pair of shears, value 7s., the goods of the Marquis of Ailsa; and MOSES KEENS for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JAMES M'RONALD . I am gardener in the service of the Marquis of Ailsa. I lost a pair of garden-shears belonging to him, on the 7th of July, at Isleworth—they were taken from a tool-shed, and left near the boundary wall—they were not in their proper place—I suspected some person put them there for an improper reason—I kept watch—I went to a public-house at Isleworth, and found Hall in the skittle-ground—I charged him with the theft—he denied it—I gave him in charge—as we walked up the town he confessed, and wanted me to call the person back that I had sent for a policeman—I refused—he said he would make it all right—I said I would encourage no such acts, he ought to have said so before, and I would not have sent for a policeman—I made him no promise or threat—he said he had sold them to Moses Keens for 1s. 2d.—they were worth about 7s.

(The indictment only stating the prosecutor's title, without his name, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

CHARLES JOHNSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2064
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2064. CHARLES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July, 20lbs. weight of cherries, value 3s., and one sieve, value 1s., the goods of William Thorpe.

OLD ENGLAND GOODSON . I am a constable of Covent-garden. I was on duty in the market on the 24th of July, and saw the prisoner carrying a sieve of fruit on his head, I followed him, he went to the side of a cart that was standing by the side of the marke, and called out "Moore—he looked round and saw me, and ran away—I took him, and took the sieve from him.

JOHN COX . I am servant to William Thorpe, a fruit salesman, in Little Russell-street, Covent-garden. On the 24th of July I saw a sieve of cherries at my master's stand—it was worth 3s.—it had not been sold when I missed it—the sieve of cherries found on the prisoner's head was the same I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it given me to put on Mr. Moore's van; I used to take to Mr. Moore's van every morning; the salesman, said he could not tell whether he sold them or not—a Mr. Miller gave them to me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined One Month.

HENRY TURVEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2065
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2065. HENRY TURVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February, 1 bird-cage, value 1s., the goods of Richard Hicks.

SARAH HICKS . I am the wife of Richard Hicks—the prisoner came about a rabbit-hutch that he wished to purchase for his master—I told him that when finished it would be 15s.—he said I must ask 1l., as he should expect a few shillings for himself—he asked if that small bird was for sale—I said not particularly, but I did not mind selling it—I said it was 3s.—he said his mistress was very fond of birds, and if I would send it he

would send the money and the cage back—he said it was at a fish shop in the Commercial-road—I knew the shop, and let my little girl go with it— she came back without money, bird, or cage—the cage was not sold, it was to be returned.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you ever seen this boy before? A. Not to my knowledge—this was past two o'clock in the afternoon—I had no customers there at the time—the prisoner bad on a tight buttoned jacket, laced up shoes and gaiters—his jacket was white or washed—it was light—my husband was not at home.

SARAH HICKS . I am the prosecutrix's daughter. The prisoner came to my mother's house—I went with him to bring back the money and the cage—he went to Whitechapel and then to Petticoat-lane—he went into two houses there—one was a barber's shop, the other a little public-house—he asked me to stay outside—there were a good many birds in the public-house—the prisoner had the bird and cage—when he came out he had not got it—I am sure he is the person who took my mother's bird and cage.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? A. No—I do not know how old I am—I cannot tell what month this was in—the prisoner had a tight buttoned-up jacket and breeches, and laced-up shoes—no one mentioned the buttoned-up jacket to me—I noticed it myself—it was a light one.

(The prisoner received a good character/)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner for a misdemeanor.)

RICHARD REYNOLDS, GEORGE ALLEN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2066
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2066. RICHARD REYNOLDS and GEORGE ALLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 1 decanter and stopper, value 7s., the goods of John Spenceley Stevenson.

HENRY FOWLER (police-constable E 111.) On the 20th of July, I saw the prisoners at the corner of Cleveland-street—they were coming down London-street—I saw Reynolds shove something up his coat-sleeve, and Allen stepped back and was picking something up—I went and asked Reynolds what he had got—he said, "What odds is that to you," and he was going on—I took hold of him and saw this decanter—I asked him where he got it—he said it was no odds to me, let him go on—I said I must first know where he got it from—he said, "I fetched it out of pawn"—I said I must know what pawn-shop he got it from—he said I might find that out—Allen was stopped by Carter, and I found on him this stopper of the decanter.

THOMAS CARTER (police-sergeant E 7.) I saw Reynolds stopped—I saw Allen stoop as if to pick up something—I took him, and said, "You have got the stopper in your pocket"—he said, "I know I have"—I asked him where he got it—he said, I might find that out.

JOHN SPENCELEY STEVENSON . I live in Frederick-place, Hampstead-road—I lost a decanter and stopper on the 22nd of July—I left it safe about nine o'clock in the morning, and when I came back at half-past one it was gone from a sideboard about five feet inside my shop—this is it—I know it by a fire-flaw in the beading—I have had it seven years.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is this fire-flaw at all unusual? A. No—I have no other mark on it.

Reynolds' Defence. I bought it of a man in the street; he came up to me and said, "Can you give me a job"—I said no, I was looking after a

job—he said, "Have you any money?"—I said I had 2s.—and he said I should have it.

Aliens Defence. I saw him buy it, and he gave me the stopper to carry, that it should not break.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

REYNOLDS— GUILTY . Aged 17.

ALLEN— GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months.

GEORGE LILEY JOHNSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2067
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2067. GEORGE LILEY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July, 62lbs. weight of lead, value 12s., the goods of Matthew Coates Wyatt, his master.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM ELLIS . I am clerk of the works to Mr. Matthew Coates Wyatt, who is building some houses in Hyde Park-square. On the 17th of July I went into a yard in Hyde-park-square, and seeing a plumber go into Mr. Wyatt's shop, I went in—I saw the prisoner there, with his back towards me—he was endeavouring to button his waistcoat, with his jacket in his hand—I turned him round, and saw on his person 62lbs. of lead, attached to a strap which was round his waist, and attached to his braces with four other straps—the lead rested on this strap, by some nails which are in it, and the marks on this strap correspond with the nails—he did not give me any account of how he came by it—I gave him to two men to take care of, but he got from them, and ran some distance—they took him again—this was in Mr. Wyatt's plumber's shop—he had four plumbers there, and each of them I could have reached with my hand at that time—these nails have no business in the lead in the course of the work.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. There was no other property there but Mr. Wyatt's? A. No, and finding this lead on him in Mr. Wyatt's shop, I presume it to be his—in a day or two after I found another piece folded up like this—here is the piece that corresponds with it—where the lead came from I do not know—the prisoner is about twenty years old —the plumbers who work in the shop are all older than him—we dismissed the others from our employ.

JOHN ROBERTS (police-constable D 180.) I went to the station, and received charge of the prisoner—he said, "I know nothing of that," pointing to this lead, which laid on the charge-room table—I found this belt round his waist—it is a horse's belly-band—he gave me his address, "No. 46, Queen-street, Edgware-road"—I went there, and he was not known.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not that the address of Mr. Jackson, his master? A. Yes—I saw Mrs. Jackson—I asked her whether George Johnson lived there—she said, "No"—I said, "Does not he lodge here?"—she said, "No, he does not"—she asked what he was—I said he was a plumber—she did not tell me he was in Mr. Jackson's service.

MR. CLARKSON called

JOHN JACKSON . I am a plumber, and live at No. 46, Queen-street, Edgware-road. I was employed by Mr. Wyatt—the prisoner was my apprentice, and up to this time his character has been good.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It is stated to me that you were in the shop when the lead was taken from the prisoner? A. I was not—I was at the shop door—I had not been there three minutes—I had not entered the shop—I could see at the door any body who was likely to come into the shop—I

saw the plumber enter the shop, which induced Mr. Ellis to enter—that plumber's name is Tibbie—I bad come from the buildings, and went to the shop to get my clothes—I had got charge of the work—I had to measure it.

Q. But what were you doing; you could not get your clothes by standing at the door? A. I was reading a piece of paper that I picked up, a scrap of the memorandum-book—I could see into the shop—I did not see my apprentice with this lump of lead—I saw Mr. Ellis and him scuffling—they were about three yards from me—I never saw this piece of lead before Mr. Ellis did—I do not let out my apprentice at a guinea a week—I know he was in Mr. Wyatt's employ—I have not a lead shop at home—I am a tin-man—I have not a particle of lead in the shop—lead is employed in a plumber's business—I am a plumber and glazier.

COURT. Q. In whose employ was the prisoner and the other men there? A. In Mr. Wyatt's—I was only employed by the day, and paid on Saturday night—it was half-past five o'clock, and I was going to get my coat to go home—the prisoner was in the shop, and two other men, who were both plumber's labourers—this lead was taken within a few feet of me and of two labourers in the shop, who were employed in the plumbing line.

WILLIAM ELLIS re-examined. Q. Was this Jackson the foreman of that department? A. Yes—I always allow the foreman to take on men, and I paid him the wages—he was inside the door certainly at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined One Year.

GEORGE AARON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2068
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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2068. GEORGE AARON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July, 10lbs. weight of nails, value 4s., the goods of William Winks and another, his masters.

WILLIAM WINKS . I am a builder, and have one partner. I live in Royal Hospital-row, Chelsea. I have some houses in Denby-street, Pimlico, and a warehouse, where I keep nails and other articles—the prisoner was in my service as carpenter, and kept the key of the warehouse generally—in consequence of missing nails I watched him, and met him, on the 13th of July, an hour after the other men had left work, coming from the warehouse—I stopped him, and said, "Have you just left work?"—he said, "Yes, here is the key"—I said, "What have you got in the basket?"—he said, "Some little bits of wood"—he took out a few bits of wpod, and put them back again—I said, "You must have something else"—he said no, he had not—I said he mast turn it out, and I found in it these nails—there are upwards of 13lbs. weight of them—they are of a peculiar make, such as are not commonly used—I bought them twelve months ago of a gentleman who retired from business—I took the prisoner to the station—he had not got the key then—he had offered it to me at first, but he must have thrown it away on the road to the station.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose you only speak as to your belief as to the nails? A. There is no mark on them—here are some which the policeman brought from the warehouse afterwards, which correspond in make and appearance with those the prisoner had—I believe them to be mine.

JOHN FULLER (police-constable B 178.) I saw this basket and its contents, and took the prisoner into custody—I have brought some nails from

the warehouse, which I have compared with those in the basket—they appear to be the same sort and pattern.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 48.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Year.

GEORGE BROWN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2069
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2069. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July, 15 sovereigns, the monies of Thomas Hunt, from his person.

THOMAS HUNT . I am a cotton-spinner, and live at Manchester. On the 2nd of July I was in Fleet-street—the prisoner overtook me, and asked where Fleet-street was—I said I believed he was in it—he said he was a stranger in London, and had come from Warrington, that he kept a farm there, and had come to London, to take a shop to deal in flour, as he would sell it to advantage, and he had 1000l. to speculate with—he said he was a native of Warrington, that his parents were dead, and had left him and another brother to carry on the farm—I said, "You have come from not far from where I came from; I came from Manchester"—he said he was glad we had met, and asked me to go and have a glass of ale, as he was tired of walking about, and he was a stranger—I refused—he pressed it, but I still refused—we walked on to the end of Chancery-lane—I said I had not been in any public-house but one, which was the Mitre (pointing to it)—he said, "We will go in there"—we went, and he called for a pint of ale, which he paid for—another man then came in, and knocked the table, and spilt some of the ale—he begged pardon—the prisoner said, "No offence," and asked him if he would have a glass of ale—he said, No, he could pay for it if he wanted any—he did take a glass, and then he took out a pocket-book, and showed his notes—and the prisoner, to convince him that he did not wish to sponge upon him, calling me his friend, pulled out his notes likewise—the prisoner then said to me, "Just to convince the gentleman, let him see that you could pay your road too"—I said, No, it was a thing I did not do—he said, "Just to show the man that you can pay your road as well as me"—I did then show two or three sovereigns—he said, just show him a few more than that, which I did—they then commenced talking about sharpers, and we went into another parlour, further in—the prisoner went in, and I followed him—the other man followed—the prisoner said, we must all take care of our money, for there were many sharpers about—he said, "Is your money loose? be sure whether it is correct or not"—I said, "I am sure it is"—he said, "Look; I should not like you to lose any thing in our company"—I did look, and counted fifteen sovereigns in my pocket, which was all I had—he said, "Here is a piece of paper, lap it up"—I did lap it up—he said, "Now, to convince the other gentleman your money is correct I will put it by"—I said, "No, I can put it by myself"—he said, "Just to convince the gentleman, I will put it in"—I was just putting it into my pocket, when he caught hold of it, and put it into my fob, as I thought— we sat a short time—we then went out, and they sent me into a shop to get three cigars, and when I came out they were gone—I found I had six copper halfpence in my fob, instead of the sovereigns.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. What time was this? A. About four o'clock—I remained there about an hour and a half—the other man did not seem to know the prisoner at first—I did not drink much—I was not drunk—we all three got into a cab—that was after the money got into my fob—I am not acquainted with town—I think they told the man

to go somewhere near Regent Circus—we got out of the cab, and walked along a street, then they sent me into a shop—we did not go into another public-house—I afterwards met the prisoner down at Manchester, at Strude-hill—I did not give him into custody immediately—he took me to the Seven Stars public-house, which is in Manchester—I took him to the house of Mr. Cook, a beer-shop—I had some beer there, but not with him—I do not know whether he had any—I went out and left him there with my brother, while I fetched two policemen—the prisoner would not let me explain to him what was betwixt us when I met him.

Q. Did you not tell him you had been robbed in London, you were doubtful about who did it, but you must have your money back? A. No, I did not say I must have 7l. back—he kept talking to me about his being a man in business—I said nothing about a sum of money—I did not say I was quite drunk that night—I came up to town on business—I could not tell how long I should remain—I staid at Hart-street, Covent-garden—I work for my living as a cotton-spinner—I am quite'sure I had 15l.—while we were going from Strude-hill to the Seven Stars, I did not say a word to the policeman—I had no doubt of the prisoner's guilt, but he begged so hard of me not to give him in charge till he had seen his old friend, and consulted with him—it was not to consult about paying me the 7l.

COURT. Q. You saw him on Strude-hill? A. Yes, he was speaking to two cheesemongers—I waited till he had done, and tapped him on the shoulder—I said I had been looking for him some time—he said to a person with him, "He says he knows me"—he said, "I don't know you, I never saw you before"—I said, "Don't you remember seeing me in Fleet-street?"—he said, "I don't know Fleet-street"—I taid, "Don't you know Chancery-lane?"—he said, "No"—he then said, "I see how it is, it is some transaction in business"—he asked me to go where he put up at, and said, "If I owe you any thing I will pay you"—he went on to the Seven Stars, and saw a man in his shirt sleeves—he said, "Can I have a private room?"—the man said, "Yes, straight forwards"—he rushed past him up the passage, and went out at the back-door—there was a man at the back-door, who tried to shut it to prevent my going after him—I pushed the man aside, and prized the door open, and jumped after the prisoner—I caught him in another street—he said, "Now you have got me again, I will acknowledge it"—he asked me to go back with him to the Seven Stars—I refused, and had him taken.

GEORGE DRAYTON . I am waiter at the Mitre Tavern. I recollect the prisoner coming there and two other men.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Ten Years.

JOHN FEENEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2070
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2070. JOHN FEENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July, 1 sovereign, the money of Barney Feeney.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be the money of James Fenwick.

SARAH FENWICK . I am the wife of James Fenwick, who keeps the Bell public-house in Ratcliffe-highway. Barney Feeney intrusted me with a sovereign to deliver to his wife if she called—he came in after with the prisoner, and Barney inquired whether his wife had called—I said not—I took the sovereign out of the till, wrapped in paper, laid it on the counter, and said, "There is your sovereign"—I went to the other end of the counter to serve a customer, Barney called for something to treat the prisoner,

and then said, "Now I will thank you for my sovereign"—I said I had given it him—he said, "If you have given me the sovereign, where is it?"—I said he had better search his pocket—I saw a piece of paper lying on the floor at Barney's feet—it was such a piece as I had wrapped the sovereign in—my husband came in, and got a policeman—the policeman said to the prisoner, "Do you know any thing of this sovereign?"—he said, "No"—he said, "Have you got a sovereign about you?"—he said, "No"—I noticed it was a new sovereign, but not of the present reign.

JAMES FROUD (police-constable K 385.) I found the prisoner at the Bell, with Barney Feeney—I asked the prisoner if he had seen the sovereign—he said, "No"—I said, "Have you a sovereign about you?"—he said, "No"—I took him into the parlour, searched him, and found a sovereign loose in his coat-pocket—I asked how he came by it, he made no reply—this is the sovereign, it is a new one of the reign of William IV.

BARNEY FEENEY . I live in Ann-street, St. George's. I have known the prisoner a good many years—he is no relation of mine—I met him by the door as I went into Mr. Fenwick's house—I asked him to have a share of a pot of beer—I asked Mrs. Fenwick if my wife had called for her sovereign—she said, "She has not, I suppose you will have it"—I said, "Yes"—I did not see her put it down—in a few minutes I asked her for it—she said she put it down—I said I did not see it, and it could not be found—I found a bit of paper on the ground outside the counter—she said, the prisoner must have it, and she sent for the policeman, who found one on him—I do not know whether it was mine or not.

Prisoner. I was getting my things washed; I had taken that sovereign out, and wrapped it in a handkerchief, and put it into my pocket.

JAMES FROUD re-examined. It was not in a handkerchief, it was loose in his coat-pocket.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Two Months.

GEORGE NORMAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2071
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2071. GEORGE NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 2 feet of lead pipe, value 6d.; and 2 metal cocks, value 1s.; the goods of Thomas Fox and others; and fixed to a building.

JOHN LAIRD (police constable K 234.) I stopped the prisoner on the 16th of July, at half-past ten at night, in Hudson-place, Shadwell—I asked him what he had in his hand—I was going to detain him—he ran about eight yards, then threw down this pipe, and metal cocks—he then ran on to the bottom of Shakespeare-walk—I nearly caught him—he turned up Farmer-street, and at the corner of Elbow-lane he dropped down—I never lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How far is it from where you saw the prisoner, to where you took him? A. About 150 yards—there are four turnings—I did not lose sight of him—he was sober—we got him to the station by carrying him on a stretcher—he did not speak a word—the first thing he said in the station was, "Oh dear, how came I here?"—that was about a quarter before eleven—he did not appear to be drunk—we were about seventy yards from the station—I do not know what was to prevent his walking—he could not walk—I will swear he was sober.

COURT. Q. Why did you take him on a stretcher? A. It was so handy to the station—we generally take the stretcher for them.

SARAH GILLER . I live in Palmer-street—Hudson-place is at the back

of the next house—one of these pieces of lead pipe is ours—I know it by being in the habit of using it, and here is a brass cock at the end of it—I went out at night on the 16th of July—it was then safe, and at eight o'clock the next morning it was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. What do you know that pipe by? A. Being in the habit of using it—this piece has been fitted to the place, and it fits well—it was fixed to the wall.

JOHN WILLIAM CAREW . I have had the entire management of the estate to which this pipe was fixed—there are about thirty houses belonging to the estate—there are seven orphans that are interested in it—Thomas Fox is one of them.

Cross-examined. Q. What is his age? A. I cannot tell—he is upwards of twenty—I derive my authority from the solicitor to the estate—I keep the houses in repair, and receive the rents on behalf of those persons—the money I pay to the solicitor is in the name of Thomas Fox and others—I have paid rents when Thomas Fox has been present, but he did not receive it—I have had receipts signed by him on behalf of himself and the others.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

SARAH BAKER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2072
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

2072. SARAH BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July, 2lbs. weight of mutton, value 1s. 4d., the goods of Robert Beard and another.

ROBERT BEARD . I am in partnership with my brother William—we live in Peerless-place, City-road, and are butchers. On the evening of the 10th of July, the prisoner came to the shop with another female—the prisoner asked for 1lb. of mutton chops, and she paid 11d. for them—directly they were gone I missed a piece of loin of mutton—I ran out and overtook them about fifty yards off—I accused them of taking it—they denied it—I requested them to lift up their arms, which they did, and it was not there—a gentleman who came by, pointed my attention to the mutton, which was at their feet—I cannot say which of them took it, but the other offered me a sovereign to say no more about it—I believe the words were, "Let us have no more bother about it"—I took them back, and gave them in charge—as they were going to the station, some persons interfered and rescued them both.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. The prisoner was the person who was occupying your attention in purchasing the chops? A. Yes—the other woman took no part in the purchase, but they were together.

THOMAS JONES (police-constable G 112.) I received charge of the prisoner and another woman—I am certain the prisoner is one of them—I had not seen her before—when I got about twenty yards from the shop the prisoner had a basket in her hand, and she struck me with it violently on the head, the contents of it came over me, and with her other hand she tried to take hold of my person—a man pinioned my two arms behind, and three or four more pressed me, and both the women escaped—as soon as I was let go, I followed the same way I saw the prisoner run, and in about ten minutes 1 found her in the parlour of a beer-shop—I said, "I am very glad to come up with you"—she denied that she was the person, but I knew she was—I sent for assistance to the station,

and with great exertion we got her to the station—I scarcely ever saw such a woman for fighting—she struck me twice.

Cross-examined. Q. How many of you were there? A. Two when we took her from the beer-shop, and when we were going to the station, there were more joined us—I cannot say how many—I will not swear that she had not been drinking.

NOT GUILTY .

JANE WALKEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2073
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2073. JANE WALKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, 2 shifts, value 4s.; 2 aprons, value 4s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 1 shirt, value 3s.; and 1 pinafore, value 2s.; the goods of Sophia Garden.

SOPHIA CARDEN . I live in Stanhope-street, and am a laundress. The prisoner was in my employ as an ironer for about a month—I lost several articles previous to my finding some things on her, and I found a duplicate in the yard.

GEORGE STEWART . I am a pawnbroker. I produce two waistcoats, a pillow-case, and apron, pawned by the prisoner on the 6th of July—I have an apron and pinafore pawned by her on the 7th of July, in the name of Ann Walkey.

JOHN LAMPART (police-constable S 288.) I took the prisoner—I produce the duplicate which was given to me by a woman who is not here.

SOPHIA GARDEN re-examined. These things belonged to different persons I wash for—this shirt belongs to a person in the College of Engineers' at Putney—this pincloth and apron belongs to another customer—this apron belongs to my servant—I know all these articles by the marks I put on them.

Prisoner's Defence. The two articles found on me I was going to put back again—I had a nephew killed, and I wanted to get a few things to attend the funeral—I came home, and my husband had stripped me of every thing—he told me to ask Mrs. Garden for a few shillings which she owed me—I did not like to ask her, and I took the two articles—I did not pawn the articles—the pawnbroker has sworn falsely.

GUILTY . Aged 54.— Confined Six Weeks.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

WILLIAM HARWOOD, WILLIAM SEAL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2074
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

2074. WILLIAM HARWOOD and WILLIAM SEAL were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July, 1 bag, value 2d.; 2 sovereigns, 4 half-sovereigns, 3 half-crowns, and 6 shillings; the property of Euphemia Pearson, from her person.

EUPHEMIA PEARSON . I am a widow, and live in Lucas-street, St. George's. On the 5th of July, I went into a shop in Ratcliff Highway—the prisoners came in after me, and stood at my right side—I had my bag in my hand, which contained two sovereigns, four half-sovereigns, three half-crowns, and 6 shillings—I missed my bag and money as soon I got three or four yards from the shop—I went home, and my daughter went to the police-office, and gave notice—I did not take my bag out of my pocket in the shop, but I felt it while I was getting my halfpence—some children had come into the shop.

Harwood. She said she had no money in her pocket when she was in the shop. Witness. I did not.

PATRICK M'ALLEN (police-constable K 95.) On the 7th of July, in the morning, I saw Harwood going up Bluegate Fields—he saw me and turned back—I followed, and took him—I found on him a five-shilling-piece,

three half-crowns, 2s. 6d., a bad shilling, and these new clothes, which I produce.

JOHN NICHOLLS (police-sergeant K 1.) I apprehended Seal at half-past six o'clock in the morning, on the 7th of July—I told him I wanted him for being concerned with Harwood in picking a lady's pocket—he said he did not know much about it, but Harwood knew all about it—I found two duplicates and 1s. 4d. on him—I had before that asked Harwood how he got his new clothes—he said he bought them in Whitechapel on the morning previous—Seal had a new hat and new shoes, which he said he bought in Whitechapel.

NOT GUILTY .

SARAH JONES.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2075
VerdictsGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentencesTransportation

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2075. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July, 1 pair of boots, value 3s. 6d., the goods of Owen McCarthy, from the person of Charles M'Carthy;— also on the 12th of July, 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Henry Nathaniel Norval, from the person of Samuel Denman Arundel; to both of which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Transported for ten Years.

JOHN WRIGHT.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2076
VerdictsGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentencesTransportation

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2076. JOHN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April, 9 yards of printed cotton, value 8s., the goods of Sarah Labbet; also, on the 5th of June, 1 spoon, value 7s., the goods of Mary Ann Rehden; also, on the 22nd of June, 1 knife, value 14s., the goods of Charles Gordon; to all which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 43.— Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM HIGGINS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2077
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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2077. WILLIAM HIGGINS was indicted for embezzling, on the 20th of July, 1 coat, value 1l. 15s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; and 1 pair of gloves, value 1s.; the goods of Thomas Merjngton; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM RIDLEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2078
VerdictsGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentencesTransportation

Related Material

2078. WILLIAM RIDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of July, 3l. 3s. 6d., which he had received on account of Francis John Cater; also, on the 7th of July, 4 handkerchiefs, value 8s., the goods of Francis John Cater, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

Fifth Jury before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

WILLIAM GREEN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2079
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2079. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July, 32 yards of woollen cloth, value 26l., the goods of the Great Western Railway Company; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Six Months.

MARY DONOGHUE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2080
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2080. MARY DONOGHUE was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 1 shawl, value 7s., the goods of Sarah White.

MARY ANN EADY . I am the niece of Sarah White, who keeps a wardrobe in Great Tichfield-street. The prisoner has been in the habit of coming to our shop with flowers to sell since the 19th of June. On the 22nd of July she came to sell a shawl—she offered it to my sister—she did not see me—she was in the shop about ten minutes—I saw her take this shawl, belonging to my aunt, off the table, put it into her basket, and put some straw on it, which was in her basket, and some old shoes out of her apron—she was then going away—I stopped her, and asked what she had got in her basket—she said, "Nothing at all"—I said yes, she had a

shawl belonging to my aunt—she said she had no shawl, but the one she offered for sale—I turned over the straw and found it.

GEORGE TOWNSEND (police-constable E 113.) I was called in, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. This shawl was lying on the ground; 1 picked it up, threw it on the table, and Eady said I stole it.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

JOHN PEAT.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2081
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2081. JOHN PEAT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Francis Matthews, from his person.

JOHN FRANCIS MATTHEWS . I am a jeweller. About five o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of July, I was in Vinegar-yard, Drury-lane—I had a handkerchief in my pocket—a boy came running after me, and said the prisoner, who was then running before me, had taken my handkerchief—I ran after him, called "Stop thief," and he ran into the arms of a policeman—a little boy brought my handkerchief, which he said he found in a shop—I did not see the prisoner with it.

HENRY PARSONS . I live with my father, in South Audley-street. On this evening I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and run away—I told the gentleman—the prisoner threw the handkerchief into a shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Drury-lane; I heard a cry of "Stop thief;"The policeman caught me; I asked what for; he said, "I don't know;" and the prosecutor came up to the boy, and said I had picked his pocket; and I said I had not.

GUILTY .* Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

FORRESTER LEACH.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2082
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2082. FORRESTER LEACH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 1 watch, value 3l. 15s.; 1 watch-guard, value 6d.; 2 half-crowns, and 7 shillings; the property of Edward Davis, from his person.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am a tailor, and live in Wilmington-street. On the 20th of July I met the prisoner at the Ship Tavern, in Talbot's-court, Grace-church-street—we were playing at bagatelle—I had not known him before—we continued playing a couple of hours—I was unsuccessful, and lost some money—I went away about eleven o'clock—the prisoner proposed to go away with me—we had a cab, called somewhere about Finsbury—we went to the Angel at Islington—I cannot exactly say what money I had when I got into the cab—it was from 12s. to 18s., and my watch was in my fob—I lost the money—the prisoner paid 1s. for the cab, and I paid 6d.—I told him I had lost my money, but I gave in to that, and we parted at the corner of Amwell-street—I missed my watch two minutes after—I am sure I had it in my fob when I got into the cab—I had a silk guard round my neck—I returned to the same house—I saw the landlord, and made some inquiries about it, but could hear no tidings of it—I saw the prisoner the next morning, at Talbot-court—I had accused him before of the money; and when I accused him of stealing the watch, he said he knew nothing about it—after a time I offered him 30s. to return the watch—he said he would try to get it, and see what he could do—he went away—I had the watch from the landlord, at the same house—the prisoner was not in the room at the time—I did not pay any money.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What was the first public-house you were at? A. The first in town was Mark Luke's, the Ship—I had

been at the Fox and Hounds, at Kingston, on Monday, and staid till Tuesday—I left it by the rail-road, at half-past three o'clock—I had friends down there, and dined with them—I had been drinking brandy—no beer—I think I could swear that—I might have had beer—I cannot tell how much—I was very bad in my inside—I cannot tell how much brandy I took—they were threepenny worths, and some rhubarb in them—I was much better afterwards—I might take beer at dinner—no, I did not take any—I came to town in one of the iron steamers from Nine Elms—I then went to Talbot-court—I had my tea, and after that I played at bagatelle for two or three hours perhaps—I had some ale and half-and-half while I was playing—I did not have any rum-and-water, to my knowledge—I might have sipped it—I know I was tipsy enough—I cannot answer where I went to after I left the Ship-tavern—I might have gone to a wine-vaults in London-wall, and drank gin there, and forgot it—I thought I had my money when I left the City—I do not know whether I pulled out my watch, and threw it in the bottom of the cab—we all sat down to a hearty dinner of wine and beef-steaks after the prisoner had robbed me—we had some half-and-half with the dinner.

MARK LUKE . I keep the Ship tavern in Talbot-court. The prosecutor and the prisoner were playing at bagatelle there—they went out of my house together—in about an hour and a half the prosecutor returned, and complained that he had been robbed—I promised to get up in the morning, and see if I could find the prisoner—the prosecutor had a bed in my house that night—I found out where the prisoner lived, and went to his house in the morning—I waited till he got up, and I told him the party he went out with the evening before had lost his watch—I begged of him, if he had got it, to give it up to save any noise or disturbance—I said the prosecutor had been robbed of his watch—the prisoner said he knew nothing at all about it—I still pressed on him, if he did know any thing about it to give it up, as the person would be sure to prosecute if he did not have his watch back—I told him of the money the man had lost, but I said, "He don't care a pin about the money, it is the watch he wants"—he still denied it, and said he knew nothing at all about it—I left the house, and went part of the way home—I then returned again, and the prisoner's wife was in the shop with him—I begged of him again, if he knew any thing about it to give it up—he said he knew nothing about it, but he would be at my house in less than an hour—he came, and the prosecutor was in the passage—as the prisoner came in they met each other, and went into the parlour—the prosecutor then came out, and wanted to borrow 30s. of me—I asked him what it was for, and whether he was going to give the money before he got the watch back—he said, "Yes"—I would not lend it him—the prisoner then went out, and returned in about an hour, and brought the watch back—the prosecutor then gave the 30s., and it was agreed that 10s. should be spent out of it for a rump-steak and a bottle of wine—they then had a bit of dinner.

Cross-examined. Q. What ward is your house in? A. Billingsgate—I do not know whether the Alderman knows of my allowing bagatelle in my house—I know it is against the law and against my license—I have seen the prisoner as a customer perhaps once in six, or seven, or eight months for these six years—I found out where the prisoner lived by inquiry.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not know where his house was? A. Of

course I partly knew, by his friends living in that neighbourhood—I did not exactly know where his house was, as he had moved higher up in the street—it may be a mile or a mile and a quarter from my house.

Q. When the watch was given back, did you think it was a lark or a robbery? A. I did not think it was a lark, I thought it was a robbery, but I thought the prosecutor had made it all right—I sat down to eat steaks and drink wine with them—I lent the prosecutor the money, and the dinner was paid for out of the 30s.

NOT GUILTY .

ANN GORMAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2083
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

2083. ANN GORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July, 1 gown, value 1s.; 2 aprons, value 8d.; and 1 handkerchief, value 4d.; the goods of Ann Bunn.

ANN BUNN . I am single. This gown and other articles were taken out of my washhouse window, at No. 3. Bloomsbury-market, on the 29th of July—after I had washed them I laid them on the window, and went up stairs to hang up some clothes—when I came down I missed these things—I do not know the prisoner.

ADOLPHUS FREDERICK COKER . I live at No. 3, Bloomsbury-market, where the prosecutrix lives. On the 29th of July I saw the prisoner on the second-floor stairs—I am sure she is the person.

Prisoner. You never saw me; you said you saw a woman, and you gave a description of me by being without a bonnet.

JAMES BRIMELOW . I live next door to the prosecutrix, and the prisoner lives in my house—I heard of this loss, and found these things in the cock-loft.

NOT GUILTY .

HANNAH MORIARTY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2084
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

2084. HANNAH MORIARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July, 1 coat, value 3l. 11s., the goods of Jeremiah Moriarty.

JEREMIAH MORIARTY . I am in the employ of a fruit-salesman in Covent-garden. I lost my coat out of my room on the 19th of July—it was found again the same day—the prisoner, who is my sister, was apprehended on the following Friday—she is a servant out of place—she would not deliver up the coat or there would have been no prosecution.

JOHANNA MORIARTY . I am the prisoner's mother. On the morning of the 19th of July, I went to Covent-garden Market, with the breakfast for my two sons, leaving the prisoner at home—on my return I found the door open, and the prisoner had absconded—when my son came to dinner we missed the coat.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a pawnbroker—I took in this coat of a girl the same size as the prisoner, but I could not swear to her, she stood back so far in the box.

FRANCIS FELLOWS . I was on duty in Clement's-lane on the night of the 23rd—I was called to take the prisoner—she said she knew nothing about the coat, but was willing to go with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN WILLIAMS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2085
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2085. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July, 1 hip bath, value 1l. 5s., the goods of George Ewart, and another; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

GEORGE HEMBOROW . I am in the service of George Ewart, and another, zinc manufacturers, in Westminster-bridge-road—this bath is theirs—I lost it from our shop between six and seven o'clock on the 16th of

July—I never heard of It again till the 20th of July—I did not know the prisoner.

JOHN DAWE (police-constable G 71.) I stopped the prisoner with this bath on Clerkenwell-green, on the 16th of July, about four miles from the prosecutor's—I asked how he came by it—he said he manufactured it himself.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person in Old-street-road; he asked me to take it for him; he turned up Islington-road, and desired me to go on this way; I was to wait for him at the end of Hatton-garden.

FREDERICK DANN . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the same person.

GUILTY . Aged 60.— Confined Twelve Months.

RICHARD MATTINGLEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2086
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2086. RICHARD MATTINGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June, 2 pairs of boots, value 15s., the goods of William Ager.

WILLIAM AGER . I keep a boot and shoe warehouse—I have known the prisoner six or seven years—he was living with Mr. Marks, a customer of mine, in Bell-yard"—he came on the 24th of June, and said, "I want a pair of Bluchers, particularly strong"—I brought him a pair—he said they were a little too short or too long—I said you had better take two pair, and tell Mr. Marks to return one—I sold them to his master, and entered them in my book to his master.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM KING.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2087
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2087. WILLIAM KING was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 1 gown, value 2s., the goods of Abraham Abrahams; 1 shawl, value 3s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 3d., the goods of Mary Welch.

HANNAH ABRAHAMS . I live in Newcastle-court—my husband's name is Abrahams—my gown was hanging at the door in the kitchen when I went to bed at twelve o'clock at night, on the 20th of July, and in the morning it was gone—this is it—the shawl is not mine—I know nothing of the prisoner.

GEORGE WALTON (police-sergeant F 6.) On the 21st of July, a little before six o'clock in the morning, I was watching, and saw the prisoner get from the area, take something and put it into his bag—I did not know what it was—I searched him and found this gown—he had this stick—I asked him what he had got—he said some bones—he was in the act of taking something off this stick—I found four nails and two strings on him—this shawl was in the bundle, and this shawl and handkerchief were in his hat—I found two hooks in his pocket.

MARY WELSH . This shawl and handkerchief are mine.

GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Friday, 27th August, 1841.

Third Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

JOHN JOHNSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2088
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2088. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August, 1 pair of trowsers, value 1s., the goods of Robert Gilchrist, in a vessel in a port of entry and discharge.

ROBERT GILCHRIST . I am an apprentice on board the brig Richard Brown, which was lying in the West India Docks. On the 14th of August I saw the prisoner on board—he was a stranger, and had no business there—he went over the bows, and went away—I missed my trowsers, and went after him—I came up to him, and accused him of having taken them

—lie denied it—I called another boy, and we found them wrapped up inside his own—those now produced are them.

ROBERT DICKS . I am an apprentice on board the vessel. I saw the prisoner going over the bows—I asked Gilchrist where his trowsers were—he missed them, and went after the prisoner—I went also—the prisoner ran a little, and then pulled the trowsers down.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take them? A. No, but I saw them found on you.

JOSEPH BROWN . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody, and charged him with this—he said he knew nothing at all about it—he made an attempt to strike Dicks, and swore he would knock his eye out—he used very coarse language.

Prisoner's Defence. Another boy gave them to me, and ran away.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Three Months.

ROBERT ROBINSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2089
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2089. ROBERT ROBINSON was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE TEBBUTT . I am a florist, and live at Vale House, Commercial-lane, Old Brompton—I knew the prisoner as living with Mr. Coles, a customer of mine. On the 27th of July he came to my house—I was ill in bed at the time—he was shown up into my room—I inquired after Mr. Coles and the family, under the impression that he was still in the service—he said they were all quite well, and were down in Hampshire—he did not say he had left Mr. Coles—he said Mr. Coles had left him without sufficient money to send glass and things down into Hampshire, and asked me to lend him 2l.—I was quite willing to do so—he said, "You may as well make it 3l., for I shall have more things comn in that I shall want to send down directly"—I let him have 3l.—he came again on the 30th, and said he had so many things to send down to the railway-station that he had not sufficient money to do it, and begged me to let him have 2l. more, which I did—I said, "I should like to have some acknowledgment," and he gave me an I 0 U—I should not have lent him the money if I had not believed he was residing with Mr. Coles—it was for Mr. Coles's purposes entirely—he came again on the 3rd of August, and said, "Mr. Tebbutt, I am sorry to trouble you again, but I have got more things, and Mr. Coles has not been up to settle with me, you must positively let me have 3l. more," which, after some hesitation, I did—I afterwards went to Mr. Coles's house, in Piccadilly, and found the prisoner had left the service—I gave information, and he was taken into custody.

Prisoner. Q. I borrowed the money on my own account, and gave you an I O U for it? A. You told me you wanted it for your master's purposes—you recommended your son to me, as I wanted a lad, and I engaged to try him for a few days—I did not show you my garden and green-house when you first called—I was ill in bed with the gout.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Did you charge the prisoner before your son with not being in Mr. Cole's service? A. Yes.

THOMAS TEBBUTT . I am son of the last witness. On the 6th of August I heard my father challenge the prisoner with not being in Mr. Cole's service—he declared that he was, and that he had got a document at home to show that he was.

Prisoner. I said, "If you would walk to my house I would prove

that I was not discharged, but that I left of my own accord—I never said that. Witness. He did.

HENRY BEAUMONT COLES, ESQ . I reside in Piccadilly. The prisoner was in my employ as butler—he left on the 16th of June—he gave me notice, as he did not like to go into the country with the family—I did not authorise him to obtain money on my account—I required no goods through him—I never saw or had any communication with him after the 16th of June—he was not in my service when he went to Mr. Tebbutt.

Prisoner. Q. Have you any thing to say against my character? A. No—you behaved very well in my service, as far as I know—circumstances hare transpired since, but up to the time of leaving me I was satisfied, and should have given you a good character—I should not have parted with you, but you gave me notice.

JOHN HEFFERMAN . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody on the 6th of August—he said he had a document in his house to prove he was in Mr. Cole's service still.

Prisoner's Defence. Before the Magistrate he said, "I heard the prisoner say he owed Mr. Tebbutt 8l., and he was ready to pay him when the time expired"—and he afterwards said, "All I heard the prisoner say was, that he would show a document, to prove he was in Mr. Cole's establishment,"Which are two different statements—is it feasible, that I should take a house of Mr. Tebbutt (and my son in his employ) forty yards from his house, if I had any intention to defraud him of the money?—I should have paid him on the Tuesday following, but he took me to prison—I gave him an acknowledgment in my own name—he said at the Police-court that I had altered the figure from 2 to 3—look at it, and see if there is any alteration at all—he has been keeping a public-house at Kensington, and treating all the police to drink, and that is why the policeman states what he does—I told him the first 3l. I borrowed was to pay my rent with, and the other 2l. to pay for moving my furniture—I asked him if he had been to Mr. Coles, to fetch away the plant-pots—he said, "No"—I said there were about fifty empty pots in the area when I was there.

GUILTY .† Aged 40.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Justice Coleridge.

THOMAS LAKE WILLS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2090
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2090. THOMAS LAKE WILLS was indicted , for that he, being employed in the Post-office, did, on the 17th of July, steal a certain post letter, containing 1 10l. promissory-note, 1 half-sovereign, and 3s.; the property of her Majesty's Postmaster-general.—5 other COUNTS, varying the manner of stating the charge; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

ELIZABETH MAXWELL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2091
VerdictGuilty > pleaded part guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2091. ELIZABETH MAXWELL was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting James Maxwell, on the 10th of July, and stabbing and wounding him, in and upon the left side of the back, with intent to kill and murder him.—2nd COUNT, stating her intent to be to maim and disable him.—3rd COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

The prisoner pleaded Guilty to the 3rd Count, and MR. BODKIN, on the part of the prosecution, offered no evidence on the two first counts.

(The prisoner received an excellent character.)

Confined Twelve Months.

JOHN CAVELL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2092
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

2092. JOHN CAVELL was indicted for a rape.

NOT GUILTY

Before Mr. Justice Erskine.

SAMUEL MIDGLEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2093
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

2093. SAMUEL MIDGLEY was indicted for b—y.

NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS PRIEST.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2094
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2094. THOMAS PRIEST alias William Smith, was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Johnson, about three in the night of the 2nd of August, at St. Benet, Grace-church-street, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 106 watches, value 143l.; 198 spoons, value 36l.; 18 forks, value 5l.; 4 pairs of Lugartongs, value 1l. 5s.; 1 sugar-sifter, value 5s.; 15 ladles, value 3l.; 8 chains, value 22l.; 11 watch-guards, value 4l.; 14 seals, value 6l.; 26 rings, value 12l.; 21 brooches, value 15l.; 13 breast-pins, value 5l.; 2 lockets, value 15s.; 5 watch-keys, value 12s.; 3 snuff-boxes, value 1l.; 1 pencil-case, value 1l.; 1 toothpick, value 12s.; 4 pairs of ear-rings, value 2l.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 3l.; 1 armlet, value 2l.; 1 watch-case, value 15s.; 1 coral, value 10s.; 1 cross, value 5s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 5s.; 1 coat, value 10s.; and 1 half-guinea and 8s.; his property.

MR. DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

BENJAMIN DURRELL (City-police-conslalle, No. 531.) On Tuesday night, the 3rd of August, I was on duty in Gracechurch-street, in company with another officer named Hart, at a quarter-past three o'clock in the morning—in consequence of observing a man lurking about, I and Hart went up a court at the back of the prosecutor's premises—we there found these two bags, which I now produce—I opened both of them—one contained spoons and forks and other things, and the other, watches—we then looked about, and perceived the prisoner concealed in a truck, about a yard and a half from the bags, or not quite so much—Hart took hold of him—I asked him how long he had been there—he said about an hour and a half, or two hours—he said he had been asleep—I asked if he knew any thing of the bags—he asked "What bags?" and then said he knew nothing about them—I asked if he had got any thing in his pockets—he said, "No, "I was welcome to feel—I put my hand into the pocket of a great-coat which he had on, and found a great many spoons, knives, and forks—we took him to the station—as we were taking him to the Compter he said, if I had stopped five minutes longer, he should have been a man in the world—on our way to the station we met Perrin, but I heard nothing pass between them.

ROBERT HART . I am a City policeman. I was with Durrell when he found the bags and the prisoner—I examined the great-coat pocket, and found in it a quantity of spoons and forks, which I now produce—I searched him again at the station, and in the great-coat, and another coat which he wore underneath it, found a quantity more of these spoons—I asked where he got the property from—he said, "The City auction-rooms"—in consequence of that I was directed to go to Mr. Johnson's auction-rooms—I rang up the porter, went up stairs, and observed a window open in the lower sale-room,

which looks out on the leads, in which is a sky-light—a person could get from the leads into the window, which was open—I found this dark lantern standing open on the board where the property was taken from—the leads look out into a court called Barnes-court.

Prisoner. I never said I got the things out of the auction-rooms; he never asked me.

THOMAS COPE . I am in the service of Mr. Thomas Johnson, whose house is in the parish of St. Benet, Gracechurch-street—he sells unredeemed pledges—I sleep on the premises. On Monday evening, the 2nd of August, I lotted out this property for sale next day—I went to bed about a quarter to ten o'clock—this property was safe then—I was the last person up—my wife and family also sleep in the house—the doors and windows, and every thing, was secure, both up stairs and down—the window Hart speaks of was shut down and fast when I went to bed—there is an upper and a lower sale-room, and there is a communication between them by means of a circular office—this window being opened would give access to the second-floor sale-room, and any one could easily descend through that hole from the upper sale-room to the lower by means of a rope—I was roused up by the officers about twenty minutes before four o'clock—I went into the lower sale-room, and found all the property stated gone from it— every thing was gone except three or four articles—I had seen it all safe the night before when I went to bed—among other things was a great-coat, which I had ticketed for sale next day—next morning I went to Giltspur-street Compter, and there saw the prisoner, in the presence of Gooch, the turnkey—I put my hand into his pocket, and pulled out some watches, a gold brooch, a diamond ring, and other things—Gooch afterwards put his hand into his other pocket, and then he said, "You have not got them all," and he gave us three or four watches and chains out of his waistcoat pocket—I gave Gooch what I found—(Gooch here produced the articles)—these are all my master's property—here is my own hand-writing on the tickets—this gold watch I took from the prisoner's person—I know it by the make and the chain, and it has my own numbering on it on a piece of paper, "Lot 305"—I placed that ticket on the watch on the Saturday or the Monday before the robbery, and it was safe with the other property in the lower sale-room when I went to bed that night—the whole of the property was in the lower sale-room—here are a great many other things which I took from the prisoner, with tickets on them made by me—I have looked at all the other property, and have no doubt it is all my master's—some of the watches I know by the maker's name and number, as well as by my tickets—the value of all the property is between 300l. and 400l.—I found no doors open in the morning, nor any windows, except the one I have mentioned.

THOMAS GOOOE . I am one of the turnkeys of Giltspur-street prison. I was in bed when the prisoner was brought there—I did not see him till Cope came there next morning, between eight and nine o'clock—we then searched the prisoner, and I saw the property found on him by Cope—it was all put on our desk, and 1 had the care of it—I have kept it ever since, and have produced it to-day—I took a great many things from the prisoner myself, among others, two silver guard-chains, and a mustard-spoon, from his jacket pocket—when I began to search him again, he took out three watches from his fob pocket, and several other things, which are among those I have produced.

ABRAHAM PERRIN (City police-constable, No. 567.) I saw the prisoner in custody of Durrell and Hart, in Gracechurch-street, and accompanied them to the station—I said to them in the prisoner's hearing, that I thought he must have secreted himself on the premises over night—the prisoner replied, no, he did not—I said I would go and ascertain in what way he had got access to the premises—he said I could soon find that out, or words to that effect—I went to the court adjoining Mr. Johnson's premises—I do not know the name of it, but it leads to the back of his premises, and there is only one house between it and Mr. Johnson's, in front—I saw a truck up the court, and three or four doors from it in a corner, I found this rope, with an iron crook attached to it—it is commonly called a creeper—the rope has knots tied in it at two or three feet apart—it would be easy to attach the crook to the top of the wall in the court—in the corner where this was lying, there is a water-spout, and with this and the assistance of the water-spout, it would be easy for a person to ascend on to the leads, where they could have access to Mr. Johnson's window.

MARY ANN COPE . I am the daughter of the witness Thomas Cope, and live with him at Mr. Johnson's—on the 3rd of August, when the police came, I went up to the upper sale-room, and about five yards from the window, inside the room, I found this other rope and iron bar, which I gave to inspector Brake.

WILLIAM LENTHALL BRAKE . I am a City police-inspector. I produce the rope and iron bar which I received from Mary Ann Cope—it has been in my custody ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work for a long time, and had no where to go—I had been out all Monday, walking about in the rain—I went up this court for shelter, to see if there was any place where I could lie down—I saw the truck, and got into it—I felt two bags—I pulled them out, opened them, and saw watches and things in them—I went to the truck again and lifted up the coat, and a lot of things fell out—I put them into my own pocket, and got into the truck again—I bad not been there long before the policemen came up and pulled me out of the truck—they asked how I came there—I said I came there to sleep—he asked if I knew any thing of the bags—I said no—he asked if I knew where they came from—I said no, and one of them said, then I had better go about my business—one of them said, "Before you go, let us see whether you have got any thing"—he put his hand into my pocket, and found the spoons—he then said, "Oh, you must not go," and they took me to the station—while I was in the truck I heard them talking—one of them kicked the bags, and said, "What have we here?"—he said he thought they were muscles—the other said, no, they were watches, and he said, "Ah! we shall not have to wear the coat any longer"—he said he knew an old woman where he could take them to till they went off duty—when they found me, they asked me where I had got them from—I said I had not got them at all, I wished they would keep them and let me go—he said to the other policeman, "Go down and see if there is any one at the bottom of the court"—he went down, returned, and said, "No"—one wanted to keep them—the other would not, and would not Jet me go; and as they could not agree to it, they took me to the station—as they went along, they kept singing out to every policeman they met, "Do you want a watch?"—at the station the policemen got pulling and hauling me

about, so that I would not give up the things I had in my pockets; if they had not done so, I should have given them up—I was taken to the Compter—they did not offer to search me there that night—when I came down in the morning they found the things in my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

Before Mr. Justice Coleridge.

DANIEL NEAL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2095
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2095. DANIEL NEAL was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting Florance Crawley, on the 5th of October, and wounding him in and upon his left eye, with intent to maim him:—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

FLORANCE CRAWLEY . I live in New-court, Bluegate-fields, St. George's-in-the-East. On the 5th of October I was with Daniel Fitzgerald, drinking at the Three Suns' public-house, New Gravel-lane, between half-past seven and eight o'clock in the evening—the prisoner came in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after us, and sat on the opposite side of the room—I and Fitzgerald were talking Irish together—the prisoner said, "I will have none of your b—Irish here"—I said, "We are not talking to you, we are talking among ourselves"—he said, "If you don't hold your tongue, you b—y Irish b—r, I will shove your eye out;" and he took his pipe out of his mouth, came over, and dabbed the small end of it right into ray left eye—the pipe broke in my eye—I pulled it out, and some blood fell out at the time—I became very weak and insensible—I was taken to a doctor's, opposite, and went to the hospital next day, where I remained three weeks and three days—I have lost the sight of my eye through it—I cannot see a bit out of it—the prisoner seemed to me to be sober—this is not the first time he has served me out—I have known him six or seven years—I do not know whether he is an Irishman—I was quite sober.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not tell you he considered you were abusing him in Irish? A. No—I did not tell him to keep his own company—I swear that—I told him I was not talking to him—I swear that he said he would put the pipe in my eye—I am sure he did not say he would knock our heads off—I cannot see a bit with my eye—(looking at his deposition)—this is my mark—it was read over to me at the police-office.

(The witness's deposition being read, stated, "The prisoner told us to leave off talking Irish, or he would knock our heads off; 1 told him to keep his own company"—"can only see very little with that eye")

Q. Now why say to-day that he did not make use of the expression, that he would knock your heads off, when you swore before the Magistrate that he did? A. I had no sense of my ears—I very likely forgot it, and also that I told him to keep his own company.

DANIEL FITZGERALD . I was with Crawley in the Three Suns—I saw the prisoner come in and sit on the far side of the room—I was talking to Crawley in Irish, and the prisoner said, "I will have no b—y Irish here" Crawley said, "We are not speaking to you"—the prisoner said, "You b—r, I will shove your b—y eye out"—he got up, walked across the room, took the pipe from his mouth, and shoved it with all his might into Crawley's eye—Crawley lifted up both hands to pull the piece of pipe out of his eye—it had broken in his head, and a little blood came down his face—I conveyed him home the best way I could.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the prisoner an Irishman? A. I cannot say—I have known him about eight years—to the best of my knowledge he was born of Irish parents—I am confident of the expression he used—I swear positively I have always said he used that expression.

JOSEPH JOHN EDWARD PORTER . I am a surgeon. In October last I was a pupil in the London Hospital—the prosecutor came there with a severe injury in the inner angle of his eye—it was a punctured, lacerated wound, made with something pointed—I should imagine the mouth end of a pipe would be very likely to inflict such a wound—it was a severe wound—there was very severe subsequent inflammation—from the highly organized state of the eye, I do not conceive that any severe injury can be inflicted upon it without a person being more or less in danger, from the connexion between the eye and the brain—I consider he was decidedly in danger at one time while in the hospital—he says there is considerable impairment of the sight, and I think that more than probable—whatever injury there is now is likely to be permanent.

GUILTY of an Assault. Aged 26.— Confined Twelve Months.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN OLIVER, GEORGE WELLS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2096
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation; Guilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2096. JOHN OLIVER and GEORGE WELLS were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July, at Tottenham, 24 wine-bottles, value 6s.; 24 quarts of wine, value 7l. 14s.; and 1 wine-glass, value 6d.; the goods of Robert Woollaston, in his dwelling-house.

ROBERT WOOLLASTON . I am a surgeon, and live at Tottenham. On Sunday, the 1st of August, I noticed a brick or stone had been taken out of the wall of my cellar, from the outside, and I missed about two dozen of old claret, which I value at about 84s. a dozen—I had three dozen in that particular part of the cellar a few days before—the hole in the wall was just about large enough to admit a man's arm and hand to remove it—it was all gone from that part, except four bottles, which were out of reach—one of those four bottles was broken, and three were whole—the prisoners had been working on my premises for about a fortnight before, and had whitewashed the coal-cellar, which adjoins the wine-cellar, the night before—they are bricklayers' labourers, in the employ of Mr. Fiddler, who I employed—I do not believe there are any chalk-marks at the bottom of my claret bottles; if there are, they have become quite obscured by age—I have since seen four bottles, which I believe to be part of the lot—I tasted a small quantity which remained in the bottles, and the flavour and colour were precisely the same as mine—this wine-glass corresponds with a set which I had, one of which had been missed by my servant—this wine had been at least fourteen or fifteen years in my family—it is a quality I can speak to—it was very excellent—it was made a present of to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Who produced the bottle out of which you tasted the sample? A. One of the policemen—Oliver had been employed emptying a drain on Thursday night, or early on Friday morning, and he had gin and beer given him in rather large quantities in consequence—I believe I gave a bottle—I forget whether it was wine, or what it was—I know it was not claret, because I did not take it from that part of the cellar—it was either wine or spirits, I forget which—I did not take particular notice—I think it was wine, because I am not in the habit of giving spirits—I had two painters, and I think a carpenter, employed on

the premises at the time, but I do not know whether the carpenter was there then—I have one man servant, he is a groom, who acts as indoor servant occasionally—I never send him for wine—when I go out I generally leave sufficient wine out—I leave the key at home under my wife's care—I had been in the cellar three or four days previously—I cannot swear that no one else went there—the key was in my library at the time, locked up in a drawer, the key of which was in my pocket, so that no one could get to it.

JAMES CURTIS . I am servant to the prosecutor. Early on Friday morning, the prisoner Oliver was in a state of intoxication—he remained in the loft intoxicated about two hours and a half or three hours, instead of doing his work.

Cross-examined. Q. What time in the morning was it you saw him? A. About eleven o'clock—I did not see the gin and beer given him for opening the drain—I was out nearly all day with my master.

JOB BATES . I am a journeyman painter, and live at East-place, Tottenham. I was working on the Friday at the prosecutor's premises—Oliver came to me between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, and invited me to come and take some drink—I do not know what it was—I never tasted any thing like it before—it was in a pewter pot—I asked where he got it—he said it was his business, and not mine—I saw it poured out of a bottle, the neck of which was broken off—I saw two broken bottles—I drank it in an outhouse, which is called the "Laundry"—it is on the prosecutor's premises—the two prisoners were with me at the time—after breakfast we had some more—I saw no bottle then—it was in a pewter mug when I drank of it—the prisoners drank of it also—I asked them again how they came in possession of it, and I think Wells said he got it by moving some stones or bricks—Oliver contradicted it immediately, and said he got it by taking out a screw—he said nothing about a cellar—I considered it was a contradictory statement on the part of Oliver, and as such I asked him no questions about it—I did not understand what they meant by it at the time—I am not able to state where the wine came from—I do not know where the prosecutor's winecellar is—it did not taste like beer.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not know this was red wine, did you? A. I had not any knowledge that it was claret—I did not know what it was—I have tasted port wine—I never tasted claret before, therefore it is impossible for me to say—I do not know whether it was claret—I am quite sure it was not beer, at least I never tasted beer like it—it tasted very pleasant—the prisoners were not drunk, that I saw, on the Friday—I saw Oliver at breakfast time, and at eleven o'clock—he was not drunk then—we had about 6d. worth of gin before breakfast, and I believe a pot of half-and-half, at about ten or eleven in the morning, besides what we had out of the pewter measure—I did not think it was wine at the time—I did not know what it was—there were the two prisoners, myself, and a paper-hanger on the premises—no one else—we were all in Mr. Fiddler's employ—I understood the prisoners to say the prosecutor had given them some ale for emptying the drain—I have never said I did not know but this was a sort of beer—I drank a very small portion—I cannot state exactly what I did drink on each occasion—I had two pulls at it before breakfast, and two after—I never tasted perry—I have cyder, but cyder I very much dislike,

and this was very good—Wells is quite a stranger to me—I have known Oliver twelve years.

Q. How came you to tell any thing about this? A. Because my employer sent for me, and wished me to do so on the Sunday night when the prisoners were taken—I was not taken.

THOMAS EMERY (police-sergeant N 89.) From information I received, I went to Oliver's lodging, in Brick-fields, Tottenham—a female went up stairs, and came down again, and went into the back-yard, to the water-closet—I saw her coming out of the water-closet, went there, and found two wine-bottles there—I found a wine-glass and tumbler on the mantel-piece of Oliver's bed-room, stained as if with wine—I found Oliver in bed up stairs—he was denied when we went to the house—I took him and Phoebe Oliver into custody—I afterwards went to Wells's lodging, at Scotland-green—I saw a chest of drawers below stairs, with a wine-glass on it, stained with red wine—I found one bottle on the sideboard, and one in the cupboard—I smelt it, and tasted what remained in them—it appeared to me something like wine—I do not know whether it was port or claret.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Mrs. Sharman claim the bottles you found at Wells's? A. No person claimed them—Sergeant Butcher was with me—he brought the prisoner, and I brought away the two bottles and the wine-glass—there were seven or eight persons in the house at the time, Mrs. Sharman among others—she did not claim them—no person in the house made any remark—there were Mrs. Sharman's sons and one or two strangers—Wells lodged in the house.

ROBERT BUTCHER . I am a policeman. I went to Oliver's house, and found two bottles concealed behind a wash-tub, in the wash-house, at the back part of the house, adjoining the privy—one appeared to have contained red wine—there was a drop or two left in the bottom—it was not like any wine I ever tasted—I have tasted port—I was in company with Emery—what he has stated is perfectly true—the glass found at Wells's was stained with wine—the prisoners were taken about three or four o'clock on Sunday afternoon—they had left work on Saturday evening—I produce the bottles I found.

ROBERT WOOLLASTON re-examined. This glass corresponds with a set like mine—I have brought one of the same pattern with me from home—it matches it.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you had those glasses any very long time? A. I cannot tell—they have not my crest on them, or any mark—it is a common pattern—the bottles my claret was in were precisely like those found by the officers—I have brought one of mine with me—the crust is the same colour, and the smell and taste is the same.

MR. PRENDERGAST called

SARAH SHARMAN . I am a widow. I saw the officers take two bottles from my house—they had contained port wine, which I had bought during my daughter's illness, about a fortnight before, as she was ordered port wine by the doctor—these are the bottles—I am sure they contained port wine—they were not brought into the house by Wells—the glass which the constables took off my drawers I have had sixteen years—my husband bought it at a sale at Tottenham—it had stripes up it, and a cross round it.

COURT. Q. Look at all the bottles produced, which of them are yours?

A. This is like one by the shape, it has a short neck; and I think this is the other one.

THOMAS EMERY re-examined. This first bottle I found at Wells's lodging, and this other I got from the prosecutor's house.

MRS. SHARMAN re-examined. I bought the port wine at a wine-shop, over London-bridge, and gave 3s. 6d. a bottle, and 3d. for the bottles—I was with some friends, and saw the price marked up, which made us go in—I cannot tell port wine from any other—I never tasted it—there was no chalk on the bottom of my bottles.

THOMAS EMERY re-examined. There is chalk on the bottom of one of these, but not on the other.

OLIVER— GUILTY . Aged 26.

WELLS— GUILTY . Aged 21.

Recommended to mercy.— Confined one year.

EMMA MALLINGER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2097
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

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2097. EMMA MALLINGER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July, 1 shawl, value 1s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d.; 1 crown, 1 sixpence, and 2 sovereigns; the property of Thomas Bryant Hills, her master.

ANN HILLS . I am the wife of Thomas Bryant Hills, a corndealer, in Red Lion-street, Holborn. The prisoner was in our service for about four months, and left without notice, about twenty minutes before six in the morning, before I was up—I missed from a room up-stairs, in which nobody slept, two sovereigns, a shawl, 2nd other articles, from a drawer—I have since seen some of them—I had missed the keys of the drawer where the sovereigns were, and one key was found under the prisoner's bed, which opened a drawer where the other keys were kept.

JOHN BECKETT . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner in charge at Enfield-wash, in a room occupied by Mrs. Abbott—I found in the room, on the table, and on a chair, an apron and shawl—the handkerchief was on her neck—she began crying, and said she had stolen some money, and gave it to Mrs. Smith, who led her astray, and she was innocent enough before she got acquainted with Smith.

MRS. HILLS re-examined. These are my things, and part of what I lost—I had no character with her—I knew her mother lived with respectable families—I know Mrs. Smith—I cannot say whether she has led her astray.—if she had given me information we should have had a warrant, and searched Smith's premises—Smith's husband was our horse-keeper, but is discharged—they lived in our yard—my husband is a cab proprietor.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Smith told me on Sunday she wanted some money, as she had kept back part of the cab money from Mr. Hills, and she would make it up again before mistress came home.

(John Fleet, of South-square, Gray's Inn; Rebecca Clark, of Baldwin's-gardens, the wife of a solicitor; and Sarah Archer, of Gray's Inn-lane; gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY. Aged 14.—Strongly recommended to mercy.

Judgment Respited.

JOHN WILLIAMS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2098
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2098. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July, 1 purse, value 1s.; 1 half sovereign, 2 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the property of Alexander Clark Forbes.

ALEXANDER CLARK FORBES . I live with my father in Old Burlington-street. On the afternoon of Thursday, the 20th July, I went to the National Swimming-baths in Holborn—I left my clothes in the box—my

purse was in my trowsers' pocket, with a half-sovereign and three or four shillings in it—there were two sixpences—the prisoner was thereat the time I went in—when I went to the box to dress, William Turner, the cashier, came to me—I felt in my pocket and found my purse was gone—I after-wards saw it in the policeman's hands.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long before you went to the bath had you ascertained that the half-sovereign was in your purse? A. When I went into the box I saw it, when I took out the silver—I do not keep gold and silver in the same side of the purse, but I saw it there through the meshes of the purse—I am positive of that—one or two persons were bathing besides the prisoner—I do not remember the number of my box—I did not see the prisoner in any box.

THOMAS DAVIS . I am turned fourteen years old—I am under waiter at these baths—I was standing on one of the dressing-boxes and saw the prisoner go into No. 51 box, where the prosecutor had undressed and left his clothes—I saw the prisoner put his hand into the gentleman's pocket and pull out something—he came out directly and went into No. 58, pulled up the grating, and put something under it, and then went out of the box—after he was gone I lifted up the grating and found a purse there—I took it to the cashier—I do not know what was in it—I went for a policeman, who took the prisoner in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Why not tell your employer that the prisoner had gone into the prosecutor's box? A. Because I was watching him to see what he did—I do not know how long before the prisoner had been there I had examined the grating—I did not know the prosecutor before—there are doors to the boxes—I was standing in box 71, half in and half out, and could see the prisoner go in.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am cashier at the bath—Davis gave me a purse—I sent him for a policeman, and gave the purse to him.

ALLEN PHILLIPS (police-constable F 48.) I produce a purse which I got from Turner—I took the prisoner, and asked him if he knew anything of the purse—he said, "Purse! no, I do not"—I searched him and found one half-sovereign and three shillings in his trowsers' pocket.

ALEXANDER CLARK FORBES re-examined. This is the purse I lost.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Weeks.

CATHERINE CAREY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2099
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2099. CATHERINE CAREY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of July, 1 blanket, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pillow, value 1s.; 2 sheets, value 2s.; 1 cloak, value 2s.; 1 pocket, value 6d.; and 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; the goods of Bridget Hogan.

BRIDGET HOGAN . I am single, and live in Calraell-buildings—the prisoner lodged and slept with me for seven or eight weeks—she paid me 18d. the first week—I supported her—I missed some things in about three weeks after she came—I spoke to her about a pair of sheets and a blanket—she said she did not mean to steal them, only to pawn them, to relieve her daughter, who was distressed—I took no notice of it, thinking it was true—I afterwards missed the towel and pillow, and other things, and thought she was stealing—about eight o'clock I got a policeman and gave charge of her.

Prisoner. She gave me leave to redeem them the latter end of the week; I could not get the money on Thursday night, and wanted her to

wait till Friday. Witness. She never asked my leave at all; she told me she had pawned the first things, and she took more afterwards without my leave.

HENRY WINCH . I am shopman to Mr. Walter, a pawnbroker, in High-street, Mary-le-bone. I have a blanket and pillow, pawned on the 30th of July, in the name of Ann Carey, No. 22, James-street. I know the prisoner, but cannot positively swear she is the person—Standlcy, the officer, has the duplicates which I gave the party.

WILLIAM THOMAS BURTON . I live in Oxford-street. I produce two sheets, pawned on the 7th of July, in the name of Ann Hogan, I do not know who by—the officer has produced the duplicates I gave her.

THOMAS CATTON . I am shopman to Mr. Gofton, of Gilbert-street. I produce a cloak, pawned on the 24th of July, and a handkerchief and pocket—the policeman has the counterpart of the duplicates.

BRIDGET HOGAN re-examined. These are all my things—I did not know of their being pawned—I never gave her authority to pawn them.

JOHN STANDLEY . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner in charge—she gave me nine duplicates, but none for the property in pawn—on the following morning, on going to the Police-court, she gave me two for this property, and before the next examination she gave three more relating to the property—when I took her she said she did not intend to steal them, but took them to help her daughter, who she thought would furnish her with the money to take them out.

GUILTY . Aged 42.— Confined Two Months.

NEW COURT.—Friday, August 27th, 1841.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

MARY CANNING.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2100
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2100. MARY CANNING was indicted for a misdemeanor."

MESSRS. BODKIN and ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

MARY WOODWARD . I am the wife of Joseph Woodward, who keeps the Rose public-house, in Hat ton-garden. On the 5th of August the prisoner came for half a pint of beer—she offered a shilling—I took it up, and saw it was bad, I laid it on the counter, she took it up, and was given into custody.

JOSEPH WOODWARD . I was present when the prisoner offered the shilling—I took it up, and was ringing it on the counter—the prisoner took it up, and would not return it—I called a policeman.

GEORGE KNOTT (police-constable G 99.) I took the prisoner—she had this bad shilling in her hand—she said she would see me d—d before I should have it—I forced her hand open, and found it in her hand.

ANN HARRIS . I am barmaid to Mr. Edmonds, at the Bleeding Heart public-house, in Charles-street, Hatton-garden. The prisoner came there with another woman on the 12th of August—she asked for a pint of beer, and gave me a shilling—I gave her 10d. change—I put the shilling into the till—there was no other shilling in the till—directly they were gone I looked into the till, and found the shilling—no one had been there in the wean time—I gave it to the policeman.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say, "One of you women gave me a shilling, but I don't know which?" A. No, you gave it me.

WILLIAM DIXON . I am barman to Mr. Edmonds, in Charles-street.

On the 12th of August I saw the prisoner and another woman—the prisoner gave Harris a shilling—I knew her before—t looked at the till—there were no more shillings in it—I went after the prisoner, brought her back, and gave her in charge.

ROBERT EDWARD STANDEN (police-constable G 37.) I took the prisoner, and received this shilling from Mrs. Harris.

MARY ANN REDMAN . I am searcher at the station. I searched the prisoner on the 5th of August—I found one halfpenny on her—I searched her on the 12th again, and found a sixpence and 4 1/2 d.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint. These shillings are both counterfeit.

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Confined Six Months.

CHARLES TOONE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2101
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2101. CHARLES TOONE was indicted for a misdemeanor.

JULIA ANN NEWMAN . My father keeps a shop in Brick-lane, St. Luke's. On the 25th of July the prisoner came for a quarter of an ounce of tobacco, which came to 1d.—he paid me with a shilling—I saw it was bad, and I told him so—he said he had taken it at our house on Saturday—I called my father, and gave it to him.

WILLIAM RICHARD NEWMAN . I keep the shop. I was called down between six and seven o'clock in the evening—my daughter gave me the shilling, which she said the prisoner gave her—I asked where he got it—he said he took it of me on the Saturday, when he changed half-a-crown—he had not been in my shop on the Saturday, and I told him so—I said, being a parish officer, I should take him into custody—he said he hoped I would forgive him, he would not do so any more—I found nothing on him—I gave the shilling to the policeman.

JAMES NEVILL (police-constable G 152.) The prisoner was given into my custody, with this shilling—he was taken before the Magistrate next day, and discharged.

GEORGE DAY . I keep the White Bear public-house. On the 8th of August the prisoner came for half a pint of porter, and gave me a bad shilling —I had him taken into custody—I took the shilling to the station, marked it, and gave it to the officer.

WILLIAM DAMEN (police-constable G 161.) I took the prisoner, and received this shilling from Mr. Day—I found 1 1/4 d. on him—he said it was the first time, and he hoped we should let him go.

MR. JOHN FIELD . These shillings are counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I drive a cab; I took the money, and did not know it was bad.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

JOHN DIXON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2102
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2102. JOHN DIXON was indicted for a misdemeanor.

RICHARD WILLIAM ATLEY . I am servant to Mr. Dawkins, who keeps the Two Brewers public-house, in Strutton-ground, Westminster. On the 17th of July the prisoner came, about nine o'clock in the evening, for a glass of rum, which came to 2d.—he gave me a bad shilling—I gave it to Mr. Dawkins.

Prisoner. I never was in the house; he is only swearing falsely; the first time he swore to my clothes, which no man can. Witness. I swear he is the man.

DANIEL DAWKINS . I keep the house. I remember the prisoner coming and offering a bad shilling—I had seen him before, and have not the

slightest doubt he is the person—I received this shilling from my man, and marked and put it into my pocket—I attempted to detain the prisoner, and while I was going round to the door he escaped—I informed the police, and saw the prisoner again on the Thursday after—I recognized him as the person immediately.

CHARLES FURBER . I keep the Bull public-house, in Little Chapel-street, Westminster. On the 21st of July the prisoner came, about ten o'clock at night, for half a pint of beer, and gave me a bad shilling—I kept him till the officer was sent for—I gave the shilling to the officer—the prisoner said he did not know it was bad.

ANTHONY ROSE (police-constable B 56.) On the 21st of July I was called, and took the prisoner—I received this shilling from Mr. Furber.

MR. JOHN FIELD . These are both counterfeit.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Six Months.

MARY ANN FLEMING.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2103
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2103. MARY ANN FLEMING was indicted for a misdemeanor.

MARGARET RUSSELL . I am wife of George Russell, who keeps an eating-house, in Tottenham-street, On the 12th of August the prisoner came into my shop—she asked for a twopenny pie, and put down a bad shilling—I told her it was bad, called my husband, and gave the shilling to him—he nailed it up against the window, and in a day or two it was unnailed, and given to the officer, after I had marked it—the prisoner said she had taken it in Tottenham Court-road—she had no other money to pay for the pie.

Prisoner. You said you were not certain about me; and if it was me, I had not the same dress on. Witness. No, I said you had the same dress on, and I was sure it was you.

GEORGE RUSSELL . I was in the parlour, and was called by my wife—I saw the prisoner—she is the person who passed the shilling.

MARY JONATHAN HAMMOND . I am the wife of Richard Hammond, a tobacconist, at Westbourn-buildings. On the 14th of August the prisoner came for a three-halfpenny cheroot—she offered me a bad shilling—I sent for an officer, and gave her in charge, with the shilling.

Prisoner. She gave it to several persons, to a butcher and others. Witness. I sent for the butcher, as my husband was not at home—the shilling was not out of my sight.

THOMAS FULLER (police' sergeant E 12.) I took the prisoner, and received this shilling from Mrs. Hammond, and this other from Mrs. Russell.

MR. JOHN FIELD . These shillings are both counterfeit.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

ELIZA COOPER, GEORGE DEAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2104
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment; Imprisonment

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2104. ELIZA COOPER and GEORGE DEAN were indicted for a misdemeanor.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am a chemist, and live in Goodge-street, Tottenham-court-road. On the 27th of July Dean came to ray shop, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning—he asked for an ounce of salts, which came to 1d.—he threw down a good half-crown—I had no change, he gave me 1d. instead, and went away—in about ten minutes Cooper came in for a pennyworth of magnesia, and she threw down a half-crown—I saw it was bad, and I said, "This is bad money"—she was saying something, I do not know what, when the officer came in and took her and the half-crown—he left her in my care, and fetched Dean in.

JONATHAN WHICHER (police-constable E 47.) On the 27th of July I was in Tottenham-court-road, in plain clothes—I saw the two prisoners walking together—I followed them into Goodge-strect—I saw Dean go into Mr. Edwards's—he remained about a minute, and Cooper waited a few doors lower down—Dean then came out of the shop, and went, to Cooper—he gave her something in her hand, and then she went into Mr. Edwards's shop—I followed, and saw her put down a half-crown—I told Mr. Edwards it was a bad one, and asked if he would give her into custody—he said, "No"—I took her into custody, and left her in Mr. Edwards's care while I went to the corner of Charlotte-street, where I found Dean—I took him—he said he knew nothing of the woman—I found on Dean a counterfeit crown, a good half-crown, a shilling, and a halfpenny—I found on Cooper two bundles of wood and a milk-jug—I had been watching them a quarter of an hour.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. So far from your telling Mr. Edwards it was bad, did he not say it was bad? A. Yes, he put it down on the counter, and pushed it towards her—I took it up, and said I was an officer.

MR. JOHN FIELD . This crown and half-crown are both counterfeit.

Cooper's Defence. I am unfortunate—I took it, not knowing it was bad—as to the policeman saying that Dean was with me it is false—I know nothing of the man.

COOPER— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

DEAN*— GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined One Year.

JANE HORROCKS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2105
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2105. JANE HORROCKS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July, 7oz. of sewing silk, value 10s. 6d., the goods of John Knight; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS KNIGHT . I am in the service of Mr. John Knight, a draper, in Goswell-street. On the afternoon of the 24th of July, the prisoner came for some sewing silk—I opened the wrapper before her—she selected a few skeins, and said she would take a quarter of an ounce—I turned to get the scales, turned again to get the weights, and saw her distinctly each time take a handful of silk—I served her, and let her go out—I followed her about four bouses down, then brought her back, and gave her into custody of Mrs. Knight—the prisoner said she had no silk, and was surprised at my asking her—I said I was certain she had—she said she would make me swear to it—I gave her in charge, but the silk had been found previously—this is the silk—it is my brother's, John Knight.

Cross-examined by MR. CARTEEN. Q. What sort of a shop is this? A. A very good shop—it is a middling size—Mrs. Knight was in the shop when the prisoner came, and a young man, an assistant—I was about four yards from the prisoner when I turned round—I was on one side of the counter, and she on the other—the counter was perfectly clear, except of the wrapper, which was placed before her—the silk I had sold her was found on her, wrapped up in the paper as I sold it—this silk is in the same state in which it would be in any other shop, but I lost silk—she left the shop as soon as I had given her change for sixpence—it might be about two minutes from the time I saw her take the silk till she went out—Mrs. Knight was at the end of the counter, and the young man was on the opposite side—I followed her out immediately—she bad got about sixteen or eighteen yards—she was quite sober.

ELIZABETH KNIGHT . The prisoner was given to me I found this silk in a merino pocket under her left arm—that is not a usual place for a pocket, it must have been put there on purpose.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the shop when she came in? A. Yes, I saw nothing of her taking the silk—she was perfectly sober.

JOHN RUDRUM . I am the officer. I took the prisoner—she laid she hoped Mrs. Knight would forgive her, and in going to the station she said it was the first time—she was sober.

GEORGE CLARKE . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined One Year.

JANE HARRIETT KENDALL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2106
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2106. JANE HARRIETT KENDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July, 1 collar, value 3d.; 1 ink-glass, value 2d.; 2 stockings, value 2d. 3 skeins of silk, value 2d.; 6 skeins of thread, value 1d.; 1 yard of twist, value 1d.; and 1 printed book, value 1d.; the goods of James Hopkins, her master.

ELIZABETH HOPKINS . I am the wife of James Hopkins, a tailor in Lamb's Conduit-street. The prisoner was my servant of all work for two months—she went out on the 25th of July, on her return I thought "It necessary to search her boxes, and these articles were found, which are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. CHAMBERS. Q. I believe after yon searched her first box she refused to let the other be searched till a policeman was sent for? A. Yes—I know these stockings by the marks, and by the holes mended in them—she said the boy had put the silk into the kitchen drawer, and the thread, and she took them—I have three kitchen-drawers, in one of them pieces of paper used to be pat for burning, and some of the sweepings.

NOT GUILTY .

ANN HALTON, EMELINE HALTON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2107
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2107. ANN HALTON and EMELINE HALTON were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July, 9 spoons, value 4l. 10s.; 1 coat, value 1l.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 1l. 18s.; 1 gown, value 3l.; 1 shawl, value 3l. 10s.; 2 sheets, value 30s.; and 1 table-cloth, value 2l.; the goods of William Henry Basley, the master of Ann Halton.

WILLIAM HENRY BASLEY . I live in Tyndal-place, Islington, and am a music master. The prisoner, Ann Halton, was in my service—on the 6th of July I went out with my family, leaving her in care of my home—on my return she was gone, and her boxes—I missed the articlss stated in this indictment—these produced are them, and are mine—I afterwards saw the prisoners together, and I asked Ann what cause she bad for taking my trowsers—one of them said they took them to disguise themselves.

HENKY BEAN (police-sergeant G 16.) I took the two prisoners together in John's-row, St. Luke's, at two o'clock in the morning of the 14th of July—I found this gown on the prisoner Emeline.

GEORGE DYER . I am a pawnbroker. I have a coat—I cannot say who pawned it.

ELIZABETH KERSHAW . I searched both the prisoners on the 14th of July—I found this gown and some duplicates on Eraeline.

ROBERT MASTERS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shawl pawned on the

6th of July—both the prisoners were together, but Ann said it was her property.

WILLIAM BUDD . I am a pawnbroker. I have two sheets, which I took in of both the prisoners on the 7th of July—Ann gave them to me, and said they were hers.

Ann Halton. It was my sister.

Emetine Halton. It was me that gave them. Witness. No, it was Ann.

ANN HALTON— GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined Six Months.

EMELINE HALTON— NOT GUILTY .

JOHN PHILLIPS, ELLEN PHILLIPS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2108
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2108. JOHN PHILLIPS and ELLEN PHILLIPS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 1 tureen, value 5s.; 5 dishes, value 2s. 3d. 4 dish-covers, value 1s.; 2 plates, value 1s. 9d.; 2 plate-covers, value 3d.,; and 1 salt-cellar, value 3d.; the goods of Joseph Proud.

JOSEPH PROUD . I am a china and glass dealer. I had a distress put into my house on the 4th of August—after that I lost my property—these tureens and other things produced are mine—I have marks on them to enable me to swear to them.

HENRY PICKFORD . I live in the City-road. On Tuesday, the 4th of August, the prisoner John Phillips was put into Proud's premises to take possession and care of the property—on the following morning I was sent to to say that his wife was in prison, taken at half-past two o'clock in the morning, with a basket of crockery—I then took another man, removed John Phillips, and put him into custody—this crockery was in the house when he was put in—his wife could not have had it without his knowing it.

WILLIAM ROGERS (police-constable G 46.) About two o'clock in the morning I was on duty in Golden-lane, and about 200 yards from the prosecutor's I saw Ellen Phillips, with a large bundle under her arm—I asked what she had got—she said, "Nothing particular"—I again asked her—she said if I came to a lamp-post she would allow me to look—she was going by the lamp-post—I caught hold of her arm, and saw it was earthenware and glass—I asked where she got them, she said over the water at her daughter's—I asked where her daughter lived, she did not know—she knew it was over London-bridge—I took her into custody.

JOHN KERSHAW (police-constable G 123.) I apprehended John Phillips—he said, on going to the station, that if she had taken them they must have been concealed in the yard.

COURT to JOSEPH PROUD. Q. Where were these things left? A. In the shop—John Phillips would be in the shop.

HENRY PICKFORD re-examined. The goods were in the shop and parlour adjoining—they could not be taken out without his seeing them.

John Phillips's Defence. The prosecutor never saw me on the premises—he left-on Monday, and I went on Tuesday.

JOHN PHILLIPS— GUILTY . Aged 41.— Transported for Seven Years.

ELLEN PHILLIPS— NOT GUILTY .

JAMES JONES.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2109
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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2109. JAMES JONES was indicted for embezzlement.

FREDERICK HOWARD OLDFIELD . I am a wine and spiritmerchant, and live in Queen's-buildings, Brompton, the prisoner was in my employ. In consequence of circumstances, I gave Rebecca Seal a half-crown and a sixpence, on the 24th of July, to purchase a bottle of 3s. sherry—I went into

the counting-house—the prisoner was in the shop, and told me be had sold a bottle of 2s. 6d. sherry, and gave me a Half-crown—I called in an officer, and a marked 6d. was found on him, which I gave Seal.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Was wine sometimes sold for 3s., and sometimes 2s. 6d.? A. Yes—he had been in my employ six weeks—this is the sixpence—there is a scratch with a pen-knife on the milled part of the edge—he took the sixpence out of his pocket.

REBECCA SEAL . I received a half-crown and a sixpence from Mr. Old-field—I paid them to the prisoner for a bottle of wine.

THOMAS BASS (police-constable V 45.) I took him into custody—he took the sixpence from his pocket—he admitted taking it, and said he was very sorry for keeping the sixpence.

(The prisoner received a good character, and several witnesses offered to employ him.)

GUILTY. Aged 16—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.— Confined.

Six Days.

JOHN GOSLING, WILLIAM BROOKS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2110
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment; Imprisonment

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2110. JOHN GOSLING and WILLIAM BROOKS were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August, 1 purse, value 2d.; 1 half-crown, five pence, and 1 farthing; the property of John Fitzpatrick, from the person of Mary Fitzpatrick.

MARY FITZPATRICK . I am the wife of John Fitzpatrick, and live in New-passage, Falcon-street, Clare-market. On the 4th of August I was at the Crown and Still public-house, Clare-street—I got drinking with the prisoner there, I treated them—I pulled out my purse, and paid for a pot of porter—there was a half-crown piece, a few coppers, and a bit of metal in it, which I know—I put my purse into my bosom—I was not drunk—Gosling pushed me down, when I refused to pay for any more drink—I was picked up by the landlord, and then I missed this purse.

Cross-examined by MR. PRICE. Q. Were the men both strangers to you? A. Yes—there were a good many persons in the house, not in the part that I was in—this was in front of the bar—it was not on a bench before the door—I saw my purse again at the station.

JOHN THOMPSON . I live in a mews in Oxford-street—I saw the prosecutrix with the prisoners—I saw her put her purse into her bosom—I saw her thrown down by one of the prisoners, and as soon as she got up, the purse was taken from her by Gosling—he put it into his coat-pocket, and gave it to Brooks behind him—Gosling went outside, and was searched, by a policeman—Brooks took a small piece of coin out of the purse, threw it to the door, and dropped the purse at his feet—he forced up the mat with one foot, and kicked the purse under with the other—Cowdery picked the purse up from the mat, where I told him it was—the money was found in Gosling's pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you in the prisoners' company? A. I was present—there were other people there.

CHARLES COWDERY . I am landlord of this public-house. I found the purse—I was present when the money was found on Gosling.

Gosling's Defence. I was very tipsy indeed; we were all drinking gin and porter together.

(Brooks received a good character.)

GOSLING— GUILTY . Aged 21— Confined one Months.

BROOKS— GUILTY . Aged 28— Confined Two Months.

JAMES JOHNSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2111
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2111. JAMES JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August, 1 sheet, value 5s., the goods of Samuel Batson.

REBECCA BATSON . I am the wife of Samuel Batson, and am a laundress, living in Hope-place, Holloway. On the 5th of August 1 had this sheet hanging out to dry—I missed it between three and four o'clock—the prisoner had knocked at the door about two o'clock that day, and asked for relief.

BETSY RUSSELL . I am the wife of William Russell, and keep a marinestore shop. On the 6th of August the prisoner came and offered a sheet for sale—I stopped him with it—the policeman was passing, and I called him.

Prisoner. A man asked me to go and take a sheet and dispose of it—I took it to the shop, and they seemed suspicious how I came possessed of it—a policeman was passing, and I told her to call him in. Witness. He said, "As you appear doubtful, call in a policeman,"Which I did.

NOT GUILTY .

JAMES BIRCH, MARK SKARRETT.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2112
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2112. JAMES BIRCH and MARK SKARRETT were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 1 basket, value 1s.; and 59 glass bottles, value 9s.; the goods of John Jones, the master of Birch.

JOHN JONES . I live in Union-place, New-road, and am a bottle-merchant—Birch had been in my employ a long time—Skarrett had been my porter but was discharged. On the 10th of August, in consequence of information, I and my wife placed ourselves at a bed-room window which commanded a view of the premises—there is a dirty bottle-warehouse there—a little before six o'clock in the morning Birch came to his work—he went into the washing-room and came out again—we then saw Skarrett at the corner of Nottingham-place—he ran across the road to our place—I ran down to the door which was then being fastened, and Skarrett was gone down the New-road—I ran after him till he stood to rest—he had this hamper filled with bottles, which I believe to be mine—I missed a hamper when I returned—I did not see the prisoners together—Skarrett could not have got in without Birch letting him in—this hamper and bottles could not have got out without Birch's assistance.

Birch. You did not see me give Skarrett any thing, nor open the door.

Witness. No, no one could have escaped out of the premises over the wall without being seen.

COURT. Q. When you took Skarrett what did he say? A. I said I have caught you at last—he said, "Let me go"—I said, "No, I will prosecute you"—he went on his knees and prayed me to let him go—the officer came up and I gave him into custody—there were four dozen and a half of bottles in the hamper—I then went back and took Birch who was at work in the washing-room—there was not time for Skarrett to have got the hamper and bottles out of my premises without assistance, and there was no one there but Birch to assist him.

HANNAH JONES . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw Birch come on the premises that morning—he went into the washing place and returned instantly—he looked round him and then he went into the bottle-ware-house—I then saw Skarrett run across the road—no one but Birch was on the premises—Skarrett could not have got the hamper of bottles without Birch's assistance.

JOHN SPIERS (police-constable D 142.) I took the prisoners, and have brought three of the bottles here to match with those in the hamper.

Birch's Defence. I went in to feed the pony that morning; I did not see Skarrett that morning till the policeman brought him.

HANNAH JONES re-examined. It was not Birch's duty to feed the pony.

Skarrett's Defence. I am in the habit of buying and selling bottles; I had bought these bottles the evening previous; I was coming along that morning by Mr. Jones' premises, and set them down while I went to get a drink of water, and then a man gave me a lift up with them.

BIRCH— GUILTY . Aged 33.

SKARRETT— GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Nine Months.

ANN POOL, MARY POOL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2113
VerdictsGuilty > with recommendation; Guilty > with recommendation
SentencesImprisonment

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2113. ANN POOL was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of July, 1 shift, value 4s., the goods of Charles Edmund Davis: and MARY POOL for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MART PATTISON . I am a widow, and live in John-street, White Horse-lane, Stepney, and take in washing and mangling. I had a basket of clothes from Mrs. Davis, of Stepney, on the 22nd of July—they were mangled about four o'clock, and 1 gave them to Ann Pool, to take to Mrs. Davis—I am sure that there was a shift amongst them—Mrs. Davis sent her son, who said there was a shift missing—Ann Pool was in my presence at the time—she looked at me, and said, "What will you do?"—I said, "I don't know, I sent them all by you"—I then sent her to another person I sent clothes to, and it was not there—about six o'clock Ann Pool wanted 6d. of me, and she said she could get the shift if I would go with her—I went with her—she went to a pawnbroker near Limehouse church—it was not there—I afterwards saw this shift at the station.

CHARLOTTE DAVIS . I am the wife of Charles Edmund Davis. This shift has the appearance of being mine, but the mark is picked out.

THOMAS DICKER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 22nd of July, Mary Pool came and offered this shift in pledge—on looking at it I found a name had been marked on it in blue cotton, and picked out—I asked if it was hers—she said yes, and she lived at Bankside, Southwark—we then fastened the door—she tried to get out, and said she was going to get the owner—we said, we thought she said it was her own—she said it was hers—we then asked how she came so far to pawn it—she said she might have come to see a friend—she then said she bought it in Petticoat-lane, she gave half-a-crown for it and the shoes she had on.

WILLIAM NICOL (police-constable K 177.) I was called, and took Mary Pool—she said she had bought this in the Back-road, and gave 3s. for it—she does not live where she said she did—she lives at Limehouse.

Ann Pool's Defence. I went to my mother, and asked her to pawn it for me; I wanted to borrow a few shillings of my sister, who lives at Bankside, and she had not got it to lend me.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

ANN POOL— GUILTY . Aged 40

MARY POOL— GUILTY . Aged 75.

Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

WILLIAM WHITE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2114
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2114. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 12lbs. weight of indigo, value 1l. 4s., and 12 table-mats, value 3s.; the goods of James Charles Williams, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 55.— Confined Six Months.

WILLIAM NIX.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2115
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2115. WILLIAM NIX was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 2 1/2 lbs. weight of brass, value 10s. 6d.; the goods of William Derry and others, in a vessel in a port of entry and discharge.

GEORGE POOCK . I am foreman in the East London Docks. This brass belongs to the owners of a ship that was there—the Plymouth Dock Company—on the 12th of August I was going along the quay, and saw the prisoner with this brass case in his hand—he was taking it to pieces—he took three pieces off, and put them inside his shirt—I went and gave information to the gate-keeper, and while I was there the prisoner came towards the gate, then went back, and I saw him throw one piece of the brass on board the vessel—I was present when the gate-keeper searched him, and found these other pieces on him—this piece had slipped down to his knees.

Prisoner. Q. What distance was you from me when you first saw me? A. About three yards.

Prisoner. It is false; you was three hundred yards. Witness. The quay is not three hundred yards long.

EDWARD BOURN . I am master of the barque Brooking—William Derry and others are the owners of it—the prisoner had no business with it—I missed this brass from the ship on the 12th of August.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the brass given to me by a man I did not know.

GUILTY . Aged 40.— Confined Three Months.

SARAH COLE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2116
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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2116. SARAH COLE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Hanson.

JOHN HANSON . I keep the Coach and Horses public-house, at Kensington. I have missed about six dozen pots lately—the pot now produced is mine—I will swear to it—I went to the prisoner and asked her if she had any pots about her—she said no—I then called in the officer, and he searched about her premises—he asked her for her frying-pan—she said she had none—he looked about and found the lid of an old kettle up the chimney, which had been employed to melt metal—this pot was in her room, and it is mine.

Prisoner. My little girl was sent for some beer in the pot—your wife sold the beer. Witness. The prisoner did not say so before.

RICHARD HILL (police-constable T 113.) I went to the prisoner's house—I heard Mr. Hanson ask if she had any pots of his in the house—she said she had not—I found this pot by the side of the bedstead—I then asked if she had any frying-pan—she said no—I looked up the chimney, and found this lid of a saucepan—it has melted pewter in it.

Prisoner. I sold the melted pot that morning to get a breakfast—Mr. Hanson saw this pot as soon as he opened the door.

MR. HANSON re-examined. I did not—she has been in the habit of having beer from my house.

GUILTY. Aged 29.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Two Months.

HONORA BOLGER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2117
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2117. HONORA BOLGER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July, 4 shirts, value 2l.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 2 shifts, value 5s.; 1 towel, value 6d.; and 1 apron, value 6d.; the goods of John Wheelin her master.

MARGARET WHEELIN . I am the wife of John Wheel in—we live in Grosvenor-market. On getting up on the 17th of July, the prisoner, who was my servant, was gone, and I missed four shirts, and other things

stated—I found one of my shifts on her person when she was in the cell at Marlborough-street.

Prisoner. She knew I was going to work—she lent me the shift for ten days. Witness. I did not.

Prisoner. She told the policeman there was a calico shift, and if it was hers it was marked "B. S."

NICHOLAS MARS (police-constable F 27.) She said it was marked "No. 2," and this is marked "2"—it is a linen shift—there was a calico shift beside.

MARY BEDFORD . I saw the prisoner go out that morning at a quarter-past eight o'clock with a bundle on her arm.

GUILTY . Aged 37.— Confined Four Months.

MARGARET SULLIVAN, MARY ANN HARRISON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2118
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Imprisonment

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2118. MARGARET SULLIVAN and MARY ANN HARRISON were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July, 2 shawls, value 1l., the goods of Charles Hook; and that HARRISON had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM DONOGHUE . I am shopman to Mr. Charles Hook, of St. John-street. On the evening of the 30th of July the two prisoners came into the shop—Harrison asked for some bonnets which she had seen in the window previously—one of them then fetched in a third party, they said they would have a shawl then, and a bonnet at some future period—I showed them I suppose thirty shawls—they fixed on one silk shawl, but a fourth person was to be fetched in—an aunt—the person who went out for the aunt took two shawls oat, and never returned—I laid a shawl which I had in ray band, on the counter, and sent a lad for a policeman—I cannot say which of the prisoners it was who went out for the third person—it was the third person who took the two shawls—I am sure of that, I had laid the shawls on the counter, and no one was in the shop but the third person and the two prisoners—I told the prisoners of it, and they said I must be mistaken—it was one of the prisoners who told the other one to fetch the aunt—they did not buy any thing—they had only 1d. on them.

Harrison. The other one who went out had my money, 18s. or 19s.; she had moved away from the street where I lived about a month before.

EDWARD GEORGE STONE (police-constable K 209.) I produce a certificate of Harrison's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office —(read)—she is the person.

HARRISON— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

SULLIVAN— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined One Year.

EDWARD COOPER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2119
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2119. EDWARD COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 1 coat, value 3s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2d.; the goods of William Smith.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am ostler at the Hanley Arms public-house, Hornsey-road. On the 12th of August I hung a Macintosh coat behind the bar, at one o'clock in the day, and saw it there at two—I missed it between five and six—this is my coat now produced, and the handkerchief in the pocket of it.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it? A. No, but I saw you come out of the gate with something.

MICHAEL CONNOR (police-constable S 276.) I apprehended the prisoner with the coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the yard, and as I was coming out I saw this hanging on a stone, and it being an old ragged thing I took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 39.— Confined Three Months.

RICHARD SULLIVAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2120
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2120. RICHARD SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July, 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person.

ROBERT AYLIFFE (police-constable K 270.) On the 29th of July I was going on the top of an omnibus, down the Commercial-road—I saw the prisoner take this handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket—I got off and collared him—he said, "I have not taken it; there goes the man that has got it"—I said, "If he has got that, I have got you"—the gentleman who lost the handkerchief, and a lady with him, came back, and the prisoner took the handkerchief from under his arm, and gave it to me—the gentleman and lady told me to go on—I could not see after them, or I should have lost the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you not got hold of the prisoner? A. Yes—I could not follow them and keep him—the gentleman did not give me any name.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

ANN SMITH.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2121
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2121. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 locket, value 11s.; 3 purses, value 4s.; 1 brooch, value 5s.; 2 scent-bottles, value 1s.; 1 pin-cushion, value 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s. 6d.; 1 shawl, value 2s. 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 1s.; 1 hair-brush, value 1s. 6d.; 33 combs, value 10s.; 1 necklace, value 5s.; 2 thimbles, value 2s. 6d.; 8 pairs of gloves, value 6s.; 4 yards of calico, value 1s. 6d.,; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 10 yards of ribbon, value 4s.; and 1 pocket, value 6d.; the goods of Benjamin Dudfield, her master.

LYDIA DUDFIELD . I am the wife of Benjamin Dudfield; we live in Lady Lake's Grove, Mile-end. The prisoner was in my service—she was going away—I missed a napkin, and questioned her about it—she gave me four napkins, and the fourth was the one I missed—the other three were also mine—I sent for my husband, and one of the prisoner's boxes was searched in the presence of my husband, and the other in the presence of the policeman.

GEORGE MOUNTFORD (police-constable K 118.) I was called, and found this locket, ribbon, and other things, in the prisoner's boxes—Mrs. Dudfield identified them—her boxes were locked—she had the key in her pocket.

Prisoner. I never locked my boxes; my mistress discharged a thief out of her house while I was there; she had a good character with me.

MRS. DUDFIELD. I did not discharge one—the prisoner came to me with a false character, I believe.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined One Year.

WILLIAM BRICKNELL, WILLIAM MILLAR.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2122
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment; Imprisonment

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2122. WILLIAM BRICKNELL and WILLIAM MILLAR were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August, 40lbs. weight of hay, value 2s., the goods of William Alder, the master of Bricknell; to which

BRICKNELL pleaded GUILTY. Aged 20.—Recommended to mercy.

Confined Three Months.

DAVID PAINE . I am in the employ of Mr. William Alder, a farmer, at Harmondsworth. I sent a load of hay to town last Monday by Bricknell,

and a bottle truss of hay for the horses—this truss produced is one that was sent with the rest of the hay—I know it by the binding.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Is it your binding? A. Yes—I have been a hay-binder above two years—I am quite sure of it.

JOHN POOL (police-constable T 174.) On Monday last I was on duty in Uxbridge-road—I saw a cart-load of hay at the Queen Adelaide public-house—Bricknell was driving it—I saw Miller standing by the side of the cart against the stable-door—Bricknell gave him a truss of hay, which Miller took into the stable—I made Miller bring it out of the stable again, and Bricknell put it on the top of the cart—I took them both into custody —I asked Miller what he was going to do with it—he said, "I hope you will take no notice of it; here is a sovereign for you."

MILLER— GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Nine Months.

JOSEPH WHEELER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2123
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2123. JOSEPH WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of July, 2 satin stocks, value 1s., and 1 printed book, Value 2s., the goods of William Richard Jeffreys; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Three Months.

ELIZABETH HENNESSEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2124
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2124. ELIZABETH HENNESSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August, 1 mug, value 1l. 10s.; and 2 spoons, value 10s.; the goods of Charles Francis James Ford, her master.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES FRANCIS JAMES FORD . I am a surgeon, living in High-street, Hampstead—the prisoner was in my service twelve years. On Sunday, the 8th of August, I missed a silver mug, which I had seen on the Friday—on Monday my wife told me two spoons were missing—I inquired of William Tibbs, my servant, who had the care of my plate—I asked the prisoner that day what had become of my silver mug—she said she knew nothing at all about it; it was very strange where it could be; that she had looked for it, and would look again—she looked in several places—I then went to the station, and in the evening, when we found the two spoons were missing, the officer came down.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it any business of the prisoner's to take charge of the plate? A. No—she was cook, and assisted in the house work—it happened at that time we had no other servant—she is not at all deficient in memory—she had the business of the housemaid as, well as her own—there were children in the house, but my wife took care of them generally.

WILLIAM TIBBS . I am the prosecutor's servant—I have the care of the plate. On Saturday night I missed a silver mug—I told Mr. Ford—I mentioned it to the prisoner more than once on Sunday morning—she said she did not know where it was, she would look for it—I saw her look for it—she said she had not seen it, and did not know where it was—on the Monday evening I misssed two silver spoons and a glass-cloth—I asked her about it—she said she did not know where it was—I was present when the policeman found these these things in the drawer—the prisoner had the key in her pocket—she said, "La! me! I must have put them there for safety."

Cross-examined. Q. She did the business of the housemaid as well as the cook for some time previous? A. Yes—I had only been there six days

—during that time she had to make the beds, attend to the children, and cook the victuals—she is a Roman Catholic—she went to a place of worship on Sunday—she was out of the house from eleven till one o'clock—if she wished to carry any thing out she could have done it.

RICHARD NEALE (police-sergeant S 3.) I was called into Mr. Ford's house on Monday, the 9th of August—when I got there the prisoner was called up into the drawing-room, and asked by Mr. Ford if she had seen any thing of the mug and two spoons—he put the question several times—she said she had not—I asked if she had any objection to have her boxes searched—she said, "Oh, no;" but it should be for the last time, if it was—I searched her box, and found nothing—Mrs. Ford was present at that time—she said, "Henessey, you have a chest of drawers down in the kitchen"—the prisoner said, "I will go down and call Tibbs to search his bed-room"—I said, "No, we will all go down together"—the prisoner gave me the key of the drawer—we both pulled open the middle drawer together—she assisted to search the drawer, and she shuffled the things about—in doing so, she shuffled this cloth to the back of the drawer—I said, "What is this?" and found these things in it—the prisoner said, "Dear me, I must have put them there for safety."

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN WILLIAM SMITH.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2125
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2125. JOHN WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for embezzlement.

JACOB BEISIEOEL . I am a baker, living in York-street—the prisoner was in my employ. On the 29th of July he took some bread to Mr. Stevens—if he received any money he ought to have paid it on the evening of the 30th—he did not pay it.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am private in the Grenadier Guards. On the 29th of July I received some bread of the prisoner—on the 30th I paid him 5s. 3d. for his master.

Prisoner. He paid me 3s. 6d. on the 30th. Witness. No, I paid him 5s. 3d. on the 30th, and 3s. 6d. on the 31st.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

MARTHA KEANE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2126
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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2126. MARTHA KEANE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 1 ale-glass, value 7d., the goods of Henry White.

HENRY WHITE . I keep the Masons' Arms public-house, in Watney-street. The prisoner and a man came to my house on the 12th of August—the man left a stick behind him—the prisoner came back for it—she went into the parlour for it—as soon as she was gone I missed the aleglass—I went after her, and she came back with me, took it out of her pocket, and put it on the bar.

Prisoner. The man gave me the glass when I took him the stick, and told me to take it if I liked, as very likely he might break it; he was a stranger. Witness. She had got to the end of the street.

GUILTY. Aged 40.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

WILLIAM THOMPSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2127
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2127. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 2 sheets, value 5s., the goods of John Tubby; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN TUBBY . I lodge in Great Peter-street, Westminster. The prisoner lodged with me—we slept in the same room—I returned from work about ten o'clock, on the 21st of July, and missed a pair of sheets—the prisoner was gone—I afterwards found him in Vauxhall-road, and spoke

to him about them—he owned he had pawned them, and showed me the tickets—I gave him into custody—I went to the pawnbroker's, and found them—these now produced are them.

Prisoner. Q. Whose sheets were these? A. Mine—I did not buy them—I know this sheet by the stain of the stuff I had when I was ill about a month ago—I had been three weeks in the lodging before I met him—on the morning he was taken I went to where he was—I knocked at the door, and he opened it—he wanted to give me the slip—he did not give me the duplicates—I gave him in charge to the first policeman I met—he threw the tickets over the bridge—I caught one—I never was in prison—I did not come out of prison on the 9th of last March.

HENRY PALMER (police-constable B 53.) The prosecutor called me on Westminster-bridge—the prisoner tried to throw something over the bridge—I saw pieces of paper flying—one flew over the bridge, and one the prosecutor picked up—it was a duplicate for a sheet, which Tubby said was his.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor and I agreed' to take the furnished lodging at 3s. a week; I was to pay half of it. I gave him no money, but found him in food. On the day stated he went out between eight and nine o'clock. I went out about four o'clock, and met two persons, who could have proved I bad no property. I staid out all night, and the next morning he called on me, and asked me to walk with him, and he gave me into custody. I know nothing of the sheet. The duplicate was found seven or eight yards from the curb.

WILLIAM CRUMP . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY .* Aged 20.— Transported for Ten Years.

MARY ANN PEARSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2128
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2128. MARY ANN PEARSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, 1 shawl, value 4s.; and 9 yards of printed cotton, value 4s.,; the goods of Caroline Brophey.

CAROLINE BROPHEY . I am single, and live in William-street, Lissongrove. The prisoner lodged in the same room with me—I went out at a quarter before nine o'clock, on the 21st of July—when I returned the prisoner was gone—I missed this gown-piece and shawl now produced—I have no particular mark on them—I believe they are mine.

RICHARD PAINE . I am a pawnbroker. These articles were pawned by the prisoner, about eleven o'clock, on the 21st of July.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Five Days.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

ANN JOHNSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2129
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2129. ANN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Joseph Wolstenholme and another.

HENRY KENWORTHY . I am in the employ of Joseph Wolstenholme and another: they are pawnbrokers. On the 2nd of August the prisoner came to the shop, and inquired the price of several articles at the door—the boy left the door, and shortly after a man came in, and said she had taken a handkerchief from inside the shop—I pursued the prisoner, who had got about twenty yards from the shop, and asked her to let me look under her shawl, and there-found this handkerchief, which is my employers'.

DANIEL HUMPHREYS (police-sergeant G 74.) I took the prisoner—

she had been drinking, but was not drunk—I did not tell the Magistrate she was the worse for liquor, to my knowledge.

Prisoner. I did not take it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined One Month.

CATHERINE LANCE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2130
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2130. CATHERINE LANCE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August, 1 candlestick and snuffers, value 2s. 9d.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; 1 pillow-case, value 6d.; 1 goblet, value 6d.; and 1 ornament, value 3d.,; the goods of Henry Fildew.

HENRY FILDEW . I live in Earnest-street, Regent's-park. I let the prisoner a furnished bed-room—she was taken on the 13th of August—she took the lodging about nine weeks before—I had given her notice to leave on the Thursday—there was one week's rent in arrear—I missed these articles—she paid me honestly before that.

EDWARD CURTIS . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a goblet, an ornament, and candlestick, pawned by the prisoner.

WILLIAM TRAMAK . I produce a pillow, pawned in the name of Johnson—I have no knowledge of the party.

Prisoner. I pledged these articles, having a payment to make, knowing I should be able to return them. I told the prosecutor they should be replaced on Saturday evening. The Magistrate would have taken bail for me to replace them, but the prosecutor would not let me.

HENRY FILDEW re-examined. I told her I wanted nothing but my property—I never permitted her to take these.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined One Month.

GEORGE PALMER, WILLIAM PALMER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2131
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2131. GEORGE PALMER and WILLIAM PALMER were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of William Warne.

WILLIAM WARNE . I keep a shoe-shop, in Bell-street, Marylebone. On the 26th of July the prisoners came together to the shop, and I missed a pair of shoes—on the Friday following George Palmer came, and asked if I would buy a waistcoat—I said, "No"—he looked round, and took up a pair of shoes, and said' they were badly done—I said, "Are you a shoemaker?"—he said, "Yes, can you give me employ?"—I said, "Yes, if you come to-morrow I will give you a seat of work"—he said he would—the next morning I got up, and missed those shoes that he had looked at—I went round to look for them—one pair of these now produced are a pair the prisoners examined on the 26th.

ANN RIDGE . I keep a clothes-shop in Charles-street. These two pairs of shoes were sold to me by the two prisoners—I gave 1s. for one pair, and 8d. for the other—George Palmer is a shoemaker.

MATTHEW REARDON (police-constable D 135.) I took the prisoners, and was present when the shoes were found—they both denied any knowledge of them till at the station, when William said he gave one pair to his brother George to sell, which he had bought of a Jew.

GEORGE PALMER— GUILTY . Aged 18.

WILLIAM PALMER— GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoners.)

WILLIAM ASHBY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2132
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2132. WILLIAM ASHBY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 1 piece of timber, value 3s., the goods of Samuel Hatchings, his master; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOSEPH BAKER (police-constable B 179.) On the 10th of August I met the prisoner in Cromwell-lane, Old Brompton, about half-past six o'clock in the morning—he was carrying this piece of timber—I asked how he came by it—he said he was going to place it down for a gate-post for Mr. Hutchings, and it belonged to Mr. Hutchings—I took him.

NICHOLAS BURDEW . I am foreman to Samuel Hutchings, a fanner and market-gardener. The prisoner was in his employ—I saw the piece of wood—the prisoner had no right to have it—it belonged to Mr. Hutchings—there was no truth in his having to put up a gate-post—it is worth 3s.

Prisoner's Defence. Coming home one morning, I saw this by the side of the road; I took it home to make a fire; I showed them where I picked it up.

HENRY WILLIAMS (police-constable S 260.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 48.— Confined Six Months.

CHARLES PRICE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2133
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2133. CHARLES PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 2 1/4 yards of a certain woollen cloth called doeskin, value 11s., the goods of John Pollard Searle.

JOHN POLLARD SEARLE . I am a tailor, and live in Brick-lane, St. Luke's. This is my cloth—it was safe on an iron rod by the door, in the evening of the 31st of July, and about eleven o'clock at night, I missed it—about an hour after the policeman came, and asked if I had lost any thing—I said I had—he showed me a ticket, which was the one that had been on the cloth—it is 2 1/2 yards of doeskin.

WILLIAM STEWART (police-constable G 133.) I saw the prisoner carrying this cloth—he was about ten minutes' walk from the prosecutor's—I met him coming down Compton-street—I asked what he had got under his arm—he said, "Washing"—I said, I should feel satisfied if I saw it—he said I should, if I would go to Seward-street—I said no, he must go with me to the Rosoman-street station—he walked a little way, and ran off—I pursued and took him in Compton-passage—a person picked up the cloth, and gave it to me—I found the ticket on it—I made inquiries, and found the prosecutor.

Prisoner. I had been out of work some months, and my mother was dying of consumption in St. Luke's workhouse.

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM BRIDGETT.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2134
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2134. WILLIAM BRIDGETT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Pegrum, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

GEORGE KEMP (police-constable N 82.) I was in the Hackney-road on the 11th of August—I saw the prisoner and another one in Hackney-road—I watched them for two hours—I saw them go up to the prosecutor—the other took hold of his arm, and the prisoner took this handkerchief out of his pocket—I saw him take it partly out in the Curtain-road—I followed them to Worship-street, and there he took it quite out—the prosecutor was drunk—I shoved against him, and gave him a black eye.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where were you when you saw

the handkerchief taken? A. About twenty yards behind—I had been following him two hours—I knocked the prosecutor down because he had been hoaxed, and was drunk—I ran against him in catching hold of the prisoner—I saw the prisoner come from the back of Shoreditch church—I was in plain clothes—I saw him chuck the handkerchief down—a young man took it up, and gave it to me.

JOHN PEORUM . This is my handkerchief—it has my name on it—I was tipsy.

Cross-examined. Q. Where had you been? A. At a public-house.

AARON PAINE (police-constable H 166.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.

MARY RUSSELL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2135
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2135. MARY RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 3 half-crowns, 4 pence, 2 halfpence, and 1 farthing, the monies of Thomas Higgs, from the person of Louisa Higgs.

LOUISA HIGGS . I am the wife of Thomas Higgs; we live in Providence-place, Tash-street. On the 21st of July I was at Mr. Reed's, the pawnbroker, in Gray's Inn-lane—I had been there ten minutes or a quarter of an hour—the prisoner came and stood very near my side—I felt her hand go from my side, but I did not know that she took it out of my pocket—she went to the door—I felt, and missed my money—I had had in my pocket three half-crowns, four pence, two halfpence, and a farthing—I looked, and the prisoner was looking towards me—she then ran, I ran after her, nearly to the top of Gray's Inn-lane, and there the policeman took her, when I cried "Stop thief"—she threw the money out of her hand at the policeman's feet.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not accuse a young woman of it in the mob? A. No, I accused nobody but you.

GEORGE TOWNSEND (police-constable E 113.) I saw the prisoner stopped—the prosecutrix accused her of stealing three half-crowns, four pence, two halfpence, and a farthing.

HENRY HAYWOOD (police-constable E 97.) The prosecutrix gave me charge of the prisoner—I stopped her in Gray's Inn-lane—she denied having the money, and said she went to pledge a ring—directly I pursued her she dropped three pence out of her left hand, and the remainder out of her right hand—three half-crowns, two penny-pieces, and one farthing, which my brother officer picked up.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask what money she lost, and did she not say she did not know till she went back, and you told her what was picked up? A. The prosecutrix said she lost three half-crowns and the coppers.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

PHILIP MOORE, EDWARD WOOLFORD.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2136
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2136. PHILIP MOORE and EDWARD WOOLFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August, 1 necklace, value 10s., the goods of Thomas Riddle, from the person of Margaret Caroline Riddle; to which

WOOLFORD pleaded GUILTY .† Aged 15.— Transported for Ten Years.—Convict Ship.

MARGARET RIDDLE . I am wife of Thomas Riddle, we live in Well-street. I have a child named Margaret Caroline Riddle, she is four

years old—she went out on the 1st of August, about six o'clock, with a necklace on—it was taken from her neck—I went to the street-door—she was coming up the step, and said a boy took her necklace—the policeman found the necklace the next day—this now produced is it.

CHARLES PANNELL . On Sunday, the 1st of August, I and Moore were were going down Well-street—we met Woolford—we went and had some beer—Woolford saw the child about the door, he gave her a drop of beer, took the necklace off, and gave it to Moore—he said he would have nothing to do with it, and gave it to Woolford, who ran down Nassau-street.

WILLIAM ISAAC . I saw Pannell and the two prisoners—Woolford gave the child a drop of beer, and took the necklace and gave it to Moore.

MOORE— NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM SHEARMAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2137
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2137. WILLIAM SHEARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 6 handkerchiefs, value 4s. 6d., the goods of Harriet Partington; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

ELIZABETH BOLTON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2138
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2138. ELIZABETH BOLTON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August, 1 shawl, value 5s., the goods of Roderick Arthur Howe.

MARY ANN HOWE . I am the wife of Roderick Arthur Howe. On the 12th of August I lodged in William-street, the prisoner and her husband slept in the same room—I awoke about seven o'clock in the morning, and the prisoner's husband was gone—the prisoner remained in bed—she and I had some conversation—she said, "Lie down, and have some more sleep," and I went to sleep again—I awoke in a quarter of an hour, she was then gone, and I missed my shawl—I found it at the pawnbroker's—this is it—no one else came into the room that I am aware.

JURY. Q. Where did you put your shawl when you went to bed? A. By the bed-side—it was safe after the man went out.

GEORGE LOVELL FISH . I am a pawnbroker. This shawl was pawned on the 12th of August, to the best of my belief by the prisoner.

Prisoner. I did not pawn it—I got up to go to work—I never saw the shawl.

GUILTY . Aged 43.— Confined Three Months.

HENRY DAVIDSON, SAMUEL PRICE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2139
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2139. HENRY DAVIDSON and SAMUEL PRICE were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August, 6lbs. 2oz. weight of sugar, value 4s., the goods of Joseph Collings and others.

JOSEPH COLLINGS . I have two partners, we are sugarrefiners, in Parson-street, Ratcliff-highway. On the 16th of August the prisoners came to our refinery, and were heading up some cases, which their master had sent in to hold sugar, which was to be shipped—as they came out I met them in the yard—I said to Davidson, "What have you got there?"—he said, "Nothing"—I said, "Are you sure you have nothing"—he said, "Only a bit of sugar"—I took them both into the counting-house, and they delivered up this sugar—there was 4lbs. on Davidson, and 2lbs. 2oz. on Price.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. They were not in your service? A. No, in the employ of Mr. Howe, a case-maker.

(Davidson received a good character.

DAVIDSON— GUILTY . Aged 22.

PRICE— GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined Three Months.

JOHN GREENSLADE, WILLIAM BAILEY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2140
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

Related Material

2140. JOHN GREENSLADE and WILLIAM BAILEY were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July, 1 box, value 4s.; 4 keys, value 3d.; 1 ear-ring, value 1s.; 1 brooch, value 1s.; 1 card-case, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 watch, value 12l.; 1 watch-guard, value 1s.; 7 sovereigns, 2 half-sovereigns, 1 crown, and 4 half-crowns; the property of Maria Parrock, the mistress of John Greenslade, in her dwelling-house; to which

GREENSLADE pleaded GUILTY, and received a good character.

Judgment Respited.

MARIA PARROCK. I am a milliner. I am single, and live in Berwick-street, St. James's, Westminster; Greenslade was my errand-boy about a year and a half, and conducted himself well. On the 8th of July the policeman produced the property stated in the indictment, which is mine—it had only been taken from my house a short time.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Is it your house? A. No, my mother's—her name is Mary—she is a widow—I had seen Greenslade about half-an-hour before the property was brought back—I had not sent him out.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. All that was found on Green-slade has been restored to you? A. Yes.

CHARLES JACKSON . I am a policeman. On the 8th of July I saw the prisoners together in Scotland-yard—Greenslade had this property in a box—I asked them what they had got—Bailey said they were going into the City to Hitchcock and Rogers—I said, "What for?"—Greenslade then said he was in the employ of Miss Parrock—I asked where the key of this box was—he had not got it—I took the box to the station, and took the two prisoners to Miss Parrock's door—just as I got there Bailey ran away.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Did Greenslade say that he was going to Hitchcock and Rogers? A. Yes, they both said that.

BAILEY— NOT GUILTY .

JAMES CARAVAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2141
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2141. JAMES CARAVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July, 76lbs. weight of lead, value 10s., the goods of William Spencer, and fixed to a building; and that he had been before convicted of felony.—Another COUNT, not stating it to be fixed.

WILLIAM POCOCK (police-constable P 81.) On the 31st of July, at eight o'clock in the morning, I was on duty in Newton-street, Holborn—I saw the prisoner carrying something heavy in a sack—he took it to a marine-store shop—I followed him, and took the sack off the counter—I asked what he had got in the sack—he said he did not know, but he was engaged by another man to carry it, and he was to have 6d. for it—I waited a few minutes—no man came—I looked out, and saw no man—I kept it a few days, and found it had been taken from a workshop in Green Dragon-yard, Holborn—I have seen the lead fitted by two plumbers, and it fitted to the nail-holes.

JAMES HALL . This lead is the property of my master, Mr. William Spencer—he is an upholsterer—it was taken from his warehouse—it was all safe on Friday evening, the 30th of July, when I locked up the place, and on the Monday following I found the wet coming in, and the lead was gone.

Prisoners Defence. I went to Drury-lane that morning, and a man asked me to carry this lead for 6d.; I said I did not mind; I looked behind me twice, and the man was behind me; where he went to I do not know.

FREDERICK BANNISTER (police-constable D 85.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at the office of the Clerk of the Peace for Middlesex—(read)—the prisoner is the person—it was on the 6th of March, in the first year of her Majesty's reign.

Prisoner. I was at sea at that time; 1 did not get my discharge till the 28th of May, 1840; I was at sea two years and three months.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

MARGARET LOVEGROVE.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2142
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2142. MARGARET LOVEGROVE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August, 1 petticoat, value 3s., the goods of Henry Pett; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

ELIZABETH PETT . I am the wife of Henry Pett, of Duke-street, Lisson-grove. On the 10th of August I was standing at our shop-door—the prisoner passed me without any thing, and went in at the private door—she had no right to go in there—she came out with something in her apron—I had had my petticoat hanging in my yard—I went up stairs, looked out of my bed-room window, and missed my petticoat—the prisoner went to her lodging, in Bell-street—I was looking about for a policeman, and she came out of there—the policeman came up, and found it hanging if her yard—nobody could have taken it but her—I saw it safe five minutes before.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How many people were in the bouse? A. I cannot say—there are eight rooms, and every room is occupied—the prisoner was not in a minute before she came out—I never saw the petticoat is her possession, but she came out with a bundle—I saw the petticoat again in three quarters of an hour—I saw it hanging on a line in the yard where the prisoner lived, and saw the policeman take it down.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I live in the house—I did not see the prisoner go in, but I saw her come out with something concealed under her apron.

ALICE MAYBANK . I live in the house where the prisoner does—I saw her hang up a flannel petticoat about half-past nine or a quarter to ten o'clock on the 10th of August.

THOMAS HASELDINE (police-constable D 104.) I heard of this, and took the prisoner coming out of the door where she lived, and in going to the station, I heard her say to the prosecutrix, "You shall have your petticoat again if you will be quiet"—I then went to the prisoner's lodging and found this petticoat on the line.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you put any question to her before she said this? A. No—the prosecutrix said, would she give her her petticoat again, and she said, "You shall have it again, if you will be quiet."

MICHAEL CUSACK (police-constable D 60.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the same person.

GUILTY . Aged 58.— Confined Six Months.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, August 28th, 1841.

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Aralrin.

WILLIAM SIMMONDS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2143
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2143. WILLIAM SIMMONDS was indicted for unlawfully obtaining 12 memorandum books by false pretences; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Three Months.

WILLIAM LILLY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2144
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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2144. WILLIAM LILLY was indicted for unlawfully obtaining 12 pigeons and 2 fowls, by false pretences; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

JOHN CHANDLER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2145
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2145. JOHN CHANDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August, 1 sack, value 18d., the goods of William Duck: 1 coat, value 1l. 18s.; 1 waistcoat, value 12s.,; 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; 1 shirt, value 2s. 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief, value 5s.; 3 pence and 12 halfpence, the property of William Wright; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a chimney-sweeper, and live with my master in Great Portland-street. The prisoner came on the 7th of August, and wanted my master to hire him—he went down stairs for five or ten minutes—my box was there, locked, and my things in it—when I went down I found the box broken open, and my things gone—no one could have taken them but the prisoner—I had seen it safe just before—I have never seen my coat since—this shirt, now produced, is mine, and was among the things I lost—this sack is my master's, William Duck.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner from a description, on the 8th of August, at No. 1, Canada-court, St. Giles'—I asked if his name was John Chandler—he said no—I said I wanted him for the robbery at No. 2, Great Portland-street—I took him to the station—seeing he had two shirts on, I asked whose one this was—he said it was his own—I took it from him, went to his room, and there found this soot-sack—I asked if it was his—he said yes.

FREDERICK HESELTON . I am a sweep. I was at home when the prisoner came there—he came down and spoke to me—I said it was not a proper time in the morning to come for a place—he said he was hungry, and I gave him some meat—he was down stairs about ten minutes—the prosecutor afterwards found his box broken open—I found the prisoner's cap and shoes left by the side of the box.

Prisoner. I know nothing about the cap and shoes.

JONATHAN WHICHER . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—he is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

WILLIAM PECURY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2146
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2146. WILLIAM PECURY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August, 1 pewter pot, value 9d., the goods of Peter Quoit.

JOSEPH QUOIT . I live with my father, Peter Quoit, a publican in Great Bath-street, Clerkenwell. The prisoner came there and went into the yard—I suspected he had something—he went out of the yard, and out of the house—I followed him, and came up with him very nearly half a mile from the house—I took him into custody, and found the pot in his hat— this is it—it is my father's.

GUILTY .** Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Justice Coleridge.

WILLIAM DAVIS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2147
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2147. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July, at St. Sepulchre, 1 breast-pin, value 9l. 10s.; 2 brooches, value 1l. 14s.; 5 rings, value 13l.; and 2 other breast-pins and chain, value 1l. 10s.; the goods of John Onions, his master.

JOHN ONIONS . I am a working-jeweller, and live in Benjamin-street, in the parish of St. Sepulchre, Middlesex. The prisoner called on me on the 19th of July, and solicited work—I did not set him then—my lad went down to him, and he wrote this note in my parlour—(reads)—"Mr. Davis's compliments to Mr. Onions, and begs to say, that could he give a little employment, at a weekly small salary, he could introduce him to a good ready-money trade of jobbing and orders. 10, John's-row, near Bath-street, City-road, July, 19th, 1841"—I engaged him on Wednesday, the 21st—no wages were mentioned—I never mention wages till I have tried a man one or two days—he came about half-past nine o'clock on the 21st—he said he had a letter to write, he went away, and returned about ten o'clock—he worked till four o'clock very well—he then said he would go round to some of his customers at different parts of the town—I knew he had been several years in the manufacturing line, in a respectable way, and said, "As you are going round, you may know a great many persons," and I let him have a quantity of goods, to show to customers to sell—he went away with them—he returned at half-past six o'clock, bringing all the goods back—he said he had had an offer of 9l. 10s. for the diamond pin—I had put 10l. on it—he then took three cameo brooches out, one at 15s. 6d. and two at 18s., which he said he had an offer for, at nearly the price I had put on them—I was surprised he had not sold them—he then selected two pairs of ear-rings, and said he had been offered 13s. for them—I had said 14s.—I said I would sell them for 13s. if the parties would give the money—he said he was sure they would give the money, they were men of respectability, and he would be sure to bring back the money—he then selected a turquoise and a garnet-keeper, which he said he had been offered 6s. 6d. each for—I wanted 7s.—I told him he could take that, and was very sorry he had not sold them, being so little less than I wanted—he said, "I could not do that without your consent, being only one day in your employment"—he also took a twin pin, with a chain, which he said he had been offered money for—I at last said, "Go out again directly, and I will give you a diamond cluster ring, worth 11l., besides, as you have got such good customers"—I said, "What time will you return?"—he said, "I don't think I can return before ten o'clock, for I am to wait at some hotel for a gentleman, a shopkeeper at Davenport"—I said, "I wish you could get back by half-past nine o'clock"—he said, "Then you must let me have 1s. for a cab, and I will be back by half-past nine o'clock"—he took out the articles stated, amounting to 26l. 14s. 6d.—he did not return that night—I was very much alarmed, and next morning I sent my youth, Churchyard, up to his lodging, to see what had become of him—he got a policeman—I saw the prisoner at the station on the 22nd of July.

ALFRED CHURCHYARD . I am in the service of Mr. Onions. On the 22nd of July I was sent to the prisoner's house, No. 10, John's-row, St. Luke's—I saw his wife, who gave me a duplicate, and a cameo brooch, which I gave to my master—I spoke to a policeman.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am in the service of Mr. Boyce, a pawnbroker, in Theobald's-road. On the 21st of July the prisoner pledged this diamond

ring and pin, for five guineas, in the name of William Davis, 10, John's-row—I am certain of him—he was in my presence about five minute—the value of the property is about 18l.—I put several questions to him, which he answered—if he had asked more I should have lent it—I asked whether they were his own property, and whether he had them to make for any one—he said they were his own manufacture; if I doubted the weight of the stone, he would take it out and weigh it before my face—if he had not had some knowledge of the business he could not have answered those questions—it is customary for manufacturers to pledge their goods when in want of money.

LAMBERT WILKINSON . I am a policeman. Churchyard desired me to take the prisoner into custody—I waited till he came out of his lodging, and then took him into custody—I told him he was aware he had been making away with some of his master's goods—he said, "Yes, I have pawned two articles for five guineas, and my wife gave Churchyard one duplicate and a brooch"—I received a duplicate from Churchyard.

JOHN ONIONS re-examined. These articles I manufactured with my own fingers—the stones in this ring cost me 10l., and this pin cost me 8l. 15s.—this cameo brooch is mine, and is similar to the two which are missing—I had a character with the prisoner from his employers, Messrs. Evans and Guibert, and I have known him many years—he was with Mr. Plumley, a watch-maker, of Ludgate-hill—he told me from the beginning where he lived—I knew where to send for him.

Prisoner's Defence—(written)—"The prosecutor told me if I could get orders he would find means, and I thought I was at liberty to employ myself the best I could for our mutual benefit; the goods I had was with that understanding, part of which I was robbed of or lost; a person tried me to let him have 20l. worth on credit, which I refused, but being under the influence of drink, he prevailed on me to pledge a part of it; I became so insensible I don't know what became of the goods or money; that is the only statement I can make with truth."

WILLIAM MARTIN re-examined. When he came to our house he was alone—he did not appear to be the least in liquor—it was between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

GUILTY . Aged 46.— Confined Eighteen Months.

Before Mr. Justice Coleridge.

JEREMIAH DRISCOLL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2148
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2148. JEREMIAH DRISCOLL was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting John Sullivan, on the 15th of August, and cutting and wounding him in and upon the left side of the neck and left cheek, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN SULLIVAN . I am a labourer, and live at No. 1, Burford's-court—the prisoner lives at No. 6, in the same court, and a man named Timothy Driscoll, also—I do not know that he is related to the prisoner—last Sunday week I went to Timothy Driscoll's, between twelve and one o'clock at night—he is my wife's first cousin—I was not paid my wages till eleven o'clock—I found the prisoner and him there, and both their wives—we had some beer there—I had some—I and the prisoner talked about scholarship—he was talking about a brother of mine—I said my brother was five years at school, and learnt nothing—the prisoner said all the scholarship my brother learnt was from Mr. Townsend, who was a gentleman in Ireland my brother lived with—I said, "Mr. Townsend never sent for my brother to

send him to school"—the prisoner then called me a liar, I believe—I took my band up, with my fist closed, and was going to strike him, but his wife up and shoved me down—she was standing close by me, on the second step of the stairs—she shoved me down on a bed which was lying down, and as soon as I recovered myself, and got up, the prisoner came, and cat my throat—I did not see any thing in his hand, because he stood so high, and his wife was between him and me—I very nearly bled to death—I did not faint away, or lose my senses—I got just outside the door, and got to my own place—I went to catch bold of him after I was struck, to see what he had in his hand, but he went up stairs directly—he lives in the top room—I got out, and got home—the doctor was sent for—I did not fall against any glass—when I went towards the stairs, to lay hold of him, his wife and another laid hold of me, and they shoved my arm through the window —I am sure the window did not cut my head, it was done before.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. How far is, the window from the bed? A. About four feet—I am sure it was after I had been cut that my arm went through the window—the cut was behind my ear—when the prisoner's wife shoved me down, she pushed me by my breast—I was thrown down sideways on the bed—there was beer on the table when I went there—there was no bread and cheese—they were not eating any thing—I eat nothing in the house—there was nobody in bed—Catherine Donovan was there—she lives in the middle room—she is not here—she is Timothy Driscoll's wife, not my brother's wife—there are two Mrs. Driscolls—I cannot say whether Catherine is the wife of the prisoner or Timothy—both the wives were present—neither of them were in bed at the time—the bed was only kid down—the prisoner and I come from the same county in Ireland—I have known him since I have been a child—I did not know the prisoner was in the house when I went there—it was Timothy I went to gossip with—I was quite sober when I went—I had received my wages at a public-house, and had a pint or two of beer—I had no gin —I had been at the house about half-an-hour before we began to talk about the scholarship—I drank two tumblers of beer there—there were not above two pots.

COURT. Q. What do you labour at? A. I was a navigator—we sometimes get paid as late as eleven o'clock, and at public-houses.

MARY DRISCOLL . I am the wife of John Driscoll. I am no relation to the prisoner—I live in the same court—I know Sullivan and his wife—we are old friends—on the night in question I heard his wife call out "Murder!"—I went in, and found Sullivan bleeding—he appeared to be sober—I sent for Mr. Tatham, the doctor—I was at the Thames Police office, and heard the prisoner say to his wife, that he hoped he should get over it, as he had the misfortune of doing it, but he would make some of the b—s swing the rope.

JOHN WELSH . I am a policeman. I was in Burford's-court on the night in question—I went up stairs to where Sullivan lived, and saw John Sullivan sitting on the bed, bleeding—I came down stairs, made inquiry, and went to the prisoner's room, at No. 6—I found him standing up, with this piece of iron in his hand—I said, "You are my prisoner"—he said, "Very well; whatever was done to Sullivan, I done it"—he was sober—I searched him, but found no knife in his possession—I did not search the premises—I saw Wood on the floor of Timothy's room, down stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not appear as if he had been drinking?

A. No, he did not—I did not sec the signs of any liquor on him—he was sober—he might have been drinking, I cannot say—he appeared to be sober, not to have been drinking—he made no resistance.

CHRISTOPHER TATHAM . I am a surgeon. I was called in to see Sullivan on the 15th of August, about three o'clock in the morning, at Burford's court—I found him seated on a chair in his house—he appeared to be very much excited—a wound was inflicted on the left side of the neck, five inches long, about half an inch below the ear, extending from the side of the neck on to the cheek—it was more than one inch in depth—there had been considerable hemorrhage, from the appearance on his clothes; but when I arrived it had ceased—he appeared considerably excited, as if he had been taking liquor, I should think beer—I did not smell any spirits—he was not intoxicated—he was quite capable of knowing what he said and did—he appeared to be agitated by passion—I dressed the wound, which had extended through the carotid glands under the ear, and the external carotid artery was laid bare, but not divided; if it had been, I consider he would have been dead before I could have arrived—he has been under my care ever since—there is now every appearance of his doing well—I should say decidedly it was what is termed an incised wound, such as a knife or razor, or some sharp-cutting instrument would make—it could not hare been inflicted by any thing else—it was quite a clean cut; the edge was not jagged at all—I put four sutures into the wound.

Cross-examined. Q. Might not that wound have been caused by a broken piece of glass, if he was thrown violently on it? A. No; I do not think it could—a wound of that description could not be inflicted by a point of glass—if the edge of the glass against which he was pushed was proportionate to the length of the wound, that might account for the appearance.

COURT. Q. Would it have done so if the edge of the glass was of the common thickness of a pane of glass, or must it be sharper than that? A. I do not think a piece of glass would have cut the wound so clean, the edge would be more ragged, and I should have found some small pieces of glass adhering to the edge—I should say if the prosecutor had fallen down on glass in that position, it might have produced that wound, but not by falling against a pane of glass in a window.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

THOMAS JOSEPH TUCKWELL, ROBERT PERKINS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2149
VerdictsGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentencesTransportation

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2149. THOMAS JOSEPH TUCKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August, at St. Andrew, Holborn, 30 sovereigns, 10 half-sovereigns, 80 half-crowns, 300 shillings, 30 sixpences, 14 groats, and 15l. Bank-note, the monies of Henry Leighton Mayo Hawthorn, in his dwelling-house; and ROBERT PERKINS , for feloniously and maliciously inciting him to commit the said felony.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

HENRY LEIGHTON MAYO HAWTHORN . I am a tea-dealer, and carry on business in High Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrew. The prisoner Tuckwell was in my service about six weeks ago, as town-traveller—he was not with me quite a month—he did not suit me, and I parted with him—Perkins was in my employment from the time of my commencing business, which was at the beginning of April, and continued so till this offence was committed—on Saturday evening, the 14th of August, I had property to the amount of 65l. 11s. 3d. in my cash-box—there were three

5l. notes, twenty or thirty sovereigns, and three 5l. parcels of silver, made up in brown paper, and marked—I took my cash-box to my bed-room on retiring to rest, and on Sunday morning, about ten minutes to eleven o'clock, previous to going to church, I left it safe on my bureau in my bed-room—it then had that property in it—Perkins went out on Sunday morning about ten minutes before me—I went to church, returned home about half-past one, immediately went to my bed-room in consequence of my mother giving me information, and found the cash-box broken open, and the whole, with the exception of two 5l. notes, missing—a fire-escape ladder which was put on boxes immediately under the trap-door of the roof, was gone—I searched the premises with an officer, but was not able to find any body—there is a loft on the roof, belonging to Mr. Booker, a fishmonger, a neighbour of mine, similar to my own—I merely looked into that loft, but did not discover any thing—Perkins came in about five on Sunday afternoon—I let him in—I said nothing till he got to the drawing-room—I then named to him the circumstances of the robbery—he turned very pale—I went out with Perkins about seven that evening to look for the light-porter who carries out my parcels—I asked Perkins some questions respecting Tuck well—I made him no promise or threat—I merely put the question to him in consequence of a suspicion which crossed my mind—I did not say it would be better for him to tell, or worse if he did not—nor any thing of that kind—I did not at that time suspect him—I asked what he knew about Tuckwcll's character—I told him he had stated to my mother and sister that Tuckwell was a very bad character, that he thought him capable of any thing in swearing away a man's life—he said he knew nothing more of him than that he was addicted to smoking cigars—I asked him when he had seen him last—he said he had not seen him for some time—I questioned him further, and after some time he said, in a careless sort of manner, that he had seen him on the Saturday morning, and had not seen him after that time—the police inspector came about half-past twelve on Sunday night—that was after Tuckwell had been taken into custody—Perkins then remarked, "I should not wonder if Tuckwell said I had some concern in the robbery"—the keys of the inner and outer shop-door on Saturday night were taken to my bed-room, and hung on a nail inside the door—I found Tuckwell at the station about a quarter to twelve on Sunday night—next morning I was standing near Tuckwell at the police-court —I did not make him any promise or threat.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Before you said any thing to him, had you spoken to a policeman named Jarvis? A. I had, on the subject of the robbery—I do not know that I mentioned any thing about Tuckwell to the policeman—most likely I mentioned Tuckwells name to him—I believe I might—it was natural to do so—I did not authorize Jarvis to make a communication to Tuckwell on the subject—I believe Tuckwell had made a communication to Jarvis previous to my having say conversation with him.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you ask Tuckwell any questions, or did he make a communication to you? A. I asked him no questions—he made a communication voluntarily—he said that Perkins was concerned in the robbery—that the plan was, he was to come on the Saturday morning, and that Perkins then "gave him over the keys of the house and shop tied together, and 2s. to buy similar keys—that he was to come at noon, when

I went to dinner—Perkins was then to admit him through the shop to the sugar-vault at the back of the shop below stairs—that he was to be there, concealed till I came down from dinner—Perkins was then to go down to him, and cover him up with the sugar mats, to effectually conceal him, and he was to meet Perkins on the Sunday afternoon at four o'clock—they were then to divide the money, and he believed Perkins was to come back to his employ as usual—that he (Tuckwell) had come at the appointed time, that Perkins had admitted him through the shop, had been with him three times during the afternoon in the vault, that he came to him after I retired to bed on the Saturday night, took him to his own bed-room, and they slept together—that he concealed him in the cupboard on the Sunday morning, and Perkins then went out—he also said that while he was in my bed-room committing the robbery, he heard the lock tried twice—he did not say any thing more—he did not give me any account of what he did in the room, or how he got out of the house.

Cross-examined by MR. CHAMBERS. Q. When was it you had the conversation with Tuckwell? A. On Monday—in the early part of the morning—Perkins was not there—he was attending at the shop at the time—we left him at the counter, but I took the precaution to leave Mrs. Hawthorn in the shop also—I cannot say I suspected him, but I felt certain the robbery had been committed by somebody in my employ, and I did not know how far any one else might be concerned—my mother left home about half an hour after me, to join us at church—she was the last person in the house—I left the servant-maid to take care of the house—the servant was not at Hatton-garden at first—she was sent for to come afterwards—Perkins was also sent for—he was not sent for as a witness, to my knowledge—he was taken into custody after I had the conversation with Tuckwell—Tuckwell was standing in the yard, and I went and stood by his side, as I thought it possible he might make some communication to me—I cannot say whether it was in consequence of what was said to me by the policeman, or not—I dare say half a dozen persons might hear the conversation between me and Tuckwell—he turned aside while he made the communication—I had given no specific orders after he left that he should not be allowed to come to the house, but I remonstrated with Perkins for admitting parties who I had discharged—I had not forbid it, but it was quite against my will—Tuckwell had been discharged about six weeks before the robbery—Perkins had been in my service for the last four months—I made a similar statement to the Magistrate, of what Tuckwell said to me, as I have to-day—I might have done so to other persons—I do not recollect—I am quite correct in stating that he said Perkins was concerned in the robbery, and the plan was that he was to come in on the Saturday morning—I am quite sure Tuckwell said he received the keys of the house and shop to get others like them—he did not say what he was to have them for—the cupboard he was put into is in Perkins's room—he said Perkins went out and left him there—I am sure Tuckwell gave the statement I have stated.

Q. Something has been said about Perkins turning pale, is he not naturally pale? A. Then he was unnaturally pale, nobody could avoid noticing it—I merely said to him, "Perkins, there has been a robbery committed"—whether I said, "in my house," I do not know—I did not tell him all about it at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Did not Perkins take the milk in that morning? A. I am informed so, I did not see him—I name the

amount of what I lost from finding what is left—I balance my cash once a week, and on balancing it after it was missing, I found there was 65l. 11s. 3d. missing—I have recovered 55l. 9s. 9d.—a 5l. note and five sovereigns have been retained—two 5l. notes were left in the box—altogether, I missed 65l., 11s. 3d.—that has nothing to do with the notes left in the box—I saw the money in the box on Saturday night, the last thing, twelve o'clock, or after that—I did not take any account of the sum the box contained then—I had given change, about an hour before, for two 5l. notes, and turned the gold and silver out of the bag to do so, and I saw it safe then—that was about half-past eleven at night—my family consists of my sister and brother, besides myself, my mother, and a female servant—they were all living with me at the time—I did not see the money in the box on the Sunday morning before I went to church, I merely saw the box—I was not in the habit of keeping my bed-room door locked when I went out—I discharged Tuckwell, principally on account of his not being properly qualified as town-traveller—I received a very good character with him—I am not aware that he now holds an appointment in the Castle at Windsor—he comes from Windsor—I believe his family to be very respectable—I said I probably might have spoken to Jarvis about the robbery—he said Tuckwell had made a communication to him about the robbery.

COURT. Q. If I understand, there was left at home in the house, during church-time, your servant girl? A. Yes—she is the only maid, servant—I dine at a quarter to two o'clock on Sunday—she prepares the dinner—it is not sent to the bake-house—the cleaning of the rooms up stairs is not generally done before I go to church—she was sent up by my mother to make the beds—my mother was detained half an hour, but still she joined us at church.

GEORGE BOOKER . I am a fishmonger, and live in High Holborn, next door to Mr. Hawthorn. On Sunday-night, the 15th of August, I went up stairs, and looked into the loft at the top of my house, about half-past ten o'clock, and saw a man there, concealed at the further end of the loft, lying with his hat at his feet, and his face towards the wall—I called somebody—the man did not come out directly, but when my brother came the man made his escape out of the loft, and got away from me, out on the roof of the house—I did not see him come out—Jarvis and a policeman, and my brother, went in pursuit of him over the roofs, into Red Lion-street—I remained at the top of the house—I could not follow with them—I afterwards saw Tuckwell in the custody of Jarvis, in George-street, and heard him say there was all the money just as he had taken it—it was in his pocket when he was searched—he said he was in the loft when Mr. Hawthorn, the policeman, and I were looking over the premises—we had been searching that afternoon, about half-past five o'clock, without any light—if we. had had one we should no doubt have seen him.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Who was present when he spoke about the money? A. Jarvis and others—I believe I have said before to-day that Tuckwell told me that was all the money, just as he had taken it—I will not swear it—I was examined at Hatton-garden—I do not know why I did not state it before to-day—the question was not put to we, I suppose—I was called upon to state all I knew, but that statement was made before by Mr. Hawthorn at the office.

COURT. Q. Did he produce any money? A. Not till they searched him, I believe—I did not see it.

MR. JONES. Q. Did he produce any money when he said, there was all, just as he had taken it? A. Yes—Tuckwell produced it, or the officer took it, I will not swear which—if he did not produce the money at the time he said that, he did a few minutes after—I was not close by the side of him—if I have not given his exact words, it was to that purpose—I will swear he used words to that effect—I believe those words were repeated at Hatton-garden—I will not say that I repeated them—Tuckwell said he felt more hurt at what he heard Mr. Hawthorn say than he did at the crime he had committed.

WILLIAM JARVIS . I am a policeman. I beard Mr. Booker at the top of his house on the night of the 15th of August—as I was going up the stairs of his house I heard him call me—I went on the top of the house—I followed Tuckwell over four or five houses, and there found him—I took him into the first window I came to, put the handcuffs on, and took him to the station in Red Lion-street—he was searched there, and the whole of the property found on him—I have part of it—I have a 5l. note, four sovereigns, and two half-sovereigns—I gave the remainder back to Mr. Hawthorn—thirty sovereigns, ten half-sovereigns, eighty half-crowns, fourteen fourpenny-pieces, a 5l. note, three hundred shillings, and one penny in copper, was found on him altogether—as we were going from the station to the police-office, on Monday morning, Tuckwell asked me whether I thought he should get off if there was any one else concerned in the case, and he was to split—I said I did not know, perhaps Mr. Hawthorn might be more lenient to him—I afterwards took Perkins into custody—when we got down to the police-court he said he let Tuckwell through the shop at one o'clock, and concealed him in the sugarvault, and visited him two or three times in the course of the afternoon.

Cross-examined by MR. CHAMBERS. Q. I suppose you promised him something before this? A. I did not—I did not ask him any thing—when he saw Tuckwell in the Court, after he had been in the office, he told me this—I never spoke to him about it—it was before we went in to the Magistrate that he stated this.

MARIA ROACH . I was servant to Mr. Hawthorn. On Saturday afternoon, the 14th of August, soon after one o'clock, I saw a man come on the stairs, about three stairs down the kitchen-stairs, leading from the passage to the shop—the kitchen is lower down than the shop—the sugar-vault is at the back of the kitchen—I saw Perkins three times that afternoon go to the sugar-vault—he asked me if I was going to clean the backarea—I told him I was.

COURT. Q. How do you know he meant the back area? A. We have no other area—a person must cross that area to go to the sugar-vault.

Cross-examined by MR. CHAMBERS. Q. I suppose you usually clean it on Saturday? A. Always—I cannot say exactly what time I made the beds on Sunday morning, but I believe between nine and ten o'clock—that was before my master went to church—he went about eleven—I had been up stairs before that—I went up to help to dress my mistress before she went out, which was as late as half-past eleven—my mistress's room is underneath my master's—I had no occasion to go up to my master's—

Perkins went out five or ten minutes before eleven, five or ten minutes before master—he was dressed in his Sunday clothes, as he generally was—he came home about four in the afternoon—my master was the first that went up to his room after church.

MARY ANN HAWTHORN . I am the prosecutor's mother, and live with him. On Sunday morning, the 15th of August, I saw Perkins about half-past nine o'clock—he brought the milk to me—he had the keys of the inner and outer shop doors—he took the milk in, and brought it up to me—it was a very unusual thing to bring it to me—it should be taken into the kitchen, or left on the stairs for the servant—I let him out about ten minutes to eleven, and said, "Will you dine at home, Mr. Perkins, today?"—he said, "I think I will, ma'am"—I said, "Recollect, we dine about half-past one"—he said, "I thank you, ma'am, I think I shall"—he did not come home to dinner—he came about half-past four—he saw his master first, I afterwards saw him—he told me he lad got the head-ache, and had come home, intending to ask for a cup of tea, and to lie down afterwards; that he had been to Knightsbridge, and passed our house about two o'clock, but thought it too late to come in to dinner—I said, "You cannot lie down, Mr. Perkins, for we have had a sad robbery"—he said, "Good gracious! I hope it will be found out; who do you think it can be?"—I said, "Of course we can have no suspicion, but on the servant"—(I did not know any thing then about Tuckwell being in the house)—he said, Have you had the house searched?"—I said, "Yes, we sent for the constable and police immediately"—we went down into the kitchen; and as we went down, or before that, he said, it must be the servant, he thought, for nobody else could get into the house, as I had the inner and outer door keys—when they are both locked, nobody can get in or out—there is no area in front, but a small grating—a person from the kitchen might hand a small parcel up—when he went down stairs, he said, "There can be no suspicion but of the girl; but how could she get the money away? have you had the house searched?"—I said, "Yes, thoroughly, but can find nothing"—he said she might have an accomplice, and hand the money up through the area—I said, "We are afraid that is the way it is gone"—my daughter was present part of the time, but not at that moment—we then said, somebody had gone out through the fire-escape, but could not conceive how it was possible they could get into the house to get out—my daughter said, "They have taken up the ladder of the fire-escape, and that, I think, makes the girl clear;" and Perkins said, "That is the worst thing against her."

Cross-examined by MR. CHAMBERS. Q. I think I understood you to say, you did not know whether it was you said something about handing up through the area, or him? A. At first I did not, because there was so much confusion; but the suggestion was made, and agreed to—he did not say the best plan was to search the—house and the girl's boxes, and that would set it at rest—the boxes had been searched before; he asked if the house had been searched—I know Perkins's friends, they live at Eton—I was there for a few days—I have had my doubts of Perkins's character for some time—I did not tell his friends that he was going on very well, and was a good lad—I suggested enough to the contrary to Mr. and Mrs. Perkins.

MR. HAWTHORN re-examined. This is one of the notes I received from the hotel on Saturday night—I put it into my cash-box.

Cross-examined by MR. CHAMBERS. Q. Before you went to church, did you go into your bed-room? A. Yes, I dressed there, and left immediately from the bed-room to go out—I cannot say whether I shut the bed-room door.

MRS. HAWTHORN re-examined. As soon as my son was gone to church, or a few minutes after, I went up stairs to take the cash-box down into my room previous to my going out—I tried my son's bed-room door, and could not open it—I did not examine to see whether it was locked, but it stuck, I could not open it—I looked down, and thought the key was out, but did not take particular notice—I only went to it once—I called the servant soon after, and told her, if she had not made her master's bed, she could not until he came from church, but she had better go up and see; and she went up immediately.

MARIA ROACH re-examined. I remember going up to my master's door by my mistress's desire, and could not open it—I looked through the key-hole, but could not see whether the key was in it.

WILLIAM JARVIS re-examined. I did not search Mr. Booker's loft, nor Mr. Hawthorn's loft.

MR. HAWTHORN re-examined. On the Monday morning I accompanied an officer to Mr. Booker's loft, and he found these two keys at the extremity, where Tuckwell had been lying—they fit my doors exactly.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. Have you tried them? A. I have—they are false keys—I have my own here as well.

(—Clark, grocer, No. 75, Shoreditch, and—Wilson, a landing-waiter, deposed to Perkins's good character.)

TUCKWELL— GUILTY . Aged 18

PERKINS— GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for ten Years.

JOSEPH LYONS, ROSETTA LYONS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2150
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2150. JOSEPH LYONS and ROSETTA LYONS were indicted for feloniously receiving of a certain evil-disposed person, on the 3rd of August, 3lbs. weight of brass, value 1s. 6d. the goods of John Warner and others; well knowing it to have been stolen.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE MILLWOOD . I live in Goswell-street, and am in the employ of John Warner and Sons, brass-founders, in Jewin-crescent. The witness Dedross was in their employ—on the 3rd of August I found two brass, weights laid behind a basket in one of the rooms—I told Ford of it, marked them, and left them in the same place—about three o'clock I stopped the boy Dedross—Mr. Charles Warner came up and took him into the counting-house, and Dow, the constable, took him away—I saw the officer pass me, with one of the weights in his hand, which I had marked in the morning.

HENRY FORD . I am in the Messrs. Warner's employ. On the 3rd of August Millwood told me something about some weights—I saw Dedross going from the basket-room that day, and placing something in his cap, which was on his head—he had no business there—in consequence of some conversation, he was brought into the counting-house by Mr. Warner—I felt his breast, and took a weight out from his inside pocket—it was one of the weights which was taken from the basket-room—Millwood afterwards saw the weight in the constable's possession.

JAMES DEDROSS (a prisoner.) I am twelve years old—I go to church and chapel sometimes, and have been taught to say my prayers—I am in the employ

of Messrs Warner. I remember, on the 3rd of August, Ford taking the brass weight out of my breast—I had stolen it out of the warehouse—I had some conversation with Mr. Warner about it, and went to the station—I afterwards went with the weight to a marine-store shop belonging to the prisoners—I had been there twice before—I saw them both—I took the weight to them, and they said they did not give so much for new weights as they did for old—they did not both speak at the same time—I spoke to the female prisoner—the man was at the door—I showed the weight to the female prisoner—she asked what it was—I said, "A four pound"—she said it was not a four pound, it was but a three pound—the male prisoner was near enough to hear what she said—she gave me 10 1/2 d., and gave the weight to a girl who was in the parlour—there is a partition put up between the shop and the back room—the girl was in the back room, and the woman too—I did not observe what the girl did with the weight—nothing more passed between me and the female prisoner—I said nothing to the male prisoner at all—they knew who I was, because I had been there before—they knew I came from my masters, and that I took such things from my masters—they had asked me when I was there before why I did not bring more than one or two pounds at a time—I told them where I came from the first time I went—they asked me where I came from, and I told them I came from Messrs. Warners'—I told the man and woman both—when I sold this weight she owed me 6d. for the last time I went, and she gave me 3d. of it, which made 13 1/2 d.—I gave the money to the policeman when I came out—there were three policemen at the comer house all but one from the prisoners, about twelve yards from the shop—when I gave them the money they went into the shop, and I followed them in—I heard what was said—the policemen asked where the weight was they had just bought of me, and they denied it, and said they had never seen me—I was in the shop at the time, so that they could see me—the female prisoner said it one time, and the male prisoner another—the female spoke first—she said she had never seen me before, and that she had just come from over the way from buying a herring, and that I had never been there, and never taken any weight—the male prisoner told the policeman to search about the place, and said he never saw any weight come in—the policeman searched about the place, but could not find the weight—the policemen then went up stairs into the bed-room, and they took the prisoners and me to the station.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you not at first give a different, account of this? A. Not that I know of—I was in Dow's custody at first—I told him I had sold the weight to a boy that sold cherries—Dow asked me where the boy was to be found—I told him by Hoxton new church—I did not say how much the boy was to give mo—I afterwards told him I was going to take it to Petticoat-lane—when I went into the prisoners shop the officers were about twelve yards off—I am sure there were three together—I think there were two City policemen, and No. 11, from Spitalfields—two went one way, and I and one the other, and they met one another before I got to the shop—the male prisoner was standing at the shop-door, talking to a butcher who was outside the door, leaning against the side—I passed by him, and went in—the female prisoner was behind the shop—after I sold the weight I went in with Barker and the other officers.

Q. Have you not stated, when you went in with Barker and the others, "I gave it," meaning the weight, "to a girl who was standing behind

the counter, and she brought it to you," meaning the female prisoner, "and you were standing at that table?" A. No, not to my recollection, because they were both behind the partition.

COURT. Q. You say you first told Dow you had sold this weight to a boy who sold cherries? A. I told him I intended to sell it to him, not that I had sold it, because I was not off the premises.

STEPHEN Dow (City police-constable, No. 166.) I saw Dedross on the 3rd of August—he went to a marine-store shop in Petticoat-lane—I was about four yards from him when he went into the shop—I saw him go in—he had a 4lbs. weight—I saw it the minute before he entered the shop—I could see into the shop—I saw Mrs. Lyons in the shop—I am sure it was her, and her husband was standing at the door—I am certain Dedross had no money when he went into the shop, for I had searched him at the station in Moor-lane about three o'clock—it was about half-past six when he went into the shop, but he was never out of my sight during that time—he remained in the shop about two minutes and a half—he gave me 13 1/2 d. when he came out—I searched him when he came out, and he had not the weight about him—I and Barker then went into the shop, and found Mrs. Lyons there, and her husband standing in front of the door— Dedross was with me—we accused the parties of buying the weight of the lad—the female prisoner denied ever having seen the boy before, and said he must be an impudent young rascal for so saying—the male prisoner said we were welcome to search—we did so, but could find nothing of the weight—they offered willing search—as we went into the room I saw a girl go into a side passage—I told the male prisoner I was directly opposite, and saw the lad go in—I did not know the prisoners before—I told them the boy had no money in his possession when he went into the house, and he had 13 1/2 d. when he came out, and I was certain he had the weight when he went into the shop; and then the female prisoner said he was an impudent young rascal far so saying, they bad never seen him before in the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Are there not several marine-store shops about there? A. I am not acquainted with the neighbourhood, and did not notice—I went with Dedross and another officer to within a rod of the shop—we were two doors off on the same side of the way—I saw Dedross go in—he did not speak to any one as he went in—I saw a butcher and Lyons standing in front of the door—I was in private clothes—Barker was at the adjoining corner—he had left me about five minutes before Dedross went in—Dedross and I were left alone for a moment or two—we three policemen were not all standing together when Dedross left us to go in—I crossed the road on to the opposite side of the way when Dedross went in—when we went in there was another female there—she was not behind the counter—as I went into the room she went into the side passage—she was just entering into the passage—she was not in the shop, but in the adjoining parlour—when I went into the shop I saw a glimpse of her going into the side passage, making her way into the shop.

HENRY CHAS. BARKER (police-constable H 11.) On the 3rd of August I was with Dow—I saw Dedross go into the prisoners' house in Petticoat-lane—there are a good many marine-store shops about there, but I have not the least doubt it was into the prisoners' shop he went—I was next door but two from the shop when he went in, about ten yards off—I was not able to see into the shop—I searched the boy before he went in, and

he had a weight with him—he remained in the shop about five minutes, at least that was the time from the time I parted with him till he came back—I searched him when lie came back—he had no weight then, and he had 1 1/2 d.—he had not that money about him when he went in, because he was searched at Spitalfields station in my presence—after he came out, I, Dow, and Perrin went in—the Magistrate did not bind Perrin over—Lyons was standing on the threshold of the door—I said, "You have just received a weight of this boy"—he said, "I know nothing about any weight," and he called to his wife—she was standing in the parlour, leading out of the shop—as I went into the shop I saw a female leave the parlour by a door into a passage, which leads into a yard, and comes again into the shop—when Mrs. Lyons came out she said she knew nothing about a weight—Dedross said, "I have just sold you a weight"—she said, "You must be mistaken, for there are other shops in the lane besides ours"—he said, "No, I am not; I gave the weight to a girl, and you were, standing at the table: she brought it to you at that table, and you gave me 1s. 1 1/2 d. for it"—she denied it, and repeatedly said she knew nothing about any weight—she denied all knowledge of the boy—we were afforded every facility in searching the house—we could not find any weight—I went out in two or three minutes, but could not find where the girl had gone to—she was not in the house.

Cross-examined. Q. You had seen the 13 1/2 d. found on the boy before you went in? A. Yes, he came out to me with it in his hand—when we went into the shop, Dedross said to the female prisoner, "I gave it to a girl who was standing behind the counter, and she brought it to you, and you were standing at that table"—he did not then say any thing about the 13 1/2 d.—he did afterwards—I cannot say exactly when—there was a constant repetition—I told the Magistrate that he had said she gave him 13 1/2 d.

(Stephen Bailey, hair-dresser, Middlesex-street, Aldgate; Moses Benjamin, fishmonger, Duke-street, Aldgate; Simon Marks, sponge-merchant, Middlesex-street, Aldgate; Abraham Joseph, glass-cutter, Dorset-street, Spitalfields; James Butler, carpenter, Thomas-street, Church-lane, Commercial-road; Henry Bobby, gas-fitter, Middlesex-street, Whitechapel; and R. H. Levin, grocer, Middlesex-street; deposed to the prisoners' good character.)

JOSEPH LYONS- GUILTY . Aged 33.— Transported for Ten Years.

ROSETTA LYONS— NOT GUILTY .

(There were two other indictments against the prisoners, upon which no evidence was offered against the female prisoner.)

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOSEPH BEAUMONT SHIERS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2151
VerdictsGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentencesTransportation

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2151. JOSEPH BEAUMONT SHIERS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May, 1 coat, value 3l., the goods of Samuel Stiff:— also for stealing, on the 4th of August, 2 watches, value 6l.; 1 ring, value 6s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; the goods of James Francis:— also, on the 31st of July, 1 watch, value 4l. 16s.; 2 seals, value 2s.; 1 watch-chain, value 6d.; 2 watch-keys, value 6d.; and 1 watch-guard, value 1s.; the goods of Richard Hemmings; from the person of Richard Hemmings the younger; to all which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

THOMAS DAVIS.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2152
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2152. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August, 1 coat, value 5s.; the goods of William Powell; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

FREDERICK THORNHILL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2153
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2153. FREDERICK THORNHILL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August, 1 bird-cage, value 2s. 6d., and 1 glass fountain, value 3d.; the goods of John Hewett.

JOHN HEWETT . I live in Thomas-street, Clerkenwell. I lost a bird and cage, worth 2s. 9d.—I stopped the prisoner with it—he said he had won it at a raffle six weeks ago—I had only lost it three-quarters of an hour—this is the cage.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How far from your house did you find him? A. Five or six minutes' walk—in Rosomon-street—it hung in the yard, too high for the prisoner to reach, I should think—I do not know a lad named Gunter, who has enlisted as a soldier in the East India service.

JURY. Q. Was there any thing to enable the prisoner to get up to the cage? A. There were tubs and pails, which he might get on—it was about five feet from the ground—there was a pair of steps in the yard, near the cage—there was nothing to intimate that any one had got on the steps—I do not think he could get to the cage without moving the steps.

WILLIAM STAVELEY . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner in charge, with the cage in his hand—he said he had won it six weeks before—he was offering it for sale to a man—I do not know Gunter.

MR. PAYNE called

THORNHILL. I am the prisoner's father. I have seen a boy named Gunter—he is gone for a soldier—my son was not intimate with him to my knowledge—I never saw them together—he enlisted immediately my son was apprehended.

Prisoner. Gunter gave it to me, and told me to say I won it at a raffle.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN CONNELL.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2154
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2154. JOHN CONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August, 1 watch-stand, value 10s.; 1 watch, value 1l. 10s.; 2 splitrings, value 1d.; and 1 watch-key, value 3d.; the goods of Richard Stone.

ELIZABETH-REYNOLDS. I am servant to Richard Stone, of Hertford-road, Kingsland. On Monday, the 2nd of August, my attention was called to the street-door—I saw the prisoner running down the garden in front of Mr. Stone's house, I called him back, and asked what he wanted, he said he wanted nothing—I asked what he did there—he said he would leave me a bill, and he gave me this paper—I ran into the front parlour, and missed this watch and stand off the mantel-shelf—I had seen it safe ten minutes before—I saw him running down the road, and gave an alarm at the baker's opposite, they ran after him, and brought him back.

Prisoner. She said I was running down the garden, and she was at dinner. Witness. I was at dinner, heard footsteps in the garden, ran out, and saw him running—he had no business in the garden—if he wished to come to the house, it would lead to it—the bill offers to purchase rags and all sorts of rubbish.

WILLIAM GEORGE KERR . I live at No. 67, Bishopsgate-street. I was in the Hertford-road, saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Stone's gate, and run—the witness gave an alarm, and he was stopped—when he was running

I saw him throw something away—he was taken back to the spot, and there I found the watch and stand.

Prisoner. He called me back, and I went back, and he said they had lost a watch, but I did not steal it; I only delivered a bill.

JESSE PAKES . I am a policeman. I received the prisoner in charge, took him to a ditch, about a quarter of a mile off, pointed out by Kerr, and found the watch and stand—it was taken out by another person, while I held the prisoner—I found a quantity of bills on him, headed "James Green," similar to the one left at the house—there was no address on the bill left at the house—it offers to buy all sorts of things, but he had no money about him.

Prisoner's Defence. I delivered the bill there, but never touched the watch.

GUILTY .* Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

JOSEPH DRAPER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2155
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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2155. JOSEPH DRAPER was indicted for embezzlement.

HENRY DOBSON . I am a baker, and live at Hammersmith. The prisoner was in my employment, and served customers every day—some persons pay for bread on delivery—on Monday, the 2nd of August, he accompanied me to Kensington, in my horse and cart—I left him in charge of the horse and cart, and went to Mark-lane, giving him instructions what to do—my wife gave him bread and flour, and a number of weekly bills—he had to call on thirty-four or thirty-five customers—I did not receive from him for Susan Wells any money that day—I never saw him from that time till I saw him in custody—Wells owed me between 6l. and 7l. at the time—he did not account to me or to any body for it, nor for any money from Mrs. Fisher.

Prisoner. He has received this money since I have been in custody—my father has paid him 1l. 10l. Witness. His father has not paid me what I charge him with—he left 30l. at my house—that is more than I charge him with receiving from Wells and Fisher—the money is at my house now—I did not accept it—I have not returned it—I received orders from the Magistrate not to do it—I told him of it—on the 2nd of August, he was intrusted with twenty quartern loaves, thirty-four half-quarterns, and some flour, with the weekly bills—he returned to my house with the horse and cart, brought back two quarterns, three half-quarterns, and one quartern of flour, and put the horse in the stable—I wrote to his father at Hemp-stead, and told him, and I wrote again when he was taken, to tell his father he was remanded to such a day—his father came over on the Saturday—he said he was very sorry, and if I would allow him, he would pay me what he had robbed me of—I said it was 3l. 1s.—he said if I would be as lenient as possible, he would pay me—I said it was not in my hands, he was before a Magistrate, but I had no wish to press the "case, and would state to the Magistrate, if he thought proper to leave 30s., if the Magistrate would like me to receive it, I should be satisfied—I named it to the Magistrate, who said I had acted right, and was not to give the money up till the trial—I hoped the Magistrate would dismiss the case, and I did not take my witnesses—he remanded him, and at the next examination I took some witnesses—he received money at eight places the same day, but the Magistrate said I need only bring two witnesses.

SUSAN WELLS . I live at New-road, Hammersmith; my husband is a

carpenter. On the 2nd of August, I paid the prisoner 20s. for bread, for Mr. Dobson—he gave me a receipt, which the policeman has—this is it.

AGNES FISHER . I live at Starch-green, Hammersmith. On the 2nd of August I paid the prisoner 8s. 8d. for Mr. Dobs on, for bread—he receipted the bill, but I have mislaid the receipt.

JAMES GREYSTONE . I am foreman to the prosecutor; the prisoner lived with him. On the 2nd of August he returned home, about three o'clock in the afternoon—Mrs. Dobson was booking my bread, and told him she would book his bread when she had done mine—he made no answer, but went out of the shop and did not return.

THOMAS BUCK (police-constable T 32.) I took him in charge about half-past twelve o'clock, on the night of the 8th of August, in Hammersmith—he said nothing.

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to replace the money—Mr. Dobson received 30s. of the amount of my father, and said if that money was replaced, he did not wish to press the charge.

GUILTY. Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy. — Confined Three Months.

HENRY WOODMAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2156
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2156. HENRY WOODMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August, 1 hat, value 6s., the goods of James Francis Thomson.

FRANCIS WILLIAMS . I am shopman to James Francis Thomson, a pawnbroker in East-street, Marylebone. On the 7th of August I was taking goods in from outside the shop, and missed a hat—I noticed the prisoner and two other boys in Paddington-street afterwards—the prisoner had the hat in his hand, he was in the act of putting it on another boy's head, when I collared him—he then threw it down—I had seen it safe five minutes before—that now produced is it.

Prisoner. He said he saw it on my head, and now he says it was in my hand—two of us were taken together—I was handing it back to the one who stole it. Witness. I collared two, and the other got away.

WILLIAM JAYCOCKS (police-constable D 81.) On the 7th of August, between eight and nine o'clock, I was passing the shop, and noticed a crowd—the prisoner was given in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I met two boys, the one who was taken had it on his head—he gave it to the other to try on, and he gave it him back—it was not in my hand at all.

FRANCIS WILLIAMS re-examined. I am Quite sure it was in his hand.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined One Month.

MAURICE O'BRIEN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2157
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2157. MAURICE O'BRIEN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August, 1 saw, value 2s. 3d., and 1 jacket, value 3d.; the goods of Charles Shepherd.

CHARLES SHEPHERD . I am a carpenter, and live in Britannia-street. This saw and jacket, now produced are mine—I had left them in an unfinished building in King-street, Holborn, on the 6th of August, at half-five o'clock, when I left off work—I missed them at six next morning, when I came to work—they were in the hands of the police.

JOHN SIMS HANDCOCK . (police-constable E 38.) I heard a noise in the ground-floor of an unfinished building in King-street, Holborn, on the 6th of August—I saw the prisoner on the first-floor—he came down stairs, and came towards a fence which encloses the building, and which is about seven feet high—he got over it—I went up to him, and asked what business he had there—he said he had been to see a servant girl—I said I should take him into custody—he run away—I overtook him—he had on

a flannel jacket, when I first saw him in the building, and when he came out, he had the prosecutor's jacket on over it—I searched the premises, and found the saw placed about three inches from the door, inside, so that it could he taken from under the door outside.

(James and Catherine Hendry, of Chichester-rents, deposed to the prisoner's good character, hut admitted that they were aware of his having been in custody; James Hendry was committed to Newgate.)

GUILTY .* Aged 50.— Transported for Seven Years.

GEORGE CLAYTON, GEORGE RADFORD.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2158
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2158. GEORGE CLAYTON and GEORGE RADFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July, 1 watch, value 2l. 1 watch-ribbon, value 2d. 1 watch-key, value 4d.; 1 coat, value 50s.; 2 pairs of hoots, value 12s.; 2 printed books, value 2s.; 4 half-crowns, 3 shillings, 1 sixpence, 1 groat, and 2 pence; the property of William Cook; and that Clayton had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM COOK . I am a shoemaker, and live in Brick-lane, the prisoners worked for a Mr. Pacey, in the same room with me. On Friday afternoon, the 9th of July, I went out, leaving my watch on the mantel-piece in the workshop, and in an adjoining room my coat and money, and two pairs of Blucher-boots—I came home between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening—all the articles were then missing, and the prisoners were gone—this watch, now produced is mine, it is worth 2l., and these two pairs of Blucher-boots—the coat has not been recovered—it was almost new—there were two books in the pocket of it.

Clayton. I made an agreement with Cook to buy a pair of Blucher-boots of him, and was to pay him 2s. a-week—I had the boots, but I know nothing of any thing else. Witness. I did not agree to sell him the boots.

Radford. I agreed to take the other pair of boots. Witness. It is not true./

HENRY CLARK . I am a japanner, and live in Queen-street, Seven-dials. On the 10th of July I was in the skittle-ground of the Colliers' Arms, public-house, near New Church-court, Strand, and saw the prisoners there playing at skittles together—Clayton asked Radford what time it was—he pulled out a watch and showed him, it had no glass—it was a very thick watch—that now produced is it—I am sure Radford put it back into his pocket.

HENRY ALFREY . I am a currier, and live in Duke-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields. I was at the Collier's Arms public-house on Saturday the 10th of July, and found this watch without a glass—I picked it up under the seat where the prisoners sat together, and went to the station with it—I do not know how it came there.

Clayton. When I was taken into the parlour I did not sit near the place—I never saw that man—he never came near the room. Witness. I went into the parlour with the policeman—the prisoners were taken to Bow-street—I found the watch after they were gone.

WILLIAM MARKS (police-constable G 101.) In consequence of information, I went to the Collier's Arms public-house, between one and two o'clock—I waited there about a Quarter of an hour, and then saw the prisoners in the court—I took them into custody, took them into the parlour, and desired them" to consider themselves prisoners—they said they knew nothing of the matter—I had not then told them what was the matter—I took them to Bow-street with the assistance of another constable—each of

them had on a pair of Bluchers—I afterwards took them from them, and have now produced them—Alfrey brought me the watch, and said he had picked it up in the public-house—I do not recollect that the prisoners noticed that observation.

Clayton's Defence. I and the prosecutor have been several times talking of bargaining for a pair of boots—these boots were fresh made by a party in the place—I was to pay him 3s. a-week—6s. was to be the value if I paid the money down, and 7s. if I paid 3s. a-week.

WILLIAM TOPPER . I produce a certificate of Clayton's former conviction—I was not present when he pleaded guilty, and had not apprehended him—I had to prosecute him—I was at Guildhall when he was charged with the offence—the constable who apprehended him is not here.

CLAYTON— GUILTY of Larceny only. Aged 32.

RADFORD— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined One Year.

WILLIAM HARDING.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2159
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2159. WILLIAM HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July, 96 pencil-cases, value 2l., the goods of Charles Goodall and another, his masters.

JONATHAN CHARLES GOODALL . I am in partnership with my father, Charles Good all, as card-makers, in Great College-street, Camden-town. The prisoner was in our service about three weeks—I missed eight or nine dozen pencil-cases, on Friday night, the 26th of July, from under the counter in the counting-house, which was not the place his employ took him to—on Saturday morning, the 7th of August, I saw him, and told him I had got a pencil from a person named Roach—he said he knew nothing about it—I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You employ a great many men? A. Men and boys—he had only worked a few days for us—his father does not live far from us, but I do not know him—the persons on the premises could go into the counting-house—I did not miss the pencils till I received information that he was selling them in the neighbourhood, and I went to the parties who bought them.

LEWIS BROWN . I am an errand-boy, and live in York-place, Camden-town. I saw the prisoner in High-street, Camden-town, a few weeks ago, just by the oil-shop, near the Mother Red Cap public-house—he said, "Have you got that knife now?"—I said, "No"—he took three pencil-cases out of his pocket—I asked where he got them—he said a boy in Oxford-street, that worked on them, made him a present of them—he offered to sell me one—I said they were of no use to me—he offered it to me for 1s., then for 10d., and then for 8d.—I said I would give 6d. for it—he said, "No," and I went away—I had got to the corner of a street, when he came and said, "I will take 6d. for it, and you must buy some apples"—I said I had no more money—I bought one for 6d., and sold it to Mr. Liney's son—I believe this now produced to be it.

Cross-examined. Q. You told Liney you had it given to you? A. No—I told him I gave 6d. for it—he said so at Marylebone-street—I know the pencil-case again—there is no mark on it—I am Quite sure I did not say I had it given to me—I have known the prisoner three years—he used to play with me.

GEORGE LINEY . I live in High-street, Camden-town. I bought a pencil-case of Brown for 1s.—I asked where he got it—he said he had it given to him—he did not say whether he gave any thing for it—it was delivered to Good all.

Cross-examined. Q. You know he said it was given to him? A. Yes—he did not say who gave it to him—I know the prisoner by sight.

ROBERT WAITE . I live in Collis-street North. I know the prisoner—I saw him by the Canal-terrace—he chucked two dozen and a half into the canal, and told me they were pencil-cases—I asked him where he got them—he told me he painted pictures for them—I afterwards saw him by the canal—he had no pencil-cases then—he threw them into the canal in a blue paper—he threw them in because some boy said there was a policeman—I afterwards saw him at the corner of the New North-road—he had something in paper—I asked him what they were—he said, pencil-cases, and that he had two or three dozen—I bought two of him for 3d.—I sold one for 6d. and lost the other.

Cross-examined. Q. You are very fond of the Canal, I believe? A. Yes—I work close to it—I was not at work at this time, I was playing—I slept at home at night—I ran away from home for a week, and slept in in some shavings then in Allen's-buildings, Kentish-town-road—that was about the time I saw these pencil-cases—I was playing in the day-time—my father and mother were at work—they lived close by—I did not go home, as I was afraid I should have a good beating, because I stopped away from work one afternoon—I was at home when the pencil-cases were thrown into the canal—I did not go to Mr. Good all with the pencil-cases—the policeman came to me—I did not know they were pencil-cases which the prisoner chucked into the canal till he told me—I saw him chuck a packet in—I do not know how he came to tell me—I was playing with him—he paints pictures, and he said a boy gave them to him for painting pictures—I worked for Mr. Good all about twelve months ago—I worked there a fortnight—I left because I did not have enough wages, and went to work with my father—I did not know above two or three of Mr. Good all's boys—I said nothing about this till the policeman came to me about my selling a pencil-case to Roach—he said he wanted me to come to Marylebone—they did not lock me up at the station—I never got into any trouble—I have been to the prosecutor's twice after work since I left—they said they did not want any body—I did not go into the counting-house, I stood at the door—I have not been inside—when I was away from home I went back to get my victuals while my parents were out—my brother was at home—my mother never denied me victuals.

WILLIAM ROACH . I am errand-boy to Mr. Danes, a grocer, and live in Monte Video-place, Camden-town. I bought a pencil-case of the witness Hrown for 6d.—I gave it to Mr. Good all—it looked new, and had leads in it.

Cross-examined. Q. What did he tell you? A. He said he gave 3d. for it to a boy—I did not ask him what boy.

J. C. GOODALL re-examined. I produce two pencil-cases, one from Liney and one from Roach—they are the same pattern as we have in stock—we lost sixteen or seventeen dozen—the retail selling price is about 18d. each—they cost us 10d.—it is albata or German silver—they are made at Birmingham.

Cross-examined. Q. They are all made on the same plan? A. Yes—there are, no doubt, plenty of them in shops in London.

JURY. Q. Can you swear to this identical pencil-case? A. No—it is the same pattern as we have for sale, and all that pattern is gone.

GEORGE COOK . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner—he said nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

CHARLES HENRY WATSON.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2160
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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2160. CHARLES HENRY WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July, 4 sovereigns, and 4 half-sovereigns, the monies of Thomas Wilcox, his master, and that he had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS WILCOX . I am a publican, and live in Bear-street, Leicester-square. The prisoner was five weeks in my service—I delivered him four sovereigns and four half-sovereigns, to get exchanged for silver, on Saturday evening, the 17th of July—he absconded—I saw him again on the 2nd of August, in custody—he never brought me the silver.

GEORGE PECK . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in High-street, St. Giles's—he said he had lost 17s., and that as his master would accuse him of having stolen it, he thought he might as well take the whole.

ISAAC SLADE . I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clarke's office—I know the prisoner to be the person it applies to—I was present at the trial—(read.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Ten Years.

NEW COURT.—Saturday, August 28th, 1841.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

JAMES CURRY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2161
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2161. JAMES CURRY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August, 1 towel, value 1s.; 21 sheets of paper, value 2s.; 3 pen-holders, value 6d.; and 36 steel pens, value 2d.; the goods of the Lords and others, Commissioners of the Royal Hospital, Chelsea; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 45.— Confined Three Months.

JOHN SPURRIER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2162
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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2162. JOHN SPURRIER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August, 1 watch-case, value 1l., the goods of William Humphreys; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

ELIAS SMALKALDEN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2163
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2163. ELIAS SMALKALDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June, 48 precious stones, called brilliants, value 138l. 6s., and 25 1/2 carats weight of diamonds, value 37l. 17s.; the goods of Lyon Samuel.

MR. CHAMBERS conducted the Prosecution.

LYON SAMUEL . I am a diamond merchant, living in Bury-street, St. Mary Axe. I have had dealings with the prisoner about two years—I have known him three or four years—I have entrusted him with diamonds to sell—he came to me, in the morning of the 17th of June last, between nine and ten o'clock—he said he wanted some certain sized diamonds for Messrs. Nock and Williams, between two or three grains each—I told him I had not got three grains, I had two grains—he said they would do—Nock and Williams are jewellers in Firth-street, Soho—he said he saw the clerk, who gave him an order to bring some diamonds of the size for Nock and Williams—in consequence of that I gave him an order to Blogg and Co., and told him the diamonds were not in my possession—besides that, he said he had an order from a party coming from abroad, for some

rose diamonds, and he had got to meet the party at the Swiss Coffee-house—I let him have the rose diamonds—he had twenty-five carats of diamonds, worth about 40l.—they were not sold to him—the arrangement was, that when he got any goods of me, they were entrusted to him as a broker—he received 2 1/2 per cent, commission on what he sold—he had another lot of diamonds of me—I did not see him again that day—he promised to call back in the evening, and said he would bring me a good deal of money—he said, Messrs. Nock and Williams wanted some credit, would I let them have it—I said, I knew them very well, he might trust them three months—between twelve and one o'clock the next day, a boy brought this letter to me—the prisoner was taken into custody last Friday morning, between two and three o'clock, at his own house—he said he lost the diamonds in Leadenhall-street—I heard him afterwards say, in the office, that he lost them at Charing-cross, between three and four o'clock—here is the box that he used to carry the diamonds in, with a chain round his neck.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. This is the prisoner's box, is it? A. Yes—Nock and Williams Are very respectable people—I do not think the prisoner has acted as my agent for twelve months—I find this is the largest amount of property he ever had of mine—I do not think he had 100l. worth of property of mine for a month before—he might have property of mine eight or ten times—I know Charles Isaacs, to my sorrow—I indicted him—he took the advantage of the law, and was acquitted, because there was a mistake in the name.

Q. Do you know a house in Bridges-street, Covent-garden, kept by Pruss? A. Yes, I know the house—it is not in Bridges-street—I have got nothing to do with the house—it is a club-house—I bought the lease of the house, and let it to Pruss—I know a man of the name of Isbell—I never gave him 5l. or any thing else, either money or money's worth.

Q. Did you ever represent you was born at Portsmouth? A. I understand I was born there—I did not give Isbell 5l. to swear I was born at Portsmouth—I gave him no money—he said he knew my father, and that I was born at Portsmouth—I became a freeman of London four or five years ago—Isbell was the person I produced to prove I was born at Portsmouth—upon my oath I did not give him any money—I had no attorney in the case—Isbell did not receive a farthing for coming to state I was born at Portsmouth—there was no affidavit—I do not remember an affidavit being read in my presence before the commissioner—I know Benjamin, of Duke's-place—he keeps a coffee-house—dealers used to go to it—it is a place of business—there may be cards played there occasionally—I have sometimes played a rubber of whist—I never played for 5l.—I have paid for what I played for—I have not been in the house at all for two years—I do not know whether I have ever played there for as much as 5l. a game—I was examined at Clerkenwell on an occasion when a man of the name of Nathan was prosecuted—I received a subpana—it may be a year ago, or more.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not swear there that you never played for more than a shilling a game in your life? A. I do not know what I swore; but that has nothing to do with it.

Q. Did you not go from that very place at Clerkenwell, and on that very same evening played at Benjamin's for 5l. a game? A. No—I did not play for any sum—I have not been at Benjamin's for two years—I

never lost at any sitting at Benjamin's as much as 100l.—Benjamin was indicted by my mother-in-law—she was not living with me at the time—I do not know where she lived—she was the prosecutrix against Benjamin for keeping a gambling-house—she did not prosecute him at my instance —I was subpoenaed as a witness—I believe Mrs. Moseley, my mother-in-law, proved the gambling—the case was not tried at all—I do not know how it was—they did not call witnesses on either side.

Q. Upon your oath, did not your mother-in-law, Mrs. Moseley, receive 100? A. No, sir, and T did not receive any thing from any body for that—I did not receive 100l. nor 95l. on that occasion—I sued a party that owed me 95l., and I received it—that was Nathan—he was the prosecutor on the occasion when I was examined as a witness.

Q. Since the prisoner has been in custody have you been to his cell? A. No, sir—I saw him with the officer at the Mansion-house, and I saw him in the lock-up place as I went by—"the habiliments of prayer" is what they put on their arms—the inside of it contains prayers written—I can swear I never made use of such language to the prisoner while he was in the lock-up place, as to say that he would be transported for seven year, or perhaps for life—I do not remember saying any thing of the kind—he had told me before that he would pay me.

Q. Did he state in the lock-up place that he would work for you for any thing, even to blacking your shoes for you? A. I do not remember it—he did not say, "How can you, as a religious man, swear to such a false-hood as to say I mentioned the name of Nock and Williams?"—I did not have any conversation with him in the German language.

Q. Did not the prisoner produce to you the parchment with the prayers on it, and say, "Can you, on these prayers, say that I named to you Nock and Williams?" and did you not say it was on that statement you would hold him, otherwise it would be a debt? A. No, sir, I never said any thing of that kind—I did not see the prisoner's brother at the bar—the solicitor offered me 100l., and said, "If you will not take it, I can bring witnesses that will kick you out of Court."

COURT. Q. Do you swear the solicitor offered you 100l.? A. Yes my lord—I told it to my attorney—it is a wicked set upon me because I am a respectable man.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did the Lord Mayor recommend you to settle it, and desire this man to write to his friends? A. The Lord Mayor might have said it.

MR. CHAMBERS. Q. You have been asked what was the extent of your transactions with the prisoner, did he at first bring parties to sell you diamonds? Q. Yes—I always dealt with the parties, not with him—the money did not pass through his hands—the house spoken of is in Bedford-street, not Bridges-street—I sued a man named Nathan for 95l., and the Judge granted an order that he should pay it—I spoke to the prisoner at the Mansion-house, as I passed by with the officer, that was all—I did not talk with him through the bars of the cell, when the officer was not present—the prisoner called to me in Hebrew, and the observation I made was, "You have robbed me, I don't want to see your teeth."

GEORGE BLOOG . I am a diamond-broker. The prisoner came to me on the 17th of June—I think it was in the afternoon—he brought me an order from Mr. Samuel, to deliver him some of Mr. Samuel's brilliants

—he had forty-two brilliants, worth 130l.—he put them in a small tin box, and went away with them.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know the prisoner as a dealer in these articles? A. I have known him four or five years—I never heard any thing against him.

GEORGE MANN . I am manager to Messrs. Nock and William, of Frith-street. I do not know the prisoner, and I never authorized him to give any orders to get any diamonds for us—I never saw him till I was at the Mansion-house.

WILLIAM ARGENT (police-constable H 126.) I took the prisoner—he said he lost the diamonds in Leadenhall-street, between twelve and one o'clock, and when he was at the Mansion-house he said he lost them at Charing-cross.

NOT GUILTY .

JAMES NEWCOMB.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2164
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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2164. JAMES NEWCOMB was indicted for feloniously receiving of an evil-disposed person, on the 29th of June, 7 caps, value 1l.; 15 collars, value 6s. 6d.; 4 chemezettes, value 19s.; 1 cap, value 6s.; the body of a frock, value 1s. 6d.; 24 cap-crowns, value 10s.; 2 boxes, value 6d.; and 60 yards of a certain cloth, called mouselin-de-laine, value 3l. 1s. 6d.; the goods of Michael Barnes, and another; well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

MICHAEL BAYNES . I am in partnership with Mr. Congdon—we live in Friday-street, Cheapside, and are Scotch warehousemen. On the 8th of July I went with Fiskin to the prisoner's—he keeps a small shop in Goswell-street, which has haberdashery articles in it—I saw some caps and collars in his window—I went in, and pointed to them, and asked where he bought them—he said he did not know the party, but he bought them of a person coming round town—he said he had had invoices, but he could not find them—I saw two pieces of mouselin-de-laine in the back part of the shop—I recognised them instantly, and asked where he bought them—he said of the same party—I asked him if he had an invoice—he said he had not—I asked if he could tell the name of the party he bought them of—he said, "No"—I asked what he gave for them—he said 20s.—I knew one would be worth 35s., and the other 25s. or 28s.—I left the shop, and told him I would call again in the morning, but on coming out, I thought it would be better to go to the station, which I did, and saw Mr. Shackle—I went back with him the same evening—the prisoner was not at home—we waited an hour in the street—the prisoner came home—we went in and examined the mouselin-de-laines, and found they were our own, printed for us by Black, of Glasgow—the prisoner was not a customer of ours—we had not sold him these, and one of them ought never to have been sold—if it got out of our warehouse it must have been stolen—we have about twelve men in our employ—they have access to the goods I do not swear to any of the smaller goods.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You pointed the prisoner's attention to these goods before you took the officer? A. Yes—I thought they were our goods—there is a custom of hawking goods about town—I left the shop an hour and a half before I returned.

JAMES FISKIN . I am in the prosecutor's service. On the evening of the 8th of July I accompanied the prosecutor to the prisoner's shop, in

Goswell-street—I looked into the window, and saw the caps and collars—we then went into the shop, and looked at some other articles—I recognized some of these collars—they came from our warehouse—I bought them at Glasgow—I know them by the pattern and the work—we never sold any of those I bought at Glasgow except one—there were three found at the prisoner's, and we missed five—these other articles I recognise as being the same pattern as we had in our warehouse—here are a dozen child's collars—I asked the prisoner what he paid for them—I think he said 6s.—we sell them at 2s. 6d.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you undertake that part of the trade which consists in selling job goods? A. Yes—I have sold job goods, gone round to different places, and taken the porter with me—I have not sold to persons I have not known—I have a regular set of customers—I have heard of job goods being sold at 75 per cent, less than they cost—the goods I bought at Glasgow was three months ago—I did not take any from the prisoner's house that I was obliged to give back—I believe the police-officer did—I did not direct him to take them, I think he took them himself.

JOSEPH SHACKLE . I am a police-inspector. On the 8th of July, in the evening, I went to the prisoner's shop, with the prosecutor and Fiskin—the prosecutor asked for those things to be produced which he had seen before—these mouselin-de-laines and some cap-crowns were produced, which the prosecutor identified—the marks on the cap-crown a were nearly rubbed out—the prisoner said he bought them of a man going round—he was asked if he had invoices—he said, "Yes"—he went with me into his parlour, examined his files, and said he had not got them—he said he did not know the man he bought them of—Mr. Barnes gave him into custody—I took him to the station, and there searched him well—I found on him two papers—one of them he said he had been writing out to endeavour to see what he had given for the goods—this other is a note—there were no other papers about his person—he was locked up in the cell, and the next morning, from information, I searched him again, and these other two pieces of paper were wrapped up, and put into his left-hand waistcoat pocket—I said, "What are these?"—he said, "These are the invoices."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not take away some of White and Greenwell's goods? A. They were not White and Greenwell's —Mr. Barnes and Mr. Fiskin said some goods there were very suspicious—I said I would take them, and see if I could find an owner, and if not, I would return them in the morning—I sent them back in the morning.

JOHN JACOBS . I live in Hoxton, and am carman to Mr. Dodd. I was put into the station on the 9th of July, because my cart leaked, and made a mess in the street—I was locked in the cell where the prisoner was—I saw him take up a piece of paper from the other side of the cell—he wrote on it with a pencil, and then rent it in half—he doubled the pieces, and put them in the corner of his pocket—these are the papers.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM NEWMAN.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2165
VerdictNot Guilty > no evidence

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2165. WILLIAM NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August, 1 pencil-case, value 2s. 6d.; two pairs of gloves, value 2s.; 2 drawing-books, value 2s.; 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; 1 printed book, value 2s.; 1 scent-bottle, value 1s.; 13 envelopes, with a stamp, value 1s.; 1d.; 1 medal, value 5s.; 1 five-franc-piece, value 4s.; 3 copper pence; 100 silver pence, value 8s. 4d.; 3 shillings, 2 sixpences, 3 groats, 12 three-pences, 3 twopences, 10 crowns, and 8 half-crowns, the property of Frank Capel Bellis, his master.

MR. BODKIN, for the prosecution, declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

THOMAS LEE, WILLIAM TEVERSHAM.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2166
VerdictsNot Guilty > no evidence

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2166. THOMAS LEE was indicted for embezzling, on the 3rd of August, 30s.; 5th of August, 30s.; and on 7th of August, 30s.; the monies of Edward Eliason: and WILLIAM TEVERSHAM , for feloniously receiving the same; upon which no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS LEE, WILLIAM TEVERSHAM.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2167
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2167. THOMAS LEE and WILLIAM TEVERSHAM were again indicted for a conspiracy; to which they pleaded

GUILTY.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Six Weeks.

JOHN HALFPENNY.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2168
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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2168. JOHN HALFPENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November, 50lbs. weight of lead, value 8s.; the goods of David M'Intosh, his master.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the Prosecution.

MILES M'INNES . I am superintendent of Mr. David M'Intosh, of Bloomsbury-square. In November last he undertook to lay down gas-pipes in Holborn—the prisoner was in his service—on the 24th of November, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was at the work—I noticed the iron pot and a pig of lead near it—the prisoner was at the pot—in about ten minutes I went to the place, and missed the lead from the pot, and the prisoner—from that time I did not see him till last Monday—it was worth about 2d. a pound.

WILLIAM ATKINS . In November last I was in the service of Mr. M'Intosh. About two o'clock in the afternoon I missed a pig of lead, and the prisoner was gone.

Prisoner. Q. Had you seen me at work in the afternoon? A. Yes—when Mr. M'Innes sent me and some other men home for being drunk.

MILES M'INNES re-examined. I stopped the prisoner from work, because he was drunk—he remained on the work, but doing nothing—I told him not to work—on a sudden I missed both him and the lead.

WILLIAM KNIGHT . I was standing at the corner of French Horn-yard—I saw the prisoner take up a pig of lead, and go as far as Day and Martin's, and there put the lead on a wagon—he then took it to a cab, and told the cab—man to drive off.

JAMES BLAND . I am a cab-man. I drove off with the lead, at the prisoner's instance.

Prisoner. Q. Where did I leave it at? A. A marine-store shop.

GUILTY . Aged 41.— Confined Six Months.

PETER COOPER.
23rd August 1841
Reference Numbert18410823-2169
VerdictGuilty > unknown
Sentence