Old Bailey Proceedings.
23rd November 1840
Reference Number: t18401123

ActionsCite this text | Print-friendly version | Report an error
Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numberf18401123

Related Material

JOHNSON, MAYOR.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

VOLUME XIII.

SESSION I. TO SESSION VI.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

WILLIAM TYLER, PRINTER, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1840.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION.

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Held on Monday, November 23rd, 1840, and following Days.

Before the Right Honourable THOMAS JOHNSON . LORD MAYOR. of the City of London; Sir James Parke, Knt., one of the Barons of Her Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bernard Bosanquet, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart.; Anthony Brown, Esq.; Sir Peter Laurie, Knt; Sir John Cowan, Bart.; Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt.; Aldermen of the said City: the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City: John Pirie, Esq.; Thomas Wood, Esq.; James White, Esq.; John Humphery, Esq.; William Magnay, Esq.; and Thomas Hooper, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

Hartley Page

Joseph Bull

John Meadon

William Milton

Charles Primrose

Benjamin Morgan

Richard Mayers

Charles Beale

Thomas Newsom

John Barlow

John Rockley

William Braley

Second Jury.

Thomas Prout

Charles Ames

James William Rutland

James Angles

William Curtis

Simeon Cracknell

Ralph Preston

Thomas Phillips

George Brown

John Ramsey

George Reed

William Fenner

Third Jury.

John Osmond

Edmund Faucit

Thomas Bailey

John Messor

Henry Crossley

Henry Pannell

James Anderson

Gideon Hall Laclare

John Bourne

Isaac Gill Petch

John Sargeant

Robert Law

Fourth Jury.

John Barnett

William Hicks

Daniel Presnall

Alfred George Picard

John Morrell

Edward Milnes

John Perring

William Noah Peck

William Morgan

Richard Moss

Richard Minton

William Roberts

Fifth Jury

Benjamin Rule

James Bowyer

John Callaghan

Henry Grundy Renshaw

Fergus Markey

Robert Morgan

George Rickett

James Reynolds

Richard Besant

Henry Milner

Robert Moss

Thomas Arnott

Sixth Jury.

James Cockle

Charles Fitz

Edward Richard Barlow

Henry Playfair

Thomas Radley

Robert Pratt

Thomas Ackerman

Edward Middleton

Samuel John Noble

Charles Smith

John Corderoy

Robert Roberts

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

JOHNSON, MAYOR. FIRST SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—Two stars (**), that they have been more than once in custody—An obeliskthat a prisoner is known to be the associate of had characters.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, November 23rd, 1840.

First Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

ALFRED WALLE, WILLIAM WELLA.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-1
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Corporal > whipping

Related Material

1. ALFRED WALLE . and WILLIAM WELLA were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November, 1 barrow wheel, value 2s., the goods of Richard Fairbank; and that Waller had been before convicted of felony.

HENRY KIMBER . I am a policeman. On the 3rd of November I met the prisoners in Church-street, Chelsea, about one o'clock in the day, about 500 yards from the prosecutor's house—they were both carrying this iron wheel—I asked where they got it—they said they bought it at a shop in Little Chelsea, and gave 6d. for it—I took them to the station-house—hey described the shop, which I went to, and found it was the prosecutor's—I returned, and then they said they had not paid for it.

RICHARD FAIRBANK . I am a wheelwright, and live at Chelsea. This wheel is mine, and laid outside my door—I had not sold it—I do not know the prisoners.

Waller's Defence. I had it on my shoulder, and a boy told me to take it.

JAMES SHUTTLEWORTH . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of Waller's conviction in September, this year—(read)—I was a witness on the trial—he is the person.

WALLE.— GUILTY . Aged 12.— Transported for Seven Years—Ship.

WELLA.— GUILTY . Aged 11.— Whipped and Discharged.

JOHN CURTOY.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-2
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

2. JOHN CURTOY . was indicted for an assault.

NOT GUILTY .

JOSEPH TADDY BUTCHE.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-3
VerdictNot Guilty > no evidence

Related Material

3. JOSEPH TADDY BUTCHE . was indicted for a misdemeanor, upon which no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

GEORGE HERBER.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-4
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

4. GEORGE HERBER . was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November, 1 pair of trowsers, value 16s. 6d., the goods of Francis Bartholomew; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

JAMES BRISCO.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-5
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

5. JAMES BRISCO . was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November,1 ream of paper, value 1l. 6s., the goods of Robert Hathway and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months.

GEORGE SIMMONDs.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-6
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

6. GEORGE SIMMONDs . was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November, 9 3/8 yards of woollen cloth called doeskin, value 3l., the goods of Frederick Wyatt and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

JOHN TANMAN.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-7
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

7. JOHN TANMAN . was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November, 2 horse-cloths, value 18s., the goods of Mary Andrews.

WILLIAM GREEN . I live in Plough-court, Fetter-lane. On the 4th of November I was standing at the corner of Felix-court, and saw the prisoner unbuckle the horse-cloths, and take them off the horses which stood in a wagon at the corner of Durham-street—he put them under his arm, and came away—I followed him, but did not see a policeman—he was taken on Friday—I am sure he is the person—I had seen him before, and knew him well.

RICHARD NASH . I am in the employ of Mary Andrews. On the 4th of November I was in her wagon loading it near Felix-court, Fetter-lane—when I got down I missed the cloths which had been buckled on the horses—I gave notice to the police, and saw them next day—these are them—(looking at them.)

WILLIAM COOPE . (Citypolice-constable, No. 264.) I received information from Green on Friday, and went to the prisoner's lodging—he was not at home, his sister was—I found these horse-cloths on the bed—I inquired where the prisoner was—she said, in Smithfield—I immediately went there, and took him—in answer to questions, he stated that a strange man had given him the horse-cloths to mind, and had never returned to fetch them away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing in Smithfield, and had the cloths given to me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

GEORGE FARRELL.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-8
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

8. GEORGE FARRELL . was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November, 1 bag, value 1s.; 33 sovereigns, 10 half-sovereigns, 1 crown, 53 half-crowns, 130 shillings, 60 sixpences, and 1 5l. note; the property of John Jarratt.—2nd COUNT. calling it the property of William Gaston.

CHARLES BROOKS . I am book-keeper at the Lewes Arms public-house, Dover-road. On the 10th of November I counted out 38l. in gold, 15l. in silver, and a 5l. Bank of England note belonging to Mr. Jarratt—I put it on the desk, and saw Gaston, the driver of the van, put it into a bag which was tied round with a string—he was to carry it to Mr. Jarratt, at Uckfield—it was in his care.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you give it to him? A. I saw him take it from the desk—I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAM GASTON . I am in the service of John Jarratt, of Uckfield. On the 10th of November I saw Brooks count some money on the desk—I also counted it—there was 58l., 15l. in silver, one 5l. note, and all the rest in gold—it was put into a bag which I wrapped up in a round frock, and put into the fore part of the van—I saw the prisoner in Blackman-street, Borough, and he came with me to the Elephant and Castle, walking alongside of me behind the van—I knew him before

—he gave me a parcel in Blackman-street, to put into the van—I had not then put the round frock containing the bag in, and I gave it to him to hold while I placed his parcel in the van—he had it about a minute or a minute and half—I then put that in—no one but he, the guard, and I were near it—the guard is not here, he did not see me put it in as he was alongside the horses—when I got to Croydon I misted the bag—I suspected the prisoner had taken it, came back directly, and gave information to inspector Waller immediately—I went with him to the prisoner's lodging, and found the bag and money in his pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not you remain outside while the officer went in? A. I did, but he called me inside afterwards—I am sure the bag was in the smock-frock when I received it back from the prisoner—I parted with him at the Elephant and Castle—he is my brother-in-law—we had not been drinking together at the Lion public-house—we had two pints of beer at the Black Boy, in Blackman-street, about nine or ten o'clock in the morning—he was not the least the worse for liquor, that I saw—I did not drink with him at several places going along—We had something at the Elephant and Castle—that was after I had put the smock-frock into the van—I had it safe after he parted with me—the last place I saw it safe was by the Plough and Harrow, at the bottom of Brixton-hill—I did not see the prisoner, after he bid me good night—the parcel was on the off-side of the wagon, and I walked on the near-side—he might have got it out without my seeing him.

CHARLES WALTER . I am a City police-inspector. The prosecutor complained to me of his loss, and 1 accompanied him to Chapel-court, Finsbury-square, where the prisoner lodged, about eleven or twelve o'clock—I opened the street-door, and knocked at the side parlour door, which was opened by the. prisoner's wife—I asked if George was at home—she said, "Yes"—I walked in—he was sitting by the fire-side—I asked if his name was George—he said, "Yes"—I asked if he was down on the Croydon-road that evening—he said, "No"—I asked if he was along with his brother-in-law as far as the Elephant and Castle—he said, "Yes"—I said, "He charges you with robbing him of a bag of money"—he said, "He is a foolish man, I know nothing about it"—I then called Gaston in, and asked if he was the man—he said, "Yes"—I asked him to stand up, and I saw the end of the bag hanging out of his waistcoat pocket—I took it out—Gaston said, "That is my bag"—in his waistcoat pocket I found this 5l. Bank of England note, and 1s. 2d.—Gaston said, "How could you be so cruel to rob me after the friend 1 have been to you?"—he said, "If I had not robbed you some one else would, in the careless way you put it."

JOHN SMITH . I am a policeman. I accompanied Waller—what he has stated is correct.

CHARLES BROOK . re-examined. I cannot swear to the bag, but I believe it to be the same—the 5l. note I swear to—it has my initials on it—the exact sum is in the bag within half a crown.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Transported for Seven Years.

JAMES GORDON.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-9
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

9. JAMES GORDON . was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November, 1 hat, value 4s. 6d., the goods of John Pound.

FRANCIS LEAR CORTON . I am errand-boy to Mr. Bailey. On the 14th of November I was in Bishops-gate-street, and saw the prisoner at

the prosecutor's door, looking at a hat—I watched him for about two minutes—he looked all over it, took it off the stand, and went up the court with it—I directly went in and told Mr. Pound, who went up the court and caught him.

JOHN POUND . This is my hat—I observed the prisoner lurking about my window and watched him—something occurred in the shop to draw my attention off, and I forgot it for a moment, till Corton came in and gave me information—I went up the court and met the prisoner a few yards up coming towards me, without the hat—Corton said, "That is the man"—he said he was not, but the man had gone into a public-house with the hat—I collared, took him to the public-house, and asked the landlord if a man had come in with a hat—he said, "No"—he went out into the court with a candle, and returned with the hat.

HENRY NICKS . I keep the public-house. No man came into my house with a hat—I found this hat about the middle of the court.

Prisoner's Defence. I went up the court to go to the public-house—there were two or three men at the corner of the court.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined Three Months.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, November 24th, 1840.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JAMES REED.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-10
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

10. JAMES REED . was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November, 12 hammer-heads, value 13d., the goods of Charles Joseph Berry; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which be pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

WHITE COULTON.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-11
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

11. WHITE COULTON . was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July, 1 shirt, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Richard Taylor; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 46.— Confined One Year.

JOHN MITCHELL.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-12
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

12. JOHN MITCHELL . was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Upsall, on the 4th of November, and stealing therein, 1 watch, value 3l., his property; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Confined One Year.

HENRY JOSEPH HIGGINBOTTOM.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-13
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

13. HENRY JOSEPH HIGGINBOTTOM . was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October, 2 bags, value 2d.; 11 sovereigns, 1 half-crown, 10 shillings, 4 sixpences, and 1 10l. and 2 5l. notes, the property of James Shaddock and another, his masters, in their dwelling-house; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

HENRY LECHMERE.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-14
VerdictsGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentencesTransportation

Related Material

14. HENRY LECHMERE. alias Mercer, alias Johnson, was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July, 5 muffs, value 8l., and 1 pair of cuffs, value 7s., the goods of Charles Williams and another; also for obtaining, on the 24th of October, by false pretences, 33 yards of woollen-cloth, value 4l. 10s., the goods of Charles Warwick; to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

JOHN SMITH.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-15
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

15. JOHN SMITH . was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November, at St. Andrew Undershaft, 1 watch, value 10l., the goods of Phillip George Dodd, in his dwelling-house; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ALFRED DODD . My brother, Philip George Dodd, keeps the house, No. 25, Leaden hall-street, in the parish of St. Andrew Undershaft. On Thursday evening, the 5th of November, the prisoner came to the shop, showed me a gold watch which he had in his hand, and asked my opinion as to the value of it—I gave my opinion, and handed it back—in doing to the glass fell out—he said, "Never mind"—when he had the watch fairly in his hand, he retreated towards the back of the shop, and seeing a gold watch on a raised platform at the extreme end of the counter, he snatched it, made a spring towards the door, and ran out immediately—I followed to the door calling "Stop thief"—a young man followed him by my order—this is the watch—(looking at it)—it belongs to my brother.

Prisoner. Q. How was I dressed! A. Similar to what you are now—the watch is No. 2816, and has the name of "Harris, Cornhill," on it—it corresponds with the entry in our books—I had seen it twice previously several repairs were done to it.

Prisoner. I brought the watch with me from Savannah—I was never in his shop.

JOHN LEWI . (City police-constable, No. 581.) On Thursday evening, the 5th of November, I was on duty in Billiter-square, and hearing the cry of "Stop thief," I ran towards Billiter-street, and saw the prisoner running, calling "Stop thief—there he goes"—several people were about twenty yards behind him, also calling "Stop thief"—I immediately prepared to stop him—he ran violently towards me and struck at me with both his fists—I avoided the blow, and immediately seized his hands, not allowing him an opportunity to open them—I took from his right-hand these two gold watches—he said he wished he had a knife and he would rip my b—y guts open—he was taken to the station-house.

Prisoner. I never said such a word—what time did you take me? A. A few minutes after six o'clock.

CHARLES GIBSON . I am a jeweller in Bishopsgate Within. On Thursday evening, the 5th of November, about half-past five o'clock, the prisoner came and asked to see some gold watches, I think he said three or four—that he was going to Havannah, and wanted to speculate—I looked at him very hard, and asked what description of watch be wanted—he said something at a low price—I took out the lowest priced watch near me, being suspicious—I had scarcely given it into his hand, when a respectable looking man came in and asked for a wedding ring—I said I could not attend to him till I had served this person—he said, "Never mind, I will call again in five or ten minutes"—he opened the door very wide, and the prisoner rushed out as swift as he could with the watch, and the other after him—I went to the door, but by that time he had gone up Camomile-street.

Prisoner's Defence. Both the watches came from New York, where I was born—I could bring three gentlemen to prove it—I solemnly declare that the watch does not belong to him.

MR. DOD. re-examined. The watch had a new pair of plates, a new spring, new hands, the dial done up, and it was cleaned besides—I saw it at intervals as the work proceeded, and I know the work done on it to be the same—this other watch is the one the prisoner tendered to me.

NICHOLAS PEARSE . I am an Inspector of police. I produce a certificate

of the prisoner's former conviction, (which I obtained from Mr. Clark's office,) by the name of Samuel Crawcour—I am confident he is the same person—I apprehended him, and was a witness at the trial—(read.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

JOHN CANHAM.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-16
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

16. JOHN CANHAM . was indicted for obtaining 2l., by false pretences. to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Two Years.

ANN KEITH.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-17
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

17. ANN KEITH . was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October, 1 cloak, value 15s., the goods of Joseph Blundy Chaplin.

JOSEPH BLUNDY CHAPLIN . I live in Wine Office-court, Fleet-street. On the 27th of October, my wife's cloak was lost from the house—the prisoner was in the habit of coming to see a lodger—she was taken into custody and then charged her friend, whom she visited at my house, with taking it—that person is not here.

RICHARD SCOTT SHORTREAD . I am shopman to Mr. Abethel, a pawn-broker in Calthorpe-place, Gray's-inn-road. This cloak was pawned on the 27th of October, by the prisoner for 6s., in the name of Mary Smith—I am certain of her—she carried it in her hand.

EDWARD SHAYTER . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner at Somers-town—she said she did not steal the cloak, nor pledge it, but she met a young woman in Fleet-street, who asked her to go with her to pawn it, that she went with her, but did not go into the shop—I asked, if she knew the young woman's address—the said, no, she did not know where she lived, nor her name—I took her to the pawnbroker, and he identified her.

RICHARD SCOTT SHORTREA . re-examined. I am certain she is the woman—I saw the lodger at Guildhall—she bore no resemblance to the prisoner—I cannot say whether the prisoner had any body with her, but she pawned it and received the money—I cannot say the other person was not present, but the prisoner spoke, and said, "Why you lent me so much on another cloak, and this is worth more than that."

JOSEPH BLUNDY CHAPLI . re-examined. The prisoner charged the lodger with the offence—she attended at Guildhall with my wife, to hear what passed—about a week after I missed it, the prisoner came voluntarily to my house, and said the lodger had taken it—she was confronted with the lodger, who denied it—her name is Hitchcock—her husband is a working man—the prisoner came to the house two or three times—I suspected her, because one morning, when I was sitting in the room where the cloak was, she pushed the door open quietly, and when she saw me, she inquired for somebody up stairs—I understand the prisoner worked at the same place as my lodger—I don't know why she accused her, unless it was to get her into trouble—I know nobody named Smith, nor do I know that my lodger does.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Three Months.

WILLIAM TUCK.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-18
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

18. WILLIAM TUCK . was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October, 1 watch, value 30s.; 1 coat, value 15s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; and 1 shirt, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of John Butler: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined One Year.

JAMES PATMAN.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-19
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

19. JAMES PATMN . was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November,101/4 yards of woollen cloth, value 2l. 6s., the good of George William Umpleby and another.

JOHN GEORGE . I am a leather seller and lire in Skinner-street. On the 7th of November, about five o'clock, I saw the prisoner take a piece of cloth from a shelf within the doorway of the prosecutor's shop, and walk off about two yards with it—I laid hold of him, and asked what he was going to do with it—he said, "To look at it"—I took him inside, and an officer was sent for—he had got quite clear into the street, and had passed about three panes of the next shop—he was coming down the hill and met me—the cloth was nearly all folded up but about a yard—he had it in his left arm, and was Walking along.

GEORGE WILLIAM UMPLEBY . I am in partnership with William Palmer—this cloth is ours—it has on mark on it.

JOHN DROVER . I am a City police-constable. I took charge of the prisoner and the cloth.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been sent on an errand, and coming back, I was looking into the shop—I took the cloth to the gas to look at, as my mistress had promised me a pair of trowsers.

GUILTY.*. Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

JOSEPH GOSLING.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-20
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

20. JOSEPH GOSLING . was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November, 1 half-crown, 4 shillings, 5 sixpences, and 12 halfpence, the monies of Edward Austin; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

EDWARD AUSTIN . On the 23rd of October, as I was returning home in the evening, I saw two boys near my shop window, which lies back two or three yards from the pavement—one of them went into the shop—I followed, and as I went up to the shop, I saw a young man, who to the best of my belief, was the prisoner, coming down the steps—I was dusk—I met my sister at the door, who said the till had been robbed—I tried to pursue the young man, but missed him—I caught Biggins, who was one of those who were looking into the shop, and took Him back—my said he had been there about twenty minutes previously, to know if I wanted any one to work for me—there was about 10s. or 15s. in the till.

RICHARD HILL . I am a police-constable. I took Biggins—he stated something to me—I found the prisoner's cap in Biggin's pocket—I had frequently seen the prisoner wear it—I afterwards found him in the skittle-ground at the Marquis of Granby public-house—when he got outside, he said he knew what I wanted him for—in going to the station-house he said he had sixpence and three penny pieces, which I took out of his hand—at the station-house I took 6d. out of his pocket, and 4s. 6d. he spat out of his mouth on the table, and said, "There is some more of it."

WILLIAM BIGGINS . I know the prisoner. On the 23rd of October I saw him and a person named May—we were coming home—they persuaded me to go into the shop to see if they wanted a young man to work, which I did—then Gosling went in and took the money out of the till—I was standing on the path when he went in, and could see into the shop—May and I were looking in—I had a hat on—I had a cap in my pocket which I had from the prisoner, and I lent him mine, as he said it was warmer—that was about an hour and a half before—I don't know how the prisoner came to go into the shop—we had not talked about it before—I did not

know what he went in for—I saw him in the shop, kneeling down, and saw him draw the till out with his hands.

Prisoner. Q. How far were you from the shop, when you say I crawled in? A. We were standing against the iron railing—I and May both saw you—it was dark—there was another man went into the shop—I could see you through the window.

EDWARD AUSTI . re-examined. I don't believe Biggins could see the prisoner behind the counter through the window from where he was, for he stood at the other side—he could see him crawling round, but not behind the counter—another person went in for a penny loaf, but I saw him go in and come out—I am sure Biggins could not see the prisoner behind the counter.

WILLIAM BIGGIN . re-examined. After he went in we walked by the shop, and saw the prisoner go behind the counter, then we went and stood at the other side, when the prosecutor came by.

FANNY AUSTIN . I saw the young man—I cannot say for certain that it was the prisoner—he was in the act of getting up from behind the counter—I let him go to the door, and then wished the young man who came for the penny-loaf to stop him—he tried to do so—my brother came in as he ran down the steps, and I desired him to follow him—I am sure the person who came in for the penny-loaf was not the person who got up from behind the counter—the till was left behind—there was some silver in it, I do not know how much—it was gone—there was a gas light in the shop—a person outside could see through the window and see the till taken.

WILLIAM OSBORN . (police-constable T 61.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I obtained from Mr. Clark's office—I was a witness when he was tried—he is the same person—(read.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

JOHN BRENNAN.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-21
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

21. JOHN BRENNAN . was indicted for embezzlement.

GEORGE ROBERT MARSH . I am a boot and shoe-maker, and live in Newcastle-street, Farringdon-street; the prisoner was my apprentice. On the 18th of October, I sent him to Mr. Steward, of Garnault-place, to see if they had got any money for me—he brought back one shilling, which he said was from young Steward, and that the old gentleman had got none for roe this week.

JAMES STEWARD . I live in Garnault-place, Spa-fields. On the 18th of October the prisoner called on me—I gave him 2s. for his master—he did not give me any receipt.

MICHAEL PANEL . I live in Skinner-street, Snow-hill. On the 7th of November I paid the prisoner 1s. 6d. for Mr. Marsh, for work he had done.

GEORGE ROBERT MARS . re-examined. On the 7th of November, the prisoner brought me 1s. from Mr. Panel, not 18d.—I said, "It won't do, go back with it"—he went back, and brought me 4d. more in about ten minutes, and said it was all Mr. Panel would give for the job.

Prisoner. I generally put down on the slate what I received, but I did not happen to do it this time—master never looked at the slate till the Monday after—he then asked me how much money I had given him—I said, "I don't know"—when I gave him the money I did not think any more about it—he said, "I think you gave me 25." Witness. I did not

find this out till about a fortnight after, as it was not set down—I said, "I only received 1s."—the prisoner said, "Yes, that is all young Steward gave me, the old gentleman had got none for me"—I did not ask him whether he had given me 1s. or 2s.—I am positive of that—I put it down on the slate as 1s. the day after he gave it me—I am sure I did not put down less than I received—I cannot say whether he saw me put it down—I had him from the Union—I had 2l. 10s. with him, and have had him nine months—I afterwards went with him to Mr. Panel, and he said to Mr. Panel's face that he had given him 1s. the first time, and 4d. when he came back.

MICHAEL PANE . re-examined. I paid the prisoner 1s. 6d. in one payment—he never got 4d. from me—when Mr. Marsh brought him to me, he stared me in the face as hard as possible, and said, "You know you only gave me 1s., and when I came back you gave me 4d."—I said, "No, you rascal, I gave you 1s. 6d." and before the Magistrate he owned I had given him 1s. 6d.

GUILTY . of Embezzling 2d. Aged 13.— ConFined One Month.

JOHN BRENNAN.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-22
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

22. JOHN BRENNAN . was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October, 1 half-crown and 1 sixpence, the monies of George Robert Marsh, his master.

GEORGE ROBERT MARSH . I sent the prisoner, on the 24th of October, to get so me blacking at Warren's, in the Strand—I gave him half a crown and three sixpences—he brought me back nine bottles of blacking.

JOHN CHARLES MONK . I am in Mr. Warren's employ. On the 24th of October, the prisoner brought Mr. Marsh's card, with an order on it for two dozen large bottles, and one dozen small—he took nine bottles, and said; "Master sends you 1s., and wishes you to send the rest in the course of the week"—he paid me two sixpences, and I entered it in the cash-book.

Prisoner. I gave him 4s.—he asked how much I had, and said, "What do you want with 4s.? 2s. is enough for me"—he took 2s.—I told him master told me to leave the other two for the other blacking. Witness. He only gave me 1s.—he was afterwards brought to me—he stared me out in the same way as he did Mr. Panel, and said he had paid me 4s., and Mr. Warren discharged me instantly, saying he believed the boy's straight-forward way—he swore me out through thick and thin—I did not send an invoice with him—I did with the carman—I credited Marsh with the 1s.

Prisoner. Mr. Warren said if I had gone there with 1s., and wanted 2s. worth of blacking, he would have been the first to kick me out of the place; and he said he had once put 3s. on a desk, and told the witness to put it in a box, but when he came home he had not done so. Witness. The value of the blacking was 8s.—2s. worth was delivered to him, which was half-a-dozen, and three bottles I let him have on account of the dozen, as he said his master was out of them—we knew Mr. Marsh—the prisoner wanted to pay me 6d. off of the other three bottles, but I would not take it, as it would have made the accounts queer—I have been three or four months in Mr. Warren's service—I have endeavoured to regain my place, and have had a policeman in plain clothes to find out the prisoner's character, and see whether he kept company with thieves—I take my oath I received no more than 1s.

JURY. Q. Did Mr. Warren dismiss you for receiving only 1s., when

you delivered goods to a greater amount? A. He believed the boy, being so young, and giving such a precise account of three sixpences and a half-crown, which he said he gave me—Mr. Warren said, "Mr. Monk, I believe the boy's straightforward way, and I shall not require your services any more"—I said, "Very well, but my friends will not let it rest here."

Prisoner. Mr. Warren said he had taken things from him before. Witness. He did not, to my knowledge—he did not say my accounts had been wrong before—I cannot remember his saying he suspected me of two or three little things—there might have been a few orders posted up, which Mr. Warren scolded me for.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM BAILEY.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-23
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

23. WILLIAM BAILEY . was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November, 1 dead goose, value 5s.; 6 dead plovers, value 1s.; 4 dead rabbits, value 2s.; and 1 basket, value 6d.; the goods of John Garen.

JOHN GAREN . I deal in poultry, and live in Little Chapel-court, Southwark-bridge-road. On the afternoon of the 19th of November, I was in Leadenhall-market—I bought a goose, six plovers, and four rabbits, and put them into my basket, which I hung up outside Mr. Howard's shop—I saw the prisoner walking along with the basket, I followed and caught him with it, and asked what he had got—he said he was going to leave the basket for a pint of beer—I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you been drinking to-day? A. I have had half-a-pint—I did not notice that the prisoner was tipsy, he was walking along very quietly with the basket—I had seen him in the market now and then, but never spoken to him.

JOHN GRIMES . I am constable of Leadenhall-market. I took the prisoner into custody, about thirty yards from where the basket was taken from—it contained this poultry.

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Confined Two Months.

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, November 2th, 1840.

fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

EDWARD COOMBS.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-24
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

24. EDWARD COOMBS . was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November, 3lbs. weight of beef, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of John Povah Cook; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.—Convict Ship.

WILLIAM WITTE.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-25
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

25. WILLIAM WITTE . was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October, 1 blanket, value 2s. 6d., and 1 yard of calico, value 6d., the goods of Edward Jones, his master.

EDWARD PARRY . I am shopman to Edward Jones, a linen-draper, of Aldgate. The prisoner was in his service—on the 6th of November, I accidentally went to the prisoner's drawer, and found thirteen duplicates, one referring to a blanket, which we have lost—this ii it—there is also a yard of calico found, which is my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Where did you find the calico? A. At his father's house—I had not seen it at any particular time—there is a mark on it in my own handwriting—it was not new, it was used as a wrapper, it may be worth 6d.—the drawer was used by the prisoner exclusively—there was no lock on it—it is down in the cellar—

other parties had access to the cellar—I had seen the blanket previous to his coming to our house—I think he came on the 24th or 25th of August—I had not observed it after that—we have women servants in the house, they make the beds, but he made his himself—he slept in a part of the shop divided for the purpose—this duplicate is the same in appearance as one in the prisoner's drawer—I will not swear that it is the same—it was for a blanket—there is a mark on the blanket—it is joined—it was on his bed.

HENRY BOWMAN . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a blanket, pawned at Mr. Vespers's, in the Commercial-road, on the 5th of October, by a person in the name of William Witte, for 1s. 6d.—I do not know by whom.

JAMES M'MICKEN PATERSO . (City police-constable, No. 507.) I produce the calico, which I found at the prisoner's father's.

WILLIAM WREFOR . (City police-constable, No. 530.) I had the duplicate of the blanket from Mr. Jones, but Mr. Parry was present.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM WITTE.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-26
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

26. WILLIAM WITTE . was again indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December, one dressing-case, value 30s., the goods of Robert Johnson, his master.

ROBERT JOHNSON . I am a perfumer, in Cornhill—the prisoner was my porter in August, 1839, and had been so for twenty months. I have lost a dressing-case—I cannot say when I lost it—I missed it on the 6th of October this year—this is mine—I have no doubt of it.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How do you know it? A. By a particular mark on the top outside from its being tied up before the varnish was quite dry—it was unsaleable from that circumstance—I will swear I never saw one marked in that way—I do not know that I can swear that I never had one marked' like it—having a stock of these things I did not miss it—I have constantly one shopman—I had the same shopman last year—I gave orders to my shopman not to sell the box when it first came to my house—it was intended to be sent back to be repaired—I never had more than one man selling—he is not here—when the case was complete it would be worth 40s. or 35s.—I can swear to it by the razorcase with razors, which have my came on them.

JOSEPH BURTON . I am shopman to William Henry Fleming, a pawn-broker, in Whitechapel. I produce this case pawned on the 4th of December, 1839, for 3s. by a man, I cannot say who, in the name of William Witte.

WILLIAM WREFOR . (City police-constable, No. 530.) I produce a corresponding duplicate to this, which I got from Mr. Parry.

HENRY PARRY . I found this duplicate in the drawer in the cellar.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you certain you found that one? A. I found one similar—I cannot swear to that—it was given in my presence to Wreford.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Eight Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

JOHN JONES.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-27
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

27. JOHN JONES . was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October, 30 pairs of stays, value 3l. 2s.; and 6 pairs of boots, value 20s.; the goods of William Thomas and another.

LEWIS THOMAS. I am in partnership with William Thomas. We lost

thirty pairs of stays and six pairs of boots at the end of October—these are them—(looking at them)—they were taken from a truck.

EDWARD JACOB RODMELL . I am porter to Mr. Brothers, in Cheapside. About six o'clock in the evening on the 24th of October, I was drawing a truck with two paper parcels, a trunk, and two boxes—some one told me something—I looked, and missed this parcel—I saw the prisoner with it in his arms—I went after him—he was walking on the pavement—I collared him, and told him the parcel was taken from my truck—he said it was found at his feet, and afterwards that a man had put it into his arms—he struggled to get away—he knocked my hat off, and got a short distance.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Noble-street; a man threw it into my arms—this young man said, "You have stolen my parcel;" I said, "No," I had picked it up; he collared me; I said, "Don't collar me;" he said, "I shall;" I never lifted my hand to him.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

JOHN LEARY.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-28
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

28. JOHN LEARY . was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of November, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Edward Miles, from his Person.

EDWARD MILES . I am a cabinet-maker, living in Luke-street, Paul-street, Finsbury. At a quarter-past six o'clock on the evening of the 15th of November, I was walking with my brother-in-law in Barbican—my brother-in-law jogged me—I did not take notice—he jogged me again—I looked round, and saw the prisoner behind roe drawing my handkerchief from my pocket—I asked him what he meant by doing that—he said, "What!" and began to abuse me—he had got my handkerchief in his hand—I told him to go on, or else I would give him in charge of the police—he told me to go on myself.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was it entirely out of your pocket? A. Yes, and in his hand—I work for myself at present—my brother lives with me—he goes with a traveller—it was quite dark—as I talked to him about it the policeman came up, and I gave him into custody—this is my handkerchief—I had a lapel coat on—the handkerchief was in the pocket behind—I am quite certain it was not hanging out—I had just before put it into my pocket—I am certain I had put it to the bottom of my pocket—he said, "D—n your eyes, go on yourself—he did not say the handkerchief was falling out of my pocket.

GEORGE FLOWER . I was walking with my brother-in-law on the 16th of November—I saw the prisoner follow us from Smithfield to Barbican—I looked over my shoulder, and saw him draw a handkerchief from my brother-in-law's pocket, I seized him by the collar, and kept him till the officer came up, and we gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. How far had you got before the policeman came? A. Not ten yards from the place—he ran away after the policeman took him, not before—my brother took the handkerchief, and told him to go on, but he began abusing us—I was willing that he should go.

THOMAS DUNGLISO . (City police-constable, No. 125.) I was on duty about six o'clock in Well-street—I heard a cry of "Stop thief—I ran towards the place, and saw the prisoner—he altered his course, and ran up the Crescent—he had been in the hands of another officer—who is ill.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Ten Years.

THOMAS SAGER.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-29
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

29. THOMAS SAGER . was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Charles Dingle, from his person.

CHARLES DINGLE . I am shopman to Mr. Garrett, in Cornhill. I was walking along Aldgate, on the 5th of November, at a quarter-past eleven o'clock in the morning—I felt my handkerchief drawn from my pocket, and the prisoner passed me with it in his band—he rolled it up in one hand, and ran up a court in Whitechapel—he threw it under a wagon—I am sure that he is the man that I saw with my handkerchief—I struck him once, because he was resisting two men who were holding him.

JAMES HAL . (City police-constable, No. 644.) I was coming up Petticoat-lane—I saw a number of people running—I went up—the prisoner was there—he was then stopped, and the prosecutor gave him in charge—said, "You must go to the station-house"—he said, "I will go quietly"—he then began to kick and plunge, and knocked my hat off.

Prisoner. I was going to a cry of "Stop thief"—the prosecutor took hold of me, and struck me in the mouth.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

JAMES WRIGHT.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-30
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

30. JAMES WRIGHT . was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November, 1 coat, value 1s., the goods of John Gentry.

JOHN GENTRY . I am a carter in the service of Mr. Miles, of Romford; I left my great coat in the cart on the 7th of November, while I went to Mr. Brooks's wharf for two bundles of empty sacks—when I came back my coat was gone—I saw the prisoner in King William-street with it on, about half an hour after—I said, "Where did you get that coat?"—he said, "It is not yours"—I said, "Yes it is, you pull it off ".—he said, "It is not yours"—I said, "Yes it is"—he would not pull it off, and I gave him in charge—this is my coat, and the toll ticket was in the cuff of it.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not tell you I bought it? A. Yes.

ROBERT LOGSDON . I am a constable. The prisoner was given to me—I said he had made a nice mess of it—he said I did not see him steal it, nor any body else—he told the Lord Mayor he had bought it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it at Billingsgate that morning of a man who I knew by his being in the market.

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

CHARLES BIRD.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-31
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

31. CHARLES BIRD . was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of November, 1 box, value 6d., and 27lbs. weight of raisins, value 14s., the goods of George Phillips.

WILLIAM TROTT . I am in the employ of George Phillips, a grocer, in Aldersgate-street. About eight o'clock on the 11th of November, a woman came into the shop and told me something—in consequence of which I went out and saw the prisoner with a box on his shoulder—I took him by the shoulder and asked where he was going—he shifted the box and threw it down—I held him till I had some assistance—this is my master's box—it contains about 271bs. weight of raisins—I had seen it safe five minutes before.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me if I would earn 6d.—I said, "Yes," I waited a few minutes and he brought this box; this man came after me, and the box fell off my shoulder.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Six Months.

GEORGE JOLLY, JOHN CALLADINE.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-32
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown

Related Material

32. GEORGE JOLLY . and JOHN CALLADINE were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November, 1 purse, value 3d.; 2 shillings, 1 six-pence, and 1 half-franc, the property of Fanny Greensmith, from her person.

FANNY GREENSMITH . I live in Cressey-street, Rathbone-place. Between three and four o'clock on the 9th of November, I was on Ludgate-hill—I had a purse containing two shillings and a sixpence in one end, a half-franc and a bit of paper with an address on it, in the other—this is the purse—(looking at one)—it contains the paper and half-franc—I know I had my purse safe at twenty minutes after three.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. You are single? A. Yes—I believe I was christened Frances, but I have always gone by the name of Fanny—this was on Lord Mayor's day, a little before four o'clock—I was not with Parthenia Pool—there was a crowd there, and I had some difficulty in making my way through.

PARTHENIA POOL . I live in West-street, Soho-square. I saw Jolly try to pass the purse to Calladine, and drop it down on the ground—this is it.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was Calladine standing? A. Exactly before me, at the station-house door, in Black Horse-court—there were plenty more people round the door besides Calladine, but none between him and me—I have mentioned this to the policeman—I have spoken to him about this to-day, and before, not frequently—I do not know whether the policeman told me that he knew Calladine, I did not ask him that question—I do not think he told me what he had seen Calladine do before—I did not talk to the policeman about it before I went before the Magistrate—I did not say that I saw Jolly attempt to put it into his hand—the first person I told was the Lord Mayor—I did not mention it to any body before.

EDWARD HOLDNES . (City police-constable, No. 341.) Jolly was brought to the station-house, in Black-horse-court, Fleet-street, on another charge—he tried to get away—I went to assist, and at the door I saw Jolly put his hand behind him, and Calladine attempt to take something from him, and this purse was dropped, which I took up—it has a piece of paper in it, and a half-franc piece.

Jolly's Defence: I was going to the Lord Mayor's-show; at the corner of Farringdon-street there was a great pushing; I was standing near the prosecutrix, and she accused me of stealing her reticule—in going up the court a great many people came up, and the purse was dropped, not by me.

(Jolly received a good character.)

JOLLY.— GUILTY .

CALLADINE— NOT GUILTY .

GEORGE JOLLY, JOHN CALLADINE.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-33
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Transportation

Related Material

33. GEORGE JOLLY . and JOHN CALLADINE . were again indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November, 1 bag, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 9d.; 1 purse, value 3d.; 1 half-sovereign, 4 half-crowns, 7 shillings, 1 sixpence, 1 penny, 2 halfpence, and 2 farthings; the property of Parthenia Pool, from her person: and that Calladine had been previously convicted of felony.

PARTHENIA POOL . On Lord Mayor's-day I was in Farringdon-street. I had a reticule, containing the property stated—I felt it go from my arm—I looked down by my left-hand side, and saw it in Jolly's hand—I

caught hold of him, and desired him to give me my bag—I saw him try to pass it to Calladine, but he dropped it on the ground—I am sure that Calladine was there, he was quite close to him, and they were both close to me—Jolly was taken into custody—when he was taken to the station-house Calladine followed him there—he could not know at that time that I had seen Jolly attempt to pass the bag—he asked my friend what was the matter, he said he did not know—this is the bag and its contents, it was cut from my arm—at the station-house door I saw Jolly attempt to pass something to Calladine.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. What time was this? A. About a quarter before four o'clock—there was a great crowd—a lady picked the bag up, and gave it to me—my friend's name is Samuel Payne—I went before the Magistrate on the Tuesday following—they were remanded—I did not talk to the policeman till after I had been before the Magistrate, not till the second occasion—Calladine was charged on the first examination.

SAMUEL PAYNE . I was with the prosecutrix in Farringdon-street on this afternoon—I saw her suddenly turn, and struggle with Jolly—I turned round—she exclaimed, "I am robbed"—I instantly collared the prisoner—some lady picked up the reticule, and gave it to the prosecutrix—I took it from her, and kept it till we got to the station-house, when I gave it to the policeman—this is it.

Cross-examined. Q. You were walking arm-in' arm with her? A. Yes, as near to the parties as herself.

SAMUEL M'CRA . (City police-constable, No. 56.) I saw the struggle with Jolly and the prosecutrix—I saw the bag dropped—I did not see Calladine there.

Jolly. Q. Did you see me drop the bag? A. No, I saw it drop.

JAMES PORC . (police-constable K 91.) I produce a certificate of Calladine's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—he prisoner is the person who was tried by the name of John Carradine.

JOLLY.— GUILTY . Aged 21.— Transported for Ten Years.

CALLADINE.— GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, November 25th, 1840.

First Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

HENRY TOTEN.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-34
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

34. HENRY TOTEN . was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October, a certain post letter, containing 1 box, and 1 ring, value 10s., the goods of, her Majesty's Postmaster General; also for stealing, on the 12th of October, a certain post letter, containing 1 5l. bank-note, the property of her Majesty's Post-master General: to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Transported for Ten Years.

CHRISTOPHER HARDING.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-35
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

35. CHRISTOPHER HARDING . was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October, 561bs. weight of bacon., value 1l. 5s., the goods of Richard Lillwall, his master: to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Transported for Seven Years.

JAMES FLANAGAN.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-36
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceCorporal > whipping

Related Material

36. JAMES FLANAGAN . was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November, 11b. weight of tea, value 6s., the goods of Henry Blake; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Whipped and discharged.

HENRY HUNT.
23rd November 1840
Reference Numbert18401123-37
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material