Old Bailey Proceedings.
17th June 1839
Reference Number: t18390617

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Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
17th June 1839
Reference Numberf18390617

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CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

SESSIONS PAPER.

SAMUEL WILSON, ESQUIRE, MAYOR.

EIGHTH SESSION, HELD JUNE 17, 1839.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

WILLIAM TYLER, PRINTER, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1839.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY,

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Held on Monday, June 17th, 1839, and following Days.

Before the Right Honourable SAMUEL WILSON , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Right Honourable, Sir Nicholas Conyngham Tindal, Knt., Lord Chief Justice of Her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Joseph Littledale, Knt., one of the Justices, of Her Majesty's Court of Queen's Bench; Sir Edmund Hall Alderson, Knt., one of the Barons of Her Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Gurney, Knt., one other of the Barons of Her Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Anthony Brown, Esq.; Sir John Key, Bart.; Sir Peter Laurie, Knt.; Aldermen of the said City: the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City; Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt.; James Harmer, Esq.; John Lainson, Esq.; James White, Esq.; and Michael Gibbs, Esq.; Aldermen of the said City: John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

William Gardner

William Harper

Joseph Turner

George Johnston

Charles Kingston

Samuel James

Joseph Jackson

Thomas Fairhead

James Jarvis

Edward Johnson

Samuel Garrett

John Johnson

Second Jury

Henry Felix Hyett

Joseph Levett

William Henry Hoare

Samuel Island

John Bromley

Matthew Herrington

John Foster

Henry Brown

Isaac Hunt

James William Bull

Thomas Munday

James Johnson

Third Jury.

Edward Franklin

William Pewster

Charles Brown

Edwin Hatton

John Fletcher

John White Fowler

Thomas Riley

Thomas Cheetwood Jones

William Lent

James Mason

Samuel Miles, Jun.

John Layton

Fourth Jury.

William Kitchen

Thomas Jones

Griffith Humphries

Leggatt Gilbert

John Lloyd

Henry Birch

Stephen Aymer

James Braby

David Harris

Arthur Floyd

Samuel Foster

Joseph Batley

Fifth Jury.

Joseph Gray

Antonio Brady

Edmund Eyres

Henry Kilby

Thomas Humphries

Joseph Brown

Stephen Butler

Charles Watson

Thomas Griffin

Robert Francis Beeton

John Hemming

Joseph Fontaine

Sixth Jury.

Robert Guyott

Thomas Wild

Willam Jones

Thomas Sidney

John Brooks

William Birch

William Humphries

William Hall

James Hurd Edwards

George Freeman

Thomas Baggs

John Foster

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

WILSON, MAYOR. EIGHTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that a prisoner has been previously in custody—As obelisk (†), that a prisoner is known to be the associate of bad characters.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, June. 7th, 1839.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

DANIEL GOOD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1714
VerdictNot Guilty > no evidence

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1714. DANIEL GOOD . is indicted for a misdemeanor. Upon which no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

SAMUEL LYONS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1715
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1715. SAMUEL LYONS . is indicted for an indecent assault.

NOT GUILTY .

LUDOVIC PEUSH.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1716
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1716. LUDOVIC PEUSH . is indicted for a libel.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, June. 8th, 1839.

Second Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOSEPH BIRCH.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1717
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1717. JOSEPH BIRCH . was indicted for a conspiracy.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, June. 8th, 1839.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

THOMAS POWNEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1718
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1718. THOMAS POWNEY . is indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 1 loaf of bead, value 9d., the goods of Ann Dorchester; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined One month.

WILLIAM TYLER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1719
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1719. WILLIAM TYLER . is indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June, 1 coat, value 16s., and 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; the goods of Samuel Wood; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 50.— Confined six months.

JOSEPH WITTAL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1720
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1720. JOSEPH WITTAL . is indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June, 1 handkerechief, value 2s., the goods of Joseph Scarlet, from his person; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Ten Years.

MARY LAWRENCE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1721
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1721. MARY LAWRENCE . was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 6 shillings, the monies of James Tansley.

ANN TANSLEY . I am the wife of James Tansley, of Sandwich-mews, Paddington. I allowed the prisoner to hang up clothes on my premises—she came on the 17th of May—I had 10$. in my box—I missed 6s. in the morning, about five minutes after she was gone—we had lost 6s. the day before, when she had been there, and my husband marked these ten shillings, and put them in the box on the 17th—I was not in the room when the prisoner was there—she came alone—this is the money that was marked in our box—(looking at it.)

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Had you marked any shillings before? A. No—they had a little notch on them—about twelve o'clock I went to fetch my children from school, and left my husband in the next room—the shillings were in the box in the sitting-room—the prisoner lives with her father-in-law next door to us—I always considered her honest and industrious—she has lost her mother.

GEORGE FELTHAM . I am inspector of the I division of police. I was called in on this occasion—I found the prisoner in the room—I said, "I am about to take you for having stolen some money from this person"—she said, "I have stolen no money"—I searched, and in her pocket I found five shillings, which I produce, and sixpence in copper—the prosecutor identified them—I took her to the station-house, and asked what she had done with the sixth shilling—she cried, and said she had gone over to the public-house and changed it there—I went to the public-house, and in the till I found the other shilling.

GUILTY . Aged 16.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Eight Days.

JOHN LOVEJOY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1722
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1722. JOHN LOVEJOY . was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May, 1 hat, value 15s., the goods of Robert Austin.

ROBERT AUSTIN . I am a hatter, and live at Uxbridge. On Saturday night, the 18th of May, about eight o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop to order a cloth cap—he left, and returned about an hour after, and desired to see another sort—he looked at some, and did not like them—he said he would call the next Saturday night—as soon as he was gone my lad said something—I went out after the prisoner, and took him—I said, "You have a hat of mine," and he gave me this hat out of his hand—(looking at it.)—it is mine—I had not sold it.

JOHN WHITFIEID . I am in the prosecutor's service. I saw the prisoner in the shop—he picked up a hat from outside the door, and placed it under his coat—I informed my master, who went after him.

JAMES CHADWICK . I apprehended the prisoner, and the hat was given to Mr. Murray.

CHARLES JAMES MURRAY . I have produced the hat.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined One Month.

JULIA LITTLE, HARRIET BOLLAND.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1723
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation; Guilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1723. JULIA LITTLE . and HARRIET BOLLAND . were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 8 yards of fringe, value 4s.; and 2 yards of ribbon, value 1s.; the goods of William Goodman.

WILLIAM GOODMAN . I am a linen-draper, and live at Uxbridge. On the evening of the 24th of May, between nine and ten o'clock, I was out, and was sent for—I found the two prisoners there—this silk fringe and ribbon are both mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How do you know the property?

A. By my private mark on both of them, in my own writing—I picked the ribbon up at the end of a court.

FREDERICK STONE . I am shopman to the prosecutor. The prisoners came in about nine o'clock in the evening, and asked for some fringe—Little spoke, and had two yards cut from a piece of blue—she paid for it—I went for change—Bolland was close to her—in: consequence of what somebody said, I went and fetched them back—I know this fringe—it was shown to them five minutes before it was missed.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were the prisoners found after they left the shop? A. Coming out of the Ram inn—they had some beer in a mug, which they were taking away—they came back with me—I asked them for the piece of fringe—I told them some man had seen them take it—they said they had not got it with them, and would go back and face the man—they went back—there was one person in the shop besides, but he was closing the shop—they were searched when the officer came, not before—I did not ask them to take off their shawls—I said the man was present that saw them take it, and Little pulled her shawl off her shoulders.

JOHN DORMER . I was standing against Mr. Goodman's shop, looking in at the window—I saw the prisoners standing at the counter—I saw Little put some money on the counter—Stone took it, went to another part of the shop, and when he was gone Little took up the fringe with her left hand, and put it under her shawl—Bolland looked up, and smiled at her—it looked like this one—Stone came back, gave them some change, they came out, and I told the shopman that those girls had taken some pink stuff—he went after them.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you? A. A gentleman's servant—I was in place at that time—I have seen the prisoners before—I am sure they are the persons—there was a gas light in the shop—there were some things hanging in the window, but I could see into the shop—I was standing with a young man—he did not go into the shop, nor before the Magistrate—when the prisoners returned I was standing on the other side of the street—all I saw was a piece of fringe like this—when she came out she passed about two yards from me.

JAMES STEPHEN NORMAN . I was at a friend's house, a few doors from Mr. Goodman's—I picked up this fringe a few doors from Mr. Goodman's,—I kept it till I heard of the robbery, and took it to Mr. Goodman, about a quarter past ten o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. How long did you have it? A. About half-anhour—I gave it to Murray.

CHARLES JAMES MURRAY . I am a policeman. The prisoners were given into my custody—I walked between them—when I got near the station-house door I felt Bolland give a sudden jerk, and throw something—I called out, "Mr. Goodman, look up that court, there is something thrown there"—he went, and found this roll of ribbon—this was about half-past ten o'clock—they had been home between half-past ten o'clock and the time they had been in the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know they had been there? A. Their mother told me so—I searched them before this, as far as decency would allow, at the station-house, and found nothing on them.

COURT. to. STONE. Q. Had you shown the ribbon to them in the evening? A. No—I had in the morning, when they had also been at the shop.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you seen it after they bad seen it in the

morning? A. No—they did not purchase it—I did not see it at night when they were there—we generally clear the counter as soon as the costomer is gone—about eight hours elapsed from the time they had been in the morning to their coming at night.

(The prisoners received a good character.)

LITTLE.— GUILTY . Aged 16. BOLLAND.— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury. Confined Three Months.

JOSIAH CLARKE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1724
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1724. JOSIAH CLARKE . was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 2 pair of boots, value 9s., the goods of Ebenezer Oliver.

EBENEZER OLIVER . I live in Bishopsgate-street Without. I lost two pairs of boots. In consequence of information I received, on the 6th of May, I went across the road, and collared the prisoner—I said, "You have two pair of boots"—he threw down one pair—I took him to my shop—he opened his coat and said, "For God's sake don't hurt me, here is the other pair."

Prisoner. I picked them up on the pavement, I did not steal them.

Witness. He said, "I took one pair, and another boy took the other pair, and gave them to me"—I found them on him about three minutes after I received the information—he was on the opposite side the way, opposite my window—the boots were hanging inside the door-way, on an iron rail—the string was cut.

GEORGE CHRISTIAN . City police-constable, No. 388.) I was going on duty—the prosecutor called me, and gave the prisoner to me, and two pairs of boots—he was remanded till Thursday, for his master to come——he went again, and his friends bad not come—the Lord Mayor ordered him back, and he made his escape from the Mansion-house—I took him again, about three weeks, after in Elizabeth-street, Hackney-road.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM PARSONS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1725
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1725. WILLIAM PARSONS . was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Charles Sutton, from his person.

CHARLES SUTTON . I am a brickmaker, and live in Hillingdon. I went to the Red Lion Inn, on the 17th of May, and fell asleep—I had a yellow silk handkerchief round my neck, and when I awoke it was gone—this is it—I was saying I had lost my handkerchief, and the policeman took me to the watch-house—the prisoner was there, and had my handkerchief in his pocket—this was four hours after—I saw him before I went to sleep.

WILLIAM WINDER . I am a police-sergeant on the rail-road. I took the prisoner for something else, and found this handkerchief in his pocket—I went to the fair—the prosecutor was saying he had lost his handkerchief—I took him to the watch-house, and he owned it.

Prisoner. I bought it of a young man in the Queen's Head public-house for 2d. and a pint of beer.

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined Three Months.

GEORGE MUNDAY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1726
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1726. GEORGE MUNDAY . was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Toovey, from his person.

THOMAS TOOVEY . I live in Chichester-rents, Chancery-lane. On the 12th of June I was on Holborn-hill—I felt my pocket pulled, I turned, and my handkerchief was gone—I saw the prisoner about a yard from me with it, partly in and partly out of his pocket—it was safe about five minutes before—I went and took it from him, and told him he had taken it—he said he had not—this is it, it has my mark on it.

Prisoner. I stopped to look at a horse which had fallen down—I had my hands in my pockets—the person who took it threw it, and it lodged in my arms, it was not in my pocket.

EDWARD HUTCHINGS . (City police-constable, No. 85.) I took the handkerchief and the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner. The officer heard a gentleman say that it was thrown on me me. Witness. There was no such person.

GUILTY . Aged 22,— Confined Six Months.

JOSEPH SHELTON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1727
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1727. JOSEPH SHELTON . was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 3 1/2 yards of canvas, value 1s. 9d., the goods of William Mosley and another, his masters.

WILLIAM MOSLEY . I am in partnership with James Mosley, of Fetterline, the prisoner was our porter. On Thursday, the 6th of June, in consequence of having missed goods, I sent for two officers, to take all my establishment into the print-room—they agreed that the whole of them should he examined, and their boxes—I went down stairs—I was told something, and went back to the prisoner, and accused him of taking a brown paper parcel to Mr. Thorpe's—he said he had taken it there, and brought it back again—the parcel was examined, and contained three yards and a half of canvas—he had no business to take it there.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. It is common canvas, in which you pack your goods? A. Yes, it is worth 6d. a yard—the prisoner had been in my service five yean—he said he had taken it to Mr. Thorpe's, to make his porter an apron, but as he did not see him, he brought it back, and put it under the counter, and produced it from there—that was its proper place—if Mr. Thorpe's porter had asked me for a piece to make an apron, I should have given it to him—Thorpe is a tenant of mine.

JOHN ROE . I am a City officer. I went to the prosecutor's, searched the prisoner, and the rest of the people—and when he was come down the prosecutor asked him where the parcel was, that be took to Mr. Thorpe's porter—he stooped down, took it from under the counter, and said, "This is it."

NOT GUILTY .

JOSEPH HIRST, CHARLES BATEMAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1728
VerdictsNot Guilty > unknown

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1728. JOSEPH HIRST . was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June, 1 1/4 yard of woollen cloth, value 10s. the goods of Benjamin Edward Brown, his master; and CHARLES BATEMAN . for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

BENJAMIN EDWARD BROWN . I live in Aldermanbury. Hirst was my journeyman—I marked two ends of black cloth at Messrs. Brett, Brothers, and Co., in Wood-street—it was sent to me on Friday, the 31st of May—these two, with six others, were damped and pressed, and returned in the usual way to Messrs. Brett—I went to Brett's and examined them, and the two I had marked had been cut—about a quarter of a yard was gone from each—I went to Roe, the officer, on the Wednesday—he came to my place at two o'clock the same day, and Mr. Brett, with Hint, was up stairs—I accused him of cutting these cloths—he at first positively denied it—I told him, if he told me about the cloths he had cut I would not prosecute him—Roe went to Bateman, and returned with two cuts of cloth, which I owned as mine—this one was safe on my premises on the Tuesday night—(looking at it.)

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Had you measured it before? A. No, but I had noticed this mark, which I can swear was on it on Tuesday, the 4th of June—it was not in my house till the 4th, and it was safe on

Wednesday morning—Hirst was the first that came to my warehouse, and this piece was brought by Roe between two and three o'clock—I did not let Hirst in in the morning myself.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You told us you had an appointment with Roe; was not Roe up stairs at the time you had this conversation with Hirst? A. Yes—I said, if Hirst did not tell me I would have Roe down.

COURT. Q. Did you say, "As you have not told me the whole truth, I shall give you no more promise?" A. Decidedly—I told him I should have Roe in—I told him that before the conversation about this cloth.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not Roe call your attention to the promise you had made? A. I am not aware that he did.

JOHN ROE . I was not present when any promise was made to the prisoner—the first time I appeared was with this cloth—I did not understand any promise had been withdrawn.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did not the prisoner turn round to his master, and remind him of his promise? A. I do not recollect.

MR. BROWN re-examined. I said, if the prisoner did confess all, I would not prosecute him, but if not I would—all this was before this cloth was brought in—be did not confess about this one till it was brought into the room—I have one boy and a man beside the prisoner, who had access to the warehouse—they are not here.

JOHN ROE . re-examined. On Wednesday, the 5th of June, I went to Mr. Brown's, and then to Mr. Bateman's, a tailor and piece-broker, in Fore-street, and had some conversation with him—he produced this piece of blue cloth—I took it to Mr. Brown's, and he took it into the room where the prisoner was—I found nothing else there of the prosecutor's.

NOT GUILTY .

JAMES SMITH.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1729
VerdictGuilty > unknown

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1729. JAMES SMITH. alias Osborne, was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 51 yards of linen cloth, value 1l. 14s., the goods of James Thompson.

JAMES THOMPSON . I am a warehouseman, and live in Watling-street I had some cloth on the 23rd of May, and went to Distaff-lane, and there found one piece of fifty-one yards—it had my trade-mark on it—it had been in my warehouse, on the end of the counter—I did not know the prisoner then—I had seen it safe about six o'clock the night before—on the 24th some strangers called, about eight o'clock in the morning, and took off the attention of the porter—this is my cloth.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Point out the mark you speak of? A. Here it is—it is my mark, made by my warehouseman in my presence, the day before I lost it—I bought it, with others, on the 21st, from Richardson's—they were delivered on the afternoon of the 21st—there were only three of this particular quality—they were on the counter, behind the door—I saw the three the night before, at six o'clock—I was showing them to a person—the shop was closed about seven o'clock—there were four men in the shop—I had not sold this.

JAMES CUTHBERT . I am an officer of Bread-street ward. At half-past eight o'clock, on the morning of the 23rd of May, I saw the prisoner carrying a parcel under his arm—I followed him to a public-house on St. Andrew's-hill—he went and called for a glass of ale, and sat down—I had a glass of

porter—he drank his ale, and walked up Johnson's-court—I went and asked what he had got—he gave me no answer, but threw down the cloth, and attempted to get away—I was obliged to throw him on his back before I could take him. GUILTY .†—Aged 50.

WILLIAM STUART, GEORGE MIDDLETON, SUSAN YOUNG.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1730
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Imprisonment

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1730. WILLIAM STUART, GEORGE MIDDLETON . and SUSAN YOUNG were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May, 7 chairs value 2l.; 2 beds, value 2l.; 1 bedstead, value If.; 1 table-cover, value 2s.; I carpet, value 1l. 5s. 4 tables, value 1l. 10s.; and 1 set of bed-furniture, value 6s.; the goods of Martha Goldsmith.

MR. PAYNE. conducted the Prosecution.

MARTHA GOLDSMITH . I did live in the Lower Road, Islington, but have removed to Duke-street, Smithfield. I let a house in Frith-street, Black-friars, to Young, in the beginning of May, 1838—the articles stated in the indictment were in the house—the value was about 14l.—I have seen some of the property since, in King's Head-court, Shoe-lane—I let the furniture with the house—she had no authority from me to dispose of it or move it—I went, on the morning of the 13th of May, to the house, and found all the furniture gone but a stove and a bedstead.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Are yon married? A. No—I can swear to the property—she was living there up to the time, and for a little better than twelve months.

WILLIAM HUMPHREYS . (police-constable M. 27.) Between five and six o'clock, on the morning of the 13th of May, I was on duty in Frith-street—I saw the three prisoners at No. 14, moving goods—there were other persons inside—the prisoners were removing the goods out of the house, and putting them on a cart—all the prisoners were together—Stuart brought up the cart to the house, and Middleton was in the house, and placed the goods on the cart—I went with the prosecutor to King's Head-court, and Middleton was coming down stairs, and the other two prisoners were in the room with the furniture—I found fifty-two duplicates in a box in the room—only one relates to the property, which is a table cover.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not see other persons there? A. There were other persons there, about half a dozen—I was in my uniform.

JOHN BROWN . I am a carman. On the evening before the 13th of May, Stuart hired me to come on the Monday morning—I moved the goods from Frith-street—I got there about a quarter past five o'clock in the morning—the prisoners all assisted to load the cart—they all went with me to Shoe-lane.

HENRY DEMPSTER . I am a pawnbroker, in Blackfriars-road. I have a table cover and bed furniture pledged at my house, by the servant of Young.

JANE.—. I pledged the table cover by desire of Susan Young—I have lived with her five weeks—Stuart lived with her.

Middleton's Defence. I was employed by Young to remove the things, and she offered to pay me.

STUART.— GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

YOUNG.— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

MIDDLETON.— NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM JONES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1731
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1731. WILLIAM JONES . was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Sir John Taylor Coleridge, Knight, from his person.

SIR JOHN TAYLOR COLERIDGE, KNT . I am one of her Majesty's Judges. I changed my clothes at Westminster-hall on the 24th of May, and my handkerchief was safe then—as I was going along Montague-place I received some information—I felt my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone—this is the one I lost on this occasion—(looking at it.)

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Have you a mark on it? A. Yes—I have no other Christian name than those I have mentioned.

WILLIAM LIGHTFOOT . (police-constable S. 65.) About half-past twelve o'clock, on the 24th of May, I was on duty in St. Martin's-lane—I saw the prisoner with two others following the prosecutor—I saw the prisoner take this handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and put it into his trowsers pocket—I went up—I took the prisoner, and called another person to assist me—I told a policeman to go after the prosecutor, and he came to the station-house.

Cross-examined. Q. You swear you saw him take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket? A. I will—the prisoner kicked me very violently, and tried to get away.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, June. 9th, 1839.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

JOHN BROWN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1732
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1732. JOHN BROWN. alias Evans. was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May, 15 yards of silk, value 30s., the goods of Moses Hart, his master.

JOEL HART . I superintend the business of my brother, Moses Hart, who is a linendraper, in Hounsditch. The prisoner had been fourteen days in his employ as shopman—he left on the 14th of May, about a quarter to nine o'clock in the evening, not in his usual way—he seemed agitated and anxious to go—he did not return—he had given no notice of leaving—I missed a great deal of silk next day—this fifteen yards was afterwards found—(looking at it.—it is my brother's—one length was cut off a large roll.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear to the silk? A. Yes—this piece has been three years in the house—there is nothing more peculiar about it than other silk, but I am perfectly sure it is my brother's—he referred me to Deptford for his character—I did not go there till after this was found out, and then found he had robbed them.

GEORGE ATTENBOROUGH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Crown-street, Finsbury. The prisoner came to our house on the evening of the 14th of May, to pledge this silk—I asked him who it belonged to—he said, to his mother—that she had bought them for her own wear, and that she was a widow—I thought it odd a widow should wear coloured silks—and from the evasive answers he gave me I suspected he had stolen them, and gave him into custody.

JAMES HENSLEY . I am a policeman. I took him into custody, and found a key and 12s. and a duplicate on him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you find any knife or scissors with which I could have cut this silk? A. Nothing of the kind.

Prisoner's Defence. I had had the silk in my possession long before I went into the prosecutor's service, having been in the habit of travelling with silk and linen drapery, and these I had not been able to dispose of—they are not his—he does not state the correct length of them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM SMITH.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1733
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1733. WILLIAM SMITH. alias William Slade Smith. was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 5th of April, at St. Luke, Chelsea, a certain order for the payment of the sum of £100, with intent to defraud Clement Wigney and another.—2nd COUNT. for uttering the same with the like intent.—Two other COUNTS, for forging and uttering the signature thereto.—Four other COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud William Masterman and others.—Four other COUNTS. stating his intent to be to defraud Sophia Woodden.

MR. CLARKSON. conducted the Prosecution.

SOPHIA WOODDEN . I am a widow, and live in Lower Sloane-street, Chelsea. I have lived there thirty-nine years—I know the prisoner very well indeed—I knew his father, who is now dead—I am entitled to some property, which I am kept out of—I put my whole confidence in the prisoner, and I had a good deal of conversation with him about it—he said it was all going on well, and I was in a fair prospect of recovering the property—the prisoner is a schoolmaster by profession—after his father was dead and buried, a friend of theirs at Woodbridge sent him to me to thank me for my kindness to his father and that was How we became acquainted—I told him myself that I had a claim to some property, and told him my case—I took him into my house for six weeks when he first came—he was very much distressed—he said, if my claim was looked into I should recover the property—he said he knew a gentleman in the law who was very clever, a Sir John Laws, who was a commissioner of laws—I put it down in my little book—(reads.—"Sir John Laws, commissioner of laws, Plummer's-buildings, Temple"—he told me he used to see Sir John Laws, and he had 6l. or seeing him—he proposed that Sir John Laws should look into this business, and I furnished him with various sums of money for the purpose of communicating with Sir John Laws—I did so at his request—he used to tell me what he should want, and received letters from Sir John—the prisoner said be wanted 100l. to send to Mr. Salmon (Sir John Laws' clerk,) at Brighton, who was to send this money to the Archbishop of Canterbury, for a faculty to remove my father's body to the family vault of his ancestors, the Buckingham family—I had four letters from Sir John—he showed me a letter about the faculty—this is it—(looking at one.—it came to me by post—here is the post-mark—I read it myself, and the prisoner also read it over to me, as part I could hardly make out—it is written across and across—he told me it was Sir John Laws' letter—here is Sir John Laws' name to it—he did not tell me whose letter it was, only that Sir John Laws had written for this sum of money, and I showed him the letter.

THOMAS MALL AN . I am a broker and appraiser, and live in George-street, Chelsea. I have known the prisoner well for about two years, and have seen him write frequently—I believe this letter to be his handwriting.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Have you been acquainted with Mrs. Woodden at all? A. Yes, I have distrained for rent for her—I was employed to distrain for rates for the parish of Chelsea sixteen or seventeen years ago—I was not dismissed from that in consequence of any deficiencies—I gave it up to go into the public line—I continued in that line about eleven months, it did not answer my purpose, and I let it, and became a broker again—no charge was ever made against me for appropriating money belonging to the parish—I had a daughter occasionally in the prosecutrix's employ—I am not aware that she was dismissed by the

representation of the prisoner—I never said the prisoner had got my daughter out of the prosecutrix's service by false statements, and I would do for him for it—I told him I thought he had acted very wrong in raising reports about ray daughter going for porter for Mrs. Woodden, and charging 6d. for what she paid 4d. for—that was after he made use of very improper language to me—I have seen the prisoner write frequently—I cannot exactly recollect now what—I have seen him write letters frequently, some a year and a half ago, and some within the last four or five months—I have seen him write in Mrs. Woodden's kitchen—I have seen him write two or three hands—I will swear I have seen him write that hand—I do not remember on what occasion he wrote that band—I am still a broker—I have been nothing but a broker and publican for the last twenty-six years—I served my time to a tailor.

(This letter was here read. It was addressed to the prosecutrix, and purported to be favoured by Lord Ebrington; dated St. Cloud, near Paris, 27th March. 1839. It held out to the prosecutrix that her claim was in the course of investigation, and conclusive evidence had been obtained, and urging the necessity of re-interring her father's body in the family vault, which would be impossible without interest being made with the Archbishop of Canterbury, Signed. "J. LAWS.")

SOPHIA WOODDEN . re-examined. The prisoner told me 100l. was to be sent to Mr. Salmon, for the Archbishop of Canterbury, for the faculty—I went to the Bank with the prisoner, went to my broker, and he sold the money out—I went to Masterman's, and deposited it there, to be sent down to Mr. Salmon, at Brighton—I think it was on the 4th of April last—the prisoner was with me—he saw me lay the money down on the counter, and the gentleman take it up.

THOMAS MALLAN re-examined. The indorsement on this £100 note is in the prisoner's hand-writing—(looking at one.)

Cross-examined. Q. Is it the same hand-writing as the letter? A. No, he writes different hands—he has written "William Smith, 6s. Commercial-road, Lambeth."

MRS. WOODDEN. Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Are you related to the Buckingham family? A. I believe I am Lord Sheffield's great granddaughter—the gentleman who has now got the title has taken it from me—I am also related to the family of Lord Macclesfield—I remember Lord Macclesfield well, and remember his coming to see me very well, at my house in Lower Sloane-street—he asked to see the next house, and I went and showed it him—we were not old acquaintances, but my brother used to do all his business for him, painting and glazing, and I used to see him.

Q. Are you entitled to the Macclesfield estates? A. If my father was, and I survive him, I must be—my father lived with a lady, and he had two sons by her—my father's name was Clarke—he married one of Lord Sheffield's daughter, and my father was Lord Sheffield's grandson—therefore I must be his great granddaughter—my father was a baronet, and he left me his title, but I never had it, and into whose hands it has got I cannot say—he went by the name of Joseph Clarke, but when Lord Sheffield died he had got his letters-patent, and the arms on it—but my poor father died, and did not take it up—I remember seeing them when I was a girl—he said, "My dear girl, I won't have this yet"—I saw his title when I was about twelve years old—he had it out of his desk—I said, "Let me

look at that, it is very pretty"—he said, "No, dear, you shall have this by-and-bye"—that was his title—I will swear that.

Q. You had some acquaintance with Lord Shaftsbury, I believe? A. Yes; he lived in the house with us, at Kensington Gravel-pits, some time—he did not pay his addresses to me, but I was informed he was an admirer of me—he never said any thing to me—I never quarrelled with him—I never had a word with him—I was going home one day, and he overtook me on horseback, and said, "My dear, How would you like to have a husband?" "Oh, sir," said I, not recollecting him, "how would you like a careless wife"—I did not think about a husband—that was my answer to him, but it was very wrong—he paid no attention to me after that—my mother told me, if any body spoke to me on the road, never to notice them—I was about thirteen years old, I believe, when this occurred—I have a great quantity of forfeited property, principally from an East India Captain named Josiah Price—I have not got it; I have only heard of it—Lord Shaftsbury knows a great deal about it, for he was left trustee of the Buckingham family—he knows more about my affairs than I know myself—I do not know what became of Captain Price—I am afraid he waa hanged, from what I have heard, but I am not sure—I did not get a halfpenny of the property—I heard I became entitled to some by his death—I knew him well—I cannot be sure he was hanged, but I have heard something became of him that was not right—he never paid his addresses to me—he had got a lady and six or seven children—I heard I became entitled to his property through his misconduct to roe in my first husband's time—we parted—we did not agree, and they wrote down disrespectfully of me to the Captain, and I believe it was his intention to destroy me, for he passed through my bed-room, when I was in bed, about one o'clock in the morning, with a knife in his hand—I was awake—I never saw any more of him till, some time after, a parcel of people got into my house making a riot and noise all night—there were upwards of forty of them, and I saw him among them—I believe they would have shot me if they could—a great many people want me out of the way, but I cannot tell what for—I do not know whether they want to kill me; they want me out of the way—I never saw the Captain from the time I saw him with the knife till I saw him in my house with the forty people—that was about the time old queen Charlotte died—they were rioting and gamboling, with the Captain among them—I cannot tell what they were doing—I had no business in the first floor of that apartment—these were upwards of forty of them, and a great many of them were theatrical people; and two boys, named Searl, wanted to shoot me—they had horse-pistols—I saw them—I think Mr. Calvert helds possession of a great deal of my property—he has made a gentleman of his footman that was—he now holds the butler's place, and now he has made him his private gentleman—that makes me think I am entitled to the property.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you ever received any property from any of the sources you think you are entitled to? A. Never a single sixpence—I suppose I am entitled to it from what people have told me, and I have had them peeping through the doorway at me when I have been on business—I have not had conversation with the prisoner about these matters—I told him about the Macclesfield property, and told him I thought there were fines also, but I did not tell him about the Prices—my father's body was to be removed by the faculty to the vault of the Buckingham family.

THOMAS BRAND . I am cashier in the house of Messrs. Masterman, Peters, and Co. On the 4th of April I received this £100 note at their banking-house—it was paid in by Mrs. Woodden, to be received by C. Salmon at Brighton—I sent this letter of advice to Mr. Wigney, of the Brighton bank, in consequence—the Brighton bankers correspond with us as their agents—by this letter they would have authority to pay the 100l. to the order of C. Salmon.

Cross-examined. Q. Has this note your hand-writing upon it? A. Yes of the particulars, written at the moment I received it.

WILLIAM WIGNEY . I am a clerk in the firm of Wigney & Co. of Brighton—there are two partners—Mr. Clement Wigney is one of them—Masterman and Co., are our London correspondents. On the 5th of April last I received this letter—it authorises us to pay 100l. to C. Salmon—the prisoner applied for the money the same day—he inquired whether we had a sum of money paid in to the name of Salmon—I referred to the letter, and said yes—he stated that he was Mr. Salmon—he filled up this cheque, which I saw him sign—(read.—"April 5, 1839. Pay self, or bearer, 100l. CHARLES SALMON."—I paid him the money—I am well acquainted with Brighton—I never heard of Sir John Laws there, or of Charles Salmon.

Cross-examined. Q. You cannot tell whether there might not be some person staying at some hotel or lodging-house there of the name of Salmon? A. No—I am quite sure of the prisoner's person—I never saw him before—I wrote the cheque, and saw him sign it—it was written off quick, in the way a man would write—we held this money for Mr. Salmon, according to the directions in the letter.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Suppose nobody had called for this money, would it have remained with you, or gone back to your correspondent? A. It would remain with us till applied for.

FRANCIS HERBERT . I am agent to the attorney for this prosecution. I accompanied Mr. Archbut, the solicitor, to Brighton, on the 3rd of April, to make inquiry for Sir John Laws, and Mr. Salmon, his clerk—I inquired at the libraries, the newspaper offices, the post-office, and every where I could imagine, but could find neither of such persons—I came to London, and went to the four Inns of Court, but could find no such person as Sir John Laws—I know nothing of such an office as "commissioner of laws."

(Frederick Day, attorney, of Hemel Hampstead, who had known the prisoner up to 1834, deposed to his good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

WILLIAM CAREY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1734
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceImprisonment

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1734. WILLIAM CAREY . was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting Stephen Longhurst, on the 9th of May, and stabbing, and cutting, and wounding him on his face and chin, with intent to maim and disable him.—2nd COUNT. stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

STEPHEN LONGHURST . I am a policeman. I was on duty about half-past three o'clock in the morning of the 9th of May, in Brydges-street, Covent-garden, and heard a disturbance in York-street—I went there, and found from twelve to fourteen cab drivers assembled, quarrelling—I did not notice the prisoner among them at the time—I desired them to go to their cabs. which were on the stand, which they did—I walked up the rank, and saw the prisoner standing at a horse's head of one of the cabs. with no

badge—all the cab men have badges—I asked whether he belonged to the cab—he said no, he was minding it for a man—I asked him where the man was—he said no more, but put his hand into his pocket, took out a pair of scissors, and stabbed me in the chin—I had my cape on, it being wet—he stabbed my cape first—it penetrated through my cape, but not into my body—I then took him into custody, and took my cape off—at that moment my sergeant came up, and then he took and stabbed me in the chin with his scissors—I took him to the station-house, after a great deal of resistance on his part—it penetrated right to the bone—I have got a jump there now—I did not go to any surgeon.

JOHN ALLEN . I am a policeman. I was attracted by the noise, and came up—I found the prisoner lying on his back on the ground, and the prosecutor on him—I saw him strike the prosecutor with the scissors on the chin—he bled profusely—I immediately seized his arm, and attempted to rescue the scissors from his grasp—I ultimately succeeded in doing it, after a good deal of violence on his part—he attempted to stab me two or three times—we at last got him to the station-house—he was very violent, and assaulted a constable there.

JURY. Q. Did he stab the prosecutor, or strike him? A. He struck him with the point of the scissors—it appeared to be done intentionally.

JOHN MANHOOD . I searched the prisoner at the station-house—I saw him go out behind an old woman who was going to be locked up, to make his escape as I thought, and he struck me and cut my lip through in two places—I was afterwards ordered to take him into a cell—he threw me down, and got on the top of me, and sung out "Murder" as loud as he could halloo.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating—that as the prosecutor was endeavouring to apprehend him, he had struck him with the scissors by accident.)

GUILTY. an Assault. Aged 66.— Confined Four Months.

WILLIAM WARNER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1735
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1735. WILLIAM WARNER is indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 1 cow, value 8l., the property of Henry Holton.

HENRY HOLTON . I live at Watton, near Croydon—I keep two cows and a horse and cart. I milked my cow at six o'clock on Wednesday night, the 15th of May, in Watton Chase, and left her there—it is not fenced in—in the morning, when I went to milk her, she was gone—I saw her again, on the Wednesday following, at the Ram, in Smithfield, in care of the officer—the prisoner lived about four miles from me.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where is Watton Chase? A. In Buckinghamshire, not at Croydon—it is fifty-four miles from London—I have not seen the prisoner for a dozen years—his father lives about four miles from me, but whether he lives with him I do not know—some part of the Chase was open, and some not—it is a large place—I never said that I suspected any body but the prisoner, or that I had a dream about it—I am certain the cow I saw was the same I lost—I had not sold it to any body—I have three acres of land—I do not know How far the Chase is from Hemel Hempstead—I have never been in any trouble, nor ever charged with any thing—I do not know that I ever was—I did have a bit of hay once—I picked it up by the side of the road, and was charged with stealing it—I have a sun—I never said I suspected him of having stolen

the cow—I never suspected any body—I never told the prisoner's brother-in-law that I had had a dream about this.

JOHN FISHER . I am a City-policeman. I was in Smithfield market on Friday, the 17th of May, at seven o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner about eight o'clock with a cow—I asked him if it was for sale—he said he had not the selling of it—I asked who had—he said it belonged to a kinsman of his, and that he was gone to Piccadilly with two more—I left him a short time, and then saw him offer the cow for sale—I said, "You are offering it for sale before your kinsman comes back"—he said, "Yes, I was to offer it for sale, if he did not come back soon"—I afterwards saw him sell it, and said, "Now you have sold the cow"—he said, "Yes, I suppose you think I have stolen it"—I said "Yes, and you must go with me to the station-house unless you can find somebody you know"—he said he knew a hundred people in the market—I went round with him, and found only one person who knew him—he was much such another man as himself—he could give me no satisfaction—I took him to the station-house, and took the cow to the Ram—it was shown to the prosecutor afterwards, and he claimed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he standing in the ordinary way with the cow for sale? A. Yes—I found the prosecutor about a week after—I was not present when the cow was shown to him.

JOHN SHORT . I live at Sinkleborough, in Bucks. I know the prisoner—he was formerly a labourer—his father lived at Winslow, and does now, I believe—Watton Chase is about six miles on this side Buckinghamshire—Hemel Hempstead is about thirty-two miles from there and is in Hertfordshire.

JAMES BATES . I am a City police-sergeant. I assisted in taking the cow to the Ram—I afterwards went to the station-house, and asked the prisoner How he came possessed of it—he said he purchased it that morning before nine o'clock at Hemel Hempstead for 5l. 10s.—I asked what he was—he said, "A pig jobber," and went about the country—I asked where he slept the night previous—he would give me no satisfactory account, and I locked him up—I was afterwards present when Mr. Holton saw the cow that was taken from the prisoner—Fisher delivered it up to him afterwards.

HENRY HOLTON . re-examined. Fisher delivered the cow to me on the Wednesday—she was worth 10l. to me—I do not know what she would fetch.

Prisoner. I did not say it belonged to a kinsman, but that a kinsman had bid me money for it.

GUILTY . Aged 42.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

DANIEL MOYLAN, GEORGE THOMAS, ROBERT ELLIOTT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1736
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1736. DANIEL MOYLAN, GEORGE THOMAS . and ROBERT ELLIOTT . were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ellen Clarke, about eleven o'clock, in the night of the 31st of March, at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 2 counterpanes, value 30s.; 2 sheets, value 5s.; 1 blanket, value 4s.; 1 bed gown, value 4s.; 3 gowns, value 9s.; 1 shift, value 5s.; 2 petticoats, value 5s.; 1 umbrella, value 2s. 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 table cloth, value 1s.; and 1 bonnet, value 5s.; her property: and 7 spoons, value 5s.; 1 pair of sugar tongs, value 1s.; 3 sheets, value 10s.; 1 blanket, value 10s.; 2 bonnets, value 25s.; 1 feather, value 15s.: 1 pair of bracelets, value 5s.; 2 gowns, value 15s.; 2 petticoats, value 4s.: 2 bed gowns, value 6s.; and 2 frocks, value 11s.; the goods of Ann Brock.

MR. HORRY. conducted the Prosecution.

ELLEN CLARKE . I am single, and live in Willow-street, Finsbury, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. On Easter Sunday, the 31st of March, I went out at half-past four o'clock in the afternoon—I left the house safe and fast—I came home at a quarter to twelve o'clock—I observed my parlour shutters ajar before I opened the door, and when I came in I got a light—I found somebody had come in at the parlour shutters—I found a crow-bar lying by the sofa, and footmarks in the house—I thought they had got in through the window—next morning I found an attempt had been made to enter at the back door, as part of it was cut away outside, but it had not been unbolted—I think they must have got in at the parlour shutters, as there were footmarks there—I missed all the articles stated in the indictment—there was a Tuscan bonnet belonging to me trimmed with black velvet, and lined with satin, the others were a black velvet and a blue satin with a large black feather in it; some spoons, sugar tongs, sheets, and a variety of articles, belonging to Ann Brock, were also gone.

SARAH ASHWELL . I live in Quaker-street, Spitalfields, with my father and mother, I know Moylan's mother, she lived at No. 1, Crown-court, which is right at the corner of our house. On the night of Easter Sunday I was at home—I went to the door to let a friend out about ten minutes after eleven o'clock, and saw the prisoner Moylan get out of a cab about three doors off, and run up the court—he was up there about ten minutes—he went towards his mother's house—when he came back he met the cab. opened the door, and somebody inside gave him a parcel out like sheeting or bed furniture—he took it up the court, came back, and took a second parcel, and then a third—as he was taking the third out a white Tuscan bonnet fell down out of the cab—the prisoner Thomas, as I suppose it to be was in the cab—he tried to stoop, but the cab seemed so full he could not stoop, and Moylan said he would pick it up—I then went in, and went to bed, and heard the cab. off about a quarter of an hour afterwards—this was on the same side of the road as our house—our door is close to the court—I was not above a yard and half or two yards from the cab—I have known Moylan between six and seven years—I supposed the other person to be Thomas by his voice, which I had heard two or three times before, and I had seen them go out together between two and three o'clock that afternoon—I have known Thomas nearly two years—I only saw him in the act of stooping in the cab.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Moylan saw you distinctly, did he not? A. He must have seen me, because he was only the space of three doors off—I never spoke to him on any occasion—there was a light from the public-house, and a gas-light three doors off—the public-house shutters were halfway down—I do not know that Moylan lived at his mother's regularly—I think I saw him a week before—he was dressed in a green frock-coat with a velvet collar when he went out in the afternoon—I did not notice his dress when he came home—he was not dressed more smart than usual—I could tell it was a Tuscan bonnet, because it fell down by the cab—it was too stiff to be a Leghorn—it fell near to me out of the cab.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did there appear more than one person in the cab. Yes, I thought there was more, and heard voices of more—I heard them say something, but I could not understand what it was—I am a waistcoat and jacket maker, and live with my parents.

MARY MOYLAN . I live at No. 1, Crown-court, Quaker-street. I am

a widow, and am mother of one of the prisoners. On Easter Sunday, the 31st of March, my son came in for a clean shirt, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon—there was no one with him—he did not lodge with me—he went out again, and I did not see any more of him till he came home at night, about half-past eleven o'clock—I saw him on the Monday morning, in company with Thomas and Elliott, and another one who I do not know, and Mrs. Sharp was there—they brought her with them—they looked over the property, it was wearing apparel, and then went away—I saw the prisoners again in the afternoon, and a Jew with them—they came back again in about half an hour, and the Jew took away part of the things—the three prisoners were present at that time—the remainder were left in ray place, and I gave them up to the policeman next day.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Can you undertake tosay your son was in the room with them? A. Yes, on Monday morning—the things were taken away, to the best of my recollection, about four or five o'clock on Tuesday—it was on Tuesday they were all there together.

Elliott. She says I came to her house on Monday morning. Witness. I am sure he did.

COURT. Q. At what time did you go to bed on Sunday night? A. Half-past eight o'clock—my son and Thomas came home at half past eleven o'clock—the door was locked—some things were put in through the window, and left there—my son and Thomas came into the house afterwards, and Thomas got a candle—I do not know where from, but not in my house—they looked over the things, and counted them, and two more came that night, which was Elliott and another—they were all there while the things were looked over—they then went away, and I got up and locked the door—there were sheets, blankets, counterpanes, and gowns, three bonnets, a Tuscan, a black velvet, and a blue satin—they all three came again on Monday morning with Mrs. Sharp—she does not live there.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Were you asleep when your son came home? A. Yes, I was awoke out of my sleep, and did not pay any attention to what was going on—I am not mistaken at all in Thomas being there—I kept awake the whole night—they did not remain there above half an hour—I did not get up to look at the things that night—my son had gone out about three o'clock in the afternoon—I had no clock in the room, and cannot tell the time exactly—there was a light in the room.

MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. How did your son get in? A. At the window—I did not open the door—I saw the Tuscan bonnet—nothing passed between me and my son—I am sure it was my son—I heard him speak several times.

JAMES MASON . (police-constable G. 30.) On the 31st of March I was on duty in Willow-street, between nine and ten o'clock, and saw the three prisoners, with another man, all standing together, about thirty yards from the prosecutrix's house—when they saw me, they began to laugh at each other, and kick their hats about—I told them to be off—they turned up Charles-street—Thomas answered me, "We are doing no harm"—they went in the direction of Cross-street—I received information of the robbery the same night, about ten minutes before twelve o'clock—I went into the house, and found the bed-clothing gone, the place in great confusion, and marks of feet dirt on the sofa—one of the bolts of the shutters partly wrenched off, and the shutters forced open—I had passed the premises in the course of the night, and examined them about ten

minutes before eleven o'clock, they were secure then—I examined them afterwards, and there appeared marks of a crow-bar having been used.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Are you sure Moylan was among them? A. Yes—and am sure of Thomas Elliott.

HENRY CHARLES BARKER (police-sergeant H 11.) I received information, and went to Moylan's mother on Tuesday evening, about eight o'clock—I found some property in a cupboard, by her information—I afterwards went to Bennett-court, Spitalfields, and found the three prisoners in bed together, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning—on handcuffing them Moylan asked me what it was for—I said, It is for that crack on Sunday night—he then put his hand into his breeches-pocket, pulled out a crown piece, and said, "Take this, and say nothing about it"—I took them to the station-house—I produce the articles found at Mrs. Moylan's.

MRS. CLARK re-examined. These are part of my things.

WILLIAM ROWLAND (police-constable H 120.) On the morning of the 2nd of April, I went, in company with Barker, to Mrs. Moylan's, and saw the property produced in the cupboard—I then went to No. 1, Bennett-court, Spitalfields, and found the three prisoners in bed—I saw Moylan hand something over to Barker, and tell him to say nothing about it—I saw Barker afterwards open his hand, and it was a crown piece—I took them to the station-house, and on Thomas I found 23s.

Elliott's Defence. On Sunday afternoon I went to bed at two o'clock; and did not get up till nine o'clock next morning, having my head so bad—I got up, and went out—I came borne about eight o'clock, and about half-past eight o'clock next morning the policeman came, and took me out of the house—I did not go to Mrs. Moylan's house—I do not know where it is.

MOYLAN— GUILTY . Aged 18.

THOMAS— GUILTY . Aged 19.

ELLIOTT— GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life.

Third Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

JOSEPH QUINTON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1737
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1737. JOSEPH QUINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of June, 1 cow, value 15l., the property of Major Handy Church.

MAJOR HANDY CHURCH . I live at Wells House, Acton. I saw my cow safe in the paddock, near the house, at nine o'clock on Thursday evening, the 6th of June—between five and eight o'clock that evening I saw the prisoner loitering about the common—I believe it was him—he was within thirty yards of the cow—it was an Alderney cow, worth full 15l.—I missed it on the morning of the 7th of June—I saw it at Paddington station-house, in custody of the officer, about eleven o'clock—it was my cow.

Cross-examined by MR. STURGEON. Q. Is not the paddock part of the common? A. It has been recently fenced off with a quick hedge and a rail, and temporary hurdles—there are constantly idle people about the common.

JOSEPH BIGGS . I am steward to Benjamin Collard. At three o'clock in the morning of the 7th of June I was at Wells farm, in the neighbourhood of Mr. Church, and saw the prisoner go by with a cow—I thought it looked like Mr. Church's cow, and followed him—I jumped out of my cart in Bayswater, and gave him into custody for stealing the cow—he never spoke a word to me—I left the cow with the policeman, who asked him

where he brought it from—he said some man had employed him to fetch it—I was going to market withal some lambs—I overtook him a quarter past four o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. That is about the usual time people go to market, is it not? A. Certainly not, with cows or milk—it was broad daylight when I saw him at Bayswater—he did not offer to drive the cow back in my presence—I saw him first about a mile from Mr. Church's, across the fields.

MICHAEL BROWNE . I am a policeman. About a quarter past four o'clock in the morning of the 7th of June, in consequence of what Biggs told me, I took the prisoner in charge, and asked where he brought the cow from—he said, from Acton Common, and was going to take it to the Red Lion at Paddington—I said, "Direct to the Red Lion?"—he said, "No, I am to meet a man on the road, who told me to drive it there"—I said, "Where does he live? what is his name?"—he said he did not know—I said, "Did you sleep at Acton last night?"—he said, "Yes"—I said, "In a house?"—he said, "No, in a shed, because I have no money to pay for a lodging;" but at the station-house I found on him a purse containing a half-crown and 1s. 1 1/2 d., and also a rope or cord.

JOHN BACHAN . I am a gardener to Mr. Church, and live at East Acton, On the 6th of June, at six o'clock, I saw the cow safe—next morning, at six o'clock, I went and it was gone—the cow found in the constable's possession is my master's.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

THOMAS PARROTT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1738
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1738. THOMAS PARROTT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June, 43lbs. weight of lead, value 1s. 6d. t the goods of Henry Hunt Piper, and others, his masters.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM HODOES . I am foreman to Messrs. Henry Hunt Piper, and others, of East cheap. The prisoner was in their employ—on the 15th of June, in consequence of suspicion against our men, I went to the factory in Green Dragon-yard, Half-moon-street, Bishopsgate, which belongs to my masters, and told the prisoner I wanted him to go to the station-house—he was searched there, and this piece of lead was found inside his waistcoat and trousers—I cannot say whose it is—my masters had lead of this description on their premises, that is all I can say—the prisoner did not say a word when it was found on him.

JAMES SOUNDY . I am a policeman. About eight o'clock last Saturday morning, the 15th of June, I went with Hodges up Green Dragon-yard—I saw the prisoner coming out of the factory—Hodges went up to him and said something, I do not know what—the prisoner was about returning—he had one foot in the doorway—I said I wished him to come to the station-house—he did not resist in the least, but walked there—I said I must search him—he directly undid his trousers, and took this lead from them.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am a partner in this concern. I believe this lead to be part of our property, but I cannot swear to it, lead is so much alike—we had a large quantity of that description in our factory—we have no means of missing so small a quantity as this.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Year.

ROBERT HOWARD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1739
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1739. ROBERT HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June, 56lbs. weight of lead, value 9s. 44d. the goods of Henry Hunt Piper, and others, his masters.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution,

WILLIAM HODGES . Last Saturday I saw the prisoner in Green Dragon-yard, coming away from the factory—I had two policemen with me—he was coming out first, before Parrott—it was eight o'clock, breakfast time—he was taken to the station-house, searched, and this piece of lead found concealed under his waistcoat—there was lead of that description in the factory—I believe it to he Messrs. Piper's, but there is no mark on it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What sort of lead is it? A. Cast—it is used by plumbers occasionally—the prisoner came to work at half-past six o'clock that morning—I do not know whether he had it about his person when he came, he might—I never expressed a doubt about it being my master's.

MR. PAYNE. Q. IS it usual for men to carry lead under their waistcoats and trousers? A. No.

THOMAS RICHARDS . I am a policeman. I searched the prisoner, and found the lead on him at the station-house.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . We had a large quantity of lead of this description in our factory—I believe it to be ours.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you ever examined to see if you have lost any? A. The stock of lead is so large it would be useless to examine it—it is the sort of lead a plumber who casts at home would have—the prisoner was regularly in our employ—I had a very high opinion of him.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.— Confined One Year.

HENRY LOCK, HENRY PAMPLETT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1740
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1740. HENRY LOCK and HENRY PAMPLETT were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June, 96lbs. weight of lead, value 16s., the goods of Henry Hunt Piper, and others, their masters.

WILLIAM HODGES . The two prisoners were in Messrs. Piper's employ—they came to Eastcheap last Saturday morning at half-past six o'clock, and I sent them from there to the factory with a truck load of lead—I saw them both go off with the truck—there was lead of this description in it—about half-past seven o'clock the same morning I was passing the end of Half-Moon-street, and saw Lock there—that was out of his way to the factory—when he saw me he turned about—I went after him, and asked what he did there—he said he was going to speak to a person at the bottom of the street—he went up Half Moon-street again, and turned into Rose and Crown-court—I followed him, and saw the truck there, and Pamplett standing by it—there was no lead in it then—I asked what business they had there with the truck, as it was out of their way—they said they could not go up the street as there was a cart in the way—I followed them with the truck up Blomfield-street and London-wall—my suspicions were excited, and I went into Bishopsgate-street station-house for assistance—they could see me go in there—I called out "police," and on turning my head again I saw them both running away from the truck—I pursued them up Clark's-place, and saw Pamplett holding his trowsers up to keep

them from falling round his knees, and I saw Lock drop a piece of lead which the policeman took up—I found another piece of lead in Bishopsgate-street, just where the truck stood—I believe the lead to be the prosecutor's, but cannot swear to it.

Cross-examined by MR. CHAMBERS. Q. How much lead did you send in the truck? A. Eight cwts.—they were to deposit it at the factory themselves—it was not to be weighed when it arrived there—it was to be put among a pile of lead, where it was to be melted—I live at the factory myself—they were merely to throw it on the heap—we have conducted business in that way twenty years, to my knowledge—sometimes we send five or six loads a day, and sometimes none—we buy large quantities of lead to melt up.

WILLIAM HENRT WOOLLEN . I am a policeman. I was at the station-house when Hodges called me to assist—I followed him to Clark's-place, and saw both the prisoners—I made up to Lock, and saw a lump of lead lying down by his side; and on coming back I found the other piece in the court in Bishopsgate-street, just under the truck.

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am in partnership with Henry Hunt Piper, and others. I believe this lead to belong to our firm.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. You buy hundreds of thousands of pounds of lead? A. Yes—I believe this to be ours from the look of it—we purchased twenty tons that had foundered at sea, and the peculiar Action of the salt water on it appears on this lead.

(Pamplett received a good character.)

LOCK— GUILTY . Aged 36.

PAMPLETT— GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months.

WILLIAM WHITE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1741
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1741. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May, 2 sheets, value 10s., the goods of John Barker: also, on the 18th of May, 3 sheets, value 1l., the goods of William James; to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

JAMES GOODMAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1742
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1742. JAMES GOODMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June, 1 waistcoat, value 10s., the goods of William Keith Elphinstone; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Confined Three Months.

JOSEPH THURGOOD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1743
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1743. JOSEPH THURGOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of June, 2 watches, value 5l.; 1 sovereign, 3 half-sovereigns, 14 shillings, and 20 sixpences; the goods and monies of Godfrey Thurgood, in his dwelling-house; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, June 19th, 1839.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

EMIL DELLE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1744
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1744. EMIL DELLE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March, 40 yards of satin, value 21l., the goods of Edward William Falk.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

EDWARD WILLIAM FALK I am a merchant, and live at St. Mary— at—

Hill, London. The prisoner was in my employ for some time—I let his have money when he wanted it—he had a commission, and I made it up to 1002. a year—if his commission exceeded that he had it—it might have produced him 300l. a year; but if it did not produce him 100l., I made it up to that—he travelled for me in this country and abroad—he ought not to have travelled for other houses—I had forbidden him to receive money for me for the last eighteen months—Mr. May is a customer of mine—on the 18th of March the prisoner told me he wanted a piece of black satin for Mr. May—I had not such an article—I got it for the purpose of the order—I gave it to him, to take it to Mr. May, to tell it to him—from half-past ten to eleven o'clock in the morning—no price was named—he knew it cost me 9s. a yard, and he was to get as much more as he could—Mr. May always paid cash on delivery to the person who carried the article—it was not the prisoner's duty to receive the money for this piece—he had received money on former occasions from Mr. May for goods—he was aware of May's practice, but I told him not to receive the money—he said, "I shall be over as soon as I can, and state at what pride I sold it"—he returned between three and four o'clock in the afternoon—I was not in the counting-house when he returned—I saw him about five o'clock—he laid Mr. May had agreed upon 9s. 6d. a yard—I said, "That it less than you expected"—he said, "But I shall see him again to night, and get 3d. or 4d. more, and let you know to-morrow, that you can make out the invoice" that was all that passed—he did not return—I did not see him till, I think, about the 7th or 8th of May, when he called at my counting-house for a letter, and was taken—before that I met one of his acquaintance in the street, in quite a different part of the town, and I communicated to that party that there was a letter for the prisoner—I gave him no reason to believe that this had been discovered.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Then he came to you for this letter? A. Yes, but not during business hours—I had had no dealings with Mr. May before the prisoner came into my service—he introduced Mr. May on my books—after he had been in my service about three months an action was brought against him, and he was thrown into prison—I went over to him that very night with my solicitor—he said he was innocent—I gave bail for him, and at the trial he was found innocent—he allowed me to draw bills on him—I never had a blank acceptance of him but once—he gave it me blank, though it has never been used—I was in the silk trade before the prisoner came to me—I have been a spruce merchant many years—I have no place to keep silks, and never had—I have a place where I keep spruce—I heard from my correspondent that he went on the Continent, after this transaction with May, for about ten days, and where he took money on my account—he was not my agent abroad at that time—I had no other agent abroad.

SARAH ELIZABETH MAY . I am the wife of William May, a tailor, in Holies-street, Cavendish-square—he is ill. On a former occasion we had purchased some velvet of the prisoner, and we stated we wanted some satin—a few days before the 18th of March he brought a sample of satin with him, and asked Mr. May if he was willing to purchase a piece of satin—he said yes, provided he could bring it according to the sample, but he should prefer seeing it in the piece—the prisoner said he would bring it, and he came, I believe, on the 18th of March, and brought a piece of satin—he asked 10s. 6d. a yard, and my husband bid him 9s. or 9s. 6d.—he

said he could not take that—they ultimately agreed on 10s. 6d. a yard, and he paid him that sum—he did not say whose it was—he did not mention the name of Mr. Falk—I gave him the money myself—it was a foreign satin—this is the bill and receipt—(read)—"40 yards of black satin, at 10s. 6d. "

Cross-examined. Q. You had several dealings with the prisoner? A. Yes—this is the ordinary form of the invoice and receipt—I never paid Falk—I always paid the prisoner. NOT GUILTY .

GEORGE MARCH.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1745
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1745. GEORGE MARCH was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May, 8oz. weight of tobacco, value 2s.; and 4 shillings; the goods and monies of Robert John King, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined One Month.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

PHOEBE MORRIS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1746
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1746. PHOEBE MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May, 1/2 peck of potatoes, value 6d., the goods of Joseph Reynolds, her master.

JOSEPH REYNOLDS . I am a farmer, and live at Harmondsworth. The prisoner was in my employ to sort potatoes in the warehouse—she lives with a man named Charles Morris—in consequence of suspicion, I had her watched, and she was found with forty potatoes in her pocket—she had a large pocket in front to put them in, and two pockets by her side.

ANN FRAZIER . I am the wife of William Frazier, a labourer. I saw the prisoner searched—I took the potatoes out of her pocket—she had one pocket down in front, and two on her side—the one before was larger than usual, and was made of everlasting—she was going home when she was searched.

HANNAH REYNOLDS . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I watched the prisoner, and saw her put potatoes in her round frock pocket—I gave information, she was taken as she was going home, and the potatoes found.

SARAH TAPPING . I am the wife of a labourer. I was present when the potatoes were taken out of the prisoner's pocket.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a horse-patrol. I received the prisoner on the 1st of June.

Prisoner's Defence. I had never taken any before, and then I should not if I had not wanted them.

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined one Week.

JOHN BYRNE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1747
VerdictNot Guilty > fault

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1747. JOHN BYRNE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June, 1 piece of handkerchiefs, value 6s., the goods of William Wickham, his master.

The prosecutor stating his name William of Wickham, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

JOHN BYRNE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1748
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1748. JOHN BYRNE was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June, 1 pencil-case, value 2s., the goods of Frederick Lipscombe; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Confined Six Weeks.

GEORGE MANSFIELD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1749
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1749. GEORGE MANSFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May, 1 plate-box, value 1l.; 48 forks, value 52l.; 60 spoons, value 56l.; 1 fish-slice, value 1l.; 1 butter-knife, value 10s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 1 sugar-ladle, value 10s.; 4 labels, value 25s.; 1 pair of asparagus tongs, value 17s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 1l.; 3 ladles, value 3l. 5s.; 12 knives, value 3l. 10s.; 12 forks, value 3l.; and 1 pair of nut-crackers, value 10s.; the goods of Henry William White, in a certain vessel, on the navigable river Thames .

HENRY WILLIAM WHITE . I live in Ross-shire. On the 22nd May I embarked with my family on board the Clarence steam-boat, at Black-wall, on the Thames—I saw my plate-chest put on board—I told my servant to take care of it—I do not know what the prisoner was—when I arrived at Edinburgh I missed the plate-chest—it contained dinner-forks, spoons, and all the articles stated—they were worth 130l.

Prisoner. Q. What time was the plate packed up to be put in the coach to be conveyed on board? A. I believe, the middle of the day—I saw it on board the steam-boat all safe.

WILLIAM STOCKER . I am butler to Mr. White. On the morning of the 22nd of May I packed up the plate, and put it into the coach—I did not go to Black wall with it—on the same evening I went to Black wall with one of the maid-servants; and after that, as I was coming home, I was overtaken by an omnibus—I came to town by it—I observed on the top of the roof the same box of plate that I had packed to go to Edinburgh, with my master's name on it on a brass plate—I inquired of the coachman about it—I got inside, and found the prisoner there—I asked him if he could tell me where he got it, and be refused to tell me, or where he was going to take it—I asked whose it was—he said it was his, and refused to tell me where he got it, but said if I took him to the station-house he would explain—I went on to the Royal Exchange—I saw a policeman there, and gave the prisoner in charge—I took him to the station-house—he then said he picked up the box on the road.

THOMAS BENNETT . On the evening of the 22nd of May I had an omnibus at the Rising Sun, Poplar, about a quarter of a mile from Black wall—the prisoner came to me there with this box—he asked if I was going to town—I told him yes—he got in—I asked him if I should put the box outside—he gave it to me—I put it outside—I overtook the last witness walking—he got up outside—in consequence of his inquiries he got in, and gave the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner, Q. I did not request you to make any concealment of the box? A. No.

Re-examined by MR. WHITE. Q. This box contains all the things? A. Yes—all quite safe—the box was found locked, and broken open at the station-house—the steamer was at the Brunswick wharf, Blackwall, and was moored in the Thames.

(The prisoner in his defence, read a long address to the Court, stating that he had been with a friend to Greenwich, and on his return he crossed the water to Blackwall; that on his way to town he found the box concealed in a gateway, and finding no address on it he had taken it up to bring it to town—that he had placed it on the top of the omnibus, without attempting to conceal it—and when he was asked by the witness he immediately said it was in his possession—and when he was taken into custody he stated the manner in which he became possessed of it.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

(The officer stated that two other portmanteaus had been found at the

prisoner's lodgings, and that he that morning found the owner of one of them, who had lost it from a steam-boat.)

DAVID FROST.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1750
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1750. DAVID FROST was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Stephen Price, from his person.

MR. ESPINASSE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM RHODES . On the 21st of May, a little after two o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Drury-lane—I saw the prisoner go behind the prosecutor, and take the handkerchief out of his pocket—he ran in the direction I was standing in—I seized him immediately with the handkerchief.

STEPHEN PRICE . I live in Russell-square. On the 21st of May I was coming down Drury-lane, about two o'clock in the afternoon—some person called to me—I turned, and saw Mr. Rhodes having the prisoner by the throat—the prisoner was in the act of throwing away a handkerchief, and upon picking it up I perceived it to be mine—this is it.

JAMES MILLS (police-constable F 97.) I received this handkerchief and the prisoner from Mr. Rhodes.

Prisoner's Defence. It was thrown right by me.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY .* Aged 22.— Confined Six Months.

GEORGE FLOXTON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1751
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1751. GEORGE FLOXTON was indicted for stealing, on 26th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 5s. 6d., the goods of James Blackett Atkinson, from his person.

JAMES BLACKETT ATKINSON . I was in the employ of Eaton and Co., of Gracechurch-street, when this happened. On the 26th of May I was walking in Fleet-street with a friend, who called my attention to the prisoner, and I saw him drop this handkerchief, which my friend picked up—it is mine, it has my mark on it.

THOMAS EVANS . I was in the employ of Messrs. Harvey and Co., but have left—I was walking with the prosecutor—I saw something white over my shoulder, and it was the prisoner with this handkerchief in his hand—he dropped it.

JOHN GUNDRY . (City police-constable, No. 252.) I took charge of the prisoner and the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Fleet-street—I saw a boy pick the pocket—I called "Stop thief," and he threw it down—I took it up, and was going to the gentlemen, and one of them seized me and knocked it down.

THOS. EVANS . When I took the prisoner he begged for forgiveness, and said he would never do it again.

GUILTY .* Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

WILLIAM BACKHOUSE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1752
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1752. WILLIAM BACKHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of December, 27 newspapers, value 10s. 9d., the goods of John Hutton, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

There were four other indictments against the prisoner.

PAUL LINE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1753
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1753. PAUL LINE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 23 halfpence, the monies of Andrew Pfeiffer, his master.

ANDREW PFEIFFER . I am a licensed victualler, and live in Compton-street,

Soho. The prisoner lived with me from April last—lie slept in my house—he was my confidential servant—I missed money out of the till in consequence of which I marked some money, on the 22nd of May. I pot it into the till—I looked in the till the next morning at half-past five, o'clock, and missed 11 1/2 d. in copper—he knew where the till wag—he attended my bar—he got up before me in the morning—I charged him with, stealing my property—he said no, and called me a liar—I called in the policeman—he denied it then—I then told the officer to count the money in the till that I might know what to charge him with—the policeman found the money on him—there were fifteen pieces marked, and eight not marked—I know it was my money.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How much was there in the till the night before? A. 6s., in copper—there was do silver—I searched U next morning, and found no silver in it—the barmaid had permission to give change when she was up—she went to bed the night before at a quartet before twelve o'clock—the prisoner said he had given hex 1s. and the had given him change in halfpence, but she could not do so.

EDWARD BRETT (police-constable C 180.) I was sent for—I found on the prisoner fifteen pieces marked in hit right-hand waistcoat pocket—the prosecutor said he knew them.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 31. Recommended to mercy.— Confined six Months.

CHARLES CREW.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1754
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1754. CHARLES CREW was indicted for embezzlement.

GEORGE DOBBS . I am in the coal trade, and live in Charles-street, Bridgwater-square. The prisoner had been nine or ten days in my service—he had been with me once before a little while—when he took goods out I expected him to return me the money if he received it—he was to account to me for it on the same day, as soon as he returned with it—he did not account to me for 1s. 8d. on the 20th of May—I discharged him On the Tuesday morning—I did not find this out till after I had discharged him—I did not speak to him about it, but when he took out the coals, I asked if he had received the money—he said, "No," and I booked them.

MARY ANN HARTLEY . I am servant to Mrs. Cotterell—she deals with the prosecutor for coals. On the 20th of May I paid the prisoner 1s. 8d. for coals—he did not give me a receipt—it was exactly four o'clock in the afternoon of Monday.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the 1s. 8d. t and gave it to my master—and on Tuesday morning he sent me away, took my shoes off my feet, and said it was because I told his customers he gave six pounds short in a cwt,—I did riot like to see these people cheated, and I told them. Witness. It is all false.

GUILTY .* Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

JOHN GILDER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1755
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1755. JOHN GILDER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, 5 half-crowns, 21 shillings, 2 sixpences, and 4d. in copper, the monies of John Turner, his master.

WILLIAM RUSSILL . I live with John Turner, a grocer, in Clare-street, Clare-market. The prisoner was engaged on the 25th of May to go on errands and give out a few bills—at a quarter before twelve o'clock on that Saturday night I saw him put his hand into one of the tills, and heard the money chink—I then saw him put his hand into one of his pockets—I told Mr. Turner of it the first opportunity.

Prisoner. It was a round piece of tin, it was not a till—it is quite false, Witness. There are three tins that serve as tills on Saturday nights.

JOHN TURNER . I had the prisoner about two days on this occasion—my young man told me of this—I went behind some chests where the prisoner was, and asked what he had taken—he said, "Nothing"—but having a great many customers, I asked another young man to watch him—I then went to him, and he had found 2s. 5 1/2 d.—he said, "I have just taken this from Jack"—he put it on the counter—the prisoner heard it, and said 1 1/2 d. of it was what his mother gave him, and he went on his knees and begged I would not prosecute him—I searched him at far as I could, and found nothing more—I said I should have the policeman, who came, and found 32s. 6d. in a little private pocket, which the prisoner acknowledged he had taken from me, and then he went on his knees again.

RICHARD LESLIE (police-sergeant T 15.) I was called in, and saw the prisoner on his knees, begging to be forgiven—in the fob of his trowsers I found this money—I asked How he came to take it—he said it was temptation.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY .* Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years—Convict Ship.

HENRY M'KEAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1756
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1756. HENRY M'KEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of George Howse, from his person.

GEORGE HOWSE . On the 3rd of May I was in the Bridge-road, Vauxhall, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon—two boys walked behind me a considerable time, which I was not aware of, making several attempts to extricate my handkerchief—I felt a tug at my pocket—I turned, and saw a boy, ten or twelve yards from me, throw the handkerchief on the ground, and run away—there were two boys together—I cannot say if the prisoner is one—this is my handkerchief.

NATHANIEL HARRIS . I was near the spot, about three o'clock, or a little after—I was passing up Vauxhall Bridge-road, I saw two boys behind the prosecutor, and, as I thought, they were playing some sort of lark—but on looking more particularly, I thought it was not likely that this gentleman should be an acquaintance of theirs—they turned and saw me, and desisted—they went again—two other boys came and said those two boys were thieves—I then crossed the way, and after they got fifty yards the prisoner made two or three attempts to get the handkerchief, and could not—the prosecutor then turned by a dead wall, and then the other boy got it out—I went to seize him, but I fell—I am sure the prisoner had attempted to do it—he did not do it, but the other did, and he was in company with him.

JOHN WIGGINS . On the 3rd of May I saw this boy run away—I followed, took him, and gave him in charge.

GUILTY .* Aged 16.— Transported for Ten Years.—Convict Ship.

MARY SIMS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1757
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1757. MARY SIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 4 shirts, value 8s.; 2 petticoats, value 1s.; 1 towel, value 6d.; 1 pillowcase, value 6d.; 1 bed-gown, value 6d.; 2 shifts, value 4s.; and 1 pair of drawers, value 1s.; the goods of James Christopher; and that she had been before convicted of felony.

MARY CHRISTOPHER . I live with my father, James Christopher, of George-street, Foley-place. In the evening, on the 24th of May, I was

sitting in the front-parlour—I heard a noise in the passage, as if somebody was walking—I went out, and saw the back of a woman making her escape from the passage—I then missed the things, which had been hanging in the passage to dry—I followed, and saw two gentlemen standing next door—I told them, and they went after her with me—she was running, she dropped them on the road—I only saw her back—the things were picked up, and I took them up going back—I had seen them two minutes before—these are them.

Prisoner. I did not take them.

JAMES BELL . I live about five minutes' walk from the prosecutor's—I was passing the door, and the prisoner came out—I saw the clothes in her arm—the witness came and said, "Please to stop that woman"—Iran after her, and she dropped these in Middleton-buildings—she went on, I caught her.

THOMAS MEAD . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner and have the things.

CORNELIUS SAVORY . I am a policeman. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was present when she was tried—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY .* Aged 52.— Transported for Seven Years.

JAMES ROBERTS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1758
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1758. JAMES ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 2 spades, value 3s., the goods of Leonard Jones, and 1 rake, value 1s., the goods of Joseph Saunders.

JAMES HILSDON . I am a policeman. On the 23rd of May I was in Harlington-street, St. Pancras—it is a retired part, a great part of it is gardens—I saw the prisoner in Mr. Leonard Jones's garden—part of it is a gate and part is pales—I asked what he was doing there—he said he had come to pick up a few bones, and that a young man gave him leave—I asked where he lived—he said he did not know—I said, "Where are you going with this spade?"—he said he meant to take it, to make a way through a hedge—I said, "What have you got in your bag?" he said, "A few bones"—I found in it this spade and this rake, broken.

JOSEPH SAUNDERS . This rake belongs to me, it was in my father's garden—I do not know the prisoner.

LEONARD JONES . These spades are mine—I left them safe on the 22nd of May, and hid them behind the canvas, at the back of the summer-house—the prisoner had no right there—I do not know him.

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Thursday, June 20th, 1839.

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

FREDERICK COLLINS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1759
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1759. FREDERICK COLLINS was indicted for embezzling, on the 8th of May, 4s., and on the 18th of May, 7s.; the monies of James M'Fee, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined Three Months.

CATHERINE COLEMAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1760
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1760. CATHERINE COLEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April, 1 pair of slippers, value 8s.; 1/4 yard of ribbon, value 2d.; and 2lbs. weight of hair, value 5s.; the goods of Sarah Ann Wales.

SARAH ANN WALES . I am a widow, and live in Lucas-place, Commercial-road.

The prisoner occasionally chared for me—I have known her for a year and a half—I had some hair belonging to my sister, which I was about to make into brooches—I missed it at the latter part of April, and on looking for it I missed several other things—I suspected the prisoner, and spoke to her, and told her I bad lost the hair—she denied knowing any thing of it—a policeman was at last employed—these shoes and boots are mine, and a pair of slippers—I did not find the hair, but this ribbon was tied round the hair.

CHARLES HENRY MOCKETT . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of May—I said, "I suppose you know what I want of you"—she said Mrs. Wales accused her of stealing hair—I took her to the station-house, and found a pair of slippers on her feet—I asked her where she got them—she said she bought them in Petticoat-lane, for 3d., and she knew nothing of the hair—I went to her lodging, and found a piece of ribbon, which the prosecutrix identified, as being tied round the hair—I found the duplicate of a shirt and a pair of boots pawned, which Mrs. Wales claims.

Prisoner's Defence. I was washing till eleven o'clock at night, and my feet were very wet—I found the old slippers in the kitchen, and put them on, and next morning went to work and got the old boots.

GUILTY . Aged 59.— Confined Six Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

JAMES WOODS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1761
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1761. JAMES WOODS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of Isaac Wilkinson, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

ISAAC WILKINSON . On the 13th of May I was in Puck-lane, Westminster, walking along—I missed my handkerchief—I did not feel any one take it—I went back, and Furber said something to me—I have not found the handkerchief—I know nothing of the prisoner—I had my handkerchief just before—it was at half-past eight o'clock in the morning.

SAMUEL FURBER . I am a firewood-cutter, and live in Duck-lane—I saw the prosecutor coming by, at half-past eight o'clock in the morning, and saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of his pocket, and cross over—I do not know what he did with it—I am sure he is the boy—I had seen him there with other boys at the corner—before I went in and told my father, and he told Mr. Wilkinson.

GEORGE THORNTON . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody.

GEORGE CARTER . I am a policeman. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.

Before Mr. Baron Gurney.

JOSEPH PIZZEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1762
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

1762. JOSEPH PIZZEY was indicted for b—y.

NOT GUILTY .

ANN BARRETT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1763
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1763. ANN BARRETT was indicted for feloniously and knowingly uttering a counterfeit shilling, to Joseph Price Bridgnall, she having been previously convicted of passing base coin.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am solicitor to the Mint. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Ann Barrett, for uttering counterfeit

silver, at this Court, at the April Session, 1836—I have examined it with the original record—it is a true copy—(read.)

SUSANNAH SPENDELOWE . My husband is beadle of St. Ann's parish. In April, 1836, I was present at the trial of Ann Barrett, I was a witness—the prisoner is the person who was convicted.

THOMAS SHIELDS . I am a market gardener's labourer, and attend Covent-garden market. On the 25th of May the prisoner bought 6d. worth of rhubarb of me—she gave me a shilling—I examined it, and it was bad—I would not give her change—she was immediately taken into custody, and given to Morgan, with the shilling.

THOMAS SLAYMAKER . I was in the market when the prisoner bought the rhubarb—the shilling was given to me by Shields—I gave it to Morgan.

WILLIAM MORGAN . I received the prisoner in charge on the 25th of May, charged with uttering counterfeit money—I have the shilling—she was discharged by the Magistrate.

JOSEPH PRICE BRIDONALL . I am a linen-draper, and live in High Holborn. On the morning of the 25th of June the prisoner came to my shop for three yards of calico, at 4d. a yard—she gave me a bad shilling—I bit it, and gave it to Eales.

ALFRED EALES . I am a policeman. I received this shilling from Bridgnall, and took the prisoner into custody.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coin to the Mint I have examined these two shillings—they are both counterfeit in all respects.

GUILTY . Aged 53,— Transported for Seven Years.

(The prisoner has been convicted three times of similar offences.)

WILLIAM RUSSELL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1764
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1764. WILLIAM RUSSELL was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting John Edward Broughton, on the 16th of April, at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, and cutting and wounding him in and upon the left side of the chest, with intent to maim and disable him.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN EDWARD BROUGHTON . I am a carpenter, and live in Green's-place, Bethnal-green. On the 16th of April I went to the Rose public-house, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, in company with the prisoner's father—the prisoner came into the room—I offered his father a drink of beer out of my pot—his father did not give him any, and they began to quarrel—the prisoner sat down right opposite me—he began abusing his father for not asking him to drink, and his father threatened to whop him for it—the prisoner then rose off his seat, and threatened to cut his father's throat—I told him he ought to be ashamed of himself for using such language to his father—I got up, and shoved him down on the form—he then began abusing me, and I said I would give him a good hiding—he called me all manner of names, and I threatened to whop him for it—he said if I came near him he would stick a knife into me—he had a knife on the table, which he had been eating his victuals with, but he had done eating his victuals, and it laid on the table—I got up off my seat, and was in the act of pulling off my coat, when he reached across the table, and struck me in the breast with the knife—it went into my breast—I hit him two or three times after that, not knowing I was stabbed till I felt the blood running down my side—I had not struck him before this, nor aimed any blow at him—when I found I was stabbed, I said to hit father,

"Look here, Mr. Russell, your son has cut me with a knife"—I went out at the door, and the father followed me—there were two policemen against the door—his father spoke to them, and gave him in charge—I went over to the doctor.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Had you any acquaintance with his father before? A. I had worked with him two or three years before—I had been in the house half-an-hour before the prisoner came in—his father had been there all that time—I sat opposite his father, in the next settle—the table parted us—there was nobody else in the house—there was somebody in the skittle-ground playing at skittles—a wash-house parts the tap-room from the skittle-ground—the prisoner's father and I went into the house together—I called for the beer, and asked him to drink with me, and he continued to do so after the prisoner came in—there was nobody but ourselves in the room when this happened—two or three came backwards and forwards afterwards—I do not know James Morgan—I have seen William Kent—he was in the skittle-ground at the time—he was not in the room when this happened—I do not know William Morris—there was no one in the room when the scuffle ensued—they came in and out of the skittle-ground—the house is kept by Mr. Bridgewater, who is also a master brick-maker—I do not know that the prisoner was working for him—I bad not been any where, except to this house, that evening—we had been drinking in the morning a little free, and then went to work—this was the first pot of beer we had in the evening—my father had been in with me, and left—I was not drunk—I was a little fresh, but knew what was transacted—we went to work at two o'clock till six—I was not very drunk at two o'clock—I continued fresh till seven, when this happened—I did not hear Bridgewater say the prisoner was in his service—he was not at home—the prisoner was eating bread and beef for his supper, and I believe he called for a pint of beer—he sat on the opposite side of the room—I know nothing of any previous misunderstanding between the prisoner and his father—there was nothing at all to induce any unpleasant words between them, excepting his father not asking him to drink—he did not ask his father to let him drink—he began by observing that his father had not asked him to drink—his father said he had no beer, and he would not believe it—when the prisoner came in, there was no pint pot of beer in the room—his father did not throw a pint pot at him—nor did he throw it back to his father—I did not throw the contents of my pot at the prisoner—he did not remonstrate with me for throwing beer at him, and say I knew nothing about the matter between his father and him—I did not get up and show the prisoner my hand, and ask him if he saw that—I did not say it was the hardest hand he ever saw—I did not say (using a bad word) that he must feel it—nor did I place my fist before his nose, and ask him if he smelt it—I shoved him down on the form—I did not strike him or knock him down before I received the wound—I was in the act of pulling off my coat, but did not get it off—I struck him after I received the blow—the prisoner had been about three quarters or half an hour in the house—I will swear he had done eating, and the knife laid on the table—he had more victuals in his pocket.

SAMUEL POPE . I am a policeman. I was coming by the house at the time, the prisoner's father and the prosecutor came out to me and showed me the wound where he had been stabbed—the father went into the beer-shop, and

pointed out the prisoner—I asked him How he came to stab the prosecutor—he replied he could not tell through the confusion—I brought him out, and requested him to give me his knife, which he had open in his hand at the time—he said he would not, no b—policeman should take the knife from him—I took hold of him, and with the assistance of others succeeded in getting it from him with great difficulty—he exclaimed at the time we were getting it from him, "If I could get at the b—I would give it him worse," speaking of the prosecutor—we took him to the station-house—I produce the knife, it is a common pocket knife.

Cross-examined. Q. He was very much excited at the time? A. He appeared so—he did not complain to me of the prosecutor using him ill—the prosecutor appeared to have been drinking—I should not call him drunk—he could walk and talk very well.

ROBERT HILL . I am a surgeon. The prosecutor was brought to the hospital that night—I found a wound on the left side of the chest such as this knife would make—I examined it, and found it had penetrated the cavity of the chest between the fifth and sixth ribs—it was about two inches deep—I ordered him to be put to bed and bled—it was a very dangerous wound—inflammation came on, and he was in danger for more than a week—he continued in the hospital between a month or five weeks, I believe.

Cross-examined. Q. The blade of the knife appears hardly two inches wide? A. It is very narrow—it had gone as deep as the blade.

COURT. Q. A very little further must have been fatal? A. Yes, it would have penetrated the heart itself—he appeared to have been drinking, but was not intoxicated—he knew what he was about very well—I should not think his being wounded would sober him.

MR. HEATON called

JAMES MORGAN . I know the prosecutor by sight—I saw him at Bridgewater's beer shop on the evening of the 16th or 17th—I was sitting at the same side of the table as Russell, not half a yard from him—the first thing I saw was Russell sitting eating bread and meat—his father and him were joking together—Broughton took up a quart pot, and threw it at Russell, and Russell called him a fool for doing so—Broughton then struck him, and Russell said Broughton was no man to strike a boy—after that Broughton pulled his things off, and hit him the third time, and he fell over the table—the table tilted, and he went over, and by that means he received his wound, but Russell did not stab him—before that Broughton put his hand out under Russell's chin, and said, "Feel that hand, it is the hardest hand you ever saw," and he hit him under the chin—he was very drunk indeed—it was the first day of brick-making, and he had been drinking in the brick field before—I had been working in the brick field with them, and they were all good friends till that moment—Russell had been there drinking with them—I never heard the prisoner say any thing about using the knife—if he had said, "If you come near me I will run you through," I must have heard it—I was close by—he did not make use of any such language at all—he did not lift his hand to strike Broughton at all, or I must have seen it—I was sitting within half a yard of him—Broughton was so drunk he could hardly stand—I did not see him shove Russell down on the seat—I am not intimate with the prisoner—I only know him by sight, and Broughton also—William Morris was there, and Kent, who is not here.

WILLIAM MORRIS . I am in the employ of a nightman. I was at the beer-shop on the night in question, and saw all the transaction—Russell

was sitting down, eating his dinner—his father and he were playing together, and Broughton threw some beer at him—Russell called him a fool, and Broughton got up and struck him three times—Russell took no notice of him—Broughton got up and struck him again, and fell over the table, and the table tilted with him—nobody saw any blow struck—Broughton was very intoxicated—I was on the right-hand side of the tap-room, a yard, or a yard and a half from Russell, and on the same side of the table—I heard and saw every thing—Russell never rose up, nor did Broughton shove him down again—Broughton did not use any language to him, but he got up, and pulled off his clothes to fight him—I am sure he pulled his jacket quite off, and his hat laid on the table—Russell did not say to him, "If you come near me, I will run the knife into you"—he could not have said it without my hearing it—I only know Russell by working with him now and then—I have no acquaintance with him—I know Kent, but do not know where he is now—he was there—we three were in the room the whole time.

COURT. Q. After Broughton was wounded, what took place? A. Nothing—the policeman came in, and fetched him out in two or three minutes—he had put on his jacket and hat again before he knew where he was wounded—he did not strike the prisoner after he knew he was wounded—the mistress of the house called the policeman.

CHARLES JAMES PREEDY . I am a surgeon, and have been so eleven years. I have not a doubt that a drunken man, from having a conflict with another, would be sobered—I had a case in point last week: I saw a man exceedingly intoxicated fall from a cart, which passed over his wrist—when at the hospital he was quite capable of answering all my questions—I had seen him in the cart in such a state he could not hold his head up—violence will not produce recovery from intoxication in all cases—in some cases it is quite the reverse.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Two Years.

Before Mr. Baron Alderson.

WILLIAM DUNDERDALE, WILLIAM SIBLEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1765
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

1765. WILLIAM DUNDERDALE and WILLIAM SIBLEY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Grenville, on the 8th of June, about one o'clock in the night, with intent to steal, and stealing therein 5 candlesticks, value 8s., his property.

MR. JONES conducted the Prosecution.

MARY GRENVILLE . I am the wife of Joseph Grenville, a tinman and brazier, on Uxbridge Moor. On Saturday night, the 8th of June, my husband and I went to bed after one o'clock—we fastened up the house as usual—a square of glass was out of the back kitchen window, and a square of tin was put in with tacks and putty—that was safe when I went to bed—I put five brass candlesticks in the window when I went to bed—there were four upright ones, one pair was a match, one stood high, which had been mended—the foot had been broken off, and it was white with metal where it had been soldered—one was a chamber candlestick, and another was smaller than the rest—it was an upright one—the shutter was not shut, as it shuts with hinges—I was going to shut it, but found the candlesticks behind it, which prevented my doing so—I got up next morning, between seven and eight o'clock, and found the kitchen curtain down, which had been up the night before, the square of tin out, and the candlesticks gone

—I have never seen them since—I gave information of the robbery that morning to Murray—the chamber candlestick had a hook, but no extinguisher, and a piece of soap was taken—the prisoners lodged in a little cottage, about 100 yards from us.

JOHN HIGGINS . I am a general dealer, and live at Uxbridge Moor, about 200 yards from Grenville's. I know the prisoners. On Sunday morning, the 9th of June, between one and two o'clock, I saw them knocking at my door—I was asleep—I got up in consequence of being awoke by my wife, opened the window, and saw the two prisoners—I am certain of them—I asked what they wanted—they told me they had got four candle-sticks to sell me—I said I would have nothing to do with them—I shut the window, and went to bed—I saw them again that day, after dinner, just at the end of my house—they asked why I did not come down stairs to buy the candlesticks, and said they were all right—I did not see the candlesticks—they never came to my house before—I knew them well.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a general dealer, and live on Uxbridge-moor. On Sunday, the 9th of June, about eight or nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoners came to my house, and asked what I gave a pound for old brass—I said, 4d. a pound—they said they had got some old candlesticks to sell—they had three upright ones and one flat one in their hands—three of them had been mended—they were old—the flat one had no extinguisher or socket—they weighed three pounds and a half—I gave them 1s.—they laid out 2d. with me in sweetmeats—I cannot say whether the three upright candlesticks were alike or different—two might have been a pair, but we did not take notice—I cannot say whether all three were the same height—they were thrown down amongst the metal—I sold them to a man in the same line as myself, about a quarter of a mile on this side Amersham, in Bucks, on the Tuesday, for 18d.—I described the property to Darvill—I was taken into custody from Wednesday till Saturday after I bought them—they would not take bail, or I could have gone and found the man.

JAMES DARVILL . I am a constable of Uxbridge. I took Dunderdale into custody on Wednesday, about one o'clock, on the moor, about five or six hundred yards from Mr. Grenville's house—I afterwards went and examined the prosecutor's kitchen-window, and saw the tin had been cut out along the bottom, and wrenched away from the rails—Smith described the man he sold the candlesticks to—I made inquiry at Chesham and Amersham, with Smith, but could not find him.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM SIBLEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1766
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1766. WILLIAM SIBLEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June, 1 duck, value 2s., the property of Benjamin Dodson Gale.

ANN DODSON GALE . I am the wife of Benjamin Dodson Gale, of Hillingdon. We had a brood of seven young ducks, which I saw safe last Monday, the 10th of June, between four and five o'clock, in a stream near our house—I missed one about five o'clock—I saw the prisoner coming along, past where the ducks were, to go over the bridge, with something under his white flannel jacket—I saw him put something up under his jacket as he went, and I missed the duck in five minutes—it was a white one—Pain was with him.

HENRY WATERMAN . I was about a quarter of a mile from Mrs. Gale's—I saw Sibley and the boy Pain in Mr. Page's field, about a quarter of a

mile from the prosecutor's, about half-past five o'clock—I know where the ducks were kept—if a person came from there it would lead to the spot where they were—they were sitting down, with their legs down in the ditch—I told the policeman where I had seen them sitting under the ditch or hedge.

WILLIAM SERVANT . I am a policeman of Uxbridge. I received information from Waterman of where he had seen the prisoner sitting with Pain—I went to the spot with Mrs. Gale, and found a quantity of white feathers—the blood was not chilled in the quills.

MRS. GALE (re-examined.) These are young duck's feathers, such as mine were.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been down to the water to wash myself, and put my clean shirt on—I had my dirty shirt under my jacket.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Seven Years.

First Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

ROBERT TERRY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1767
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1767. ROBERT TERRY , the younger, was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Ottrey Rayner, about two o'clock in the night of the 18th of April, at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 8 spoons, value 52s.; 1 pair of sugar tongs, value 20s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 4 coats, value 9l.; 1 card case, value 8d.; his property: 1 cloak, value 3l.; 2 coats, value 35s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; the goods of John Rayner.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

ELIZA SMITH . I am servant to Thomas Ottrey Rayner, a surgeon in St. Matthew's-place, Hackney-road. On Thursday, the 19th of April, I went to bed at twelve o'clock—the house was then fastened up securely—I got up at four or half-past four o'clock next morning—I sleep in the kitchen—I went towards the surgery, and on passing through the hall to the parlour I missed a quantity of coats off the pegs—I had seen them hanging in the hall the night before when I went to bed—I saw some hats on the floor which had hung up the night before—I went into the surgery and called the boy who slept there—I observed the shutter of the back parlour window half way down, and the blind moved backwards and forwards with the wind—I got on a chair, and observed the top sash lowered completely to the bottom—I called my young master up, went to the kitchen, and found two cupboard doors open—I missed from the kitchen two silver table-spoons, marked "T. H. R." and four German silver tea-spoons—the back-door was unfastened, top and bottom, but shut to—it was fastened the night before—that must have been opened from the inside—the wash-house window had the bottom sash up at the top—I missed from the back parlour cupboard a pair of silver sugar-tongs, marked "T.H.R." and two German silver salt-spoons—a pair of steps which were kept in the yard were removed from their place, and put under the window to enable a person to get in at the window, and there was dirt under the windows and on the window ledge—I found things moved from one place to another, besides what was gone—I had awoke in the course of the night, and saw the reflection of a light shine on the dresser—I was frightened, and covered my head over—I afterwards saw the light through the keyhole—I listened, but heard no noise, and went to sleep again, thinking I might fancy something.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Were you the last person up? A. No—I left my young master, Mr. John Rayner, up—I was surprised

to find a robbery had been committed—I do not know How long I had been in bed when I saw the reflection of the light—it was quite dark, I am certain—there was a hole in, the shutter, where daylight comet in when it is light.

JOHN RAYNER . I am a medical student, and live with my brother, Thomas Ottrey Rayner—I did not open any shutters or doors before I went to bed—I left the room in the same state as the servant did—I was called up, on the morning of the 19th, between four and five o'clock—I went down into the hall, and missed an old dress-coat, with a white silk handkerchief in the pocket, scented with musk; a Pilot greatcoat, and other articles, of my property, and some coats belonging to my brother—I found a pair of steps near the back-parlour window—I found a case of cupping-instruments broken open, and the instruments scattered about the garden—there were footmarks at the bottom of the garden, near the wall—I examined a desk in the surgery, and found things moved, but nothing taken away—I have seen this crow-bar which was found, and here is a small one which was compared with the marks on the box of cupping-instruments, and they appeared exactly to correspond.

Cross-examined. Q. You would not call this a crow-bar? A. Yes, it is a small one—I do not know that it is used by brick-makers—I saw Kemp, the officer, before I went before the Magistrate, and told him what had happened—I cannot say when I went before the Magistrate—it might be about the 12th of May—the prisoner was not apprehended when I went.

MR. PAYNE. Q. I believe the prisoner was never taken into custody till you gave your statement to the Magistrate? A. No.

THOMAS OTTREY RAYNER . I am the occupier of the house—it is in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. I was called up by my brother on the morning in question, and missed a great variety of articles belonging to myself and others—my brother's evidence as to the state of the place is correct—I saw coats produced by a person who said he found them in a garden—there were brick-makers at work near the garden at that time.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you occupy the house yourself? A. I do—my brother is not in partnership with me—I have an agreement for it in my own name.

ANN WILKINSON . I am now an inmate of the workhouse. When I went before the Magistrate I lived in Essex-street, Commercial-road—I am an unfortunate girl—I have known the prisoner two or three years—on Friday morning, the 19th of April, I lived at No. 3, Green-gate-gardens, Hackney-road—a young woman named Douglas, lodged with the prisoner—Terry was at home on the night of the 18th—he went out between eleven and twelve o'clock, and returned between three and four in the morning—he knocked at the door—I let him in—he had a gentleman's cloak on—I never saw any cloak like it before—it was a blue-black, or black—it had two tassels and a velvet collar—when he came into the room he pulled off the cloak and three coats—whether he had them on I do not know, but they were on his person—he pulled them off, and put them on the foot of the bed—they were a pilot-coat, a dress-coat, and a frock-coat—some had silk linings—there were four silver tea-spoons and two silver table-spoons—three of the tea-spoons were broken in halves; the table-spoons were not—there were two salt-spoons of a kind of gold

colour, and a pair of silver sugar-tongs—the prisoner went out, leaving the articles on the table—he said he thought the spoons were German silver—there were two white silk handkerchiefs, one figured all over, and the other plain with a figured border, and scented with musk very strong—Mary Ann Douglas asked him, when he came in, where he had been—he said, "To the doctor's shop at Cambridge-heath"—she asked How he got in—he said he got in at the back window, and stepped over a man-servant in bed, and he was going back again for three coats he had left in the back garden—he went out about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after—he was gone about half or three-quarters of an hour; and when he came back, he said he could not go because there were brick-layers at work—he went out about six o'clock, and took the things with him in a box—he returned home between seven and eight o'clock—when he came in the morning he gave the girl Douglas 8s. 6d., and in the afternoon he gave me a sovereign to fetch a pot of beer, and I brought him the change back—I saw a pair of pincers in the house—the prisoner put them in the fire, made them red-hot, put them on the hearth till they were cool, then with a rasp broke them—this is part of them (produced)—I know this iron chisel—I have seen it before in the prisoners's house—I was there from the 17th till the 20th, at my sister's house—I saw it there on the 17th and 18th, but not afterwards—I did not have any share in the property, or assist in disposing of it—I was taken into custody by the police, and told what I knew about it—I and Douglas had a quarrel six weeks ago last Sunday—I was taken into custody a week after that—the quarrel had nothing to do with my giving this statement.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say you would be revenged on this man, if you had an opportunity? A. No—I remember being taken to the station-house for a row—I never said I would have revenge against him—he never did me any harm—I did not threaten to serve him or Douglas out, after I went to the station-house—I did before—I went to reside at the house on the 17th—I was in the House of Correction on the 16th, for disorderly conduct—I have been there five times, no more—I have been six or seven times in the station-house, including the time I was taken for this—I was taken on this charge last Sunday five weeks, the 12th of May—as soon as there was any inquiry I spoke about it—the prisoner's story struck me as very odd, and frightened me—it was not what I was used to—I have been an unfortunate girl, but never was in any thing in that way—Douglas told me to get out of bed and let him in, when he knocked—it was just the break of day when he came in—Douglas got up too—she sat up in the bed, and looked at the things—I did not stay there after the I 20th—I then went to Essex-street—I told about this as soon as there was any inquiry—I should have spoken about it if there had been no inquiry—I did not say a word before I was taken into custody for a participation in the robbery—I did not tell the police—I know Kemp the policeman—he is no relation to me—his cousin married my cousin, I believe—I see him about the street, and speak to him when I see him; no more—I cannot recollect when I saw him first, after the 19th of April—I believe it was on the Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday after, but I am not sure—I saw him in Kingsland-road—I do not know whether he was on duty—he was walking along in the street—I do not know whether he had his uniform on—I went up to him and told him what I knew of the robbery—that was at the beginning of the week—I believe the Wednesday or Thursday

day after the robbery—it was not in April—you must give roe time to recollect—I was thinking it was on the Sunday after the robbery that I was in custody, but it was not—now I recollect myself, it must have been either the Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday week after the robbery that I told Kemp—it was in May when I saw him—I was taken into custody on the 5th of May—I told him first on the 29th of April—I told him who the person was—I did not see the prisoner again till he was in custody—I have no recollection of seeing him before—he was in custody before he was taken for this robbery—I had not seen him—he was about the streets from one place to another—I did not see him above once, and then he was going by the top of Essex-street—I do not think I saw Kemp again after the 29th of April till I was in custody, but I cannot recollect—I cannot say any thing about it—I do not know when I saw him—I do not think I saw him at all—I will swear I do not recollect seeing him from the time the robbery was committed till I was taken into custody—I had been in custody when I told him—I was taken into custody on the 5th of May—now I come to recollect it was the Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday fortnight after the robbery that I told him—I had been in custody, and was discharged—I was taken into custody on this charge on the 5th of May—that was when Douglas and I were quarrelling—it was on the 12th of May I was taken for this charge—I saw Kemp in Kingsland-road the week before I was taken on this charge—I do not think I saw Kemp between the time of telling him about it, and being taken into custody—I cannot recollect that I did—I cannot recollect whether I did or not—I might have seen him and forgotten it—I never heard any thing about the robbery till I was taken into custody—I heard there was inquiry about such a thing—I do not know when I heard it—it was in between times, but I cannot recollect when it was—I heard it from a person I know, named Edwards—when Kemp came and took me into custody, he told me he wanted me, and I went with him to the station-house—they asked me if I knew such and such things, and I told them yes—they asked what I knew about the matter, and I explained it—I believe Kemp was present—he was when I gave a description of the clothes—they only asked me about the coat and things—I did not hear them say any thing about the surgical instruments—they asked me about the coats, and spoons, and things; and I told them what I had told Kemp before, that the prisoner brought some of those things home—there were a great many officers there, for they were going out on duty—the inspector questioned me—I left Douglas because I was not safe there—they told me to get another place, as they carried on such a game there, and they would not wish to get me into trouble—I left on the Saturday morning, as this happened on the Friday—I took a room in Essex-street, and was living there when taken into custody—a man was living with me.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Although you have been in custody for disorderly conduct, were you ever charged with any theft or dishonesty? A. Never, and the policeman knows the same—the quarrel between me and Douglas was a week before I was taken on this charge—it was when I was taken into custody about the quarrel that I stated this—I was taken on Sunday, and discharged on Monday—I was a whole week at liberty—it was after I was in custody about the quarrel that I told Kemp—I have not been told by any body what to say on this occasion—I am speaking of what I saw myself, and no more—I never had any quarrel with the prisoner—nobody

at the station-house told me How the robbery had happened—I told them—I beard nothing about it from any body but the prisoner.

COURT. Q. Who was the first person you told about the robbery? A. Why, I believe it was Beck, the policeman—he was the first one I gave the evidence to—the first person I named it to at all was Mr. Godfrey, the police-sergeant—that was the day I was taken into custody for the quarrel, the 5th of May—I told Beck next, on the Monday night, the 6th of May, when I was discharged—I told Kemp next, I believe, on the Tuesday or Wednesday of the same week—I made a mistake at first—I am sure I did not tell Kemp till after I was in custody on the 5th of May—I went up and spoke to him about it, in the Kingsland-road, and I spoke to Beck about it in Kingsland-road—the prisoner was in custody on the 12th.

MARY ANN CHARLTON . I am servant to Mr. Miller, who lives two doors from Mr. Rayner. On the morning of the 19th of April, in consequence of something mistress said to me, I went into the water-closet at the bottom of the garden, and found three coats—one is a very good one, faced with satin—Mr. Rayner was sent for, and identified them as his property—I believe this to be one of them—(looking at one)—I delivered them to Calnan.

MAURICE CALNAN . I am a policeman. On the morning of the 19th of April, I went into Mr. Miller's, and received these three coats from Charlton—about half-past twelve o'clock on Sunday, the 12th of May, I was on duty in Kingsland-road, and met the prisoner in company with three other men—I followed him, and met another officer—I had received information relating to him—I took him into custody, and told him I wanted him to go to the station-house—he said, "For what?"—I told him, "For a robbery"—he said, "I'm b—if I shall go"—I had got hold of him—he got away from me—I made an attempt to retake him—he took up a stone about five or six pounds' weight, and said, "You b——b——, if I pitch into you I will dash your b——brains out"—I remonstrated with him, and said, "You had better put the stone down; if you use any violence with me you will suffer for it"—I drew my truncheon, and said, "If you don't put down the stone I will knock you down"—he threw it down, and ran into a court, called the Land of Promise—I followed, and brought him out—it is a court where very low people live—I had my truncheon in my hand—he laid hold of it, and we had a scuffle for it for ten minutes—he said several times, "You b——, if you do not let it go I will kick you"—a mob of about a hundred and fifty collected—he let go of the truncheon, and ran away—I attempted to stop him, but was stopped by the people, and he got away—it was about half-past twelve o'clock.

BENJAMIN BECK (police-constable N 197.) I was on duty in Kingsland-road, on Sunday, the 12th of May, at a quarter to one o'clock, and I saw the prisoner corning out of Black Horse-court, leading to the Land of Promise—I had information, and took him into custody—we had a severe struggle for a length of time—he scaled two gates, but I pursued him, and he did not succeed in getting away—he bit me severely, and kicked me several times, and threw my truncheon away—I at last took him in Maria-street, with the assistance of police-constable N 203—I had some conversation with the witness Wilkinson, on Monday, the 6th, about a quarter to nine o'clock—she gave me information about this.

WILLIAM BROOK (police-sergeant H 1.) I had occasion to search the place where the prisoner lived, No. 3, Greengate-gardens, on the 26th of

April, when I had him in custody on another charge—I found, in a small table-drawer in his room, this iron, this half pair of pincers, and this small hammer.

GEORGE KEMP (police-constable N 82.) I apprehended Ann Wilkinson on Sunday, the 12th of May—the prisoner was brought to the station-house that day in custody—when Wilkinson came there she gave information of the robbery, which was taken down in writing—she bad told me about it once before—I think it was two or three days before—she met me in Kingsland-road—I did not take her into custody till the day the prisoner was taken—I have not given her any information at all about the robbery.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know of her being in custody before? A. Yes—she did not state any thing to me about it then, she did to somebody else—I have been a policeman nearly ten years—I was on duty when I saw her in Kingsland-road, it was in the evening—I have known her two or three years—I do not think I had seen her above twice for a month before—I might have seen her between the 19th of April and the 7th of May—I do not know that I did, for she had been in prison, I believe—she came out a few days before the 19th of April, now I recollect—I had information of the robbery the morning after it was committed—I had no grounds of suspicion for taking Wilkinson on the 7th of May—she told me about the robbery, and who committed it—I took her on the 12th, on my own responsibility—I did not think proper to take her on the 7th—I reported her to the inspector—it was no use to take her till I had taken the prisoner—I apprehended her at night, and he was taken in the afternoon—I am not related to Wilkinson by marriage—I know somebody she may call a cousin—I do not know whether she is—my wife is not related to her, but I believe once, when I had her in charge, she said, "Give your own cousin a month!"—I was suprised at her saying so, and asked her what she meant, and I found that a cousin of hers, a very respectable man, had married a cousin of mine—I know her as an unfortunate girl, seeing her about the street, but not in any other way—I was on the look-out for the prisoner—I made every inquiry that laid in my power—the robbery might be well known in the neighbourhood, and was stated in the police reports.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you ever know Wilkinson on any charge of dishonesty? A. Never—I did not take her till I got the man she was to give evidence against—she has been at the workhouse since, and not in prison.

MR. RAYNER re-examined. These coats are mine. On the Thursday night, the 18th of April, a lad-servant of mine slept in the surgery, near the door leading into the back-parlour—a person getting in must have stepped over the lad—I have no reason to suspect the boy's honesty.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you told the officer he must have stepped over the boy, who was sleeping there? A. I did.

GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Transported for Fifteen Years. (The prisoner had been nine times in custody.)

HENRY TUCKER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1768
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence

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1768. HENRY TUCKER was indicted for feloniously forging a request for the delivery of 2 bib cocks, and 1 washer and waste, with intent to defraud Joseph Wheeler. 2nd COUNT, for uttering the same.

EDWARD BASTIN PAGE . I am clerk to Joseph Wheeler, a brass-founder

in Tottenham Court-road. Simpson is in the house of Mr. Smith, a plumber, who we supply with goods—on the 20th of March the prisoner brought this order to our house—it is signed "Simpson, 38, Castle-street"—I did not know Simpson's hand-writing, but believing it to be his hand-writing, I delivered the prisoner the articles—I should not have done so, but for that order.

ROBERT JOHN SIMPSON . I am in the service of Mr. Smith, who deals with Page—this order was not written by me, it is a forgery—I never gave the prisoner any order at all—I do not know whose writing it is—the prisoner formerly lived with me—I never gave him authority to fetch such things.

Prisoner. I have never been in trouble before—it is my first offence—I was out of work a long while—I always got my living in an honourable way.

GUILTY of Uttering.

HENRY TUCKER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1769
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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1769. HENRY TUCKER was again indicted for forging and uttering a request for the delivery of 3 bib cocks and 1 spindle valve, with intent to defraud Joseph Wheeler.

EDWARD BASTIN PAGE . On the 5th of April the prisoner brought this order, signed, "J Simpson, for Mr. Smith, No. 38, Great Castle-street"—I delivered him the goods in consequence of the order.

ROBERT JOHN SIMPSON . This order is not signed by me—I do not know whose it is—the prisoner had no authority from me, or any of the firm, to get these goods.

GEORGE THORNTON . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner, and on the way to the station-house I asked him How he came to do such a thing—he said, "I own I have acted wrong, but if I am allowed time my friends will settle it."

GUILTY of Uttering. Aged 30.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There were 8 other similar charges against the prisoner.)

NEW COURT.—Thursday, June 20th, 1839.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

WILLIAM NEWINGTON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1770
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1770. WILLIAM NEWINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May, 480 pence, and 480 halfpence, the monies of John Howard, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined One Month.

ANN BOWMAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1771
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1771. ANN BOWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May, 1 pair of breeches, value 7s.; the goods of David Davies, to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 24.— Confined One Week.

WILLIAM JOYCE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1772
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1772. WILLIAM JOYCE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 1 trunk, value 1s.; 1 coat, value 1l. 10s.; 1 pencil-case, value 1s.; 2 pairs of trowsers, value 10s.; 4 waistcoats, value 14s.; 2 stocks, value 1s.; 1 tobacco-box, value 6d.; 4 printed books, value 14s.; 2 shirt collars, value 1s.; 3 pairs of gloves, value 2s.; 1 hat, value 8s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 1 cigar-case, value 1s.; and 2 snuff-boxes, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of Samuel Combes: and 1 pair of boots, value 5s., the goods of George Combes : to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Twelve Months.

JOSEPH FORD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1773
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1773. JOSEPH FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May, 1 looking-glass and stand, value 1l. 10s., the goods of John Schneider, his master.

SARAH SMITH . I am the wife of William Smith, who is bailiff to Mr. John Schneider, of New Cottage farm, Enfield Chase—we live in the farm yard of the cottage, and have the charge of it when it is unoccupied by the family. I was in the cottage on the 26th of May, and saw a looking-glass safe there—on the 29th I saw a pane of glass had been removed from one of the windows, and missed the glass, which I had known for seventeen years—the prisoner worked on the premises, and had 12s. a week.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Does Mr. Schneider live there? A. No—no one lives in the cottage at present—Mr. Schneider never lived there—his nephew did, but did not pay rent—it has been empty for the last two years—it is partly furnished—Mr. John Schneider is the proprietor.

JOHN THIMBLEBY . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Chipping Barnet, between four and five miles from Enfield. On the evening of the 28th of May the prisoner came to my shop with this looking-glass—he said it was his father's, who had died, and left it to him; that his sister wanted to get it away from him, and he had brought it to me for safety till his matters were settled—I lent him 14s. on it—he gave his name as William Gay, and said he lived at Potter's bar, about two miles off.

JAMES HAWKER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 31st of May, in Enfield parish—he was at work with eight more men—he made great resistance, and said he would go life for life before he would go with me—he had a bill-hook in his hand, and threatened to make use of it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.— Confined Nine Months.

JANE HAYNES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1774
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1774. JANE HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March, 1 pair of scissors, value 2s., the goods of Amelia Stone.

AMELIA STONE . I am the matron of a ward in St. Thomas's Hospital. The prisoner was a night nurse with me for nine months—one evening a patient asked me to lend her a pair of scissors, I took these from my side, the patient did not make use of them—I put them on the table, and in a quarter of an hour I inquired about them—I said, "Nurse, where are my scissors?"—the prisoner assisted me, and talked in that way that no person could suspect her—she could, not have taken them home by mistake, without-knowing they were lost—I am responsible for what I lose from my ward—I went with the officer, and found them at her lodging.

DENNIS POWER (police-sergeant H 18.) I found these scissors at the prisoner's lodgings, in her box.

Prisoners Defence. I did not find them for about a month after they were lost—I used to keep them about me to use there—I took them home one night by mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Three Months.

JANE HAYNES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1775
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1775. JANE HAYNES was again indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May, 1 pair of shoes, value 1s. 6s., the goods of James Henderson, Weatherston, to which she pleaded

GUILTY .— Confined Ten Days.

SAMUEL DAVIS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1776
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1776. SAMUEL DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May, 1 pair of trowsers, value 6s.; 2 yards of silk, value 4s.; 3 pence; and 6 halfpence; the goods and monies of Dennis Duffey.

DENNIS DUFFEY . I am a calico printer, and live in King-street, Drury-lane. The prisoner came to lodge in the same room on the Saturday night, and lodged there three nights—my box was locked, and the key in my pocket, I afterwards found it had been broken, and these things taken out.

GERSHOM MAYNARD . I am servant to Mr. Lamb, a pawnbroker, in Stanhope-street, Clare-market. On the 21st of May, the prisoner came and pledged these trowsers for 5s.—I asked him whose they were—he said his father's.

STEPHEN SHEPPEY . I am servant to Mr. Walmsley, a pawnbroker, in Drury-lane. I have a piece of silk pawned by the prisoner for 4s. on the 21st of May.

JAMES LAWRENCE , (police-sergeant F 9.) I took the prisoner on the night of the 21st of May—he said he had done it, and no one else had any hand in it—he gave up the duplicates, and half-a-crown—I found 3s. 8d.

(The prisoner pleaded poverty.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Two Months.

JAMES RYAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1777
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1777. JAMES RYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Henry Joshua Robinson, from his person.

HENRY JOSHUA ROBINSON . I live in King's-parade, Chelsea. On the morning of the 23rd of May I was standing on the parade of St. James's Park—while there, a few boys pressed against me for the purpose of breaking into the ring, where the band was playing—I gave way to them, and almost immediately after a girl told me something, and then I missed my handkerchief—my attention was pointed to the prisoner and I gave him into custody.

ANN LIGHTLY . I was standing in St. James's Park, behind the prosecutor—I saw the prisoner put his hand in the prosecutor's coat pocket, take out a silk handkerchief and give it to another boy, who put it in his fob and ran away—I told the gentleman—I am quite sure he is the boy.

WILLIAM COURTNEY (police-constable A 164.) I took the prisoner into custody on the parade, about five* minutes after the occurrence.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Six Months.

JOHN THORPE, JAMES CAMERON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1778
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment; Imprisonment

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1778. JOHN THORPE and JAMES CAMERON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Charles Cannon, from his person.

CHARLES CANNON . I am a dyer, and live in Davis-street, Berkeley-square. I was in Oxford-street on the 18th of May—there was a crowd on account of a drunken man fighting—I saw Thorpe—he placed himself on the left side of me, and Cameron on the right, as close as they could stand—I was outside the crowd—I stood for a minute or two and felt a tug at my pocket on the left side, and missed my handkerchief—I looked on my left side and did not see it there—I looked to the right and saw it in Cameron's jacket pocket—I took it from him immediately—I took both the prisoners—there was no one near enough to have taken it but them—

Cameron said he knew nothing of it, though I had taken it from his pocket—I took them towards Bond-street, and there Cameron slipped from, under my arm—I called out, "Stop thief"—an officer opposite caught him—this is my handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. CHAMBERS. Q. What sort of a pocket was it be had it in? A. A fustian jacket—I saw it in the pocket.

WILLIAM LYON (police-constable D 57.) I heard a cry of "Stop thief," and stopped Cameron—the prosecutor had hold of Thorpe, and gave him into my custody—Cameron said he did not know How it came in his pocket—Thorpe said he knew nothing about it.

Thorpe's Defence. The prosecutor said I had picked his pocket, and put the handkerchief to Cameron; but now he says he felt a tug, and found it on him.

Cameron's Defence. There was this row, I stood alongside of the gentleman, he took the handkerchief from me, and I ran away to go to my father, and was taken.

(Cameron received a good character.)

THORPE— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

CAMERON— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Ten Days.

HENRY WILLETT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1779
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1779. HENRY WILLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of Jane, 1 rule, value 2s., and 5 half-crowns; the goods and monies of William Barrett, from his person.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I was at the Crown and Anchor beer-shop, at Cranford, on the 16th of June. I had ten half-crowns and a rule in my pocket—the prisoner went with me—I went to sleep there between two and three o'clock—when I awoke I missed my rule and five half-crowns—the prisoner was gone—he had produced a sixpence that day, and said it was all the money he had.

Prisoner. I took the rule out of his pocket and gave it to his brother, that was all that I meddled with him.

ROBERT GILHAM . I live at Cranford. I was at the Crown and Anchor, when the prosecutor fell asleep—I saw the prisoner take the rule from his pocket—I said he should not do that in my presence, and advised him to give it to his brother, which he did—we had six pots of beer—we had to pay 4d. a piece—I was going to awake the prosecutor, and the prisoner said, "Don't, I'll pay for him"—he paid with half a crown, and I saw he had two or three more—the prisoner went away, and then the prosecutor complained of his loss.

THOMAS BRAY . I am a horse-patrol. I apprehended the prisoner at a beer-shop, about four miles from the Crown and Anchor—the prisoner gave me 1d.—I asked what other money he had, he said, "None"—I said, "I think you have some half-crowns"—he put his hand into his pocket, and got some half-crowns—I tried to get them—he clenched them in his hand, and struck me, but I got the three half-crowns.

GUILTY . Aged 27.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

MARTHA WILLIAMSON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1780
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1780. MARTHA WILLIAMSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 3lbs. weight of beef, value 1s. 6d., and 2lbs. weight of mutton, value 8d.; the goods of Charles Collins.

CHARLES EDRIDOE . I live with Mr. Charles Collins, butcher, Upper Seymour-street. On the 24th of May the prisoner came to the shop, went to where the mutton lay, turned it over, and walked to where the beef lay—she

went away, and I missed a piece of beef—I went out and brought her back, and found the beef on her—she offered to pay for it—the mutton was found under her arm, at the station-house, concealed under her cloak.

GEORGE ANDERSON (police-constable D 136.) I took the prisoner to the station-house—I desired her to take off her cloak, and found this mutton under her arm—I found 11s., a knife, and handkerchief, in her pocket—she wanted me to give the money to a woman who was following, for the support of her four children—I said I could not, if she went to prison her children would go to the workhouse—she said it was owing for rent—I afterwards gave it up to Bridget Hayes, by order of the Magistrate.

(The prisoner pleaded poverty.)

GUILTY .* Aged 30.— Confined One Month.

JAMES LLOYD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1781
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1781. JAMES LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May, 9lbs. weight of brass, value 2s., the goods of John Kohlen, his master.

MR. STURGEON conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES KOHLEN . I am a musical instrument maker, in Henrietta-street, Covent-garden, the prisoner is my apprentice. On Sunday, the 19th of May, he wished to go out, as his brother had just returned from sea—I said I had no objection—I had some suspicion, and in the evening I asked him to open his box—he did so, and pulled out two or three things, and then locked his box again—I then had the officer—he was taken to the station-house—his box was opened, and these things were found—there are 9 3/4 lbs. weight of brass, worth about 2s., or more—I had such things on my premises—I know this.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How long had he been in your employ? A. Nine years—I gave him 8s. a week—he was of age in January last, and his apprenticeship expires in August next—he has worked for me as apprentice since he came of age—I can hardly say How much he has earned, it may perhaps be 24l.—when I told him I wished to examine his box, he said he had no objection—I saw him take three pieces of brass from his box—there was no effort made to open the box while the prisoner was there, but I gave the three pieces of brass tube into the policeman's custody—after the prisoner was gone, and the policeman had got the key of his box, he found it—these pieces of tube are used for valve instruments, not to draw patterns from—the whole of it is worth more than 2s., but I did not wish to press it.

MR. STURGEON. Q. Were you not prevented from examining the box in the first instance? A. Yes—he would not allow me to do it—he kept the key in his pocket, or else I would not have proceeded further, but it was his obstinate temper.

JAMES LOCK (police-constable F 150.) I was present when the box was opened, and took this property from it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the prisoner there then? A. No—the prosecutor desired the prisoner to open his box—he said, "I will not"—he then said, "Take him to the station-house"—I took him, and then opened the box, and found the things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

MARY ANN BAKEWELL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1782
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1782. MARY ANN BAKEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June, 1 coverlid, value 2s.; 1 umbrella, value 2s.; 2 vallances, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 3d.; 1 pillow-case, value 3d.; and 1 shawl, value 6s.; the goods of Daniel Sutton, her master.

DANIEL SUTTON . I am a general dealer, and live in Bedfordbury. The prisoner attended on my wife in her illness—in May I had the misfortune to lose my wife—the prisoner rented a room in my house—she quitted about a week before this happened—I missed an umbrella on Sunday before the 10th of June—the prisoner denied all knowledge of it—I saw the coverlid and other things on her bed at the milk shop where she lived—I cannot say if the umbrella was safe on the 16th of May—we had it on the day of the funeral.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You gave this woman in charge as your servant, did you? A. No—I received a communication from the prisoner as a message from my wife as to where she had concealed some money—the prisoner said she knew it was there—it was I believe sixteen sovereigns—I recovered it by going to the place—my wife and her had been on good terms—the prisoner with her husband went to my wife's funeral, but I did not observe what gown she had on—there was a little shower—it was not very showery—the umbrella was not produced from her room, but from my parlour—I delivered it to my little girl—I do not recollect any thing of a quarrel between the prisoner and me—her husband said his wife had made a charge of 24s. for six weeks' attendance on my wife—he wanted to get a sovereign from me—he made me deduct a sovereign out of the rent—I intended to give her something—she attended on my wife five or six weeks occasionally.

Q. Have you not said that all you wanted was your sovereign, and if you got that back you would be contented, and she should be discharged, only you were afraid of your recognizances? A. Nothing like that—her husband brought a friend one night to make me say something or other, and brought a paper for me to sign, which I refused—I said I considered I was robbed of a sovereign—my wife had paid the prisoner half a crown a week for what she did—I had a quarrel with the prisoner about her child beating mine—I missed these things on the 9th of June, and my wife was buried before that—I do not know what the prisoner and her husband left my apartment for—I saw some part of their goods removed—I did not borrow a boy's shirt of the prisoner—I will not swear I have not got a shirt of hers at home now, or some towels and pillow-cases—I do not recollect that I said any thing about the prisoner's discharge—I was bound in a 40l. bond to appear, and I could not afford to lose it.

COURT. Q. Were you so aware of it as to say, "But for my recognizance I would not go on?" A. No—I believe I did say that I considered myself robbed of a sovereign, and that was the urgency of the case—I believe there was something said about the recognizance, but what I cannot say.

MARIA ANNA JONES . I am the prosecutor's daughter-in-law. On the 9th of June he sent me to the prisoner, who lived two doors from us—I asked her for the umbrella which had been left in her room on the night of the funeral—she said she had not got it.

EDWARD WHISTLER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I produce a shawl, a pillow-case, and an apron, which were pawned on the 3rd of June by the prisoner, with other things of her own.

GEORGE MARSH (police-sergeant F 8.) On the 10th of June I went to

the prisoner—I asked her to go up stairs—Mr. Sutton asked her for an umbrella—she produced one, and said, "Is that yours?"—he said, "No"—I found the coverlid and piece of vallance, and under the bed I found this umbrella—she gave me the duplicates of these other things when I asked for them.

NOT GUILTY .

JOSEPH GARDINER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1783
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1783. JOSEPH GARDINER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s. the goods of Robert Ward.

HONOUR WARD . I am the wife of William Ward, and live in Willow-walk. My son Robert is sixteen years old—on the afternoon of the 23rd of May I washed out a pair of my son's trowsers, and hung them on a line at the back of the house—I did not miss them till the officer came from Queen-square—these are my son's trowsers—his father gave them to him.

JOHN LODDER . I live in Dorset-place, Vauxhall-road. I was employed by Mr. Cubit, in a field at the back of Mrs. Ward's-house, on the afternoon of the 23rd of May—I saw the prisoner take a pair of trowsers from the line—I went towards him—he threw them down—I hallooed to him to stop, and then he denied taking them.

WILLIAM ANNANDALE (police-constable B 86.) I received the trowsers and the prisoner—he said he did not take them, they were given to him.

GUILTY Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

WILLIAM TARSEY, SAMUEL KEATE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1784
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > with recommendation
SentenceTransportation; Imprisonment

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1784. WILLIAM TARSEY and SAMUEL KEATE were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of May, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Samuel Harvey, from his person.

SAMUEL HARVEY . I am a linen-draper, and lived on St. Andrew's-hill. On the 23rd of May, I was in St. James's-street, a little before ten o'clock—there was a scuffle and crowd behind me—I turned round, and saw the two prisoners in custody—I missed my handkerchief from my coat-pocket—it was produced to me—I had had it five minutes before.

JOHN EATON (police-constable S 193.) On the 23rd of May I first saw the prisoners in Pall Mall—Tarsey was trying people's pockets in the crowd—Keate was in his company, covering him—I followed them up St. James's-street, and at the corner of Jermyn-street I saw Tarsey put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, take his handkerchief, and give it to Keate—I took them both, and Keate threw the handkerchief down.

WILLIAM LIGHTFOOT (police-constable S 165.) I was with my brother officer—I saw Tarsey take the handkerchief, and give it to Keate—Eaton took hold of them, and Keate threw the handkerchief down—I took it up, and we took them to the station-house.

(Keate received a good character.)

TARSEY*— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

KEATE— GUILTY . Aged 21.—Recommended to mercy.

Confined Six Months.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

JOHN M'NALLY, DANIEL COLLINS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1785
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1785. JOHN M'NALLY and DANIEL COLLINS were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May, 1 pair of boots, value 5s. 6d., the goods of Sarah Stacey; to which

COLLINS pleaded GUILTY . Aged 15.

SARAH STACEY . I am a widow, and live at Chelsea. On the 22nd of May the prisoners came to my shop—M'Nally wanted a pair of boot-laces for 1/2 d.—I said I could not find a pair for that, I would give them a pair—I tamed to get them, and then Collins must have taken the hoots—I did not miss them till the policeman brought both the prisoners back.

JOHN SMITHERS (police-constable B 67.) I saw the prisoners walking together—M'Nally had something in one of his pockets—I stopped him, and asked him what he had got—he said a pair of boots, which he was going to take for his master to a customer—I went to where he said, and there was no such person—I took them to the station-house, and then be said a boy gave them to him—he afterwards said, he and Collins went into a shop and took them, and he put them into his pocket.

M'NALLY— GUILTY . Aged 19.— Both Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM PROWSE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1786
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1786. WILLIAM PROWSE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May, 2lbs. 6oz. weight of tobacco, value 10s., the goods of the London Dock Company.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

GEORGE TROTTER . I am constable of the London Dock. On the 28th of May I stopped the prisoner coming out of the tobacco gate—I asked what he had with him—he said, "I have nothing"—I said, "You have got some tobacco"—he said, "I am a ruined man; for God's sake don't hurt me," and wanted me to let him go—this is the tobacco—it weighs 2lbs. 6oz.—he said he had picked it up in the gangway.

WILLIAM FORDTCE . I am apprentice to Mr. Walls, Old Gravel-lane. I was employed in the Docks—between two and three o'clock I saw the prisoner in between the hogsheads, with some tobacco in his hand—he put it into his bosom—it was near where some tobacco was kept.

MR. PHILLIPS, for the prisoner, called

JOHN WARD . I am retired from business. I have known the prisoner two years—he met with some ill treatment from some smugglers, since which he has been deficient in soundness of mind.

SEBASTIAN PERRY . I am a physician. I have examined the prisoner at different times—I have ordered him leeches once a month at times—in my opinion, he required it—his head was affected.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 37.— Confined Three Months.

GEORGE SMITH.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1787
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1787. GEORGE SMITH, alias Chadwick, was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May, 1 fender, value 10s.; 2 standards, value 4s.; and 3 sets of fire-irons, value 8s.; the goods of Obadiah Lane.

OBADIAH LANE . I am a hardwareman, in Black Horse-place, City-road. On the 13th of May, 1833, I was in company with the prisoner at the Leaping Bar public-house—he was in distress—he asked me if I could give him a job—I told him to sit down, and I would give him some beer; and next morning I hired him to carry the articles stated, to the corner of Farringdon-street, and to wait, not to deliver them—I went down about half-past nine o'clock, and then I hired him to carry them on to Hyde-park-corner, and to wait there till I came—I got there about half-past eleven o'clock—he was not there—I never saw the goods, nor him, till about six weeks ago, when I heard he kept a lodging-house in Wentworth-street—I went, and saw him—I asked him what his name was—he said, "Chadwick"—I asked him about these goods—he said he never knew any thing about it

—I said, "It is strange you don't know me; don't you remember carry, ing these fender and fire-irons?"—I am sure he is the same person.

Cross-examined by MR. CHAMBERS. Q. It is six years since these were delivered to him? A. Yes; I never said it was three, nor four—I might have said that through mistake—I bought the fender of Mr. Hartell, at the Leaping Bar—when I was asked when I delivered these to him, I said I could tell by going to Mr. Hartell's; but he had not got his books by him—I had not said it was four years—I might have said four to five—I asked Mr. Hartell if he had the books six years back, or if he could recollect when I have them—I was to carry them to Brentford to sell, to execute an order for a broker—I had more goods with me—some went on with a van—I cannot recollect who ordered them.

JOHN WILLIAM LANE . I am the prosecutor's son—my father gave the prisoner the goods to take to Farringdon street, and from there to Hyde-park-corner—I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. How long ago is it? A. About six years—I could not tell exactly How long it was till my father got the bill—I had started off that morning for Brentford—I could not tell where these things were to go to—I had fenders and fire-irons in the cart—I am certain the prisoner is the man—he has grown stouter since then—I did not have above five minutes' conversation with him.

WILLIAM ALDERMAN (police-sergeant H 7.) I took the prisoner on the morning of the 13th of May—he said he knew nothing of the prosecutor, and had never seen him.

NOT GUILTY .

HENRY BROWN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1788
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1788. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of April, 2 coats, value 23s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 8s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 2 pairs of boots, value 10s.; 1 comforter, value 1s.; 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; 2 razors and case, value 5s.; 1 razor-strop, value 1s.; the goods of Charles Barker: and 1 pistol, value 5s.; 1 hat, value 5s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; 2 mustard-pots, value 1s.; and 1 burnishing stone, value 2s.; the goods of William Day, the younger.

CHARLES BARKER . I am a varnish-maker. On the 5th of April I was at my cousin's house, Mr. William Day, the younger, in Edward-street, St. Pancras—my cousin brought the prisoner home, about half-past one o'clock in the morning—I was sitting up to let my cousin in—I had never seen the prisoner before; but he and I having been to sea, we sat, talking, till about four o'clock—I then said I was going to bed, and went up stairs, but previous to that I had made up the prisoner as comfortable a bed as I could in the kitchen, where we had been sitting—I got up about half-past six o'clock in the morning, and the door was open—the prisoner and the articles stated were gone—I found this strange knife lying in front of my trunk, which had been broken open, and these pincers, which are mine, are, I believe, what the trunk was broken open with—I looked round, and missed a pistol from the mantel-piece, which was my cousin's—I then missed my boots, my cousin's hat, and the rest of the articles stated—I was looking for the prisoner, but did not see him till the 18th of May, when I caught a glimpse of him at the corner of Brill-row—I followed him, and saw, by his quick step, that he must have recognized me—I followed him, till I saw a policeman—I then collared the prisoner—he said, "What do you take me for?"—I said I would let him know when I got to the

station-house—I am sure he is the man—he had my boots on at the time, and this comforter was round the neck of a young female who was living with him—it is mine—I can swear to it—it was worked by five different people—I have found no other property.

Prisoner. Q. Have you not found your articles on your own premises once—I was told you had? A. No, I have not—when I asked you for my pocket-book, which contained documents for about 40l., money lent, and my character, you said you knew nothing about it.

WILLIAM ELMER (police-constable S 187.) The prisoner was pointed out to me by Mr. Barker, and I took him in Weston-street—the prosecutor claimed the boots which he had on, and he did not deny they were his.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY . Aged 33.— Transported for Seven Years.

ARCHIBALD EWINGS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1789
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1789. ARCHIBALD EWINGS was indicted for stealing on the 23rd of May, 2 ale-glasses, value 1s. 6d., the goods of William Garratt.

ELIZABETH TRIPE . I live at Mr. Garratt's public-house, on Little Tower-hill. On the 23rd of May the prisoner called for a glass of water, and I gave it him in a glass—in a short time I missed the glass, and asked him for it—he made no answer—I asked him again, and he went put of the house, and into the Ship and Star, which is opposite to us—I followed him in, and asked him for the glass—he put down this handkerchief—I took it up, and found in it these two glasses; the one I took to him, and one more—they are my master's.

CHARLES CHAMBERS (City police-constable, No. 42) I took the prisoner—he was very tipsy.

NOT GUILTY .

LOUISA JONES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1790
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1790. LOUISA JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May, pair of trowsers, value 5s. 6s., the goods of John Giles.

DAVID EVANS (police-constable H 113.) On the 27th of May, I was in High-street, Shoreditch, I saw the prisoner walking up and down with a man—when they got to Mr. Giles's door, who keeps a clothes shop, the man stood at the door, and the prisoner pulled these trowsers about; then the took this pair, and ran off—I followed and took her—she said, "O my God."

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. What was the man doing? A. He was pulling them about as well as the prisoner—the prisoner said she picked them up.

JOHN GILES . I keep the shop. These are my trowsers—they have my mark on them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Days.

JOHN HODKINSON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1791
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1791. JOHN HODKINSON was indicted for embezzlement and larceny.

JOHN WEDDELL . I an footman to the Honourable Arthur Lennox. The prisoner stood at the corner of St. James's-place, where we live, and went on messages—I gave a £10 note, belonging to Lord Arthur Lennox, to the prisoner, at half-past four o'clock, on the 30th of April last, to get it changed—he did not return—he surrendered himself to Mr. Baker—I had known him two months or better—he was hired by any one to run on errands.

CHARLES BAKER . I am a police inspector. On the 7th of May, at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and gave himself up—he said he was the person that ran away with the £10 note.

Prisoner. I hope you will be merciful—I will take care it shall never occur again.

GUILTY . Aged 52.— Confined Three Months.

HENRY CROMEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1792
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1792. HENRY CROMEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 1 hat, value 5s., the goods of Ann Collins.

ANN COLLINS . I am a widow, and keep a shop at No 21, High-street. This hat was taken from my window at half-past eleven o'clock at night, on the 1st of June—I went after the prisoner, and he dropped it—I never knew him before.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You were down upon him very quick? A. Yes—the hat was inside the window, which was open.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

THOMAS JONES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1793
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1793. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June, 441bs. weight of iron, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Henry Hattersley, his master.

WILLIAM MILLERMAN . I am a policeman. On the 3rd of June I was in Belgrave-square, between nine and ten o'clock at night, and saw the prisoner with a heavy load, I stopped him, and asked what he had got in the basket—he said tools—I found it was old iron—I took him to the station-house—he begged of me not to take him, as he had got a wife ill—he confessed before the inspector and me that he brought it from Mr. Hattersley 's in Horseferry-road.

WILLIAM HENRY HATTERSLEY . I am a hackney-coach proprietor—the prisoner was in my employ between two and three years—I believe this iron to be mine—I cannot swear to it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. I believe you said it was yours because the prisoner said he took it from your place? A. Yes—if I had seen it at a distance I could not have had any idea of its being mine.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM STEVENS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1794
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1794. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June, 1 box, value 5s.; 2 coats, value 2l.; 1 waistcoat, value 8s.; 1 pair of trowsers, value 10s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 5s.; 2 shirts, value 4s.; and 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s.; the goods of John Humphries.

JOHN HUMPHRIES . I work at Mr. Keene's, on Garlick-hill—the prisoner's sister and her husband live in the house where I lodge—he was in the habit of coming to visit them—I was out at work on the 3rd of June, and left my box locked, containing the articles described—when I returned it was gone, and its contents—I have found nothing but some papers that were in the box.

MARY MEAGER . I am landlady of the house where the prosecutor lodges—the prisoner had come with the prosecutor to look at his lodging—on the 3rd of June he came and said John Humphries had sent him for his box, and he was to take into him to Mr. Keene's, as he wanted to change it for a hair trunk with one of his fellow-workmen—he said he himself was at work at Mr. Keene's—I asked him several questions, and at last I let him have a box—he brought that one back, and said, "This is not the one that John Humphries wants, he wants the little green one, and there is a cord behind the door to put round it"—I let him have it.

JOHN HUMPHRIES . I had known the prisoner three or four weeks—I did not send him for either of my boxes.

WILLIAM COTTON (police-constable P 62.) I took the prisoner—he said it was all right, that he had had it, and sold it for 16s.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Six Months.

EDWARD SHAW.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1795
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1795. EDWARD SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 basket, value 1s.; 1 1/2 lb. of bread, value 3d.; and 1lb. of cake, value 3d.; the goods of Samuel Blake: also 1 smock-frock, value 1s., the goods of Edwin Marvin Abbott; to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 15.— Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM WEST.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1796
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1796. WILLIAM WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of May, 1 teapot, value 12s.; 6 knives, value 8s.; and 12 forks, value 8s.; the goods of Francis Jeffery Bray, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Six Months.

JAMES WOODGATT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1797
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1797. JAMES WOODGATT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May, 14 printed books, value 1l. 11s., the goods of Christopher Mudie and another, his masters: also 3 printed books, value 9s., the goods of Christopher Mudie and another, his masters; to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Six Months.

OLD COURT.—Friday, June 21st, 1839.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

JOHN WHITWORTH.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1798
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1798. JHON WHITWORTH was indicted for stealing 1 watch, 4 rings, and other articles, value 10l., the goods of James Aldous and another, his masters, in their dwelling-house; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Six Months.

DANIEL KENNERLEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1799
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1799. DANIEL KENNERLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 valve, value 15s.; and 30lbs. weight of brass, value 10s., the goods of the London and Birmingham Railway Company, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Transported for Seven Years.

THOMAS TUBBS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1800
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1800. THOMAS TUBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 bed, value 25s.; 1 bolster, value 2s.; 2 sheets, value 10s.; 1 counterpane, value 7s.; 5 shirts, value 16s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 16s.; 14lbs. weight of beef, value 7s.; and 5lbs. weight of bacon, value 4s.; the goods of Moses Littlemore, in a vessel on a navigable canal, called the Regent's Canal.

MOSES LITTLEMORE . I work on the Regent's Canal, at Paddington, and have a boat there. On the 31st of May, I left it, about six o'clock at night—the cabin was locked, and all the property in it safe—I went to it again about nine o'clock at night, and found the cabin broken open, and the articles stated gone—the prisoner worked on the canal—I have assisted him when he has been out of work—he had no business in my boat—I gave information to the officer—I missed some salt beef and bacon out of the cabin—I have found nothing but my bed—this is it—(looking at it.)

GEORGE M'DONALD . I am a labourer, and live in Whitecross-street.

On the morning of the 1st of June the prisoner came to me, with this bed tied up in a sheet, and asked me to let him leave it for a short time—I gave him leave, and he went away—I afterwards gave it to the police, man.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a policeman. I apprehended the prisoner—he said he knew nothing about this.

SUSAN WATSON . On the 1st of June the prisoner lodged in the same house as me, with a female—I was disturbed between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and saw him going out of the house, with the bed on his back.

GUILTY . Aged 34.— Transported for Seven Years.

JOHN JONES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1801
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1801. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May, 271bs. weight of lead, value 5s., the goods of William Essex and another.

WILLIAM ESSEX . I live in I am in partnership with my brother as plumbers—I was repairing the next house, and the prisoner was employed by me through our foreman—on the 27th of May I was at the window of our ware-room, overlooking the premises, and saw him beating up a piece of lead, and concealing it about his person—I called my foreman, and we together saw him beat up another piece, and conceal it in his jacket—we then went down stairs—he had just reached the bottom of the ladder—the foreman said to him, "Turn out that lead"—he said, "What, you see'd me, did you?"—I said, "Yes, we both saw you"—he then produced four pieces from his jacket, and one piece from his trowsers—this is it—(looking at it.)

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had a plumber left your employ a day or two before? A. Yes—he gave directions to the men when he was there.

PHILIP KIRKBY . I am the prosecutor's foreman. I saw the prisoner take and beat up some pieces of lead, and conceal them about his person and his pockets—he was going away when I stopped him—the time had expired for them to work.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.— Confined Three Months.

Before Lord Chief Justice Tindal.

WILLIAM JOHN MARCHANT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1802
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceDeath

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1802. WILLIAM JOHN MARCHANT was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Paynton.—He was also charged on the Coroner's in—quisition with the like offence; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— DEATH .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

FRANCIS KNOWLES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1803
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1803. FRANCIS KNOWLES was indicted for feloniously forging an order for the payment of the sum of £70 10s., with intent to defraud William Masterman and others.—2nd COUNT, for uttering the same.

MESSRS. BODKIN and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

DANIEL MILDRED . I am a partner in the banking-house of Messrs.

Masterman, Peters, and Mildred. On the 29th of May, between twelve and one o'clock in the afternoon, I went to the office of the Van Diemen's Land Company to pay some calls on some shares—I saw the prisoner there, and told him I believed there was a call on some shares, that I had lost the letter announcing such call, and I would be obliged to

him to check with me the names of the parties, and the amounts of the shares upon which I had to pay—I had to pay for two relatives as well as myself—the amount altogether was 17l. 10s.—the prisoner referred to a book, to see that I was correct—on ascertaining the amount, I asked for a piece of paper, not having a blank cheque about me, and he gave; piece of blank paper—this is it—(looking at it)—I wrote a cheque for the me a amount on it, on our house—when I had written it, he said, "Mr. Ewins, the secretary, who signs the receipts, is engaged, and if you will allow me, I will send the receipts to the banking-house;" to which I assented, and said, "Who are your hankers?"—he said, "Currie, and Co."—I then wrote "Currie and Co." across the cheque, for security, as I had no receipt—it appears that I have dated the cheque the 30th of May, but it was on the 29th—I have an account with Masterman and Co.—I made a memorandum on the back of the cheque, of the initials of the parties who owned the shares, and I find it here now—I called the prisoner's attention to that, and said, "Ten shares, are in the name of Francis Mildred, my brother, ten in my own name, and five, in the name of Emily Pearce, who is now Mrs. Mildred"—I told him that for his guidance in, entering it in the Company's books—that is all that passed between us—next morning I was shown this cheque for 70l. 10s.—(looking at it)—at our own banking-house, when I came to business—I think it was Mr. Stafford gave it to me—I perceived that it was forged, though it is very much like my writing—it is a forgery in every Respect—I never wrote it—in consequence of this, I went to the Van Diemen's Land Company's office, and saw the prisoner and a junior clerk—I said to him, "I paid a cheque here yesterday for 17l. 10s., have you paid it to your bankers?'"—he appeared confused, and I think said he was not quite sure about it, or something of that sort, but I was a little excited myself—I said, "These must be some mistake," for a larger cheque, had been presented—I then called in Mr. Stafford, who had accompanied me, but not into the room exactly, and asked, him whether the prisoner was the person who had presented the fogged cheque—he said, "Yes, you are the person," which the prisoner did not deny—I think he acknowledged it—he said, "I did," or words to that effect—he appeared very much confused—I said, "Unless you can give some explanation about this cheque, you must consider yourself my prisoner—he then said he had found it on the counter—there in a small sort of counter in the Company's office—the conversation took place in the room where I gave him the cheque—I told Mr. Stafford to get an officer, which he did—I saw some paper in use in the office, but I did not compare it—I have compared the two, cheques together—one paper appears to be thicker than the other—(placing one over the other)—with the exception of the sum one appears a fac-simile of the other—the distance between the lines is exactly the same—I should think a person would be, able to trace, through so thin a piece of paper as that, the contents of the genuine cheque.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Look at the figures "7" in each of these cheques; are they any thing like fac-similes of one another? A. There is an additional stroke to one 7—the "L" in the word "London" appears to have more of a loop at the back than the other, but it appears to me to be the same character—one has a loop, and the other not—the date of the £17 cheque is the 30th of May, the £70 10s. one is dated the 17th of May—I was examined before the Lord Mayor—this is my

signature—(looking at his deposition)—I saw Mr. Ewins there—I understand he is secretary to the Company—I think he was examined—the case was remanded for one week nearly, and then for another—that was after I, Mr. Ewins, and Mr. Stafford were examined—the Lord Mayor first gave from Wednesday till Friday, and then from Friday to that day week, that inquiry might be made further—no additional evidence was produced at the end of the subsequent week.

JAMES TEBAY . I am clerk to the Van Diemen's Land Company—the prisoner was clerk to the Company, and Mr. Ewins is the secretary. There is an inner office, which Mr. Ewins usually sits in, and the prisoner's duty was in the outer room with me—saw Mr. Mildred at the office on the 29th of May—the prisoner attended to him—Mr. Ewins left the office about a quarter to five o'clock that afternoon—after Mr. Ewins left, the prisoner remained in the public office, which is the outer room—he went into the court-room before he went out, and after Mr. Ewins left—he staid there from five to ten minutes, I believe—I did not observe the exact time—there is an almanac in the outer office—he came out of the inner room to look at it, and then returned into the inner room—I did not observe How long he remained there—he left the office about five o'clock—he desired me to remain till his return—our time for leaving is generally five o'clock—he did not say where he was going—he sometimes left at half-past five o'clock—the office is then entirely left—the time of leaving depends on the business—it is from five to half-past five o'clock—he returned, I think, before half-past five o'clock—he did not tell me where he had been, nor say any thing about a cheque—I left immediately on his coming back, and went to the office next morning at half-past nine o'clock—the prisoner was there before me—I remember Mr. Mildred coming about ten o'clock—the prisoner had said nothing to me about the cheque before Mr. Mildred came—Mr. Mildred showed it to me that morning, and the genuine one too—the prisoner was there—I had not seen the forged cheque till then—I have examined the paper on which it is written, and it agrees with the paper we have in the office for foreign correspondence—I have none of it here.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You will an inferior situation to the prisoner, do you not? A. I am junior clerk—the court-room, where the secretary sits, is not kept locked—I could have gone in while he was there, if so disposed—I do not keep the books of the company—half-past nine o'clock was later than our usual time for coming in the morning—it was not usual for me to communicate with the prisoner, nor he with me—I was before the Lord Mayor, and was examined.

STAFFORD. I am a cashier in Masterman's house. On Wednesday, the 29th of May, about five minutes after five o'clock, the prisoner came to our banking-house, and presented this cheque for 70l. 10l.—I told him it was past banking hours, and we were not in the habit of paying after five o'clock—I did not know him at all—he said he would feel obliged by my paying it—I had not possession of the cheque before, but when I got it, I immediately doubted the signature—I took it round to one of the partners in the house, and the result was, we determined not to pay it—we called the prisoner round to us, and I asked him who he brought it from—he said, from the Van Diemen's Land Company office, and that it was for payment of shares which Mr. Mildred had paid in the course of the day—he said one portion of them was in the name of Mr. Mildred, another portion in the name of Mrs. Mildred, and one in the name of a party which he did not recollect—I asked him if the Company had a banker's—he

said, Curries were their bankers—I asked him why it was not paid into Curries—he said he was in the habit, in the afternoon, after the cheques had been paid in, of taking round to the bankers the cheques which were not crossed, and receiving the money for them—we told him we had a doubt as to the signature being genuine—he said if that was the case, he would leave the cheque with us—we had it in our possession then—I told him if he left the cheque, by way of security to himself, it should not be used for any other purpose; he might as well endorse it with Currie's name, which he did—this is the cheque he so crossed—I gave it to Mr. Mildred next morning.

SAMUEL ROLLS EWINS . I am secretary to the Van Diemen's Land Company. It was the prisoner's duty, when I was engaged with the Directors, to receive money from persons who came to pay on shares—on the 29th of May, about one o'clock, I was in the inner office, engaged with the Governor on important business, and it was the prisoner's duty, if he received a cheque at that time, to keep it till I was disengaged and then hand it over to me—the Governor left about three o'clock, I think, but I was not disengaged till I left, which was about a quarter to five o'clock—I saw the prisoner as I went through the office on leaving—he made no communication to me of having received such a cheque—Curries are the bankers of the Company—it was the general rule that all cheques should be crossed when received from the proprietors—the prisoner may, on one or two particular occasions, which might be explained, go to bankers and present cheques received for calls, but the general rule of the office is to pay all cheques into Currie's—a proprietor, occasionally, has presented a cheque for more than the amount of his call—those were the occasions on which he presented cheques himself, and then he has done it by my directions—he has been in the service of the Company nearly seven years—this cheque was shown me first by Messrs. Bush and Co.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you before the Lord Mayor? A. Yes—I was examined on oath—I presume my deposition was taken down in writing—I saw a gentleman writing—it was not read over to me—the prisoner was of a most amiable disposition, very steady, and strictly honest—I gave him a good character before the Lord Mayor on oath certainly.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Was the prisoner's solicitor there? A. Yes—he could hear what was stated—I do not know whether he was taking notes—no deposition was read over to me, nor was I asked to sign any.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not Mr. Humphries, the prisoner's solicitor, complain that the depositions were not taken? A. He did—I believe both the solicitors for the bankers were there—Mr. Tebay was examined—I cannot say of my own knowledge who was acting as clerk, but I think it was Mr. Hobler—it was in his hearing and that of the Lord Mayor that the complaint was made about the depositions.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. In consequence of information I went on the 30th of May to the Van Diemen's Land Company's office and took the prisoner into custody—(cheque read.)

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM GERMAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1804
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1804. WILLIAM GERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April, 1 gelding, value 40l.; 1 chaise, a set of harness, and a whip; the goods of Jeremiah Biggs.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the Prosecution.

JEREMIAH BIGGS . I am a livery-stable-keeper, in South-place, Finsbury-square. I first knew the prisoner on the 28th of March—on the 13th of April he came to me, and said he wanted a horse and chaise for the purpose of business, calling on the bakers round London, being a miller—I asked him for what time he wanted it—he said he would take it for twenty-eight days certain; and if I was satisfied with him, and his business answered, he probably might want it longer—I let it him for twenty-eight days certain, at two guineas a week, and a guinea a week for its keep at my place—he took away the horse, chaise, and harness on the 17th of April—he gave me a card of his residence at the time of hiring—(reads)—"William German, Miller, Pier Steam-mill, 18, Union-street, Deptford"—I saw the prisoner on the 3rd of May, at the Castle Tavern, Mark-lane—I said to him, "Mr. German, I want to have a few words with you—I am not quite satisfied with you, a man ought always to be found where he gives his address"—he asked me what I meant—I said, "You do not reside, according to the name you gave me, at Union-street, Deptford," and I asked him for his proper address—he would not give me his address, but said, "Mr. Biggs, whenever you have a claim on me, when my month is up, I shall satisfy you, I shall pay your account"—I said, "I am not satisfied; where is my horse and chaise?"—he said, down at Reading, and it would be returned to my place in three or four days—a few days after I met him again in Bell-alley, near Finsbury-square—I asked him again where my horse and chaise was—he said it was then at Chelmfsord, and in three or four days it should be returned to me—I saw him afterwards, on the 21st of May, and gave him into custody—I found my horse and chaise at Mr. Miller's, in Blackfriars-road—I never gave the prisoner any power of lending or disposing of it in any way—there was no trading or negotiation between us from which he could fancy he had any right to dispose of it—the only thing between us was this, I was apprehensive, from what I found of the man, that I should not get my account for the horse, he having had another horse from my place, and put it into the possession of a pawnbroker—I saw him on my premises on the 29th of April—I said to him, "Mr. German, you millers are generally in the coal-trade, and we are in want of some coals"—he said, "I am not in the coal-trade, but I do sell coals occasionally, and I can send you some"—I said, "You may send me five tons"—he said, "No, I will send you four—that will be just a waggon-load"—I asked him when he would send them—he said, "The day after next"—they did not come, but, about nine o'clock in the evening, a quarter of a ton came in a truck—in consequence of that I went down to Deptford to find him—I went to No. 18, Union-street, but could not find him there, nor anywhere in Deptford.

Cross-examined by MR. JONES. Q. When was the first day on which he spoke to you about hiring the horse and chaise? A. I cannot say what day—it was between the 28th of March and the 13th of April—that was the first time of my knowing him—I saw him frequently at my place after that—he gave me his card on the 13th of April, when he hired the horse—I had not asked him for it before, nor had he told me what he was, or where he lived—he closed with me on the 18th—he had been five or six days in treaty—I delivered him the horse and chaise on the 13th—he took it away that day, and brought it back at night; he used it once or twice between that and the 17th, and he brought it back each night—

he took it away altogether on the 17th—he was to pay roe for the hire at the end of the month—I let it him for twenty-eight days certain from the 13th of April.

Q. Did you not let it to him for three months? A. No, certainly not for three months certain—I gave him a ticket for eighty-four days, which is customary in our business—if he had paid me for twenty-eight days, and I was satisfied with him, he would have gone on regularly—we pay no duty to the Stamp-office for twenty-eight days, and that was the reason I let it for that time—eighty-four days was stated on the ticket, but he was not bound to keep it that time—I saw the prisoner on the 3rd of May, in Mark-lane, and spoke to him about only sending me a quarter of a ton of coals, and next day he sent me four more tons—my object was to set that off against the hire of the horse and chaise—he did not tell me, when he gave me his card, that he was in the habit of having his corn ground at that mill, nothing of the kind—I met him on the 21st of May, in Mark-lane, close to my place of business—I asked him to walk with me before the Lord Mayor, and said I should give him into custody if he did not go—he wanted to get away, but a friend went with me to prevent him—I had so policeman—he was remanded, to give him an opportunity of returning the property, to which I consented, but he did not, and was committed—the officer has the horse and chaise.

JOSEPH MILLER . I am an auctioneer, in Blackfriars-road. On the 18th of April the prisoner called at my office there, with a person named Solomons, and applied to me for a loan of 40l. or 50l., and offered to lodge this horse and chaise, which he drove up in, as security—our negotiation was taken down in writing—this is it—he signed it—the horse and chaise were delivered to me—I gave him 16l. that day, and he gave me this promissory note for £23—the horse and chaise were taken from me on the 27th, I think—I sold the horse to Mr. Seal, a coal-merchant, in Black-friars-road, for sixteen guineas, on the morning of the day on which Mr. Whityear and the prosecutor applied to me, three or four days after the note became due—I believe it was on the 24th.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you sell it after you received notice from Mr. Biggs that it was his property? A. I did not—I had not received any notice at the time I sold it—I sold it to Seal about ten o'clock in the morning—I had partly sold it to him the day before—he had offered me the money for it, but I expected the prisoner to call for it, and put it off as long as I could—I used the horse and chaise while it was in my possession—I went all over London with it, and passed the prosecutor's yard several times—I have had many transactions with Mr. Seal before—he is a sheriff's officer, and holds a farm in Surrey—I sell for the sheriff of Surrey—I consider sixteen guineas as much as the horse was worth—Seal paid me for the horse, I think on the same morning as I sold it, in my own counting-house—my foreman, Graves, was present—I gave him a receipt for it—the horse was standing in my own stable—it had been occasionally at a livery stable opposite—Seal has a small stable at the back of his own house—he sent for the horse on Friday, the 24th, I believe—it only came back to my stable to be given up to the authorities—at the time the prisoner applied to me he said he was only in want of a temporary loan, and he should in all probability redeem it in two or three days.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Up to the time the horse was given up, did the prisoner ever pay you the money, or any portion of it? A. No—he

called on mo once or twice—I never told him I had sold the horse to Seal.

GEORGE SEAL . I am a coal-merchant, and live in Blackfriars-road. I bought a horse of Mr. Miller, on the 24th of May, for sixteen guineas, which I paid him.

Cross-examined. Q. You live very near Miller? A. About three or four hundred yards off—I frequently buy at his auctions, if any thing suits me—I am a sheriffs-officer, and a farmer as well.

JAMES WHITYEAR . I am superintendent of the London police. On the 27th of May, Miller delivered up to me a chaise-harness and whip, and Seal delivered me the horse the same day—Biggs saw the same property, and identified it.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe the prisoner was searched when he was taken? A. He was—one bill of exchange, and a document about ten shares in a joint-stock bank, were found on him.

FREDERICK WESTON . I keep the Pier Steam-mill at Deptford. The prisoner has no residence at that mill—I live at No. 18, Union-street—I never authorised him to give my address as his—I advertised for grinding, and the prisoner answered my advertisement—I stated in my advertisement that any one who wished to grind at my mill could reside at my house, if they wished, as I wanted to let part of it—the prisoner never came with corn to grind—he said he expected to send some down.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he call on you? A. I was to see him at the Castle—I saw him about six months ago, or more—the first time, I dare say, was five years ago—I told him, when I saw him about this, that he could have part of my house, if he wished it, and he expressed a desire to do so—he asked if he might have any letters addressed to my house, and I said yes—I have seen him within the last six months about the corn-market, apparently engaged in business—he did not tell me he had any place of business in Mark-lane—if any one had asked me, in April and May, if I knew him, I should have said I did, but not as regards business—my mill is sometimes called Pier Mill, as it is near the pier.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you give the prisoner authority to have a card engraved with your address on it? A. No—I think there is another No. 18, Union-street, besides mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

CHARLES SMITH, JAMES CLARK, JOHN LIDDIARD, MARIA WILLIAMS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1805
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1805. CHARLES SMITH, JAMES CLARK, JOHN LIDDIARD , and MARIA WILLIAMS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Reeve and another, about the hour of four in the night of the 24th of May, at St. Andrew, Holborn, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 65 spoons, value 16l.; 12 pairs of sugar-tongs, value 3l. 5s.; 8 watches, value 12s. 4s.; 4 pepper-boxes value 6l.; 1 wine-strainer, value 2l. 10s.; 6 seals, value 4l.; 27 rings, value 8l. 15s.; 6 brooches, value 7l.; 8 breast-pins, value 1l. 15s.; 1 snap, value 2s.; 1 watch-guard, value 10s.; 4 tooth-picks, value 8s.; 2 pencil-cases, value 5s.; 1 sovereign, 1 half-sovereign, 20 half-crowns, 80 shillings, and 36 sixpences; their goods and monies; and that Williams had been before convicted of felony.

MR. CHAMBERS conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS REEVE . I am in partnership with my brother, as pawn-brokers, in Gray's Inn-lane. On the 24th of May I went to bed about

half-past twelve o'clock at night—the front door of the home was fastened—I was called up next morning by my shopman, and found the tills were empty—I lost one sovereign, one half-sovereign, and 6l. 10s. in silver—there was some copper on the back-counter, two five-shilling papers of halfpence, and a few halfpence left in the till—the shutters were perfectly safe, as I had left them—I missed three dozens of silver spoons, three castors, wine-strainers, wedding-rings, and many other articles—the wedding-rings were fastened on a card, and laid in a jewellery-tray in the window—I saw a card, at Worship-street, in the policeman's possession, which has one of my private marks on the back of it, and I can swear it is one which had the wedding-rings on it—Pheasant-court is at the back of my house—I can see it from the back of my premises—I found the window, in the first floor back room, open, which was shut close the night before when I went to bed I am certain—it was not fastened—they must have got over two walls, and got up a skylight; to get to that window—the house next door was being repaired, and a ladder was left, by which means they could get over the walls on to the skylight, and open the window—the maid servant slept in the back parlour down stairs.

HENRY BODMAN . I am shopman to the prosecutor. I was the first person who came down on the 24th of May, and missed property from the shop—I found the back-room window open—the shop was fast at it was the night before.

GEORGE BALL . I am a policeman. On the morning of the 25th of May I was on duty in Wentworth-street, which leads to Petticoat-lane, and saw Clark and Williams walking together down Wentworth-street, in the direction of Petticoat-lane—Williams had the property now produced, tied up in two handkerchiefs—I turned up a court—they looked after me, then walked very fast, and kept looking back—I followed them, and at the corner of Petticoat-lane I laid hold of Williams, and asked what she was carrying—she made no answer—I laid my hand on her right arm, and felt something hard—I said, "What is that?"—she said, "I don't know"—I said, "Whose is it?"—she said, "That young man's," pointing to Clark, who was within bearing—I took the parcel, and brought Clark back to Williams, and asked him what the bundle was—he said he did not know—I asked How he came by it—he said he picked it up in Whitechapel—I requested him to go to the station-house, and Williams walked by the side of us to the station-house—I saw him speak to Harris at the station-house—the two bundles contained the plate produced—in going to the station-house they said they picked it up in Ben Jonson's-fields, which are at Stepney—this was at five o'clock in the morning—Clark gave his address, No. 6, Ernest-street, Regent's-park.

WILLIAM ROWLAND . I am a policeman. I went to Gulston-street, Petticoat-lane, on the morning of the 26th of May, in plain clothes—I saw Smith, Liddiard, and a girl named Gilbert pass by roe, and as they passed I heard Liddiard say, "Hush, hold your tongue"—I followed them, and they separated—Liddiard went on first—I went up to Smith and Gilbert, and asked them where they had been—Smith said he had been to a public-house with the female prisoner to have a pint of porter—I asked if they knew each other before—they said they did not—Trew then apprehended Liddiard—all three were taken to the station-house, and there Liddiard said he lived in Pheasant-court, Gray's Inn-lane—I found that to

be true—they denied all knowledge of each other—I found five lucifer-matches in Liddiard's waistcoat pocket—I asked him what he used them for—he said to light his pipe—Gilbert dropped a chased ring from her mouth—I saw one found on Smith's finger, and one on Gilbert's finger.

GEORGE TREW . I am a policeman. I was with Rowland, and saw the prisoners pass by—I took Liddiard, and asked him what he was waiting about there for—he said for his brother—I asked where he lived—he said in Pheasant-court, Gray's Inn-lane—I asked if he knew the other two prisoners—he said not—I took him to the station-house, and found a ring on Gilbert's finger, which I produce—she said a gentleman had given it to her—I found another ring on Smith's finger, which I gave Harris, and he gave it me back.

HENRY HARRIS . I am a police-sergeant. I found the rings on the prisoners.

MARTHA GILBERT . I am eighteen years old—I was taken up for this robbery on the morning of the 25th of May, and have come from prison—when I was taken up I lived in No. 1, Pheasant-court, Gray's Inn-lane, in the back-parlour—I could see Mr. Reeve's back premises from that house—I knew Clark, Smith, and Liddiard before—they all three lived up in the top garret, and Williams lived with me—the night before I was taken up, when I left home, about ten o'clock, I saw the three male prisoners in our room, sitting down—I returned home about two o'clock—I had been walking the street all that time—when I came home I found them all in my room, playing at cards, and Williams was playing with them—shortly after Clark got up, and said he was going out, but where I did not know then—they all three went out together, and returned in about a minute, and said there was a policeman—Clark asked Williams for a piece of candle, and the young girl who lived with Williams, and who she called her sister, said to Williams, "They are gone over to Mr. Reeve's back premises"—they had gone out with the candle then—I noticed that Liddiard had a lucifer in his hand before they went out—I did not see where he got it from—Williams gave him the candle—it was not lighted then—I went out again—I was not out a minute—I came back, and sat at my door—I afterwards went to Hoi born-hill, and came back again with the girl who lived with Williams—her name is Sarah—when I came back I saw Smith standing, looking at the other two prisoners, who were over the wall leading to Mr. Reeve's back premises—Williams was not there then—I next saw Liddiard coming over the wall, with a bundle of things, which he handed to Smith in the yard—at that time Williams was in bed—she slipped on her petticoats, and came into the passage just as they were getting over the wall—I am quite sure I saw Liddiard, Smith, and Clark there—Clark and Liddiard were over the wall, and Smith and Williams were in the court—when they came over the wall, Liddiard said to Smith, "I have done it"—Smith came into the room with a bundle of things, and went up to his own room with them—we all went up into his room together, and he opened the bundle on the bed—there were several watches, a lot of silver spoons and gold rings, and gold pins and things—the rings were all on cards—they were taken off the cards, and the cards torn up and burnt with the candle, and put on the side of the fire-place—Smith said he had better take the cards off the rings and burn them, or he should get found out with them—the things were then all tied up in two handkerchiefs

—he said, "Tell me, Maria, do you know where to put them away?"—Williams said, "I do know where to put them away"—a cab was hired, and we all five went away in it to Whitechapel—Williams left me, Smith, and Liddiard in Whitechapel, while she and Clark went to put the things away—I did not hear Clark, or any of them say any thing about where the things had been got—Clark said, that after he got over Reeve's wall, he went down stairs, and heard somebody snoring, and he took off his shoes, and walked gently along—he said he went down stairs into the shop, and took the watches and the silver spoons out of the window—he said nothing about money—Williams said to Smith, "May I give the girl Gilbert a ring?"—he said, "Yes;" and she gave it to me—I picked the one I dropped from my mouth off the floor, and thought it was no harm keeping it—the things were tied up in both of their handkerchiefs.

COURT. Q. When you saw Smith, Clark, and Liddiard go over the wall, where was Williams? A. In her room—she was inside the passage when they got over the wall—she could see them get over the wall—our passage is just opposite the wait—her sister went up stairs into the frontgarret, to watch—Williams was in her room—she had just got into the bed with her petticoat on, and she came out into the passage with her petticoat on, I suppose to watch for them—she could watch in the passage.

Smith. She first said Williams was in bed, and then she said she came back, and saw me and Williams in the court together; and after that she said the saw Williams in the passage—she does not mention where she saw me—I was not near the wall at the time. Witness. You got on the wall to help lift the bundle down.

WILLIAM BARTON . I am a policeman. I went to Mr. Reeve's premises about twelve o'clock, on the morning of the robbery, and found a piece of candle on a ledge, under the first-floor back window, where it is supposed the thieves entered—I found a quantity of burnt paper strewed over the first and second floors, and the floor was burnt in places—I examined the house No. 1, Pheasant-court—I examined the wall opposite the house, and saw recent marks of footsteps—the wall was scratched in several places, where persons had climbed up very recently.

WILLIAM COLEMAN . I am a police-sergeant I went to No. 1, Pheasant-court, after Gilbert made a statement at Worship-street Office—in the front attic there, behind a stove, I found a piece of card, two duplicates, a small screw-driver, and the blade of a knife—I have the piece of card here—I found particles of paper which had been recently burnt in the grate—it was more substantial than paper, it is rather card.

THOMAS REEVE re-examined. This has part of my private mark on it—it is part of the card to which the rings were fastened—I have the cards in my pocket which were pulled off the plate and watches—some of the pieces remain on the property, and they correspond—I am positive of the property—here are the hooks on which they hung in the window—I am sure it is the property I lost—my house is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn.

Williams's Defence. I was not out of doors, and did not know of the robbery being committed, till I was asked to carry the bundle, which a woman who lives in the front parlour knows.

SAMUEL PARKER . I am a policeman. I have a certificate of Williams's

former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was at the trial—she is the person who was convicted.

SMITH— GUILTY . Aged 16.

LIDDIARD— GUILTY . Aged 17.

WILLIAMS— GUILTY . Aged 17.

CLARK— GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fifteen Years.

WILLIAM CUSHNIE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1806
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1806. WILLIAM CUSHNIE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Christopher George, on the 2nd of June, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 7s.; and 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; the goods of Thomas Hassall: and 12 pence, and 16 halfpence, the monies of Christopher George.

THOMAS HASSALL . I live at Streatham, in Surrey. On Saturday night, the 1st of June, I was at the Salisbury Arms, Durham-street, Strand, sitting there—I had a coat and waistcoat there, which I saw safe on Saturday night, about half-past eleven o'clock—when I was retiring to rest I left it on a chair in the bar—I got up next morning about seven o'clock, and my coat and waistcoat were gone—these are them—(looking at them.)

CHRISTOPHER GEOROE . I am landlord of the Salisbury Arms tavern, in Durham-street, Strand. Hassall was at my house—I went to bed about half-past two o'clock on Sunday morning—I was sitting up for a gentleman—I made the house fast—the servant called me about half-past seven o'clock, and told me something—I found the coffee-room shutter and window open, the till open, and 20d. in copper money gone, which I had seen safe when I retired to bed—they had got in at the coffee-room window—Hassall had put his coat and waistcoat on a chair the night before, and they were gone—the fastening of the window was forced—I saw the prisoner about half-past two o'clock that morning, as I closed the door.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Did you let the prisoner out? A. No, I refused to let him in—I was letting a gentleman out, and the prisoner came to the door, and wished to have a glass of wine, which I refused, and shut the door—it was an outer shutter which was forced, but an inside fastening—I saw the shutter safe when I went to bed—I left nobody up.

REBECCA CARDINAL . I live at the Salisbury Arms. I came down about seven o'clock in the morning, and found the door open—I went in, and found the till broken open, the coffee-room window open, and the bolt broken.

WILLIAM WALKER . I have produced the coat and waistcoat—I bought them of the prisoner on the 3rd of June, in my own shop, in Radnor-street, St. Luke's, about nine o'clock in the morning, for 3s. 6d.—I am quite sure it was him.

WILLIAM WOODWARD . I am a policeman. The prisoner met me by appointment, and I took him—I had been to his house, and consulted his father previously, and his father made the appointment to bring him to me—I had made a charge before.

Cross-examined. Q. He was taken to Bow-street? A. Yes, and twice remanded for a week—the property was not found the first week—he was remanded for a week after it was found, owing to the absence of a witness, who is not here—he was to prove that he saw somebody get in at the window—it was on that witness's evidence I took the prisoner into custody—

he was examined once, but at the next examination we could not find him, nor have I been able to find him since.

NOT GUILTY .

ALFRED CARTER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1807
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1807. ALFRED CARTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Bull, on the 4th of June, at St. Dunstan's, Stebonheath, alias Stepney, and stealing therein, 1 table-cloth, value 9d.; 1 blanket, value 1s.; 1 yard of cotton cloth, value 6d.; 3 towels, value 6d.; 3 pudding-cloths, value 3d.; and 3 pence; his goods and monies.

MARY ANN BULL . I am the wife of George Bull, a tailor, in White Horse-lane, Stepney. I and my husband left our house on the evening of the 4th of June, as near half-past eight o'clock as possible—I returned about twenty minutes to twelve o'clock—we left every part of the house fast and secure—I found the street door as we had left it—I got a light, and as soon as my husband entered the kitchen I found a pane of glass broken, and the sash taken out of the kitchen window—the kitchen door had been fastened, and bolted top and bottom, when we left—I found it wide open, and a table-cloth, an ironing blanket, and a yard of cloth, were gone, and some towels out of the dresser-drawer in the kitchen—(looking at the property)—I missed all these articles, and three penny-pieces, off the mantel-piece.

JOSEPH RADFORD . I live in John's-court, White Horse-lane, Stepney. About a quarter past nine o'clock in the evening, on the 4th of June, I was in Ben Jonson's-fields, near Mr. Bull's house, and saw the prisoner come by with these things—I had seen him before—he had a bundle under his arm—nobody was with him—he went down the Rope-walk—an officer came, and I gave information—I went with the officer, and saw the prisoner throw the bundle on one side—the officer took—It up—it was all undone when he threw it down, and these things came out—this wrapper is what he carried.

THOMAS PARKER GREATREX . I was in Ben Jonson's-fields with Radford and others, and saw the prisoner go by, with a bundle of clothes under his arm—he went up the Rope-walk—it was about a quarter past nine o'clock—I am sure I saw him.

CHARLES HENRY MOCKETT (police-constable K 87.) About a quarter past nine o'clock I received information from Greatrex, as I was turning down the Rope-walk—I ran after the prisoner, who threw the bundle from under his arm—I took it up, and secured him—these are the articles which were in it—I found three penny pieces in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down Stepney Fair-fields, to see a young man—I was coming back, with three penny-pieces in my hand—I happened to shake them in my hand, and the policeman came and said, "I want you;" but as to having the bundle, I never saw it till the policeman produced it at the station-house.

(Elizabeth Ray, Bridge-street, Mile End-road; and James Bennett, cabinet-maker, Bridge-street, Mile End-road; gave the prisoner a good character.)

GUILTY .* Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.

NEW COURT.—Friday, June 21st, 1839.

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

CHARLES BENNET.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1808
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1808. CHARLES BENNET was indicted for embezzling, on the 2nd of May, 1l. 4s., and 17s. 6d., which he received on account of George Odell, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined One Month.

JOHN INMAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1809
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1809. JOHN INMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, 9lbs. weight of lead, value 2s.; and 1 metal cock, value 1s.; the goods of William Wait, and fixed to a building, &c., and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Seven Years.

JANE BLINKFORD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1810
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1810. JANE BLINKFORD was indicted for uttering counterfeit coin; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

ANN BENNET.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1811
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1811. ANN BENNET was indicted for a misdemeanor.

NOT GUILTY .

ELIZABETH NORRIS, ANN JONES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1812
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1812. ELIZABETH NORRIS and ANN JONES were indicted for a misdemeanor.

MESSRS. SCARLETT and ELLIS conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN BLACKETT . I am a butcher, and live in Union-passage, St. George's. On Friday, the 3rd of May, the prisoners came between nine and ten o'clock in the evening and asked the price of a piece of neck of mutton—I said, "6 1/2 d. a pound"—they offered,"6d.," and I sold it at that price—I cut it in chops—they then asked for a pennyworth of peas-pudding, which I gave them, and Norris put down a half-crown—they then talked about having had some peas-pudding that was sour—I asked if they had had it at my shop—they said, "No"—this took my attention off the money—I gave them 1s. 6d. in silver, and 7d. in copper—my wife who was sitting behind me kept nudging me on the back, but I took no notice of it—I put the change on the counter—I am not certain which of them took it up—it was Jones took up the meat and pudding—I put the half-crown into my till—there was other silver there, but no other half-crown I am certain—as soon as the prisoners were gone, my wife spoke to me—I went to the till and found the half-crown was bad—I took it out and put it into my pocket, where I had no other half-crown—I went after the prisoners, but did not find them—I then put the half-crown on a shelf in the cupboard, where it remained till next morning, when I took it to the policeman and marked it in his presence—I saw the prisoners at the police office again, about three weeks ago.

COURT. Q. How long was it after this transaction that you saw the prisoners? A. Within a fortnight, I think, or three weeks—I am not mistaken in them.

GEORGE HARRISON (police-sergeant K 15.) I produce the half-crown which I got from this witness.

MARIA BLACKETT . I am the prosecutor's wife. I saw the prisoners at our shop on the 3rd of May—I am quite sure they are the persons—I had seen them before.

SARAH MOCKLEY . I am the wife of Benjamin Mockley—he keeps the Dover Castle in Red Lion-street, Whitechapel—I was at the bar on the 17th of May, when the prisoners came in and called for half-a-quartern of gin and spruce—Jones gave me a half-crown—I examined it, and thought

at first it was good—I was going to the till to give them the change, when it struck me it was not a good one—I asked a friend if it was good—he said, "No"—I did not let it go out of my hand—I went round and put the door to—I said to the prisoners, "How came you to give me this bad half-crown? I have taken so many at different times, you shall answer for all"—I gave them into custody, and gave the officer the half-crown—I was walking from the sitting-room to the bar that evening, I put my foot on something—it was a small bag with a half-crown in it, of the same date as the one I had taken—I gave that to the same officer—it was inside the bar, as if it had been thrown over the counter.

JOHN CORMACK (police-constable H 177.) I took the prisoners, and received this half-crown from Mrs. Mockley, and in the course of the evening I received from her a bag, with another half-crown in it—when I went into the bar there was a good half-crown in Jones's hand—I found 3s. in silver on Norris, and about twelve pennyworth of copper.

MR. JOHN FIELD . I am inspector of coins to the Royal Mint. This half-crown, uttered to Blackett, is counterfeit—the one Uttered to Mockley and the one found in the bag are both counterfeit, and both cast in the same mould.

Jones's Defence. I tendered her a half-crown, but did not know it was bad—the policeman came and took me.

NORRIS— GUILTY . Aged 20.

JONES— GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Twelve Months.

ELIZABETH DAVIS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1813
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1813. ELIZABETH DAVIS was indicted for a misdemeanor.

WILLIAM KING (police-constable E 89.) On the 15th of June I saw the prisoner, in company with a man and a little girl, in Montague-street, Russell-square—the prisoner had a basket in her hand—they turned down Montague-mews—I went to the top of the mews, and saw the prisoner come from the bottom—she went out of the Mews, and the man and little girl followed after her—they all went down Montague-street—I saw Fryer, and gave a signal to him—he stopped her, and said, "What have you got in your basket?"—she said, "What is that to you?"—he then looked into the basket, and saw a purse, and said there were five counterfeit sixpences in it—he showed them to me—she was then taken to the station-house.

JOHN FRYER (police-constable E 113.) I stopped the prisoner at half-past three o'clock that morning—I found in the basket a purse, containing five counterfeit sixpences—I found in the basket a bundle of wood, some pieces of meat, some bread, and an orange—I took her to the station-house—she told me the money was given her by a gentleman, and afterwards she said the girl who had been with her gave it her, and told her she could get a better living by passing counterfeit coin than by begging—I said if she had any more money she had better give it to me, as she would be searched, and she gave me another counterfeit sixpence, a good shilling, and 7 1/2 d.

MR. JOHN FIELD . These six sixpences are all counterfeit—four of them are cast in one mould, and two are different.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman gave them to me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

ROBERT PYMER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1814
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1814. ROBERT PYMER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Charles Cartwright, from his person.

CHARIES CARTWRIGHT . I live at Manchester. I was in Fleet-street on the 14th of June, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, returning from the opera—I felt my handkerchief going out of my pocket—I turned round, and saw it on the ground, and the prisoner was running away—I did not see it in his hand, but the moment I turned I saw it descending from his hand to the ground—I know it fell from him, because he was running away, and there was no one there but him—I took it up, and ran after him—he was stopped by the officer—this is my handkerchief.

Prisoner. Q. What can you swear to it by? A. By the pattern—there is no mark, but the manufacture is peculiar, and it has never been washed.

WILLIAM ANGOTE (City police-constable, No. 218.) I saw the prisoner, on the morning of the 14th, put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and take out his handkerchief—he dropped it—the prosecutor took it up—I took the prisoner.

GUILTY .** Aged 25.— Transported for Ten Years.

WILLIAM JONES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1815
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1815. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for forging and uttering a request for delivery of goods.

THOMAS WEBB . I am porter to Mr. Edward Sherman, he is master of the Bull-and-Mouth, Regent-circus. On the 29th of May the prisoner came to the booking-office—he presented this order, and asked for a basket, addressed to Mr. Blandford, of Dover-street, Piccadilly—(read)—"Bull-and-Mouth coach-office, Regent-circus,—Please to send by the bearer a basket, that came by the Devonport and Exeter coach, this day, for J. Blandford, 20, Piccadilly—J. SMITH. 29th June."—I did not notice the date, but I took the order, and gave it to Mr. Sanders—there was a hamper on a box in the office, directed to Mr. Blandford, which had come by the Devonport and Exeter coach that morning—it was pointed out by a porter in the office—the prisoner took it, put it on his shoulder, and walked out of the office with it—two days afterwards I was in Oxford-street, in a cart, and saw the prisoner—I drew up immediately, and laid hold of him—the parcel was directed to No. 30, Dover-street, Piccadilly—Mr. Blandford is a surgeon, I believe—he always used to send for his parcels, and there was no complaint of their not being delivered—he never sent orders before, but this being a fresh person, we thought that was the reason—we knew the person who came before—we did not know How the name of Smith came on this order—we thought it was some assistant or something.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me before the time you mention? A. No—I do not know your handwriting.

SILAS BLANDFORD . I live at No. 20, Dover-street, Piccadilly. I have had a basket by the Devonport Subscription-coach, for the last three years, containing butter, meat, and vegetables—my servant was in the habit of fetching it till about five weeks before this, when I told the people to send it by the porter—this order I did not write nor send, nor did I authorise any person to take the basket away—it generally came on a Wednesday.

ALEXANDER THOMPSON (police-constable D 117.) The prisoner was brought to the station-house by Webb, charged with taking a basket from the Bull-and-Mouth—he said he was not the man—I found on him two duplicates, one in the name of Brown, and the other Smith.

Prisoner. I am not the person who committed the offence, and there is no person to prove that 1 forged the order—it is an odd thing that they should take an order dated the 29th of June on the 29th of May—it proves great carelessness, and, by the same rule, they may be mistaken in my identity.

HENRY BROWN . I am clerk at the Bull-and-Mouth, Regent-circus, I taw the prisoner on the occasion in question—I am sure he is the person.

CHARLES JORDAN . I saw the prisoner in the coach-office both before and after he received the parcel.

GUILTY .* Aged 40.— Transported for Seven Years.

JOHN BROWN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1816
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1816. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March, 8 planes, value 25s.; and 1 saw, value 2s.; the goods of William James Young, his master.

WILLIAM JAMES YOUNG . I am a carpenter, and live in North-street, Maida-hill—the prisoner was in my employ—these tools are mine.

FRANCIS TAPLIN . I am assistant to a pawnbroker in Lisson-grove. I have three planes, pawned on the 18th of April, I think, by the prisoner—the officer has the duplicate of then.

JAKES BARR . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I produce twelve planes; two of them are Mr. Young's—one was pawned on the 28th of November, and the other on the 30th of December—the officer has the duplicates of them.

SAMUEL BARNETT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in John-street, Edgeware-road. I produce a taw and two planes—the officer has the duplicates of them.

HENRY KILSBY . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a plane, pawned for 2s.—the officer has the duplicate.

JOHN TAYLOR (police-sergeant S 17.) I have ten duplicates, which I found on the prisoner, four of which relate to Mr. Young's tools.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.— Confined Twelve Month.

(There were two other indictments against the prisoner.)

GEORGE SHEPHERD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1817
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1817. GEORGE SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March, 1 phaeton, value 20l., the goods of Edward Ives Fuller.

CHARLES THORNTHWATER . I am clerk to Edward Ives Fuller, a coach-builder, of Margaret-street, Cavendish-square. On the 24th of March, the prisoner came to hire a phaeton for the following day—he fixed on one, and hired it in the name of Mr. Griffiths, No. 46, Pall-mall—I knew there was a family of that name there—5s. a day was to be paid for it—the next morning a lad fetched the phaeton—it was not returned, and we put an advertisement in the newspaper; and, on the 28th, two persons called on me—I went with them to Millbank—I saw the phaeton there, but the cushions were gone—the phaeton Is worth 20l.—I am sure the prisoner is the man, I cannot be mistaken in him.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. What time did the person come to you? A. About seven o'clock in the evening—it was after dark—I had to use an oil lamp—I did not see him again till the 1st of June—I have always said I should know him again—I had not seen him before that

night—there was a gas-light burning in the shop—I have not a doubt be is the person.

NATHANIEL TURNEY . I live at No. 50, Milbank-street, Westminster. The prisoner lived at No. 52—I never knew him by any name but Shepherd—he owed me a trifle of money—on the 25th of March he told me he had got a four-wheeled phaeton from his brother-in-law in the country, and if I would take it into my yard he would give me 3s. a week till be sold it, which would be a security for my debt, and he asked me to lend him 3l. on it—I refused—he said he wanted a sovereign to fetch the cushions home from the wharf, and some other things that came up; and I let him have a sovereign—as the phaeton was coming into my yard a person asked the prisoner if it was for sale—he said yes—I saw the advertisement, and gave information.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not understand that you were going to buy it? A. No, he was going to advertise it—the person offered him 8l. for the phaeton, and he refused it.

HENRY DODD (police-constable C 121.) I took the prisoner—he said it was another man, not him, who stole it.

GUILTY . Aged 53.— Confined Twelve Months.

JAMES CREECY, REUBEN CREECY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1818
VerdictsGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentencesTransportation

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1818. JAMES CREECY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May, 20 half-sovereigns, the monies of Thomas South, his master; and REUBEN CREECY , for feloniously receiving 8 half-sovereigns, part of the said property, well knowing the same to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.—2nd COUNT, for feloniously harbouring and maintaining the said James Creecy.

MR. BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

THOMAS SOUTH . I am a farmer, and live at Great Stanmore. The prisoner James Creecy was in my service for about twelve months; and Reuben had been in my service, but had left me about a month or five weeks before this—on Sunday, the 12th of May, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I gave James Creecy a brown-paper parcel, which contained 20 half-sovereigns—he was to take it to Mr. Tootell, at Edge ware—it was sealed and directed—he was to ask him what message he had to send back—I then went to church, and on my return I saw James Creecy in my yard—I asked if he had been down to Mr. Tootell's—he said, "Yes; I saw Mr. Tootell, and gave him the parcel; he said it was all right; there was no other message"—in the afternoon I saw Reuben Creecy in my stable, with James Creecy—I asked Reuben what he did there, and whether he was not ashamed to show his face there after leaving my service in the way he had—the next morning James Creecy was missing, and did not return—I sent to Mr. Tootell's, and on the following Thursday I went with the officer, and overtook the prisoners about three miles on the other side of Ipswich—I said, "James, here you are"—he said, "Yes, master, what do you want with me?"—I said, "You know very well, I want you to go with me"—he said, "You don't owe me any thing, master, nor do I owe you any thing—what do you want with me?"—Reuben said, "What do you want with me?"—I said, "To go with your brother"—he said, "I don't work for you now, you can't have any business with me"—they were taken to Ipswich, and eight halfsovereigns and some silver were found on James, and also a piece of the paper the money had been wrapped in, directed to Mr. Tootell; and on Reuben eight half-sovereigns.

James Creecy. I was not there when you came from church. Witness. Yes, you was standing there.

WILLIAM FRY (City police-constable, No. 122.) I went with the prosecutor down the Suffolk road, and found the prisoners three miles beyond Ipswich—the Inspector took from James 11s. in silver, and 4 1/2 d. in copper, from his pocket; and in his bundle were eight half-sovereigns, one four-penny piece, and 1 1/2 d. in copper, and this bit of paper; and in Reuben's pocket were eight half-sovereigns, one shilling, and 4 1/2 d.

Reuben Creecy. I left my master on the Saturday night, and he said, If I am clear of this robbery he will take me back. Witness. I asked Reuben How he came to be so silly as to leave his place because his brother had left his—he said, the reason he left was, his brother gave him half the money to go home with him—I asked if he knew whether it was stolen—be said, no, he did not.

WILLIAM SMITH TOOTELL . I live at Edgeware, and am vestry-clerk of Great Stanmore. Mr. South, the prosecutor, was the overseer of last year—be had to pay me some money—on the 12th of May I did not see James Creecy, nor did I receive twenty half-sovereigns—I bad only one manservant that day, which was Richard Purser.

James Creecy. I gave the parcel to your servant at the great door—he told me there was no answer.

RICHARD PURSER . I am servant to Mr. Tootell. I did not see James Creecy on the 12th of May.

Reuben Creecy's Defence. The money I had I worked hard for.

JAMES CREECY— GUILTY . Aged 20.

REUBEN CREKCY— GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years.

JAMES TALLANT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1819
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1819. JAMES TALLANT was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of Jane, 1 sovereign, the monies of John Thompson, from his person.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am a coach-wheelwright, and live in King-street, Drury-lane. On Sunday, the 9th of June, I was in front of the bar in the Rose public-house, Great Wild-street—the prisoner was sitting near me—I took a sovereign out of my pocket to pay for half a gallon of beer—the prisoner snatched it out of my hand—I went out after him, but he was gone—I saw him at Bow-street on the Tuesday after—I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. Was I near to you, or did I speak to you? A. Yes—when you were at Bow-street you said you were in liquor.

TIMOTHY DESMOND . I was at the Rose public-house on the 9th of June, with another man—we heard the prosecutor call for half a gallon of beer, and we thought he had no money to pay for it—I asked him where was the money—he said, "Here is a sovereign," holding it up betwixt his fingers—the prisoner snatched it out of his hand.

Prisoner. Q. Why did you net take me? A. That was not my business.

THOMAS POCOCK (police-sergeant F 13.) I apprehended the prisoner two days afterwards at the Red Lion public-house, in Great Wild-street—he said he knew nothing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went home from the house to go to bed on the Monday—I met a young man, who told me I was accused of robbing a man of a sovereign—I said I would go down Wild-street, but no one said any thing to me, and on the Tuesday the officer took me.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN BROWN, ROBERT KEMBLY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1820
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1820. JOHN BROWN and ROBERT KEMBLY were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May, 1 pair of boots, value 4s. 8d., the goods of Charles Camp Penn; to which

KEMBLY pleaded GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined One Month.

JOHN THOMPSON . I am shopman to Charles Camp Penn, a boot-maker, in Crawford-street, Bryanstone-square—he lost a pair of boots—these are them.

EDWARD THOMAS EAOLING (police-sergeant D 12.) On the night of the 28th of May I was in Crawford-street—I saw the two prisoners in company in front of Mr. Perm's shop, looking into the doorway—I had seen them before—Brown walked in front of a policeman I had just put on the beat—Brown turned and joined Kembly, and they kept together—I went back again, and just as I got in front of Penn's shop I saw Kembly go and take the boots off a hook, and come over to where I was—I took him, and found the boots under his jacket; and on coming out again, I saw Brown, and took him.

BROWN— NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM MOORE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1821
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1821. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Maxfield, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS MAXFIELD . I was passing along Tower-street on Monday hut, at noon—I felt a tag at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief—I saw the prisoner in advance of me—I went and said I wanted to speak with him—he asked what for—I put his jacket aside, and saw my handkerchief partly in his pocket—I took him to the station-house—this is my handkerchief—(looking at it.)

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a trunk-maker. I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—I was a witness against him in December last—the prisoner is the same person—he came out of prison on the Saturday, and this was on the Monday following.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Transported for Ten Years.

ELIZABETH BRITTON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1822
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1822. ELIZABETH BRITTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May, 1 cap, value 2s. 3d., the goods of Benjamin Jones.

WILLIAM KIRKHOUSE . I am an apprentice of Benjamin Jones, a linen-draper, in the City-road. On the evening of the 28th of May the prisoner came into Mr. Jones's shop, to look at some caps, and some were shown her—she then requested to look at one in the window—the young man pulled one out, and she requested to look at another—he had left fonr caps on the counter, and while his back was tamed to go to the window, she took one up, and put it under her shawl—I went round, and looked her in the face—she was very much agitated, and Mr. Jones came in—I went and told him—she purchased goods, but I cannot recollect the amount—she put down the money, leaving the shop—Mr. Jones followed, and brought her back.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did not a man come in and say a lady had dropped it? A. Yes—I heard him say a lady dropped it, but not that the prisoner dropped it.

NOAH SMITH . I am shopman to Mr. Jones. The prisoner came in on the Tuesday evening, and wished to look at some caps—I showed her some from the box—she desired to look at one or two from the window—I took one from the window, and showed it her—she declined it, and selected one from the box, which was 1s.—I sold her three other articles, which came to

7s. 8d.—Mr. Jones time in, and as she was leaving, he called and said he wished to speak with her, but she left the shop—he went out, returned with her, and gave her in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. And there was a gentleman came into the shop? A. Yes, but Mr. Jones had the cap in his hand—the gentleman is not here—be left without his address.

BENJAMIN JONES . I am a linen-draper, and live in the City-road. I called after the prisoner as she went out—she did not attend—I repeated the call—I followed, and stopped her about ten yards from the door—I told her I wanted to speak to her—she returned—before I got back a gentleman ran, and said, "Is this yours, ma'am?" producing this cap—I took it, and said, "I know all about it"—I took her into the shop, and gave her in charge—I accused her of stealing the cap—she offered to give up the goods she had bought if I would let her go.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you said any thing before about her offering to give up the goods if you would let her go? A. I do not know that I told the Magistrate so—I followed her instantly—when I got to the door a gentleman gave me a cap he had just picked up—I did not see her drop it—it is mine.

GEORGE WILKINSON (police-sergeant G 18.) The prisoner was given into custody, on charge of stealing a cap, and said she had not taken it.

NOT GUILTY .

GEORGE RUSSELL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1823
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1823. GEORGE RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June, 1 trowel, value 2s., the goods of John Jenkins; and 1 trowel, value 2s. 9d., the goods of George Young.

JOHN JENKINS . I am a bricklayer, and live at Clarence-gardens. I was working in Stanhope-street, St. Pancras, on the 3rd of June—I left my trowel in the building while I went to dinner, and while I was in the public-house a young man brought in the prisoner and the two trowels—one was mine, and one was Young's—the prisoner said, "For God's sake, let me go, I will never do so any more"—these are the trowels—I bad bought them both.

CHARLES SMITH . I am a labourer, and live in Currier-street, St. Giles. I was in Stanhope-street on the 3rd of June, and saw the prisoner go over the wall to the building—he came back—I said, "What have you got?" and he dropped the two trowels from under his coat.

JOHN BETT (police-sergeant S 19.) I took the prisoner—he requested the prosecutor not to proceed against him, and he would do so no more.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

ROBERT CADBURY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1824
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1824. ROBERT CADBURY was indicted for embezzlement.

JOHN BURNS . I am a fruit salesman in Covent-garden. The prisoner was in my employ—I intrusted him to receive money on my account—he was with me from fifteen to sixteen years, off and on—he received 1l. 7s. 6d. of me, to pay Mrs. Almond, which he did not do.

MART ALMONDM . I am a widow, and live in Little Russell-street, Covent-garden. The prisoner was in the prosecutor's service—he had five bushels of apples of me in March—they came to 25s.—I never received the money—he told me he would pay me on the 24th, but I never saw him again till he was in custody.

JOHN BURNS re-examined. The prisoner sold goods for me to the amount of 2l. 12s., and he deducted 1l. 7s. 6d. for these apples, giving me the balance.

Prisoner. I had bad some losses, and intended to pay Mrs. Almond the following week. NOT GUILTY .

ROBERT CADBURY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1825
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1825. ROBERT CADBURY was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March, 2 sovereigns, the monies of John Burns, his master.

JOHN BURNS . I gave the prisoner two sovereigns on the 24th of March to pay to Mr. Jacobs—on the 25th Mr. Jacobs applied to me, and the prisoner absconded—I never saw him till he was in custody.

CHARLES JACOBS . I am a fruit-salesman. The prisoner had paid me several sums of money, but he paid me none on the 24th of March or after that—the 13th of March was the last he paid to me.

THOMAS BLOSSETT . I am a constable. I took the prisoner at his house in Little Catherine-street.

GUILTY . Aged 39.— Confined Four Months.

FREDERICK ABBOTT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1826
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1826. FREDERICK ABBOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 2 pairs of ornaments, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 saltcellar, value 2s.; the goods of Jacob Samuel Bowling.

EDWARD BOWLING . I am the son of Jacob Samuel Bowling, in High street, St. Pancras—he sells china and glass—the goods were on a table outside the house under a portico. On the 1st of June in the evening the prisoner and another came to me as I was outside, and the other person asked me the price of the ornaments—I told him—he then asked me the price of an ale glass—I went into the house to inquire, and while I went the prisoner went off with the ornaments—the other then said, "Never mind," but as soon as he was gone I missed the articles—I went and overtook them both in High-street—I ran up against the prisoner, and felt something hard in his pocket—he then turned up York-street, and asked me which was James-street—I told him it was in the Hampstead-road—he said "No, this is the way"—I went on a little way before him and then he began to run—I called the policeman, and he was taken in Grove-street—I have since seen the ornaments in a broken state and the glass salt, which is not broken.

JAMES SKARRETT . I live in Camden-town and am a tailor. I was going along George-street, and heard a cry of "Stop thief"—a man ran by me—when he had passed a few yards I saw this saltcellar fall from his hand, and took it up—I believe the prisoner is the man, but I did not see his face—I did not see any other person running.

THOMAS BARRISTER (police-constable S 90.) I was in Park-street on that evening, and heard a cry of "Stop thief"—the prisoner passed me running—I followed him to Grove-street, and he was stopped at the corner of Warren-street—I said I took him on suspicion of stealing some things at Mr. Bowling's—he said he knew nothing about them—I took him to the station-house, then went to Grove-street, and took up these broken ornaments in the direction in which he had run—I did not see any other men running.

EDWARD BOWLING re-examined. These are the ornaments we lost—I can see the mark on one of them.

Prisoner. Q. Are there not other images marked like them in your shop? A. Yes—I can swear to these, because I know what was on the stall—we had only two of these salts on the stall, and one of them was gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing two streets off—I went to look what time it was, and this boy came and looked hardin my face—two men ran up the street—the boy then ran against me—I said, "What do you run against me for?"—he said nothing, but whistled and ran on—it was then near the time that I was to meet my brother—I went up Park-street, and two men were running up the street—a young man said to me, "They are running after you." I turned back, and the policeman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

WILLIAM DAVIS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1827
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1827. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May, 1 brush, value 2s. 6d., the goods of George Imber; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged— Confined Six Weeks.

HENRY TAYLOR.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1828
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1828. HENRY TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, 1 pair of shoes, value 9s., the goods of Samuel Mansbridge; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 27.— Transported for Seven Years.

DENNIS WILLIAMS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1829
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1829. DENNIS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May, 1 shawl, value 1s. 6d.;1 cap, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 1 pencil-case, value 2s.; and 1 printed book, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of John Conrey: also for stealing, on the 28th of May, 3 sheets, value 5s.; and 1 blanket, value 4s.; the goods of Ann Denham and another; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged.— Confined Six Months.

WILLIAM LANE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1830
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1830. WILLIAM LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of Jane, 1 pocket-book, value 1s., and 1 card-case, value 1s. 6d., the goods of William Nicol, from his person.

WILLIAM NICOL . I live at Liverpool. I was in town on the 6th of June, and had been to the Opera—I had a pocket-book and a card-case in my coat pocket—I am sure I had them when I went to the Opera, and I missed them at night in taking off my clothes—I lived then in Stafford-street, Bond-street—when I came out of the Opera I had to cross Charles-street to reach the carriage—this is my property—(looking at it.)

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You do not know the prisoner? A. No—I cannot say How these things got out of my pocket.

CHARLES WALKER (police-constable A 78.) I was on duty that night, and saw the prisoner making his way along Charles-street to the Colonnade—I knew him, and stood behind a pillar and watched him—I saw him turn round and lift up the tail of a gentleman's coat—I went and took him—I found on him 2 pocket-books and a card-case—he threw them down and resisted violently—I saw the prosecutor's address on the cards, and went to him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you not know that the person you saw the prisoner near was not the prosecutor? A. I cannot say, as there were so many people, but as soon as he took his hand away I took him—I think it was the prosecutor whose pocket I saw him touch, but I cannot say—I took him on Thursday—the prosecutor saw the card-case on the Monday following, and he came to Queen-square on the Tuesday.

GUILTY *. Aged 23.— Transported for Ten Years.

JAMES DOBSON, JANE BARTLEMORE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1831
VerdictsNot Guilty > unknown

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1831. JAMES DOBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of February, 1 pair of spectacles, value 10s., the goods of James Willis, his master; and JANE BARTLEMORE , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JAMES WILLIS . I am a farmer, and live at Hanger Hill. Dobson was in my service, and slept in my house, in February—I lost a pair of spectacles out of the house, or out of my pocket.

HARRIET T. ROOK . I live next door to the prisoner Bartlemore. In March last she asked me to take a pair of spectacles to Brentford, and pawn them for her—she said Mrs. Dalton, at the Coach and Horses public-house, had given them to her—I pawned them in the name of Saunderson, the name she goes by.

JOHN BURFORD . I am a pawnbroker. These spectacles were pawned with me on the 3rd of March.

WILLIAM LYNES (police-constable T 50.) On the 27th of May I took Dobson into custody—he said he knew nothing about it.

REUBEN HALL (police-constable T 55.) I received information, and went to a cottage near Ealing church—Bartlemore came to the door—I asked where Dobson was, she said she did not know—I asked if he would be there that night—she said she did not know—Dobson then came in, and I said it was about a pair of spectacles—Bartlemore said, "I will tell you the truth, Dobson gave them to me"—when I got them to the station house, Dobson said, "I will tell you the truth"—I said, "You have no occasion to say any thing; what you say I shall give against you"—he then said, "I found the spectacles by Mr. Wood's pond on Hanger Hill.";

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN LAMBERT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1832
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1832. JOHN LAMBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 4 yards of woollen cloth, value 3l. 4s., 7 1/2 yards of satin, value 2l., 1 1/2 yard of serge, value 6s., 1 1/2 yard of cotton cloth, value 1s., 1 coat, value 3s., 1 pair of trowsers, value 30s., and 1 waistcoat, value 17s., the goods of Henry Martyn, his master.

HENRY MARTYN . I am a woollen draper, and live at Aldgate. The prisoner was my porter—I suspected him, and on the 6th of June, when he came home I made him go into his bed-room and get his bundle—he brought it into the dining-room, and opened it—it contained all the things stated in the indictment—the whole was worth 10l. or 11l., and are mine—he had this one piece at a tailor's, to make a waistcoat—he had no right to have any of these.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out—the servant and I did not agree very well together—T know nothing of these things—the cloth I bought, at 13s. a yard, and the kerseymere I gave 7s. 6d. a yard for—the bills were in the trowsers pocket—I had 3l. when I came to London.

MR. MARTYN re-examined. His uncle told me he came up pennyless. GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

JOHN CHAPPEL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1833
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

Related Material

1833. JOHN CHAPPEL was indicted for embezzlement.

WILLIAM SWIFT WALFORD . I am a publican, and live at Vauxhall. I engaged the prisoner as pot-boy, on the 4th of May—he took out beer, and received money to bring to me—he did not pay the sums stated to me—he absconded on the night of the 3rd of June.

ELIZABETH BAKER . I receive beer from the prosecutor. On the 3rd of June I paid the prisoner 8d. for a pot of beer—one pot I owed him for.

ELLEN TALBOT . I paid the prisoner 1d. for half a pint of beer.

ELIZABETH FOUNTAIN . I live at the prosecutor's—the prisoner never paid these sums to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I am accountable for the beer I take out—he it well aware there is a larger sum due to me from the customers than I owe him—I should not have gone away, but a drunken woman threw my cap into the bar—my mistress made me pay half a pint of gin, and I got tipsy.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM RYALL, GEORGE BANKS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1834
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Imprisonment

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1834. WILLIAM RYALL and GEORGE BANKS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May, 1 set of cupping instruments and case, value 3l., and five weights, value 2s.; the goods of Philip Peter Smyth.

MARY ANN SMTTH . I live with my father, a surgeon at Bromley. On the 17th of May I received information, and went out—I saw Ryall about forty yards from our house with this box of instruments under his arm—I had seen it safe on our counter a little before, and I had seen the prisoners in the shop—they were strangers to me.

THOMAS BEAL . On the 17th of May I stood on the bridge, over the River Lea. I saw the two prisoners running towards the bridge—Banks was some distance before Ryall—several boys were following them, crying "Stop thief!"—I did not stop Banks, as I thought they were at play—by that time Ryall was near the bridge, and had the box under his arm—before I could get to him he threw it, intending to throw it in the river, but it struck against the bridge, and bounded hack, aid flew open—some of the contents went into the river, and some in the road—there were two or three glasses, which broke—I picked up some of them, and some other person took up the box—I kept Ryall till the clock struck one—Smyth came up, and said the box was her father's—I then gave Ryall to a man to take care of him.

THOMAS PEARSON (police-constable K 220.) I took Ryall, and received the box—this scarificator I got since, from a man who got it out of the river.

PHILIP PETER SMYTH . This is my box, and these are my instruments.

Ryall's Defence. Two boys ran on first, and dropped it—I took it up.

RYALL†— GUILTY . Aged 14.— Transported for Seven Years.

BANKS— GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Three Months.

THOMAS HARLINE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1835
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1835. THOMAS HARLINE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person.

MARY ANN CROOK . I live with my grandmother in Clerkenwell. On the 26th of May, about eleven o'clock at night, I was in Fleet-street—I saw the prisoner following a gentleman, and saw him touch the gentleman's pocket—I did not see him take the handkerchief out, but I saw him throw it into a doorway, directly the officer went after him—there were three of them.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How came you to be in the street? A. I had been to Deptford, and came home by the steamer to Hungerford-market, about half-past ten o'clock—I am not often in Fleet-street—I did live in Charles-street, City-road, with my sister, who keeps a shop, but I have left her.

Q. Have you never said that you saw the prisoner draw a white silk handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket? A. Yes—I said to-day that I did not see him take it, more out of compassion to him than any thing else—the officer saw him throw it into a doorway—I did not go after the gentleman—I went after the prisoner—I told the policeman, and he took him.

HENRY BAYLEY (City police-constable, No. 169.) I saw the prisoner loitering up and down Fleet-street, attempting several gentlemen's pockets in company with two others—I watched him some time, and when he saw I noticed him, he ran across the road—I ran after him—he threw the handkerchief into the doorway of No. 167, Fleet-street.

Cross-examined. Q. Which side were you? A. On the left hand in going to Temple Bar—the witness was on the same side—I did not see the prisoner take the handkerchief—I told the magistrate that I saw him trying other people's pockets—I had never seen him before.

GUILTY .* Aged 26.— Transported for Ten Years.

CHARLES JOHNSON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1836
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1836. CHARLES JOHNSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of June, 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of William Phin Murray, from his person.

WILLIAM PHIN MURRAY . I am a piano-forte maker. I was walking with my wife in George-street, St. Giles's, on the 2nd of June, between six and seven o'clock in the evening—I felt something—I turned immediately and saw the prisoner walking away from me; but he must have been walking towards me—when I felt the touch, I felt my pocket, and told my wife I had lost my handkerchief—I ran round Broad-street and up Plumtree-street, where I knew I should meet the prisoner—I saw an officer and I told him, and I had hardly got the words out of my mouth when the prisoner passed, and the officer took him—the handkerchief was found in his trowsers—this is it.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear that it is yours? A. Yes; I had it in my pocket the minute before.

THOMAS WIGGINS (police-constable E 26). The prosecutor spoke to me, and I took the prisoner with this handkerchief concealed in his trowsers. GUILTY *. Aged 20.— Transported for Ten Years.

HANNAH WILSON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1837
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1837. HANNAH WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May, 6 bottles, value 1s. 6d.; 3 quarts of brandy, value £1; and 3 pints of gin, value 4s.; the property of Nathaniel Fountain, her master.

NATHANIEL FOUNTAIN . I keep the Marquis of Granby public-house in Percy-street, Rathbone place. The prisoner was my servant for about a month—I have brandy and spirits in bottles—I usually kept them on shelves in cupboards in the bar—she had access to them—here are six bottles here which have contained three quarts of brandy and three pints of gin, which are my property.

WALTER WALKER . I am a porter. I was sitting outside the prosecutor's house on the evening of the 30th of May—the prisoner came to me and asked me if I was a porter—I said "Yes"—she said, "I want my boxes taken to Mary-le-bone,"—I said, "Where are they?"—she took me up stairs to the attic, and there was Mrs. Fountain and another lady—Mrs. Fountain said, "I think there is something in your box, I must search it"—the prisoner said, "I can't have it done, there is some dirty linen I don't want every person to see"—the prisoner sat down, and said she would not let any person search—Mrs. Fountain then went down and got Mr. Glendenning to come up to try to let the prosecutor see it, but* she locked her box and would not let it be seen—Mrs. Fountain then said "Fetch a policeman"—I went and brought one—the box was opened, and these bottles were found in it.

JOSEPH CLEMENTS (police-constable E 102). I was sent for, and the

landlady said, "Let me search your box"—the prisoner ran to the box, and took up some things—then Mrs. Fountain went to the box and found 5 other bottles, one of them contained brandy.

GUILTY . Aged.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

ANN DAVENPORT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1838
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1838. ANN DAVENPORT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May, 1 shawl, value 6s. the goods of Richard Lee.

ANN LEE . I am the wife of Richard Lee, a blacksmith at Lisson Grove—I have known the prisoner these ten years—on the 29th of May I had her to mind my child while I went down stairs to washing—she left me at nine o'clock in the evening—directly she was gone I missed a shawl from my box in my room—I spoke to her about it that night—she denied knowing any thing about it—there was another woman about, and she was taken into custody, and after inquiry was set at liberty—the prisoner came to my house again, and still denied all knowledge of the shawl—at that time her brother came in with the shawl and I had her taken—this is my shawl.

FREDERICK AULDER . The prisoner is my wife's sister—she came home a little after nine o'clock on the night stated, and went to her own room, which is next to mine—I heard her box lid shut down—she then came into my place to supper, and then went to bed—the prosecutor afterwards came and said she had lost her shawl—the prisoner denied knowing any thing about it—she went afterwards to the prosecutrix—I went to her box and found the shawl—I took it to the prosecutrix—when I showed the shawl she could say no more.

Prisoner. I did it from want. GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

MARY CHEESEMAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1839
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1839. MARY CHEESEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 1 pair of boots, value 2s. 6 d.; 2 baskets, value 2s.; and 1 half-crown; the goods of James Bennett.

JAMES BENNETT . I live at Shepherd's Bush, and am a famer's man—I have a little cottage of my own. On the lst of June the prisoner was there on a visit—I have a daughter about 14 years old—she went away with the prisoner, and these articles were missing—I went after them, but did not find them—my daughter came home three or four days after—I have not found my things.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer—I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday last, at Hounslow—I asked if her name was Cheeseman—she said "No"—I said, "Do you know Mr. Bennett of Shepherd's Bush?"—she said "No"—I said she was charged with robbing him: of a pair of boots, half-a-crown, and two baskets—she denied it, and after that she acknowledged that she left the baskets in a wagon.

Prisoner's Defence. His daughter put the boots on, and I saw 2s. in her hand—I said, "Where did you get that?"—she said, "I had it given to me, aunt"—she spent it.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN DEXTER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1840
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1840. JOHN DEXTER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May, 1 shawl, value 10s. 6d.; the goods of John Davies and another.

JOHN WILSON . I am shopman to John Davies and another, linen-drapers in Chiswell-street. On the evening of the 25th of May, the prisoner and another person came in—I was serving a lady who made a remark to me, which made me look at the prisoner—I saw him putting something into

his trowsers—he went out, I followed him—he had got two doors off—I saw something in his trowsers, and Haseldine took the shawl from him.

THOMAS HASELDINE . I was passing—Wilson had the prisoner by the collar—I saw the fringe hanging out of his trowsers—I pulled it out, and it was this shawl.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up outside the house.

GUILTY . Aged 13.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, June 22nd, 1839.

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

AMELIA GOODRICH.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1841
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1841. AMELIA GOODRICH was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May, 2 sheets, value 7s.; 1 blanket, value 5s.; 1 pillow, value 2s.; and 1 looking-glass and stand, value 6s.; the goods of James Styles.

ELIZA STYLES . I am the wife of James Styles, and live in Thornville-street, Islington—the prisoner occupied one furnished room in my house for five days—she took it by the week, and represented herself as a married woman—she came home in liquor one Saturday night, I went into her room with her, found all my things gone, and gave her in charge—these are them—(locking at them)—I can swear positively to them—she took the lodgings alone—there was no man with her while she was there, nor any friend, male or female—she gave me a reference when she came, but I did not go to it—no one but her had access to the apartment.

GEORGE GRAY . I am shopman to Mr. Blackmore, a pawnbroker in Somer's-town—I produce a pillow pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Woodrich, Collyer-street—I might have mistaken the name, and put W instead of G.

EDWARD POPE . I am a pawnbroker at Battle-bridge—I produce a blanket, two sheets, and a looking-glass, pawned by the prisoner at different times, in the names of Mary Goodrich and Ann Goodrich.

JAMES FRANKS . I am a policeman—I took the prisoner into custody—I found 6 duplicates in a tea-caddy in the cupboard of her room, which led me to the pawnbrokers.

GUILTY . Aged 23.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

WILLIAM BROWN, HENRY FRANCIS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1842
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1842. WILLIAM BROWN and HENRY FRANCIS were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May, 1 work-box, value 2l.; 4 reels of cotton, value 4d.; 1 thimble, value 2s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 2s.; 1 penknife, value 1s.; 1 pencil-case, vaule 4s.; 1 tea caddy, value 30s.; 1/2 lb. weight of tea, value 3s.; and llb. weight of sugar, value 9d.; the goods of Mary Smith.

MARY SMITH . I am single, and keep a confectioner's shop, in Whitmore-place, New-road, Marylebone. On the 15th of May, at two o'clock in the morning, I was in bed, and was disturbed by the policeman knocking at my back door, telling me there was some one in my house—I dressed myself, came down, and found the two prisoners in my bake-house, in custody of two policemen—I found my work-box, tea caddy, and other things, removed from where they had been in the parlour, at eleven o'clock, the night before, when I went to bed—we judge they got in by my servant's bed-room window—these articles are all mine—(looking at them.)

JAMES COLE (police-constable D 25.) I was on duty in Whitmore-place, going round my beat, and on looking over Miss Smith's window shutter of

the bakehouse, I perceived a small light in the parlour window, which separates the bakehouse and the parlour—I waited a little time, and saw the light move about—I then saw Brown come out of the parlour door to a little landing-place, where a few steps lead into the bakehouse—he was followed by Francis, with the two boxes—they made their way into the bakehouse—I placed myself against the bakehouse door which leads out, and in a little time the door opened a little way—I pushed it open, and caught hold of Brown—I then closed it, and sprang my rattle—a fellow-constable came to my assistance, and we took them both—they were carrying the property produced—I found some skeleton keys on a bench close by where I took Brown—they were not there before.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you try them to see if they would fit any thing? A. I did not, as the doors were fast, and I had no occasion.

JOHN BROWN . I am a policeman. I was on duty, and way called to Coles's assistance—I took Francis into custody in the cellar—this is the property that was found.

BROWN— GUILTY . Aged 22.

FRANCIS— GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for seven Years.

Before Lord Chief Justice Tindal.

HENRY ALLEN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1843
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceDeath

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1843. HENRY ALLEN was indicted for a rape.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— DEATH recorded.

Before Mr. Justice Littledaie.

RICHARD ROSE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1844
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1844. RICHARD ROSE was indicted for a rape.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tindal.

JAMES CRANE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1845
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1845. JAMES CRANE was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously assaulting Joseph Arnold, and stabbing, cutting, and wounding him upon his belly, with intent to maim and disable him.—2nd COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOSEPH ARNOLD . I live at Palmer's-green, near Edmonton. On Monday, the 20th of May, I was at the Fox public-house nearly the whole of the afternoon—I left at eleven o'clock—I went to Mrs. Walledge's, at Palmer's-green, about a hundred yards from the Fox—I stopped there about a quarter of an hour, and then came out to go home, and saw George Gladman and the prisoner scuffling and fighting—I went up to them, and Gladman asked me to be his second—I did so—they kept on scuffling up the road, but I never saw any blows struck—the prisoner then hit me with his fist, I hit him again, and then they ran down the road, and I after them—when I caught him I hit him, and directly I hit him he stabbed me with a knife in the belly—it was not much of a wound—it bled a good deal—I fell down—the prisoner ran off home—two young chaps took me up to Mrs. Walledge's, and then home—the doctor came next morning—I did not see what the prisoner struck me with, but I thought it was a knife.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How had you spent this day? A. I had been at work in the morning till one o'clock, and then I went to the Fox, and stopped there till eleven o'clock at night—I was drinking, but did not get drunk—I had about four pots of beer—I do not think I had eight, but I should not like to swear it—I paid 2s., and ran a score for six pots—I was drinking with a man—I did not knock the prisoner down at all, I swear that—I did not see Gladman and his wife fighting—I did not

hear any screams of "murder"—Gladman was not with me when I pursued the prisoner—I was alone when he struck me—I did not hit him till he hit me—I have been in gaol once for two months for stealing a few pears—I know a woman named Glasscock—I had not been in Gladman's house that night, nor was I at Walledge's when he was there—I know nothing of any quarrel and a call of "murder" from Mrs. Gladman—I never heard of it before now.

GEORGE GLADMAN . I had a quarrel with the prisoner on the 20th of May, but it was only words—we did not come to blows—I asked the prosecutor to be my second—he said he would—I was about three yards behind him when he was stabbed, and there was nobody near him but the prisoner—I did not see him stabbed.

Cross-examined. Q. How long had you been drinking that day? A. I had been at work all day—I went to the Fox, about half-past seven o'clock, and staid there till 10—I was drinking by myself—I never said to any one, speaking of the two Cranes, "The two b wanted to ran away, but we would not let them"—it is false—I know Macey—I never said it in his presence that I was at Walledge's house that night—I and my wife had a quarrel—I never heard her scream "murder!"—Mrs. Glasscock did not call the prisoner in to save her—I struck her, I cannot tell where, it was in the dark—it was in the face—I cannot say whether it was a hard blow, I dare say it was—I did not hear her scream—I will not swear she did not.

JOSEPH ALDER . I am a policeman of Southgate. I apprehended Crane on Tuesday morning, at Palmer's Green—I told him it was for stabbing the prosecutor—he said he had done it in his own defence—I found this penknife on him.

THOMAS WARD . I am a surgeon. I was called in to attend the prosecutor on Tuesday morning, the 21st of May—there was a wound in his belly about a quarter of an inch in length—it was not severe, it was about half an inch deep, it was not bleeding when I saw it—there was some blood on his shirt, but not to any great extent—it might have been done with this knife.

Mr. PHILLIPS called

EMMA GLASSCOCK . I am a washerwoman, and live at Palmer's Green. On Monday night I was in Walledge's house—Gladman looked in at the door—I saw his wife, and beard her scream "murder!"—he had her down on the ground—he was on his knees, ill-treating her, and he bit her on the cheek—the prisoner and his brother are musicians—I saw the prisoner, and said, "Jem Crane, will you come and assist Mrs. Gladman?"—he was inside Walledge's house at the time, with his clarionet in his hand—he gave it to his brother, and came and said, "For God's sake, George, let your wife get up, do not kill her"—Gladman said, "You b—, if you mean that, I will serve you the same"—he rose, and hit the prisoner, and knocked him to the ground—he struggled to get up, and Gladman hit him another blow, and got him down again—his brother John not liking to see him ill-treated, said, "Come away, Jem, for they will do you a mischief," and then somebody, I do not knew whether it was the prosecutor or Gladman, knocked the brothers down, and there was one hitting John, and the other hitting James—after that they cleared the way, and there were blows and fighting, lads and men together—I took Mrs. Gladman into her sister's house, and saw no more.

HENRY KIRBY . I am servant to Mr. Seymour, a hay salesman, at Palmer's Green. On the night in question I saw the prosecutor knock the prisoner down—he got up and ran away, and his brother also—the prosecutor, and Gladman, and four or five more ran after them, and I saw no more—the prisoner had given no provocation.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Littledale.

CATHERINE MORGAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1846
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceImprisonment

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1846. CATHERINE MORGAN was indicted for unlawfully, maliciously and feloniously assaulting Edmund Cunningham, on the 2nd of June, and cutting and wounding him upon his head, with intent to maim and disable him.—2nd COUNT, stating her intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

EDMUND CUNNINGHAM . I am a navigator, and work at Blackfriars bridge. I received my wages there, and gave 1l. 5d. to the prisoner's husband, told him to take 8d. for his trouble, and to take 1l. home to my wife—in consequence of what I afterwards heard from my wife, I went on Sunday morning to where the prisoner and her husband lived—I found them there, and Bryant their lodger—I asked the husband why he did not return the money to my wife neighbourly—he said he returned all he received—I said he did not, and that I had had a better opinion of him—the prisoner said, "I know what you gave my husband, I know he has delivered it"—I said to her, "You had better mind your own affairs, and not trouble with us"—I said, "If this man had done his duty towards his own wife, who is in Ireland, or paid me the money in a week or fortnight's time, I would not have cared"—the prisoner took up a hatchet from the fire-place, came behind me, and hit me right in the poll of the head with it, and with the dint of the blows I went down on my face and hands—I got up, turned round, and laid hold of the prisoner, and she dropped the axe—I laid hold of her, and Bryant hit me right in the side of the head with the chopper, while I had hold of her, and I fell with the dint of the blows, and was senseless—when I came to myself I was on the stairs—my wife was the first that found me—I said, "I am dead, wife"—a policeman came and took me to the hospital, where my wound was dressed—I came out of the hospital on the Sunday evening—I ran out from the effects of the blow, and staid out till Tuesday—I was obliged to go in again, and stopped there till that day week—I had not struck the prisoner at all before she struck me with the axe—I never spoke to her—I was speaking to her husband—I have not been able to find Bryant.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Of course you were very quiet at the time, and never molested any one? A. I am sure I did not—I never touched any one—this is not a large axe—I saw no broomstick—I recollect nothing after the two blows—she dropped the axe on the floor—when the policeman and my wife came they were all gone—I ran out of the hospital from the violence of my head—I did not know what I was doing—my wife was outside the hospital, and she and another woman conveyed me home—I staid out all day on Monday, and went back on Tuesday afternoon about three o'clock—I drank something on the Monday—if I did not drink I could not live—I do not think I drank any liquor, and I will swear I did not drink

more than a pint of beer—on my oath I did not strike any body a blow in the room.

LEWIS CURD (police-constable F 108.) On Sunday morning, the 2nd of June, I found the prosecutor at the bottom of the staircase in the passage with his hands up against his head—I observed three very large wounds, and blood all down to the floor—I went up stairs, and searched three or four rooms—I found the prisoner concealed in a room at the top of the house—she had bolted the door—I shook the door, the bolt went back, and she was standing up in a corner of the room—she seemed very much agitated—I took her into custody, and conveyed the prosecutor to the hospital—I saw no chopper or axe—I did not find Bryant, but the husband was sitting in the room smoking his pipe.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you searched very accurately? A. Yes—the prosecutor was sitting on the stairs—any body going down must have passed him—there was no woman in the room when I went up.

(The prisoner received a good character.) GUILTY—Of an Assault. Aged 34.— Confined Three Months.

THOMAS GREENBURY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1847
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1847. THOMAS GREENBURY was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Barker, on the 1st of June, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 5 half-crowns, 6 shillings, 2 sixpences, 1 groat, and 13 halfpence, his property; and immediately before, and at the time of the said robbery, striking and beating him.

GEORGE BARKER . I am a painter and glazier, and live in Great Titchfield-street. On the 1st of June I was working at the Assembly-room, Kentish-town—I went into the kitchen there about half-past six o'clock in the evening, and the prisoner was there taking a pint of porter—he asked me to take a sup, which I did—I called for a pint myself, and when it was brought I asked him to take a sup of mine, which he did—I have not been drinking now—I am very nervous, and have had a fall since the robbery, which hurt me very much, but I am not at all intoxicated—I took out my purse to pay for my porter and his too—I had 23s. altogether—the prisoner saw I had money—he said he was going to his barracks, and we walked from the assembly-room house together—we then went to the Nag's Head, and had two pints of porter, which I paid for—we then came on to Kentish-town-bridge together, and when we got there the prisoner pinched hold of my throat with one hand, and put the other into my pocket, and took out all my money but a halfpenny—he ran away immediately, and was not taken till the 4th—I went to Portman barracks then, and saw him in the guard-room with four or five more—I went straight up to him, and said he was the man.

Prisoner. I wish to ask him if he thinks himself sober? Witness. Yes, I do, but I am very infirm and nervous—people may take me to be intoxicated, but I am not—I was not intoxicated when I was robbed—I never saw the prisoner before—I treated him, and would have given him four or five pots more if he had wanted it—it was the glorious 1st of June—I am not tipsy at all.

RICHARD DANIELS . I am a policeman. I have seen the prosecutor in the course of the day—he has been drinking—I consider him the worse the drink—I went over to the public-house opposite this morning, and told for landlord not to let him have any more, as I saw he was getting in that way—he speaks differently to what he usually does—I consider him tipsy.

GEORGE BARKER re-examined. I have been taking a little refreshment, but not enough to make any difference. NOT GUILTY .

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

WILLIAM WOODHOUSE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1848
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1848. WILLIAM WOODHOUSE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June, 5 loaves of bread, value 2s.; 1 3/4 lbs. weight of bacon, value 10d.; llb. weight of mutton, value 7d.; llb. weight of butter, value 1s.; 4lbs. weight of pork, value 2s.; 1/4 lb. weight of tea, value ls.; 2lbs. weight of sugar, value 1s.; 1 hat, value 2s. 6d.; 1 pair of shoes, value 8s. 6d.; 2 baskets, value 1s.; and 1 cap, value 6d.; the goods of James Randall, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged.— Confined Three Months.

HENRY GILES, MAGNUS HOLLAND, ISAAC BARROW, RICHARD WILLIAM STRUDE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1849
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1849. HENRY GILES , MAGNUS HOLLAND , ISAAC BARROW , and RICHARD WILLIAM STRUDE were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Howes, on the 23rd of May, and stealing therein, 1 waistcoat, value 10s.; 2 pairs of trowsers, value 6s.; 4 gowns, value 2l.; 1 cloak, value 1l.; 1 jacket, value 12s.; 4 sheets, value 16s.; t shirt, value 8s.; 13 yards of printed cotton, value 7s.; 4 yards of merino, value 6s.; 2 forks, value 6s.; 2 pairs of shoes, value 10s.; 2 shawls, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 4s.; 5 pairs of gloves, value 3s.; 1 accordion, value 3s.; 1 shift, value 2s.; and llb. weight of bees' wax, value 3s.; his property.

MR. PRBNDERQAST conducted the Prosecution.

MARY ANN HOWES . I am the wife of John Howes, and live in Grosvenor-street, Commercial-road. On Thursday, the 23rd of May, I left my house between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, and double locked the door, leaving nobody in the house—I had some property in a drawer in my front parlour—my children went to school in the morning, and were left in care of Mrs. Jordan, to whom I gave the key of my door—when I came home, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I found the drawers open, and missed the articles stated—my window was shut to—it fastens with a bolt, which was taken out, and the window left wide open—a square of glass had been broken before, and a piece of pasteboard was nailed up, and that was pushed away to get at the bolt.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Would the breaking of the pasteboard enable a person to unfasten the hasp? A. I fastened the window myself before I went out—it does not shut down, but slides—I have not found any of the property, but some gloves, which I suppose to be mine.

ELIZABETH JORDAN . I am the wife of Thomas Jordan. The prosecutrix's children were left in my charge that day with the key, and at a quarter past seven o'clock in the evening I went to the house to put them to bed—I had a difficulty at first in getting in at the door—when I got in I saw several things lying about the parlour, and the drawers open—I went up stairs, and other things laid about there in the same way—the back window was open, and the pasteboard pushed down.

SAMUEL WALKER . I am carman to a builder. On the 23rd of May I went into Grosvenor-street, with a lot of gravel, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon—I saw the prisoner Strude and two others, who I know, but they are not here—I saw Strude cross, and put his hand inside the palings of Mrs. Howe's house—it is a door in the fence nailed up—that would have opened the gate if it had not been nailed up—he then

looked through the palings, and when I came back I saw him cross the road—I returned about half an hour afterwards, and saw Strude, Barrow, Holland, and another, in a rough cap—I did not see them do any thing.

Cross-examined. Q. When he put his hand in he pulled it out again, did he not? A. Yes.

GRACE MORE . I live in Grosvenor-street, five doors from the prosecutrix. About three o'clock, on the 23rd of May, I was sitting at my parlour window, at work, and saw the four prisoners and another boy standing opposite, one smoking a pipe—they were consulting together—they staid about five minutes, and then three walked away towards Mrs. Howes—I did not see them go into the house—I saw them again in about a quarter of an hour—one had a very large bundle on his head, tied in a large blue shawl, the other had a bundle tied up in a yellow silk handkerchief under his arm, and one had a paper parcel under his arm—they all five joined and walked away together up the street, and turned towards the Maid and Magpie public-house—they could get to East-street that way—I have no doubt of the prisoners, as I was at my window nearly half an hour watching them, but did not know they had plundered my neighbour—I was going to the door to call after them, but my daughter called after me, and pulled me back.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you tell which had one bundle, and which the other? A. The one who had the large blue bundle is not here—they all five went off with the bundles—Strude stood opposite my door all the while, till the others came back—I cannot exactly say which had the bundle in the yellow handkerchief.

JAMES WELCH . I live in East-street, Stepney. On Thursday, the 23rd of May, about four o'clock, I was passing Grosvenor-street—I saw four boys, two had a bundle—Barrow had a bundle in a yellow handkerchief, and Giles a bundle in a large blue shawl which he carried on his head.

CHARLES HENRY MOCKETT . I am a policeman. I took Barrow on the 24th, and Giles on the 25th—as I was taking Barrow to the station-house Giles accompanied him, but I had no description of him then—I saw Barrow offer Giles four white gloves—I asked where he got them—he said Giles gave them to him the night before, when he was tipsy, to take care of—Giles said, "I did not—I gave you a tobacco-box"—the reason the gloves are dirty is, that they had been playing at skittles—they are women's gloves.

MRS. HOWES re-examined.. I missed five pairs of these sort of gloves—I produce a pair of the same sort from the drawer where the others were—they are the same kind of gloves, but not the same pattern, and mine were all different patterns—I bought them of a man that came to the door.

NOT GUILTY .

EDWARD CARNEY, THOMAS DONOVAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1850
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1850. EDWARD CARNEY and THOMAS DONOVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June, 1 coat, value 1l., the goods of William Joshua Hollebone.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

WILLIAM JOSHUA HOLLEBONE . I am an appraiser, and live in Great Titchfield-street, Marylebone. On the 19th of June I went in my gig to the Duke of York public-house, High-street, Shadwell—I went into the house, leaving my son in the gig, and in about half an hour, in consequence

of what my son told me, I came out, and turned to the right, but found nobody—I came back, and missed my great coat from the gig—it was an invisible green great-coat, and was in the gig, under the Mackintosh—it was faced with velvet, and had a velvet collar on—I have not seen it since.

JOSEPH HOLLEBONE . I am the prosecutor's son. I went with my father in the gig to Shadwell—I sat in the gig while he went into the Duke of York—I was on the right hand side—the Mackintosh was on the top of the seat, and my hand was on it—I felt it move, turned round, and saw a boy running round the corner—I looked, and missed the coat—I went in and told my father—the chaise was very near the corner.

HANNAH DUNMORE . I live in Blue Anchor-court, Brook-street. On the 19th of May I saw the chaise at the door of the public-house, and the witness in it—I saw both the prisoners about the chaise—I thought they were going to hold the horse—I heard a noise shortly after, and heard the people say a boy had stolen a coat—I had seen the prisoners just before in company together, and two girls with them, by the White Hart, close by the Duke of York—I had seen them talking to the girls for about ten minutes—I saw the people run round—I am quite sure the prisoners are the persons I saw near the gig—I did not see any thing taken.

ANN STEWART . I live in Gun-lane. I was at the Duke of York public-house when the prosecutor came in. I went out afterwards, and was by the door of the White Hart—I saw both the prisoners by the White Hart door, with two girls—Donovan hit the girl twice in the face—I was crossing over to the baker's shop, turned my head, and saw Carney ran round the corner of the Duke of York, from the chaise, with the coat on his arm—I saw Donovan go from behind the chaise up a court—Carney had a dark coat on—he stood about the middle of the shaft of the chaise, as if he went to hold the horse—he beckoned to Donovan, and in an instant afterwards I saw Carney go away with the coat, and Donovan go up the court—I should have gone and informed the gentleman, but I saw his son get out of the chaise, and thought he knew of it—I saw Donovan in High-street, Shadwell, next day, and went and told the landlord of the Duke of York of it.

Donovan. She said at the station-house she did not see any body take the coat, and at the Thames police she said she saw Carney take it and run away. Witness. I have not given different accounts—the policeman knows what I said—I consider one pulled it out, and the other ran away with it, but I did not see it taken.

THOMAS SQUIRE (police-constable K 282.) I apprehended Carney in High-street, Shadwell on the 20th—I told him it was on suspicion of stealing a coat from a gig—he said, "I know nothing about it, I have been at Plymouth for the last six or seven months"—I apprehended Donovan afterwards, from the witness's information—he said he knew nothing about it.

Donovan's Defence. I went home about eleven o'clock, and laid down—I got up about two o'clock—I told my mother I was very bad, and thought a fever was coming on me, as I have had one three summers running—she gave me 3d. to buy some meat, and my sister went with me to Bluegate-fields—before I came back the robbery was done—I came straight on by Mr. Pillington's door—he said, "A boy is running down there with a coat, you run after him"—and I went down the lane, towards home.

MARY CONNLY . I am the prisoner Donovan's sister, and am married—I came home on Wednesday, after selling my goods—my brother was very ill in bed—my mother said to him, "Would you like to take a walk with your sister up to the top of the lane? perhaps it would do you more good than lying in bed"—he went with me to Mr. Smith's, and bought two muggets, and as we came to the top of the lane, we heard the people crying, "Stop thief"—I and my brother came straight home—he had his tea and went to bed again, and never went out again till next morning.

MR. PAYNE. Q. What time was this? A. Last Wednesday—I cannot exactly tell you the hour, but that was the day—my brother was ill in bed on the 19th of June, but he got up and went out with me—we did not go near the Duke of York public-house—not further than the top of New Gravel-lane—there was no girl with me, only my child—I am sure my brother was not in company with Carney all day—nor with any young woman besides me—he never left my company—it was from half-past two to three o'clock that he went out with me—he was in doors all the day before that—we did not stay out much more than half an hour—I did not go before the magistrate—I did not know he was taken up—they would not allow me to go in—I was outside—they did not ask me to go in—I thought he might send out for me—he is a coal-whipper and works with his father.

CARNEY— GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

DONOVAN— NOT GUILTY .

JOHN HOARE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1851
VerdictNot Guilty > no evidence

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1851. JOHN HOARE was indicted for feloniously forging and uttering a bill of exchange for the payment of 28l. 10s. with intent to defraud Edward Taylor.—2 other COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud Robert Tutton; upon which no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

CHARLES WILMORE, ISAAC BARROW.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1852
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1852. CHARLES WILMORE and ISAAC BARROW were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April, 1 shift, value 3s.; the goods of William Wright.

ELIZA COLEMAN . I live with my mother in Joseph-street, St. George's in the East. On the 19th of April I was coming home, down Joseph-street, and saw the two prisoners walking down the street together—they went towards a clothes-line which hung at the bottom of the street, and peeped round the corner at the linen—I told my mother, and in consequence of what she said, I went to Mrs. Wright, and she and I went into Lucas-street, where we saw the prisoners—I saw the shift hanging out of the side of Barrow's jacket—when they saw us, Barrow ran away—Wilmore walked on—we overtook him, and Mrs. Wright asked him for the shift—he said, "I know nothing about your shift"—I said to Mrs. Wright, "Yes, he does, he was with the one that took it"—he threatened to break my head, and used a bad expression—Mrs. Wright said, "You dare touch her, or I will slap your face."

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How soon after this did you see Barrow again? A. I think about six weeks, when he was before the magistrate—I am sure he is the same person—I knew him before by sight, but never spoke to him—I never said I was not sure it was him—I am quite certain of him.

Wilmore. She said at the office, she did not know him till he was brought forward. Witness. I never said so—I should know him any where.

SARAH PILLER . I am the last witness's mother, but am married again—she told me something which induced me to go to the door, and I saw Barrow take the linen and run away with it—he attempted it twice—I directly sent my daughter to Mrs. Wright.

Cross-examined. Q. How far were you from where the shift was taken? A. About ten yards—I could see it distinctly, and the prisoner could see me—I did not pursue him myself, as my daughter could go faster than I could—Mrs. Wright lives just against where the linen was taken from—I had seen Barrow before, and cannot be mistaken in him—I have had no quarrel with him or any of his family—I did not notice the other prisoner.

ANN WRIGHT . I am the wife of William Wright, and live in Joseph-street. On a Friday in April I had some clothes hanging out on a line across the street, to dry—the witness Coleman came, and gave me some information, in consequence of which I ran with her in pursuit, and saw both the prisoners walking together—when they saw us coming Barrow ran away—I ran after him as far as I could, but could not overtake him—I observed the shift hanging down the left side of his jacket—Wilmore walked on—I accused him of being as bad as the other—he made use of a very awful expression to the little girl, and said he was not with him—when I returned I missed the shift from the line, and the pegs were lying on the ground, as if it bad been taken by force—I had the shift to wash, and was answerable for it.

Cross-examined. Q. May you not be mistaken about Barrow? A. No, I am sure he is the person—I never saw him before—it was six weeks before I saw him again in custody—I knew him then, and should have known him any where—he was crossing the rail-road, and did not see us till we got close up to him—I noticed him and his walk.

WILLIAM CLAY (police-constable K 278.) I apprehended Wilmore on the 25th of May—I told him I wanted him for a shift, taken out of Joseph-street—he said he knew nothing about it, he had not done it—I took him to the station-house, and charged him with being in company with Barrow, and stealing the shift—I had been after him and Barrow for more than three weeks, but could not find them—he asked me if any one was coming against him that knew him—I said, "Yes"—he wanted me to point them out, as we stood in the passage by the Magistrate's door, but I did not point out Coleman or her mother—he said he hoped I would not put forth a paper, which he called a former conviction—I found Barrow afterwards in custody at Lambeth-street for another robbery—I told him what I wanted him for—he denied tailing the shift, and said he had not seen it—I told him I had been after him better than three weeks, and could not find him—he said he had seen me about—I have frequently seen the prisoners together in company.

WILMORE*— GUILTY . Aged.

BARROW*— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM ROBERT WOOGATE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1853
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceTransportation

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1853. WILLIAM ROBERT WOOGATE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May, 1 watch, value 1l. 10s.; 1 watch-guard, value 5s.; and 1 penknife, value 6d.; the goods of John Francis Matthews, and another.

JOHN FRANCIS MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker and silversmith, in partnership with Benjamin Matthews, in Liquorpond-street. The prisoner was in our employ as salesman—I lost a watch—the prisoner's

brother gave me some information which induced me look for it—the prisoner left us last Monday, of his own accord—I had no suspicion of him at that time.

HENRY MARK WOODGATE . I am a tailor in Westminster-bridge-road. The prisoner is my son—I heard he was in possession of a watch—I searched the privy, but could not find it there—I and his brother questioned him very strongly that we had heard he had got a watch—he denied it very strongly—at last his younger brother said he had thrown it down the privy—we could not find it there—he showed us where it was, and we found it in a hat-box under the show-board—he told us he took it out of his master's window—he denied having the chain for a long time, but at last produced it—he has been a very bad boy.

WILLIAM MURRAY . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody last Wednesday morning—the watch was given to me at the station-house by the father and son together—I questioned the prisoner, and he said his master had beat him, and that was the reason he left—I said, "Was that for taking the watch?" he said, "No, it was before I took the watch"—I said, "Where did you take the watch from?"—he said, "From the window"—he also acknowledged taking a knife from the counter—I did not threaten him or make him any promise—I had heard he had the watch in his possession, and knew he was sleeping about from his father's house when he might have been at home.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14.—Recommended to mercy.

Transported for Seven Years—Isle of Wight.

NEW COURT.—Saturday, June 22nd, 1839.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

JOHN TURNBULL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1854
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1854. JOHN TURNBULL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June, 25 rules, value 7s., the goods of Henry Hobbs, Chambers, and others, his masters: also, on the 27th of May, for stealing 6 galleys, value 9l., the goods of Henry Hobbs, Chambers and others, his masters: to both of which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged.— Confined One Year.

WILLIAM STEPHENS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1855
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1855. WILLIAM STEPHENS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June, 1 watch; value 3l.; and 1 knife, value 1d., the goods of John Capt; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

GEORGE DAVIS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1856
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1856. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of William Bulkeley Glasse, esq., from his person.

RICHARD KINGDON . Between eleven and twelve o'clock on Tuesday morning, the 11th of June, I was in the Vice-chancellor's Court, Westminster, on business—I saw the prisoner come in and stand at the end of the barristers' bench—he appeared to grapple the gown of one of them, and after looking at him ten minutes, I saw him take from his pocket a pocket-handkerchief—he put it into his pocket, and passed to the door of the Court—I gave information to the gentleman—I pursued the prisoner and he gave up the handkerchief.

WILLIAM BULKELEY GLASSE, ESQ . I live in New Square, Lincoln's Inn—I was in the Vice-chancellor's Court—I received information, and found my handkerchief in the prisoner's hat—it is marked with my name—this is it.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am constable of the Vice chancellor's Court—I took the prisoner into custody.

(The prisoner pleaded poverty.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined Six Months.

ELLEN ALLEN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1857
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1857. ELLEN ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May, 1 pair of scales, value 10s., and 1 weight, value 1s., the goods of William Dedman.

JOHN HARDING . I am shopman to William Dedman, a grocer in Bryanstone-street—I missed a pair of scales and weight off the counter on the 28th of May—these are them—(looking at them.)

ANN STARR . I live at the prosecutor's. On the afternoon of the 28th of May, between four and five o'clock, I was sitting in the parlour adjoining the shop—the prisoner came in with some mats, to know if we wanted any—she was told there were none wanted—she went out and came again in about ten minutes, and I heard a noise—I saw her go out—I followed her, and took the scales from her, with the assistance of a young man.

EDWARD BIGGOTT (police-constable C 98.) I was sent for, and produce the scales.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman offered me some money for a mat; which I would not take—I turned back—a boy ran up told, and me to hold the scales—the woman came up, and gave me in charge.

GUILTY .* Aged 56.— Confined Three Months.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1858
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1858. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May, 2 chairs, value 30s., the goods of Christopher Cockerton.

THOMAS KEEN . I am officer of the the City of London Theatre—I live in Upper Copenhagen-street, White Conduit-fields—I have seen two chairs produced by Brannan—they are Christopher Cockerton's—he is the proprietor of the theatre—they were missed on Sunday, the 19th of May, from the workshop at the back of the theatre.

JOSEPH MOSS . I am a tailor, and live in Holywell-place. On the night of the 19th of May I was in Norton Falgate, and saw the prisoner come from the court alongside the theatre with these two chain on his head.

ELIZABETH RAISBECK . On Sunday evening, the 19th of May, at half past nine o'clock, the prisoner came to me with these two chairs—I delivered them up.

JAMES BRANNAN (police-sergeant G 20.) I received these chain from Raisbeck.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Month.

GEORGE REYNOLDS, RICHARD WATTS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1859
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1859. GEORGE REYNOLDS and RICHARD WATTS were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 iron grating, value 1s., the goods of John Foss and another; fixed to a certain building; against the Statute.

JOHN FOSS . I have a cow-house in the Adelphi, where there was an iron grating—I had not seen it perhaps for a month—on the 31st of May

the prisoners, who are strangers, were brought to my house with the grating—this is it—I went to the cow-house, and the grating was gone.

CHARLES CLEMENTS . On the 31st of May I was going down Durham-street, Adelphi, with a cart—the cow-house is in the arches—I met the prisoners—Reynolds had this iron, which I had seen at the cow-house the day before—I asked where he got the iron from—he said be picked it up—I took him to the prosecutor's house in Maiden-lane.

Reynolds. I showed you three boys—one of them offered me a penny to carry this iron. Witness. I saw no boys at all.

DAVID RICHARDS (police-constable F 134.) I took the prisoners and the iron.

REYNOLDS— GUILTY . Aged 14.

WATTS— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month.

JOHN ADAMS, CHARLES SMITH.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1860
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment; Imprisonment

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1860. JOHN ADAMS and CHARLES SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Alexander Horner, from his person.

WILLIAM ALEXANDER HORNER . I live in St. Paul's Church-yard, and am a warehouseman. About ten o'clock in the evening, on the 27th of May, I was opposite the New Church, in Pickett-street, Strand—I felt a jerk at my pocket—I put my hand to my pocket—a little boy came to me, and said something—my handkerchief was then gone—I had used it about a minute before—I went forward, and collared the prisoner Adams—I accused him of having my handkerchief—he denied it—I said, "Where is your friend?"—he said, "He is gone on before"—I made him walk a little quicker, and followed hit friend, but before I overtook him he had turned up a court—that was the prisoner Smith—the prisoners were taken, but my handkerchief was not found.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Who told you to call Smith Adam's friend? A. No one—I said so because I saw him in his company—I told the Magistrate that—there was a crowd in Pickett-street—the people were looking at something particular about the moon.

JAMES JENNINGS . I am fifteen years old—I live with my mother—I was standing in Pickett-street, waiting for my mother—I saw the prosecutor pass by, and the two prisoners close to him—I saw Adams tuck up his sleeves, and go to the prosecutor's coat pocket—the prosecutor then put his hand to his pocket, pulled out his handkerchief, and made use of it—he put it back, and Adams went to his pocket again, took the hankerchief out, and gave it to Smith, who went on, and turned up Ship-yard—I told the prosecutor.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you get your living? A. I used to work at the Thames Tunnel—I now sell play bills about the theatre—when the prosecutor went up to Adams, he said, "Come, my man, give me up my handkerchief and I will let you go"—Adams said, "I have not got it, sir, you may search me"—that was all I heard—I was not quite close to him—the handkerchief was a black one with yellow—I was not searched—I have been about three months engaged at the theatre—I cannot say How many people were in Pickett-street at the time—there might be about fifty.

GEORGE GATER . (police-constable F 23.) I took the prisoners, and found nothing on them.

(Smith received a good character.)

ADAMS— GUILTY . Aged 19.— Confined Six Months.

SMITH— GUILTY . Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Three Months.

Third Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

MATTHEW HANLEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1861
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1861. MATTHEW HANLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of Jane, 1 half-sovereign, 2 half-crowns, and 3 shillings, the monies of George William Perryman, from his person.

GEORGE WILLIAM PERRYMAN . I am in the service of Mr. Elger, a builder. I had been at work at Bury Hall, a mile from Maidenhead—I had 7s. a week—I left there on the 4th of June—I had 19s. 2d.—I paid a shilling for some rabbits, and 2d. for a pint of beer—I had in my right-hand jacket pocket one half-sovereign, two half-crowns, and three shillings—I got into a cart to come to London—I came as far as Colnbrook, where we met with the prisoner in the middle of the day—he asked me if I could give him a lift in the cart—I said I did not know, he had better go and ask my mate—he went—my mate said, "I have got a heavy load, but I will see what I can do"—he got a quartern of gin, and gave the carter a glass and me a glass—the prisoner then put his things on the cart and got in—I got in the cart, and the prisoner took me on his lap—we went on further and stopped at another public-house, where we had a pot of beer—he paid 2d. and the carter the other—we at last got on to Brentford, and there I missed my money from my jacket pocket—I said to Nicholson the carter, "Have you got my money?"—he said, "No"—I said, "One of you have"—I then said to the prisoner, "You have taken it"—he patted me on the shoulder and said, "No, my boy, no, my boy, I have not, I have got money of my own"—I met a policeman and gave the prisoner into custody—he found on him a half-sovereign, two half-crowns, and three shillings, which was exactly the money I had lost—I had it safe when the prisoner got into the cart—I was sitting in his lap asleep, and he had his arms round me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had he exactly about him what you lost? A. No, he had a sovereign and a half besides wrapped up, also a sixpence and some halfpence—there was a man and woman in the hind part of the cart—I was asleep part of the time—I did not say if they would give me 10s. I would not appear.

JAMES MYNOTT (police-constable T 96.) I was on duty near the bridge, and saw the prosecutor crying in the cart—he said the prisoner had robbed him of his money—I took the prisoner, and found on him a sixpence and 5 1/2 d. in copper—I took this pocket-book out of his pocket, and found in the corner a sovereign and a half wrapped up in a piece of paper, and a half-sovereign, two half-crowns, and three shillings loose—the boy had stated the amount of his loss before I found it.

WILLIAM NICHOLSON . I was the carter. I drove the cart.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you charged with stealing the money? A. No, the policeman searched me—the prisoner got into the cart at Colnbrook—he went on to Hounslow, there he got out and went into a public-house, and was there three quarters of an hour—the prosecutor was asleep in the cart.

JURY. Q. Did the boy sit in his lap? A. Yes, after he fell asleep.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.— Confined Six Months.

ELIZABETH GUY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1862
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1862. ELIZABETH GUY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May, 1 ring, value 1l. 10s., the goods of John Tunbridge.

MARY TUNBRIDGE . I am the wife of John Tunbridge, who lives in Salmon's-lane, Limehouse, and is a baker. The prisoner was in the habit of charing for me—she was there on the 6th of May, and on the following day I missed a ring from a drawer in the bed-room where she bad been cleaning—this is it—(looking at it.)

MARGARET ROONEY . I live at Shadwell. I went to a raffle and won this ring—I paid the prisoner 3d. for the raffle—on the 6th of May, in the evening, two or three more young girls told me of it.

Prisoner. You did not give the 3d. to me. Witness. Yes, I did.

CATHERINE LEONARD . I went to the raffle, and paid the money to the prisoner—Rooney gave me the ring, and I gave it to my mother to pawn.

MARGARET LEONARD . I pawned the ring at Mr. Williams's.

RICHARD COLLINS . I am shopman to Mr. Williams. I took in this ring of Margaret Leonard.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

MATILDA VOZINE VADE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1863
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1863. MATILDA VOZINE VADE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May, 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 watch-chain, value 8d.; 1 watch-key, value 6d.; and 1 seal, value 6d.; the goods of William Ashby.

WILLIAM ASHBY . I live in Richmond-street, Maida-hill. On the 6th of May I met with the prisoner in the Harrow-road, in the morning—I found she was very interesting in conversation respecting the East Indies—she said she was tutor, in a nobleman's family, and taught the young ladies music—she told me a variety of interesting things—she said she lodged in the City-road—we came on to my own door, and I asked her in to breakfast—I introduced her to my wife and sister—she was very familiar with my sister—I asked her to come and tea with me on the next Sunday—she came on the Thursday, the 9th—she stopped till four o'clock or half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, and then said, she, wished me to go out of the room, while she tied up her garter—I went out—I then showed her out of the house, and when I came back to the room, my watch was missing, which had hung over the mantel-piece—this is it—it had a chain, and seal, and key, attached to it.

EDWARD COLLINS . I know the prisoner by her visiting my sister—I was going to sea, and she promised me a great many things—I came home on Saturday, the 11th of May, and the prisoner was there—she had this chain and seal and key—she said she had promised them to my sister, but if I liked, and my sister would give them up, I might have them, and she gave them to me—I gave them to the police-officer.

ELIZA WILLIAMS . I am the wife of William Williams, of Grove-street. The prisoner came to my house on the 15th of May—she said she was going home to her sister's, and she drew from her bosom a purse, and gave me a duplicate of a watch at Mr. Smith's, a pawnbroker—I asked her who it belonged to—she said Edward Stretchfield gave it her, and she had no use for it—I gave it to the officer.

EDWARD COLLINS . I am in the service of Mr. Smith, a pawnbroker. This watch was pawned by the prisoner on the 9th of May.

JOSEPH FULLER (police-constable D 28.) I went after the prisoner and said I wished her to go with me to the station-house, concerning a watch—she said she knew nothing about it, and she had never seen the prosecutor before.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the prosecutor's house to see his wife's sister, who is a dress-maker—I went on the Thursday, as I could not go on the Sunday—his sister went out to her work, and I waited for her—the prosecutor then got up, took hold of me and wanted to take liberties with me—I said I would tell his wife—he said if I did not he would give me this watch, and he would buy another watch before his wife came home from the country; but his wife coming home, he reported I took it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.—Recommended to mercy— Confined Two Months.

BENJAMIN DOHERTY, GEORGE MORSE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1864
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation; Guilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1864. BENJAMIN DOHERTY and GEORGE MORSE were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 35 quarts of beer, value 12s. 6d., the goods of Thomas Goding.

GEORGE HAYWARD . I am store clerk to Mr. Thomas Goding of the Cannon Brewery, at Knightsbridge—he rents store-cellars for ale in Charlotte-street, Pimlico—Mr. King's yard adjoins to those premises—I went there with the officers on the 30th of May—we found two barrels, and part of another had been drawn out—Mr. Goding's ale had been drawn out of them—18 gallons, or 72 quarts—we have some particular candles there—the wicks have one red thread in them—we take them there, a few at a time, and put them in the box—I have examined some stout now produced, it is Mr. Goding's—it is the same as is in the casks in those cellars.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is Mr. Goding a great brewer of stout? A. Not a great deal of stout, about 400 barrels in a year—he brews beer as well—this is stout, it is stronger than beer—this is exactly the same quality as my master's—it is the best priced stout—there is beer, stout, and ale.

COURT. Q. Are they all beer? A. They are all beer if you like to call them so—they are all made of malt, and hops, and water—this is stronger beer.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Is not Mr. Goding's son in partnership with him? A. No—he had two sons in partnership with him, but not now—there is a plate on the door—it is "Thomas Goding and Sons"—but the bills and receipts are different.

HENRY BAREFOOT . I am an Inspector of the B division, of police. On the 1st of June I went to the cellars under Charlotte-street Chapel—I placed myself in one of the vaults—it is divided into six departments—I was in the middle one—I heard a rumbling noise in the adjoining vault at the end, and soon after I saw the prisoner Doherty with a lighted candle in his hand—he examined the place, and immediately after went to a barrel with this measure in his hand—I saw him take out a spile from the barrel, and fill the measure with the beer in that barrel—he then conveyed it to a hole in the wall where he got in at—I did not see him get in, but he could get in no other way—he gave the beer to Morse and another—he returned three several times more to the same barrel, filled the measure each time, and took it to the bole in the wall—on the fifth time, while he was in the act of knocking the spile in he moved his position, and saw me advancing, he fell down, and the light went out—I fell on the

top of him—I saw decidedly that the other person was Morse—I after that went to King's yard, and took Morse—I went into the stable, and found this funnel with the froth of malt liquor on it, and close by it I found this bung, and the cuttings of another bung—when I took Doherty I took this measure of beer from him—I put it into this jar now produced—the hole in the wall is 16 inches by 10—I could not get through it—there were three bars built in the wall, which had been sawn asunder top and bottom, and put in their places with a quantity of hop matting to support them—I found them so when I went at 4 o'clock in morning—both the prisoners are servants to Mr. King.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many carmen has Mr. King? A. I do not know—he is a large builder—the servants had access to his stable—Doherty had a candle—I took Morse at Mr. King's yard—he opened the gate to me in consequence of my violent ringing—the third person was in the yard, but he has escaped—I was locked in the vault.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Could not the door have been shut, without locking it? A. The bar would not have, been down—Taylor, another inspector, was outside, holding the key—Doherty was in the outside vault nearest to Mr. King's yard, the next to the one I was in, but when he commenced his operations I came and looked round the corner—I had an officer with me—I had been in the vault about two hours before he came—these sort of candles are not made for any other firm—here is one I got from the brewery.

COURT. Q. Did you go to No. 16, Little George-street? A. Yes—Doherty lives there—I found two candles there—they have a red wick, and the one from the brewery is the same—when Doherty went to the hole in the wall there was light sufficient for me to see Morse and Beck with outside—I am correct as to the persons who were outside—I tried to get through the hole to take the other two—they were within half a yard of the place—I am sure Morse is the man to whom Doherty gave the beer.

WILLIAM FLOYD (police-constable B 43.) I went with the inspector to the vault—I saw Doherty with a candle—he drew three of these measures of beer out of a barrel, and put them through the hole to Morse and another.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was that all you saw? A. I saw my superior take Doherty—I saw Morse and Beckwith outside—I have always said so—I do not know that I said so to the Magistrate—the vault is a long narrow place, about two yards and a half broad, and twelve yards long—the hole was about fifteen inches long, and twelve broad—I was standing behind my inspector, farther from the hole than he was in the first instance—I might be ten yards from it—there was a candle, which went out when Doherty fell down—the inspector kept hold of him while I tried to get through the hole, but I could only get my arm through—I was standing up when I put my arm through—I put my head part of the way through, as far as I could—I could not get my shoulders through.

(The prisoners received good characters.)

DOHERTY— GUILTY . Aged 28. Recommended to mercy.

MORSE— GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Three Months.

THOMAS WEDDELL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1864a
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1864. THOMAS WEDDELL was indicted for embezzlement.

CHARLES REEKS BURFORD . I am a house decorator, and live in Duke-street, Borough. The prisoner was my servant—it was his duty, if he received money for me, to pay it over to me the same day—he kept my

books—I did not allow him to run trust with me—what he received he ought to have given me immediately—I gave him an order and receipt to get some money from Mr. Passmore—if he received on the 11th of March 7l. 8s. 8d. from him, he has not paid it to me—he would not have had an opportunity of paying me till the next morning, about ten o'clock, when I came to town—I did not see him till he was in custody—on looking at my book, I found it was entered as having been received, in the prisoner's hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You found this entered the next morning? A. Yes—I had had him in my employ about six months—I had known him about twelve years—this money was for the benefit of a family to whom myself and two others are trustees, but I collected it, and employed the prisoner—he was my servant only—the trustees had nothing to do with paying him—I searched after him, but did not see him until he was apprehended—he sent me a letter—I know his writing—I went out on the 11th of March, and gave him a receipt when I left—this is his letter—I received this letter on the Saturday, and he was apprehended on the Monday.

(This letter was here read; in which the prisoner expressed his contrition for the offence, and that he hoped at some future period to be able to repay the amount.)

DANIEL PASSMORE . I live in Patriot-row, Cambridge-road. On the 13th of March I was at Mr. Burford's counting-house, and saw the prisoner—I paid him 8l. 5s.—here is the receipt for it—I counted it out of my pocket to my friend, who went with me—(read)—"March 11th, 1889.—Received 8l. 5s. C. R. BURFORD."

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined Six Months.

WILLIAM SAUNDERS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1865
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1865. WILLIAM SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June, 1 pencil-case, value 8s., the goods of John Armstrong and another, his masters.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am a bookseller, in partnership with Alexander Blake, in Wellington-street, Strand. The prisoner was my errand-boy—I have lost a pencil-case—I saw it safe a day or two before—this is it—here is the name of the maker on it—it belongs to the firm.

GEORGE SEARLE (police-constable F 143.) About eleven o'clock in the forenoon, on the 10th of June, I was in Bow-street on duty—I saw the prisoner with a pencil-case in his hand, looking at it—I asked where he got it—he said he bought it of a boy for 3d., and he should know the boy—I took him into custody—he told me where he was living—I took the pencil-case there, and they owned it—he afterwards said, first, that he picked it up in the shop, and after, that he opened the cases, took one out, and put it in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was dusting my master's desk down, and saw the pencil-case—I took it to look at, some one came in, and I forgot it—I was going along Bow-street, and put my hand into my pocket and found it—I was looking at it, and was taken.

GUILTY . Aged 15.— Confined Fourteen Days; Four Days Solitary.

GEORGE WARD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1866
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1866. GEORGE WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June, 1 pewter pot, value 1s. 3d., the goods of George Wadley.

MATTHEW HITCHCOCK . I live with Mr. Wadley, of the Pimlico Arms. I missed some of his pots—this is one—I am his potman.

STEPHEN TAYLOR (police-sergeant S 11.) Between four and five o'clock, on the evening of the 3rd of June, I was in York-square—I saw the prisoner go to the door of No. 4, take this pot off the railing, put it under his jacket, and walk away—I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it from York-square.

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Nine Months.

RICHARD CORNELL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1867
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > whipping

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1867. RICHARD CORNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June, 6 pence, and 12 halfpence, the monies of Thomas Hayward.

GRACE LASH HAYWARD . I am the daughter of Thomas Hayward of Bedford-place, Commercial-road—on the 7th of June, I was in the back parlour—I heard a noise in the shop—I came out—Beach had got hold of the prisoner, and charged him with robbing the till—I asked the prisoner if he had taken any thing—he said, "No," and I let him go—I then went in—I missed the money, and I sent Beach after him—there had been halfpence and silver in the till—he had left the silver, and taken as much as twelve halfpence and six pence.

THOMAS BEACH . I am servant to Mr. Hayward—I was coming towards my master's shop, and saw the prisoner leaning over the counter, with his hand in the till—there was a boy and girl waiting at the door—I asked the prisoner what he wanted—he said, his mother bad sent him to know the price of a quartern of flour—I asked if it was to make a pudding, he said, "No, to make cakes for tea"—his hand was in the till, and he had hold of the string of the silver bag—he came to the door, and passed some halfpence to the other boy, then went back to the till, and I went and took him.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 9.— Confined Ten Days; Four Days Solitary, and Whipped.

CHARLES WILDS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1868
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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1868. CHARLES WILDS was indicted for forging and uttering a request for the delivery of goods.

JAMES RUSSELL . I am a shovel maker, and live in Europa-place, Bath-street. On the 12th of June I was at my master's, Mr. Rome—the prisoner and another man came about eleven o'clock in the morning—the prisoner said he came from Waterloo Wharf—he gave me this order—(read)—"Please to let the bearer have four pointed shovels, four flat, two ladders, and one spudger"—Mr. Blackell is the proprietor of Waterloo Wharf—we had never done any thing for him—I had not got the things ready—I brought out seven shovels—he picked out four, and said he could wait an hour if I would give him something to drink—I did not give him the goods—I told him I could finish another ladder, and while I was gone he came and took away six pointed shovels, instead of the four which he had picked out—I did not intend to let him have the things—I intended to go with them myself—I should not have brought them out if he had not said he came from Waterloo Wharf, and produced the order.

THOMAS ROME . I came in and saw this paper—my man had been to the wharf and found the order had never been sent—he would not have thought of giving the goods up on such an order as this—he meant to go with the man to bring the money back—the prisoner and another went into the yard and took the six shovels away.

THOMAS BYRNE . I live at Waterloo Wharf. This is not the handwriting of any person at the wharf.

Prisoner. I was never near the place.

WILLIAM HORSPOOL . I am a butcher. I was at my shop and saw two persons come out of Mr. Rome's with some shovels and a ladder—Mrs. Rome sent me after them—I ran and said they had got six shovels instead of four—the prisoner said it was a mistake, they had got another gang on and he was to have six.

GUILTY of Uttering. Aged 42.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There were two other indictments against the prisoner.)

Sixth Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

THOMAS WARD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1869
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1869. THOMAS WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May, 17lbs. weight of cheese, value 12s. 9d., the goods of James Parsloe; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .* Aged 12.— Transported for Seven Years.

THOMAS MILLS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1870
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1870. THOMAS MILLS was indicted for embezzlement.

HENRY FREDERICK LEWIS . I am an attorney, and live in Essex-street. The prisoner was my clerk—he used to pay and receive money in the office from day to day—I used to give him a sum in the morning for the purposes of the office—on the 18th of May a fi fa was issued in a case in which I was engaged, and I requested the prisoner to get it and take it to the office of the Sheriff of the county—he has deducted 7s. for doing so from the money I gave him.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. How do you know he did not spend some of his own money? A. Because he handed me a balance—I do not know the sum I gave him in the morning—I did not expect he should give me the money back—I expected him to do the business—I gave him money every morning when the business required it, and he settled with me in the evening—I think I gave him 2l. that morning—it might have been 3l.—I told him to take out a warrant in the case of "Webb and Brown."

JOHN KNIGHT WOOSTER . I am a clerk in the Sheriff's Office. On the 18th of May there was no warrant issued in the case in question.

NOT GUILTY .

SIMEON MERCER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1871
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1871. SIMEON MERCER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th June, 2 sheets, value 3s., the goods of James Cummins.

CAROLINE BROWN . I take care of a house for Mr. James Cummins, at Westminster—the furniture is his—I let beds for the night—the prisoner came there on the 15th of June for a bed—I had not known him before—he was to pay 1s.—he went to bed, and got up the next morning at half-past eight or a quarter to nine o'clock—I missed the sheets after he was gone—these are them—they were put clean on the bed.

MARY COUSINS . I went up stairs and missed the sheets—I followed the prisoner and gave him in charge—I saw the sheets found on him.

JOHN BANKS (police-constable B 60.) I took the prisoner, and found one sheet in his breast, and the other wrapt round him lower down.

GUILTY . Aged 26.— Confined Three Months.

JAMES CASEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1872
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1872. JAMES CASEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Robert Brooke.

ROBERT BROOKE . I am captain's cook. I was on board the Malabar,

in the East India Docks—I saw the prisoner on board on the 13th of June—he had no right there—I was called away, and my little girl watched him—he went to the forecastle where I had left a silk handkerchief just before, and took it out of the ship—I went after him, and took the handkerchief off his neck on shore—this is it.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. Do you mean to swear that he was not employed as a rigger? A. He was not—I have been the ship-keeper for five years, and he never was employed—I do not know the Kingston steam-boat, nor the Thistle—the prisoner had come on board without my knowledge—I only saw one boy on board that vessel—the handkerchief was tied loosely round his neck—he was putting the ends of it down his bosom.

SUSANNAH CAROLINE BROOKE . I was on board the ship, to give my father his dinner—I saw the prisoner and another boy come on board—the prisoner went away with this handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you step on board from the shore? A. Yes, my father was gone below—the boys went to the galley, one of them went in, and one was at the door—the galley was open—I did not see what they were doing.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.— Confined Three Months.

THOMAS ANSELL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1873
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1873. THOMAS ANSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June, 1 hammer, value 1s. 4d., the goods of William Leonard, and 1 trowel, value 2s., the goods of William Russell.

WILLIAM LEONARD . I am a plasterer, and was at work in the Holloway-road on the 7th of June. The prisoner came there, and we gave him a job—it came on to rain about 11 o'clock, and we had to go away—the prisoner came again about 1 o'clock, and took these things—this hammer is mine.

WILLIAM RUSSELL . This trowel is mine.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a pawnbroker. These articles were pawned by the prisoner on the 7th of June.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Two Months.

SAMUEL M'CORMACK.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1874
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1874. SAMUEL M'CORMACK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the property of Edward Angelovich, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded

GUILTY .— Transported for Ten Years.

JAMES ANDREWS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1875
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1875. JAMES ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June, 5 shillings and 5 sixpences, the monies of Ann Bull, from her person.

ANN BULL . I am a widow. On Saturday night last, about 11 o'clock, I was opposite a butcher's shop in the Broadway, Westminster, seeing what I could purchase—I had my money in my right-hand pocket—I felt a hand leaving my pocket—I turned sharp round, and saw the prisoner making away from me as fast as he could—I felt in my pocket, and missed 7s. 6d., which had been loose in my pocket, in shillings and sixpences—I told my son, who was with me, to follow the prisoner—I followed as fast as I could, but a female caught hold of me and entangled me—the

prisoner was taken, and I followed to the station-house, where he was searched—I attended the next day at the office, the prisoner was in custody—he asked me How much I had lost—I said, seven shillings and six-pence—he said he would give me a sovereign if I would not get him into trouble—an officer, who saw us in conversation, called me, and made me tell him what it was.

GEORGE BULL . I was with my mother—the prisoner was standing on the right-hand side of her—I saw him pointing with his right hand to the meat, and with his left hand he was feeling at my mother's pocket—my mother turned round and missed her money—a woman then stopped my mother—I had seen that woman with the prisoner.

JOHN PURNELL . I am a plumber. I heard the cry of "Stop thief!" and saw the prisoner pass my door in a great hurry, followed by several people—he was forced to turn back, it being no thoroughfare—he fought his way back—I heard the renewed cry of "Stop thief!" and stopped him—he resisted very much, but I kept him till the policeman came and took him.

HENRY POLLINGTON (police-constable B 138.) I took the prisoner, and in his left-hand trowsers pocket I found five shillings and five six-pences.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from Camden Town, where I had met two or three friends, and drank more than did me good—I was charged with picking the pocket—I can just recollect that I ran across the road, and when I was taken they took 7s. 6d. out of my pocket—I awoke in the morning, and found a half-crown and one halfpenny in my pocket—the money was my own—I had just changed a half-sovereign—when we were at the office the prosecutrix said, "Give me back my money, and I will not proceed against you"—I said I would give her a sovereign not to get me into trouble.

GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

GEORGE WRIGHT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1876
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1876. GEORGE WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June, 1 jacket, value 10s.; 1 knife, value 6d.; and I tobacco-box, value 4d.; the goods of William Simons.

WILLIAM SIMONS . I was at work at the West India Docks on the 12th of June—I put my jacket in a shed at eight o'clock in the morning, and missed it a little before twelve o'clock—this is it—the knife and tobacco-box are in it—the prisoner did not work in the docks.

JOSEPH MONTAGUE . I am an officer of the Docks. I was at the south-west corner, and saw the prisoner run past—I pursued, and brought him back—the prosecutor owned the jacket, which the prisoner then had on—he did not work there.

Prisoner. I was going down the Docks, and it laid on the, ground—I took it up.

GUILTY .** Aged 25.— Transported for Seven Years.

MARY ANN PALMER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1877
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1877. MARY ANN PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June, 1 half-sovereign, 2 half-crowns, 5 shillings, 2 sixpences, and 2 pence, the monies of Thomas Upton, from his person.

THOMAS UPTON . I am a house painter. Last Monday morning, about three o'clock, I was somewhere about Marylebone-lane, but I do not know the street—I was coming home from seeing some friends, and was not the worse for liquor—I called in at a public-house to have a glass of

beer—the prisoner was there, and a drunken man, a painter, who knew me—he tried to introduce me to the prisoner, and pulled me about—I left as soon as I could—she followed me, and took hold of my arm—she walked on the same way with me—I know my money was then right in my pocket—at the moment she was leaving me I missed my money—I grasped her hand, and some money fell on the stones—I took out my money, and found it was deficient in bulk, and saw there was a half-sovereign gone, which I had had in my pocket—I accused her of having it—she denied it, and gave me a half-crown—I said that was not all—she then gave me a shilling—I called the policeman, and gave her in charge—she denied before the policeman that she had any gold about her, but at the station-house it was found on her—I had lost 1l. 11s. 2d.

THOMAS GASSON (police-constable E 123.) I took the prisoner—the prosecutor accused her of stealing some money—after we had gone a few steps, he said he had been robbed of a half-sovereign and some silver—the prisoner said nearly a dozen times that she had not got any gold about her, but she had got a quantity of silver, which had been given her during the night—when I got to the station-house I said she must be searched, and she said she would give me up all the money she had—she pulled from her bosom two half-crowns, a half-sovereign, five shillings, and one sixpence.

SOPHIA NOBLE . I searched the prisoner, and found 3s. 6d. more in her bosom.

Prisoner. He asked me to go out with him, and gave me the 3s. 6d.

THOMAS UPTON re-examined. I did not give her any.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Ten Years.

JOHN WILLIAM BARRS, JAMES BENSON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1878
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1878. JOHN WILLIAM BARRS and JAMES BENSON were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person.

THOMAS BLOSSETT . I am a constable of Covent Garden Market. On the 1st of June, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I saw the two prisoners together—I knew them and watched them—they followed a gentleman down the market, and Benson took a handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket—he gave it to Barrs—I followed and took them both, and Barrs dropped the handkerchief—this is it—I do not know the name of the gentleman, I lost him in the crowd.

Barrs. I was not with him—I never saw him before. Witness. Yes, you had been with him and were covering him.

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a salesman. The officer came to me and said "These two young fellows have done so and so, help me to take them"—I saw the handkerchief drop between their feet.

Barrs. I am innocent.

Benson. I never touched the gentleman's pocket.

BARRS*— GUILTY . Aged 21.

BENSON*.— GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Ten Years.

FREDERICK PELLETT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1879
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1879. FREDERICK PELLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May, 1 plane, value 2s., the goods of James Livock.

JAMES LIVOCK . I am a carpenter. I lost this plane out of my workshop in Neville's-court, Fetter-lane—I have seen the prisoner picking bones out of the dust in my yard—there was a pane of glass broken in my workshop window, and this plane laid six feet from it—it would require a hook to get it out.

GEORGE JOHN RESTIEAUX . I am a policeman. On the 24th of May, at a quarter before five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner with a bag on his shoulder in George-street, St. Giles's—I asked him what he had got in the bag—he said, "Nothing but rags and bones"—I found this plane in the bag—I found on him this fish-hook, which is used for drawing things out of a place.

GUILTY . Aged 14.— Confined Three Months.

ANN KELLEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1880
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1880. ANN KELLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of May, 1 gown, value 2l. 10s., and 1 brooch, value 6s., the goods of Ernest Augustus Harding.

SARAH AVERY . On the 11th of May, I was at the house of Mr. Harding, in Paul-street, Finsbury, with a lodger—I saw the prisoner about half-past four o'clock coming down stairs with a bundle under her arm—she went out and crossed the road—I spoke to the lady I was with, and she said no doubt she belonged to Mr. Harding—she went away down Castle-street, and took the bundle with her, tied in a blue handkerchief.

CHARLOTTE HARDING . I am the wife of Ernest Augustus Harding. I missed a gown and a brooch out of my bed-room on the 11th of May—I had seen them safe the night before—I have never seen them since—I did not see the prisoner there—she was a stranger to me.

NATHANIEL NICHOLLS . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner from the description I had of her.

Prisoners Defence. I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

ANN KELLEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1881
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1881. ANN KELLEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 2 shawls, value 3l., and 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Maynard; and 1 shawl, value 16s., and 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of John Booth.

MARY ANN STURMAN . I live at Mr. Maynard's, in the Curtain-road. On the 1st of June, I was going to the bed-room on the first floor, and found the prisoner, who was a stranger—she had a bundle with her—I asked her who she wanted—she said, Mr. Sims, a chair-maker—I told her to come down, and Mr. Maynard asked her what she had in her bundle—she said a dress—he found this property in it.

THOMAS MAYNARD . I was at home—when the prisoner was brought down she had this bundle containing this property, partly mine and partly Mr. Booth's—my wife had shawls like these and I believe these are hers, and this handkerchief.

HARRIET BOOTH . I am the wife of John Booth. I live in that house—these two articles are mine.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years.

OLD COURT.—Monday, June 24, 1839.

Fourth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

PHILIP WYMAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1882
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1882. PHILIP WYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June, 1 watch, value 1l. 12s., the goods of Charles Johnson.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am shopman to my uncle, Charles Johnson, a pawnbroker, in Providence-row, Finsbury-square. On the 5th of June, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came and asked to look

at a watch—I showed him one—he asked me to wind it up—I did so—he said, "I see it is out of repair," and asked if I knew any one who would put it in going order—I told him I could get it done—he said he was going into the country to-morrow and would look at another—I showed him another—that was too thick for him, and he asked to look at a third—he did not like that—he took up the first watch I had shown him, and was looking at it—he said he should not mind the expense of repairing, and perhaps he could get it done himself—he then went towards the door, as if for the purpose of looking at it, and ran off with it—I am quite sure he is the person—I have not the least doubt about it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you known him before? A. Never to my knowledge—he was there about a quarter of an hour—my uncle was in the shop, and one or two customers—he had a green scarf round his neck, a black coat, and cloth boots—it was between two and three o'clock in the afternoon—I saw him again on Saturday, the 8th.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a watch, which I took in pledge of the prisoner, on the 5th of June—this is the duplicate I gave him.

JAMES JOSLEM . I am a policeman. I took the prisoner into custody, and found the duplicate of the watch on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence (written.) "I met a man who told me he had a watch in a pawnbroker's window, which had been stolen from him—he asked me to go in, and see the interior of it, not liking to go himself, as he was not friends with the pawnbroker—he said he would satisfy me for my trouble, and told me to bring the watch to the door, which I did, and he ran off with it—I met him again promiscuously, in an hour and a half, and accused him, and said I would give him in charge—he said it was not the article he thought it was, and gave it me back—I was in two minds whether I should bring it back or not, but poverty caused me to do what I did—I took the watch and pledged it."

GUILTY . Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

Third Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

HENRY M'PHUN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1883
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceImprisonment

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1883. HENRY M'PHUN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 watch, value 5l.; 3 seals, value 1l. 10s.; 2 watch-keys, value 2s.; and 1 split-ring, value 5s.; the goods of James Pridmore Bryan, in the dwelling-house of Henry Bodman.

JAMES PRIDMORE BRYAN . I am a coal-merchant. I live in Basing-place, Waterloo-road—I have a wharf in the Savoy, Strand—on the 30th of May I took my watch to Mr. Tollit, in the Strand, and gave it to his young man, to be repaired—it had three seals, a ring, and two or three keys attached to it—I afterwards heard it was stolen.

WILLIAM LONG STANTIAL . I live with Mr. Tollit, in the Strand, Mr. Henry Bodman is the landlord of the house. Mr. Bryan brought this watch to me on Thursday evening, the 30th of May—I took it, wound it up, and put it into the top-drawer of a chest of drawers on the counter—I saw it there again the next morning, at nine o'clock, and I missed it about half-past two o'clock that day.

Cross-examined by MR. THOMPSON. Q. Did you tell your employer or his daughter, that you had received any watch from the prosecutor that

evening? A. I did not—I first spoke of it when I found it was gone, at half-past two o'clock, I think it was, but we have no clock or watch in the shop—Mr. Tollit does not allow me to keep watches going—I cannot tell How many persons were in the shop that day—Mr. Tollit came in about eleven o'clock—a young man was there then, and another young man came about two o'clock—I went out to. breakfast at half-past nine o'clock, and returned at twenty minutes to eleven.

ELIZABETH HESTER TOLLIT . I am daughter to Mr. Tollit. On the 31st of May, between ten and eleven o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked if any thing was wanted—I have known him for two years, coming to the shop for orders—he was close by the drawer where the watch was, but I did not know it was there—he was near enough to have taken it—he might have taken it without my seeing him, as my back was towards him, and I could not observe all his movements—there was a looking-glass on the counter, and he stood before it.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you not watching him? A. No—I looked up at times, when he spoke to me—it is a common counter—the drawer in which the repairs are placed is on the counter—the prisoner need not have leaned over the counter to take the watch—it was so narrow he could have opened the drawer, and put his hand in.

WILLIAM EDMUND RUMSEY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in High-street, Marylebone. On Friday, the 31st of May, the prisoner came to my shop, and pledged this watch—I asked him if it was hit own—he said, "Yes"—I asked How much he wanted on it—he said, "2l. 10s. "—I asked his name and address—he said, "John Cooper, 21, Arundel-street, Strand"—he had a blue bag with him—I am positive he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. How did you describe his dress? A. I said he had on a black frock-coat, a dark waistcoat, and blue bag—I saw him afterwards at Mr. Tollit's shop, and said he was the man—he said he was not—he seemed rather agitated—he said it was utterly impossible I could mean him, I must be mistaken—I asked him if he had been in the neighbourhood of High-street—he said, "No"—I said, "Not High-street, Marylebone?"—he said, "No"—I then asked him if he was not at Mr. Cave's, in High-street, Marylebone, and he said, "Yes"—I never said I did not believe the prisoner was the person—I said I had no doubt of it—he was taken back to my shop, after having been to the police-office—one of my men said he could not swear to him, but he did not serve him—he is not here.

SAMUEL CAVE . I am a jeweller, and live in High-street, Marylebone. On the 31st of May the prisoner called on me, as was his usual custom, for orders for Mr. Tuffnell, his master—I told him there was none—he had a blue bag with him.

WILLIAM HOOKER . I am a policeman. On the 5th of June I went to Mr. Tuffnell's, in Salisbury-square, in company with Mr. Tollit—Rumsey pointed out the prisoner to me, and said he was the person who had pledged the watch—I said he was to consider himself my prisoner—he turned round to Rumsey, and said, "Surely you are mistaken"—he said he was not—I found nothing on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY of Larceny only. Aged 21.— Confined One Year.

NEW COURT.—Monday, June 24th, 1839.

Sixth Jury before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

ANN SMITH, ELEANOR SULLIVAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1884
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Imprisonment

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1884. ANN SMITH and ELEANOR SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June, 9 yards of printed cotton, value 5s. 3d., and 5 yards of printed woollen cloth, value 9s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Norbury.

GEORGE SMITH . I am in the service of Joseph Norbury, in Crawford-street. On the 10th of June, the prisoners came to his shop about a quarter before one o'clock—I had seen them before—I saw them go to the end of the shop—Smith sat on the left hand, and Sullivan on the right—Smith told Mr. Norbury she wanted to change a dress they had bought a day or two before—Mr. Norbury got some mousseline de laine dresses for them to look at—they did not decide on any—he went to the window to get some more—while he was there Smith went to the other side of the shop, and took this printed cloth dress, and shewed it to Sullivan—I then looked for the dress, and all at once it disappeared—I then went round the end of the counter, and saw Smith lift the left hand side of her cloak up—I saw this printed cotton dress under her cloak—I went back to where I first was, and Mr. Norbury came with some more dresses to the prisoners—they decided on one, and changed the dress which they brought back for it—they then bought some calico and half a yard of silk—they paid for them and went out—I then went out and went up to Smith—I said I wanted to speak to her respecting a dress—she said, "What dress? I have not any dress"—I then asked where Sullivan was—she said she had gone round the corner—I took Smith with me to Sullivan, and told her I wanted her respecting a dress we had lost—I brought them both back to the shop, and asked Smith about the dress—she said she had not got it—Mrs. Norbury said, "I saw her drop this dress," pointing to this one, which is the one I had seen under Smith's cloak—I then spoke to Sullivan, and she said Smith had been drinking just before she entered the shop with a young man, and she begged Mr. Norbury to let Smith go—a policeman was sent for—Mr. Norbury said he did not suspect Sullivan but Smith, and the policeman took Smith—but previous to that they had changed their bonnets in the shop—Sullivan went with us to the station-house, and when we got nearly there Smith said, "Sullivan has got a dress also, and if I go she shall go"—I then mentioned it to the policeman, and when we got in the policeman searched Sullivan, and found this cloth dress, which is the one I saw Smith take off the counter—Sullivan said she had bought it at our shop, and had given 8s. 6d. for it, and brought it with her that Smith might have one like it—but when she was in the shop Sullivan had not shewn any dress at all—Mr. Norbury said he should like to have the premises searched at No. 2, George-street, Lisson-grove—this dress was found there in the back room first floor, and this shawl was in the front room, and in a work box on the table I found four or five duplicates—I can state that these were our goods, and had not been sold.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you not state before the Magistrates, "I saw Smith go to the counter, take a Saxony cloth dress from the counter, she then went back to Sullivan, shewed the dress to her, and then put it under her cloak?" A. Sullivan must have put it under her cloak because it was found there at the station-house—I did not intend to represent that Smith put it under her own cloak—I can swear that the

dress found on Sullivan was the one I had seen Smith take from the counter and show her—it was the only dress on the counter of this pattern—we had sold dresses of this pattern before, but not for 8s. 6d., which was the price Sullivan said she gave for it—Sullivan might have gone away.

RICHARD ROADNIGHT (police-constable T 120.) I was sent for and took Smith in charge for stealing this dress—the prisoners then exchanged bonnets—we came out, and in going along, Smith said Sullivan was as bad as she was—I said, "Do you live together?"—she said, "Yes," that Sullivan took her to the shop, and Sullivan had taken a dress—I then found this other dress on Sullivan—I went to the lodging which Sullivan gave me the direction to—the landlady took me up stairs, and there I found this shawl and this other dress, and four duplicates of three dresses, some shawls, and half-a-dozen white handkerchiefs.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Sullivan tell you which room to go to? A. No.

Smith's Defence. I went to the shop and bought a dress—I brought it home—Sullivan did not like it—I took it back to change, and Sullivan went with me, but seeing nothing I liked better, I bought six yards of calico—Sullivan then took a dress, and persuaded me to have another, which in my flurry I took and dropped it in the shop.

SMITH— GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported Seven Years.

SULLIVAN— GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Six Months.

First Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

WILLIAM TOWNSEND, GEORGE MONTAGUE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1885
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1885. WILLIAM TOWNSEND and GEORGE MONTAGUE were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May, 4 tons weight of stones, value 5l., the goods of John Mowlem, their master.

JOHN MOWLEM . I am a stone-merchant, at No. 8 wharf, Paddington—the prisoners were my carmen—these stones were put into the carts to be delivered at London-street, in the South-west district of St. Pancras, where a large quantity had been delivered before—I saw them taken from my wharf, and the prisoners drove the carts, but in place of delivering the stones where they ought, they delivered them at Somers-town—there were four or five tons of them—I saw the stones at Mr. Hayes, in Somerstown.

EDWARD HAYES . I am a master-pavior, and live in Drummond-street. On the 20th of May, I saw the two prisoners come out of the Marquis of Hastings public-house, and a man told me that they had been to my yard and taken two loads of new granite—I went there, and they had shot them—I asked them why they did it—they said it was all right—I said it was not right for me, and I wrote to Mr. Mowlem.

GEORGE WAUGH . I was at the yard when the stones were shot—the prisoners asked me if that was Mr. Hayes's yard—I said, "Yes"—they said they had got some stones—I asked if they had seen my master—they said yes, and be had said he would have those stones shot against the others.

TOWNSEND*— GUILTY . Aged 44.

MONTAGUE— GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months.

JAMES SPRINGETT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1886
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1886. JAMES SPRINGETT was indicted for embezzlement; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 21.— Confined Three Months.

EDWARD TOMBLIN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1887
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1887. EDWARD TOMBLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June, 1 table-cloth, value 8s.; 5 napkins, value 3s. 6d.; 2 wine glasses, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 pair of shoes, value 1s.; the goods of David Treherne, his master.

DAVID TREHERNE . I keep an hotel in Leicester-square—the prisoner was one of my waiters, but did not at this time live in my house—he was going away, on the 5th of June, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night—I wanted him to go up stairs to fetch something—he took off his hat and put it down while he went up—I looked in the hat and found a napkin and table-cloth—he came down, put on his hat, and went out ten yards—I called him back and gave him into charge—the officer found this napkin, and table-cloth, and these two glasses, one in each of his coat pockets—the officer then went to his lodgings in Bury-street, Bloomsbury, and found four napkins and a pair of shoes, which are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was he in the habit of sending napkins to wash? A. No, he never was allowed to do it.

WILLIAM HENRY MATTHEWS (police-constable C 92.) I took the prisoner, and found the articles.

MR. PHILLIPS called

SARAH ANN THOMPSON . I wash for the prisoner—I have taken napkins from the hotel to wash for him.

NOT GUILTY .

JAMES WHITE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1888
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1888. JAMES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June, 3 pairs of boots, value 1l.; 30 pairs of shoes, value 3l. 7s.; 11lbs. weight of leather, value 5s.; and 2 shillings; the goods and money of William Judd, his master.

WILLIAM JUDD . I am a shoemaker, and live in Tothill-street, Westminster. The prisoner was in my service—I missed some money, and on the 11th of June I marked 9 shillings, and then 6 shillings—I put them all in the till—the prisoner went to dinner at 1 o'clock—I examined the till, and one shilling was missing—I went to his lodgings in the course of the day, and found all the articles stated—they are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Have you looked at this leather? A. Yes, carefully—I cannot say when I saw any of these articles in my shop—some of them were manufactured within a fortnight of the time I found them—it was the prisoner's duty to sell goods to any one that came—this leather is of a particular kind—there are not six shops in the trade that have such—it is very expensive.

WILLIAM WARDLOW (police-constable B 87.) I took the prisoner—on his way to the station-house he threw down this piece of shoe-binding from his pocket—I found a pair of boots on his feet which the prosecutor claimed.

WILLIAM JUDD . I know these boots by my private mark on them—the prisoner wore them at my shop, but he had not paid for them.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your other shopman here? A. No—he had no authority to sell these to the prisoner.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined One Year.

CHRISTOPHER CLARK REYNOLDS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1889
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1889. CHRISTOPHER CLARK REYNOLDS was indicted for embezzlement.

WILLIAM JONES . I am a stable-keeper in York-terrace, Regent's-park,

The prisoner was my clerk, and was accustomed to receive monies on my account—if he received a sum of any amount, he was to account for it to me the same day, if not, he was to account once a week.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . I am a coachman—I deal with the prosecutor. On the 3rd of May, I paid the prisoner 16s., on the 10th, 8s.; and on the 17th, 16s.—these are his bills and receipts.

WILLIAM JONES re-examined. The prisoner never accounted to me for these sums, nor did I know he had received them till he told me so at the police-office—he was absent from my service for a few days.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was he in custody then? A. No, he came and gave himself up at the office on another charge, and there he said he would tell me of other things.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Six Months.

(There were four other charges against the prisoner.)

GEORGE BENNETT.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1890
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1890. GEORGE BENNETT was indicted for embezzlement.

SUSANNAH PURKIS . I am a widow. I carry on the business of a horse-hair manufacturer in Wilson-street, Finsbury—the prisoner was my porter, and used to receive monies for me, which he ought to have accounted for as soon as he came home.

JAMES PETER BLAGG . I am in the service of Mr. Davy, a trunk-maker, in the Strand. On the 9th of April, I paid the prisoner 13s.; on the 25th of April, 1l. 12s.; and on the 4th of May, 1l. 16s., on account of his mistress.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Have you a distinct recollection of paying these sums? A. Yes, I know I paid them by our day-book, and I made the memorandum in a small cash-book myself—I did not make the entry in the day-book, but I have a copy of it.

SUSANNAH PURKIS re-examined. The prisoner never accounted to me for either of these sums—I sent some articles to Mr. Davy by another porter on the 11th of June, and then I ascertained about these.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he left your service? A. No, but on the 11th of June he was not there, and I had him taken the next morning.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 20.— Confined Three Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

JOSEPH CARROLL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1891
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1891. JOSEPH CARROLL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June, 1 purse, value 1s.; 3 half-crowns, 13 shillings, 5 sixpences, 1 penny, and 7 half-pence, the goods and monies of Susan Williams, from her person.

SUSAN WILLIAMS . I am an unfortunate woman, and live in Red Lion-yard, Holborn. On the 7th of June I was at the Sun public house, at the corner of Broad-court, Long Acre, about half-past five o'clock in the morning—I had been out all night, and was a little the worse for liquor, but I knew perfectly well what I was about—I had one glass of rum and cold water at the bar—the prisoner came in while I was counting the change which the landlady gave me out of a sovereign—I put the change into a dark brown purse, and put it in the left side of my bosom—I sat down, and the prisoner forced some conversation to me—I told him I did not wish to have any conversation with him, but if he wanted a glass of any thing

I would give it him—I saw he was in liquor—I had seen him several times in two public-houses down Bow-street—the prisoner took my purse out of my bosom, and ran out of the house into Broad-court—the policeman was coming by, and took it out of his hand—he had taken it against my will—I stood with him, and was trying to take it out of his hand when the police-man came up.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Was he an acquaintance of yours? A. No, I had seen him, but had not spoken to him—I had not seen him in Long-acre that evening to my recollection—I was not so drunk that I could not tell whether I saw him—I went out about nine o'clock in the evening—I was not drunk then—I had been in one or two public-houses—when I saw the prisoner I was able to walk and to speak—it was before the purse was taken that I offered him something to drink—I believe he was the worse for liquor—I have been sentenced to be transported, and I had one year and ten months in the Penitentiary—that is seven years ago.

EDWARD RUSSELL (police-constable F 145.) I was on duty in Broad-court, and saw the prosecutrix crying—I went up and asked her what was the matter—she appeared to know what she was about, and accused the prisoner of robbing her of a purse, which I found in his hand—the prosecutrix claimed it—he said it was his, and resisted very much—I was compelled to call another officer to assist me—this is the purse—it contains the money stated in the indictment—I believe the prisoner knew what he was about.

SARAH GEORGE . I am the landlady of the Sun public-house. I gave the prosecutrix change for a sovereign, and took 2d. out of it—she appeared to know what she was about—the prisoner came in after I gave her the change.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see him do anything? A. I saw him take the purse from her bosom—she taxed him with it at the time—they appeared to be strangers—I thought when he took the purse that they were known to each other, but she began to struggle with him—I passed them and called the policeman.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 29.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutrix.— Confined Four Months.

JAMES DENNISON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1892
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1892. JAMES DENNISON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May, 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of William Burnie Harrington, from his person.

WILLIAM BURNIE HARRINGTON . I was walking with Rosina Murray, on the 26th of May, in New-street, Covent Garden—she pointed out the prisoner as having my handkerchief—I had felt a pull at my pocket, and my handkerchief was gone—I had it safe about a quarter of an hour before.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. What time was this? A. Half-past nine o'clock in the evening—it was twilight—Murray was walking on my right-hand inside—my handkerchief was in my left-hand pocket—I saw the prisoner pass me, and she pointed him out—I did not run after the prisoner—I walked on till I saw the policeman come round the corner, and told him of it—I was going from Covent Garden towards Leicester-square—the prisoner was going the same way—I did not see what became of the prisoner after I told the policeman—I had been to see a friend in Vinegar-yard—I had been in one public-house with Murray before I got to

New-street—I had had one glass of ginger-beer, but no spirits—I dare say I could have stopped the prisoner, but I was rather confused at the moment—I have not found my handkerchief.

ROSINA MURRAY . I was walking with the prosecutor—I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his pocket—he ran as fast as he could past us, and ran away—I had not seen the prisoner before—I am sure he is the person.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you hold of the prosecutor's arm? A. No, I was walking by his side—the side next the wall, going towards Leicester-square—I saw a number of persons about, I cannot say How many—I turned my head at that moment as I heard some one coming behind me—I saw the prisoner close behind our heels—he drew the handkerchief as he passed, out of the prosecutor's left hand pocket, next the road—he ran on—I walked with the prosecutor nearly to St. Martin's church to get a policeman—I did not notice which way the prisoner ran—I could not see what sort of a handkerchief it was—he took it out top quick—I had not been in a public-house—I met the prosecutor in King-street, Covent-garden—I do not know Vinegar-yard—if the prosecutor says we had been in a public-house he tells a falsehood—the Magistrate did not think that I had stolen the handkerchief—he did not suspect me—the prisoner was remanded three or four times—I gave my address in Prince's-court—I saw the prisoner's mother, but I do not know her—I did not see her in Prince's-court—if she called there it was when I was out—I did not see her and use certain language to her—she spoke to me at Bow-street—I did not make her an answer with my fingers.

WILLIAM CLARK (police-constable F 129). I saw the prisoner about half-past nine o'clock that night coming down—the street—he passed close by me—I turned and looked after him—the prosecutor then came up and spoke to me—I said I had seen a person—I went after him, but he was gone through the courts.

Cross-examined. Q. This was in New-street? A. Yes, at the bottom of New-street—I have heard where the pocket had been picked—the gentleman was coming towards me—the prisoner was out of my sight when the prosecutor spoke to me—I did not see the prisoner run away.

GUILTY .* Aged 21.— Transported for Ten Years.

Before Mr. Recorder.

MARY ADCOCK.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1893
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1893. MARY ADCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May, 1 shawl, value 4s., the goods of Joseph Donovan.

MARGARET DONOVAN . I am the wife of Joseph Donovan of Shacklewell-street, Bethnal green—I was in the New Prison last sessions for want of bail—the prisoner was there also—I had a shawl, which I kept on the bed I slept on—I recollect the prisoner leaving one Saturday morning, and after she was gone I missed my shawl—this is it.

Prisoner. She received a new shawl for it on the 10th, and she gave me in charge on the 31st. Witness. No, the governor let me have a shawl to come out, that I might see after it.

JOHN KERSHAW (police-constable G 123.) On the 31st of May I saw the prisoner come out of the House of Correction—I asked her whether she had got any thing in her basket—she said, "Yes, a shawl"—I asked the prosecutrix if it was her shawl—she said, "Yes," and gave her in charge for stealing it.

Prisoner. The officer asked me if I had a shawl—I said I had, it was not mine, but Peggy gave it me to take to Mrs. Butcher, for whom she washed—the officer was sent there by the Magistrate to knowabout it.

Witness. I went to Mrs. Butcher's, and found Peggy, who stated that she never gave her any authority to take it.

LYDIA KNOWLES . I am the wife of Thomas Knowles. I am employed in the New Prison—Mrs. Donovan was in there last Sessions for bail—she brought this shawl with her—the prisoner was there afterwards on a charge of felony.

Prisoner. I had not left the prison ten minutes when the prosecutrix said she had lost a shawl—Peggy asked me How I should get on—I said I had no doubt I should get discharged as I was only in for a shilling—and she asked me to take the shawl and leave it at Mrs. Butcher's—I took it, but I was fined 25s., I could not pay it, and was sent for a month—I went there and said I had a shawl which belonged to a person in the New Prison, and I was taken when I was coming out.

MARGARET DONOVAN re-examined. I have seen Peggy, but do not know much about her—she had nothing to do with my shawl—I had no knowledge of its being sent to Mrs. Butcher's.

Prisoner. You asked me the morning I came out for my direction—you wanted another prisoner to take out your boots in the same way.

Witness. No, I did not—I had but one pair, and I could not spare them—I did not ask for your direction.

Prisoner. The prosecutrix and Peggy live together.

JOHN KERSHAW re-examined. No, Peggy is in service at a baker's, in Bishopsgate-street—she was taken before the Magistrate, and contradicted the prisoner's story.

MARGARET DONOVAN re-examined. I got the place of wardswoman, and the prisoner used to go into the room, and sit down.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined One Month.

GEORGE AHLERS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1894
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1894. GEORGE AHLERS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 1 watch, value 3l., the goods of Francis John Barnard.

FRANCIS JOHN BARNARD . I live in Leman-street, Whitechapel, and am a watchmaker. On the 6th of June I saw the prisoner in my house, about half-past eleven o'clock—he said he was captain and owner of the ship Johanna, from Hamburgh to New York, and wanted to buy some watches—I showed him eight or nine—he was with me about two hours—he gave me an order for about 50l. or 60l. worth of watches and time-pieces—he did not select them—he left it entirely to me—he said he was not particular what the amount was—after he was gone I missed a watch—on the next day two young men came into my shop—I made inquiries of them, and I had reason to believe that the prisoner was neither a captain nor an owner of a ship—he afterwards came and dined with me—I had heard he was an impostor, but he gave himself such a good character that I did not suspect him—I afterwards found my watch in pawn.

Prisoner. I was captain of a ship, but I did not steal this watch—I had been twice after that in the prosecutor's house.

WILLIAM ANDERTON . I am a pawnbroker, in Cannon-street-road. I produce this watch—it was pawned by the prisoner, on the 7th of June, for 35s.

FRANCIS JOHN BARNARD re-examined. This is my watch—I know it by the case, the maker's name, and the gold figures—I do not know the

number—it is not one of my make—the sight of it is enough—it was the only watch of this kind I had—I laid it on the table while the prisoner was there, and when he had left it was gone—I had it by me six weeks—I think it is a watch not made to go—it does go, but I do not suppose it keeps time.

NATHANIEL JACKSON (police-constable H 114.) I took the prisoner—he said he knew nothing of the watch, but he would take the goods which he gave the prosecutor the order for, as soon as he got his money—I found the duplicate of this watch on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal it—I bought it of another man in the morning, and I bought three more of him in the afternoon—his name is Jacob Miers.

GUILTY . Aged 35.— Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM HENRY WALKER, ELIZABETH LANNING.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1895
VerdictsGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentencesTransportation

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1895. WILLIAM HENRY WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May, 1 shirt, value 4s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; and 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d.; the goods of George Dodd, from the person of Thomas Henry Fowle: and ELIZABETH LANNING , for feloniously receiving 1 handkerchief, value 9d., part of the same, knowing it to be stolen.

ANN AMELIA FOWLE . On Sunday, the 12th of May, I saw my mother give my little brother a parcel—it contained a fine linen shirt, two silk handkerchiefs, and a pair of stockings—she told him to take them to George Dodds, at the Olive Branch, in Gray's Inn-road—shortly after the little boy came back, complaining of something—the prisoners were in custody on another charge—I saw them both in the waiting-room, and Lanning had the silk handkerchief round her neck, which had been outside of the bundle that my brother had—it was taken from her neck, in my presence, by the officer.

THOMAS HENRY FOWLE . I am six years old—I go to school sometimes, and can say the Lord's Prayer. I was carrying the bundle, which contained a fine linen shirt, a pair of stockings, and two handkerchiefs—the prisoner took it from me in Judd-street—there was no one with him.

Walker. Q. What did I say to you? A. You said you would give me a penny if I would go over to the public-house—I know it was you by the mark on your face.

GEORGE DODD . I am waiter at the Olive Branch public-house. I sent this handkerchief to Mrs. Fowler, to be washed with other things—it ought to have come home on the 12th of May.

Walker. Q. Can you swear to that handkerchief? A. Yes, by the holes in the corners of it and in the middle—there may be others of the same pattern—I have had it nearly two years.

ANN AMELIA FOWLE re-examined. I can swear this is the handkerchief—I washed and ironed it that week.

Walker. Q. Did the boy give you a description of me when he came home? A. Yes, by the mark on your face—he said you snatched the things from him.

Walker's Defence. I am innocent—if I had stolen it, I should not have kept it about my person—I had it round my neck, and I put another round my neck—the officer said, "You don't want two handkerchiefs"—I took it off and gave it to this woman—I had it two years and a half.

WALKER*— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Ten years.

LANNING— NOT GUILTY .

(There was another indictment against the prisoner Walker.)

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

BENJAMIN SPUNDLEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1896
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1896. BENJAMIN SPUNDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June, 4 saws, value 19s. 6d.; and 1 tobacco box, value 6d.; the goods of William Anderson.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I was working as a carpenter at a house at the corner of Belgrave-street—I had 4 saws and a tobacco-box there on the 16th of June—I missed them about twenty minutes past six o'clock in the evening—these are mine.

JOHN BANNISTER . I live in Seager-place, Bagnigge-wells—I was at work at the building at Belgrave-street on the Saturday evening, and locked up the tools in the cupboard at half-past seven o'clock—these are them.

THOMAS VEAR (police-constable E 54.) I was on duty in Belgrave-street, between five and six o'clock that Sunday evening—I heard a noise in the house at the corner—I watched, and saw the prisoner there—he jumped down—I took him, and found this tobacco-box in his pocket, and these four saws were taken out into the washhouse, and hidden behind some stones.

GUILTY of stealing the tobacco-box.— Confined Three Months.

(There was another indictment against the prisoner.)

JOHN BARRY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1897
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1897. JOHN BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 1 handkerchief, value 6d., the goods of William Mossom, from his person.

WILLIAM MOSSOM . I was in High-street, St. Giles's—about twelve o'clock, on the 1st of June, I received information and missed my handkerchief, which I had safe about five minutes before—this is it.

STEPHEN THORNTON (police-constable E 53.) I was on duty and saw the prisoner and two others attempt several gentlemen's pockets—I then saw a taller boy than the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket—he then spoke to the prisoner, who changed sides with him, and the prisoner took this handkerchief from the prosecutor—I took him—the taller one kicked me, but I kept the prisoner.

Prisoner. I met two persons, who took me into a cook's shop and gave me some pudding—we then went out, and one of them told me to hold this handkerchief while he tied his shoe.

GUILTY .* Aged 16.— Transported Ten Years.—Convict Ship.

ROBERT HALEY, GEORGE BEESON, HENRY DOWNES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1898
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > whipping; Imprisonment; Corporal > whipping; Imprisonment; Corporal > whipping

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1898. ROBERT HALEY , GEORGE BEESON , and HENRY DOWNES , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 5 pairs of trowsers, value 1l. 12s. 6d., the goods of Richard Swan.

WILLIAM STORY BARBER . I am shopman to Mr. Richard Swan, a pawnbroker, in Seymour-place. On the 6th of June, between five and six o'clock, I received information, and went up Wellington-street, to Grove-street—I saw Haley and Beeson running together—I came up to them, and Haley said, "There he goes"—I then saw Downes running with some trowsers—he was stopped by a policeman, and then he dropped these trowsers, which are my master's—here are five pairs—they were just outside the door, tied to a chair.

ROBERT NAYLER . I live opposite the shop—I was standing outside playing, and I saw the three prisoners sitting on Mr. Swan's steps—Haley got up, looked round the corner, and said, "All right"—Beeson then got up, cut the string of the trowsers, and threw them on the ground round the corner—Haley picked them up and handed them over to Downes—

Beeson came to me and said, "Don't go and tell, we have been starving all the week, and my father was transported last week."

EDWARD CLARK . I am a policeman—I stopped the prisoner Downes with these five pairs of trowsers.

HALEY*— GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months, and Whipped.

BEESON— GUILTY . Aged 17— Confined One Month, and Whipped.

DOWNES*— GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months, and Whipped.

MARIA STOOP.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1899
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1899. MARIA STOOP was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April, 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 2s.; and 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; the goods of Ann Jordan.

ANN JORDAN . I am servant to Mr. Davies of Stangate. I met the prisoner on the 3rd of April—we went to the Hampshire Hog, in Charles-street—she complained of being hungry and thirsty—I took her in to give her something—I unpinned my shawl, and it slipped off my shoulders behind me, and these shoes were down between the prisoner and me—I saw her going out, but I did not think it was my shawl she had on, but when she was gone, I missed them—I met her again on Saturday fortnight, and gave charge of her—I have not found my things.

JOHN WALLACE . I am a private in the 1st Regiment of Dragoons. I was in the Hampshire Hog on the 3rd of April—I saw the prosecutrix and the prisoner there—they sat down, and we had a glass of grog together, and a biscuit and cheese—we stopped an hour, or an hour and a half, and the prosecutrix slipped her shawl off—I saw the prisoner take the shoes in a little handkerchief, and then the shawl, but I thought they were friends.

Prisoner. They are mistaken in the person. Witness. I am not—her husband is a soldier, in the 1st Regiment of Foot, and she spoke to me about a person.

CHARLES DURRAND . I was in company with Wallace—I saw the prosecutrix unpin her shawl, and there was a pair of shoes in a handkerchief—I saw the prisoner take them—I am sure she is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. I was washing on the 2nd and 3rd of April—I never saw the prosecutrix before, till she met me and gave me in charge—I do not know the public-house, nor either of the men.

GUILTY . Aged 28.— Confined Three Months.

HENRY MARTIN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1900
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1900. HENRY MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of May, 1 tea-caddy, value 8s., the goods of Joseph Walker.

JOSEPH WALKER . I keep an upholsterer's shop in Holborn. I had a tea-caddy from Lieutenant Smith to repair—I had it safe on the 22nd of May, and missed it when it was brought back to me in about an hour.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Is this it? A. Yes.

THOMAS LONG . I was in Holborn on the 22nd of May—I saw the prisoner running along with a tea-caddy—just as he came opposite to me he flung it down—I kept it till the officer brought the prisoner back—I have heard he was in great distress—he has a wife and one or two children—the Magistrate ordered him something to eat.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you quite certain he is the man? A. Yes, he flung it down close by me, and then he ran out of my sight.

NER BROWNING (police-constable E 59.) I saw the prisoner running

with this caddy—he threw it down—I ran and took him—I did not lose sight of him till I caught him—I then took the caddy and him to the station-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you take him? A. He went up Dean-street, and then into Eagle-street—I did not lose sight of him—he appeared to be in very bad health—he told me he was under medical advice.

(The prisoner received an excellent character.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.—Recommended to mercy.— Confined Eight days.

ELLEN DACEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1901
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1901. ELLEN DACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June, 3 milk-cans, value 10s., and 10 quarts of milk, value 4s. 2d., the goods of Charles Wilkinson.

JOSEPH JEFFERSON . I am servant to Mr. Fox. Last Wednesday afternoon I saw Catherine Brown put down two milk-cans, and leave them—I saw the prisoner go to them with some cans in her hand, and she poured some milk from Brown's cans into her own, and then she went down Belgrave-place—I did not see her take any cans—I saw her take the milk.

CATHERINE BROWN . I am servant to Mr. Charles Wilkinson, of Chapel-street, a milkman. I left my cans at the corner of Eaton-place, on the 19th of June—I left them four or five minutes—I missed ten quarts of milk, and three cans, which had been hooked to the large cans—I saw the prisoner with the cans, and she dropped them out of her hand—she had about three pints then.

Prisoner. This woman has been two years living with my husband, it is all through spite. Witness. I am married, and living with my husband—I never knew the prisoner's husband.

SAMUEL BALL . I am an officer. The prisoner was given in my charge—she denied that she had taken the witness's milk and cans, but said she would make her a recompence—the prisoner had three other cans with her—I know Brown's husband, he is a marble polisher, a respectable man.

GUILTY .* Aged 30.— Transported for Seven Years.

GEORGE VALENTINE, PATRICK LEE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1902
VerdictsGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentencesImprisonment; Transportation

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1902. GEORGE VALENTINE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May, 2 1/2 tons weight of stones, value 2l. 10s., the goods of the trustees of the Middlesex and Essex Turnpike roads: and PATRICK LEE , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. DOWLING conducted the Prosecution.

DANIEL DANCE . I am foreman to Mr. Farey, the surveyor to the trustees of the Essex and Middlesex turnpike roads—they have stones in their yard, near Stratford Dock—on the 17th of May I observed something about the lock of the gate which induced me to sit up that night—about half-past three o'clock I saw Valentine watering his horses, and about five minutes past five o'clock I saw him drive his horses and cart and a load of stones out of the yard—he came over Bow-bridge, and turned down the by-way towards Old Ford and Bethnal-green—I got the assistance of the policeman, and we watched the cart till it came to Bethnal-green-road, near the Salmon and Ball, when Valentine left his horses, and was away about ten minutes—he then came back again, and put the bag on his horses, and stood by his horses for an hour and a half—he then shot the stones down by the side of the road, where there

was some paving going on—nothing had been said to him about the stones in my presence—I then saw the prisoner Lee, he was about fifteen yards from the stones—I went up, and asked him who owned those stones just shot from that cart—he said he did, they were his—I then gave him into custody—I went with Lee, and another officer went with Valentine—I asked Lee whether he was not in the dock at Stratford, on Friday night (the night before)—he said he did not know where it was—he at first said the stones were his, and then he said he knew nothing about them—before he left the place he pointed to the stones, and said to the man, "Go on with your work with these stones."

COURT. Q. How long was it between the time of Lee coming up and the stones being shot? A. Not two minutes.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where were you standing when you saw the cart go out of the yard? A. About one hundred yards from the yard gate in the road—I could not see what was done inside the yard—I saw no one but Valentine—I do not expect he saw me—I have no authority to sell stones—I never sold any—I do not know of any bricklayers being about the place—I know the Fountain public-house and the Plough—I have been in them—the house I rent has no back garden, only a small bit in front, not worth calling a garden—one man might have loaded the stones into that cart in a quarter of an hour if he liked—I went into the yard and round it about two o'clock, and all was right—I then went where I thought I could see them.

Cross-examined by MR. JERNINGHAM. Q. Where did you first see Lee? A. About fifteen yards from where the stones were shot—there was some paving going on—I did not notice any other stones—I looked at the stones that were shot—when I went up to Lee I asked him who owned the stones that were shot from that cart.

JOHN BARKER (police-constable K 288.) I was called by Dance to go in pursuit of this cart—it turned towards Old Ford—I took a short road, and ran on to Clay-hall—I listened and heard the noise of a cart—I saw the cart loaded with stones, and three grey horses in it, and Valentine was driving it—I followed on for half a mile or more—Valentine said, "Good morning"—I passed on a-head of the cart, and fell in with Brown—I told him I should want his assistance—I went on with him to where the stones were shot, nearly opposite the Salmon and Bull—when the stones were shot I asked Valentine who authorized him to pitch those stones—he pointed to Lee, and said, "That man, my master"—I saw Lee, and in consequence of the pointing I went add asked him if those stones were his—he said, "Yes"—I said, "Did you authorise that man to shoot them?"—he said, "Yes"—Dance then said, "I shall give him into custody"—Lee came on to where the stones were, and said to one of his men, "Go on with your work with these stones"—there were no other stones there but two or three which were lying loose—I then took Lee, and as we were going he said, "I know nothing of the stones, if they were pitched it was unknown to me."

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where did you first see the cart? A. About a quarter of a mile from the dock—I am sure Valentine pointed to Lee.

JAMES BROWN (police-constable K 48.) I was called by Barker about five o'clock, and followed the cart—what he has stated is correct.

JOHN PARROTT . I am a labourer in the service of Mr. Farey—I was employed in breaking stones—on Friday night, the 17th of May, I saw Lee come and look round the yard between six and seven o'clock in the evening—he then went to the stable door, and Valentine and another horse-keeper

came out to him—they went and had something to drink—they then went to the yard again, and Lee went to the bridge.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. How near were you to them? A. I was near, but I could not hear what they said.

Cross-examined by MR. JERNINGHAM. Q. Had you seen Lee before? A. Never, to my knowledge—I noticed him because we had lost stones, and we had a sharp look-out.

JOHN CLAY examined by MR. JERNINGHAM. I am assistant-surveyor of the highway in Bethnal-green—I have known Lee since he had our contract—when he had the contract we did not think we should want any fresh stones, but on the 14th he said there was a load of stones dropped there by mistake, would we have them, we should have them at the same price that we had had some—I could have no objection—on the Thursday he came to me again, and said he had bought some, and received 3l. of me—he went on with the work to our satisfaction—I looked at the place, there were nothing like stones enough to finish the job without these—we were obliged to have others after these were, taken away.

MR. PAYNE. Q. Do you know Valentine? A. No—I believe he was carting ballast, but I never saw him with stones.

SAMUEL FAREY . I am surveyor to the trustees of the Essex and Middlesex turnpike roads—I gave no authority to any one to take away these stones from this dock—they were worth from 2l. 10s. to 3l.

DANIEL DANCE re-examined. Valentine did lodge over Bow bridge—the horses and cart belonged to Mr. Nicholls, who contracts for the work on the road—he had carted stones to there and from there before—the carmen usually come at six o'clock in the morning.

(Edward Hayes, Peter Aimer, of Church-street, Mile-end; John Ryan, of Lamb's-buildings, gave Lee a good character.)

VALENTINE— GUILTY . Aged 23.— Confined One Year.

LEE— GUILTY . Aged 37.— Transported for Seven Years.

WILLIAM DIDDLE.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1903
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1903. WILLIAM DIDDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June, 1 brush, value 1s., the goods of William Lenny; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

MARY LENNY . I am the wife of William Lenny—he lives in Greek-street. On the 6th of June I went into the wash-house, and missed a brush, which I had seen safe at nine o'clock the night before—some one had taken down a board of the wash-house, and taken out a brush and a copper saucepan—this is my brush.

WILLAM MILLERMAN (police-constable B 95.) On the 6th of June I stopped the prisoner about half-past six o'clock in the morning in Strutton-ground—he had a bag with this brush in it—I took it from him, and asked him where he got it—he said he found it in Milbank—there was another lad with the prisoner who got away.

Prisoner. The lady cannot swear I stole it—I found it in a little ditch at the back of some houses—he searched the other boy, and found nothing on him. Witness. I did not search the other one—when I took the prisoner, the other ran away—I did not tell the Inspector that the other boy had only a lot of old rags and bones.

WILLIAM PEARCE (police-constable B 131.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Transported for Seven Years—Penitentiary.

JOHN SMITH.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1904
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1904. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June, 1 looking-glass and stand, value 2l., the goods of Thomas Field.

MARTHA MARTIN . I am the wife of Dennis Martin, a pork-butcher; he is in the employ of Thomas Field, my father, in Tottenham-court-road. On the 10th of June, about four o'clock, I was going into the parlour, I happened to turn my head, and saw a young man look very hard in—I saw the prisoner take the looking-glass from a chiffioniere in the shop—I went after him and caught him in the public-house with the glass—I caught him round the waist—he said, "What do you want?"—I said, "You vagabond, you have stolen that glass"—he put it down, and struck me a tremendous blow in the face.

Prisoner. Q. What attracted your attention to the glass? A. I was there to mind the shop—I was not minding the glass in particular—there was a person very much like you standing, watching—I saw his mouth go, but I did not hear what he said—I saw you take the glass—I am certain you are the person.

GEORGE ROWLEYSON . I live in Duke-street, Bloomsbury. I was passing, and saw the prisoner come from the shop with the glass in his hand—he passed by me into the public-house—the witness came and seized him—he put it down, and struck her in the face—he ran across the road—I pursued—he was taken at the corner of Store-street.

Prisoner. Q. Did you lose sight of me? A. No, you turned some streets, but I kept sight of you—I was not six yards from you when you first started.

Prisoner's Defence. I passed near the shop about four o'clock, and was about to enter the public-house, when I was seized and pulled back by this young woman—I pushed her from me, fearing it might cause a quarrel—I then walked on, and was followed by some man, and I ran from him—the woman trumped up this charge against me—I solemnly declare my innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined Six Months.

ELIZABETH ELLERY, JOHANNAH SULLIVAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1905
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1905. ELIZABETH ELLERY and JOHANNAH SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June, 1 sovereign, and 1 half-crown, the monies of Francis Hickey, from his person.

FRANCIS HICKEY . I am a compositor, and live in Furnival's-inn-court, Holborn. On the 14th of June, I and a witness met the prisoners in a house in Drury-lane—we went home with them—I had a sovereign, two half-crowns, and one shilling—there was a sort of closet in the room, to which I went with Ellery—Sullivan was sitting outside in the room with Jones—I had before that sent Sullivan for some ale and wine—I had taken a glass of ale—I do not recollect taking any wine—I was sober—I staid in the closet with Ellery about ten minutes, and then Jones sent Sullivan a second time for wine, and he went with her—during their absence I discovered I had been robbed of a sovereign and a half-crown—I went to the door to wait for Jones and Sullivan to return—when they returned I did not say any thing to them, but waited till the policeman went by, and I gave Ellery in charge—she denied it—I said, "If you give it up there shall be nothing said about it"—she cried, and said she had taken the money and given it to Sullivan—the sovereign was picked off the ground by the policeman, where it appears Sullivan threw it, and the half-crown Ellery gave up in the station-house, with a shilling and some copper.

WILLIAM JONES . I was at the house with Sullivan—I went out with her for wine—Hickey accused Ellery of robbing him—the policeman was called, and a sovereign was found partly under the bed—Ellery gave up a half-crown, a shilling, and some coppers.

CHARLES HENRY BAGNALL . I am a policeman. I was called in, and Hickey gave Ellery in charge for robbing him of a sovereign—he said nothing about the half-crown there—Ellery said, "All the money you gave me I gave to Sullivan"—Sullivan then said, "Perhaps it is on the bed, I will go and look"—I went in and got the quilt and sheet off the bed—I then heard a chink—I looked and found a sovereign, which I believe came from Sullivan's hand—I saw her hand move—at the station-house Ellery gave up a half-crown, a shilling, and some half-pence.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, June 25, 1839.

Second Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

JOHN FURLONGER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1906
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1906. JOHN FURLONGER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June, 3 tame fowls, value 5s., the property of John Duncan.

JOHN DUNCAN . I am a clothes salesman, and live in Monmouth-street I had three tame fowls on the 31st of May, which I saw safe in my back kitchen, about eleven o'clock at night—I missed them at half-past five o'clock next morning, and found them at a bird shop, kept by Carr, in the next street, in a cupboard at the top of the house, between two rooms—I have had them twelve months, and know them to be mine—I do not know the prisoner—he is a stranger to me—the back kitchen was left open that night—the back of Carr's premises is about five houses off mine.

THOMAS BEASMORE . I live with my father in James-street, New Cut. Between five and six o'clock in the morning, I was coming down St. Andrew-street, and heard a noise in the passage of No. 29—I looked into the passage and saw the prisoner—I had seen him about before—he had three fowls in his hand by the legs—they were alive, and one was hallooing—I waited at the door till he came down, and asked what he was doing—he said they had got away from him, and he went over the wall after them—he spoke of them as his own fowls—he asked me to lend him 2d. till he sold them—I would not—I saw the fowls afterwards at the office, and they appeared to be the same.

Prisoner. I am not guilty of stealing them—the two witnesses have been in custody twice before for stealing fowls. Witness. I never was in prison in my life, nor ever before a Magistrate.

THOMAS OWENS . I live in White Lion-street. I met the prisoner about seven o'clock in the morning—he told me he had three fowls—it is false what Beasmore says, for he slept with me that night, and did not get up with me till after six o'clock, and could not see him—I am now charged with stealing fowls, but I have never been in prison.

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined One Month.

JAMES WARD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1907
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1907. JAMES WARD was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June, 1 tin box, value 5s.; &1/2lb. weight of paint, value 15s.; 1 bag, value 1s. 6d.; and 1 pocket-book, value 2s. 6d.; the goods of Edward Smith.

EDWARD SMITH . I am a traveller. On the 17th of June I was at the Feathers public-house, in Oxford-street, between two and three o'clock—I

had a box containing the property stated—I put it on a ledge in the window, above my head—the prisoner was there, with his brother and another—I was reading the newspaper, and then looked for my box—all the parties were gone, and my box too—I went to the Argyle Arms, Argyle-street, in consequence of information, and found the same three persons sitting in a box together—I saw a sack in the tap-room, and my box was found in it—they had denied the sack being theirs.

JOHN WARD . I am the prisoner's brother. I was in the public-house with him—while there I went out, down to a timber yard—I afterwards went to the Argyle Arms, with my brother and another—the sack belongs to Crick, a baker—it was lent to my brother to get some saw-dust—he carried it into the Argyle Arms.

Prisoner. He carried it in himself.

EDWARD CURTIS . I am a policeman. I was sent for, and found the box in the sack, and a pocket-book also.

JOHN COLLYER . I was at the first public-house—Ward carried the sack into the Argyle Arms—I did not know what was in it.

Prisoner's Defence. Both sacks were together when I took them up—I did not know what was in it—they were there an hour before the man came in to own it.

GUILTY . Aged 36.— Confined Three Months.

ANN EVANS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1908
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1908. ANN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June, 6 spoons, value 3s. 6d.; 1 penknife, value 6d.; &1/2lb. weight of tea, value 1s.; and 1 napkin, value 6d.; the goods of Edmund Deacon, her master.

EDMUND DEACON . I keep a coffee-shop, in Upper North-place, Gray's Inn-road. The prisoner came into my service last Friday, as maid of all work—about half-past two o'clock on Sunday afternoon she was tipsy—I went down stairs to watch her—I observed her sweeping up something on the floor, and saw some tea down on the floor—I charged her with stealing it—she said she had not got any, and drew out the spoons, knife, and other articles—I sent for an officer, and the tea was found in a napkin pinned on to her shift, between her thighs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in liquor at the time—it is my first offence.

GUILTY . Aged 31.— Confined Three Months.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

RICHARD PIERCY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1909
VerdictNot Guilty > no evidence

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1909. RICHARD PIERCY was indicted for feloniously forging an acceptance to a bill of exchange for 250l., with intent to defraud Robert Richmond.

(MR. BODKIN, on the part of the prosecution, offered no evidence, in consequence of a defect in the instrument charged to be forged, and the prisoner was ACQUITTED .)

JOHN BEAUMONT, GEORGE HYMNS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1910
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1910. JOHN BEAUMONT and GEORGE HYMNS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Christopher Fox, on the 18th of June, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 9d.; 1 handkerchief value 3d.; 4 half-crowns, 1 shilling, and 1 groat; his goods and monies; and immediately before and at the time of the said robbery feloniously beating and striking him.

CHRISTOPHER FOX . I am a carpenter, and live in Lower Northampton-street, Clerkenwell. On the morning of the 18th of June, about a quarter

to one o'clock, I overtook the prisoners in Barbican—I passed them, and Beaumont said, "Goodnight"—after walking a little way, seeing they looked like hard-working men, I asked them if they would take a glass of any thing to drink—we went into a public-house, and had a pint of ale—we then went towards Smithfield, and soon after turned into St. John's-street—each prisoner took one of my arms—we walked a little distance, and they asked me again if I was going to stand a drop more of something to drink—I said I would have no objection if they would walk a little farther—we had not walked many paces before Beaumont left my right arm, and took my left by one hand, and soon after I received a blow on my arm, and a kick on my leg, and fell on the ground—my hand was pulled out of my pocket, and my money was drawn out with it—I heard some fall on the pavement—no one was near me at the time but the prisoners—I had taken my money out in their presence when I treated them—there was four half-crowns, one shilling, a fourpenny-piece, and some copper—I do not suppose the blow would have felled me to the ground, if it had not been for the kick—I lost my hat and handkerchief—I believe Yardley secured Beaumont.

Cross-examined by MR. HORRY. Q. What were you doing out at this time? A. I was returning towards home—I had been with a friend or two in the City, to meet my brother in Mark-lane, at the corn market—I left my brother's about 12 o'clock—I met him in the market, and went with him to a public-house—we had two or three pints of ale there, nothing else—I then came straight on to Barbican, and overtook the prisoners—I merely said "Good night" as I passed, and went on—they made some observation, and we got into conversation—I had a pint of ale with them, which I paid for in copper money, and put it into my right—no, my left-hand pocket, in the same pocket as my silver—I took out my silver when I paid for the ale, but I do not know How much there was—it was at the corner of Peter-lane, St. John-street, that Beaumont took hold of my arm—I suppose I had then walked half or three quarters of a mile with them—I saw nobody near me but the two prisoners—I was between them, they both took hold of my arm—when I felt the kick, Beaumont had hold of my arm—nothing passed between us—I received the kick on my left leg, I felt it afterwards—I did not mention about the kick till I went before the magistrate—I found I had a hat on afterwards which did not belong to me—it has not been claimed by Beaumont—I cannot tell whether the prisoners ran away directly—to the best of my knowledge they did—I saw them run away as soon as I could see them—I saw Beaumont secured by Yardley in Peter's-lane, 20 or 80 yards off—it was not long after I was thrown down, I cannot say How long—I cried out as soon as I got on my legs, and followed them—I cannot tell who gave me the kick or the blow—Beaumont took hold of me with his left arm, and must have struck me with his right—Hymns had hold of my left arm—I was sober—I saw Hymns secured in the same court by Cook—the prisoners were in custody when I got up—I only went to one public-house, I do not know the name—I did not break a glass, and have to pay 10d. for it—I did not change a half-crown.

Beaumont. He had a quartern of rum, and paid 5d. in coppers for it, and he changed a half-crown for the glass he broke, which was 10d.

Witness. I did not.

CHARLES PARSONS YARDLEY . I live in Peter's-lane, St. John-street

A little after 1 o'clock in the morning of the 18th of June, I heard money falling on the stones of the street—the two prisoners came running down Peter's-lane towards me—I tried to stop them, but they ran up New Court, which is no thoroughfare, and on their returning I secured Beaumont, till the officer came up and took him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. How far off did it appear you heard this money falling? A. I should say 15 or 20 yards, not further—I did not search the prisoners.

JAMES LEE . I am a constable, and live in Greenhill's-rents. A little after 1 o'clock in the morning of the 18th of June, I was spoken to by a female in Cow-cross, and went to Peter's-lane, where I found Beaumont in custody of Yardley—the prosecutor said he had been knocked down and robbed, and that was one of the two that did it—I searched him at the station-house, and found 4 half-crowns, 4 sixpences, 1 shilling, a four-penny piece, and 9d. in copper—he said it was all his own—the half-pence were gritty, as though they had been in some mud—I found a pocket-handkerchief, and a fourpenny piece, a sixpence, and a shilling tied in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prosecutor claim that handkerchief? A. Not that one.

JOHN COOK . I am a policeman. On the morning of the 18th of June I heard a cry of "Police!" in Peter's-lane—I saw the prosecutor there—he pointed my attention to the prisoners—I noticed Hymns was walking fast—I took him into custody—the prosecutor charged him as one of the parties who had robbed him—Hymns said he was not—I found no money on him.

THOMAS CLARKE (police-constable G 13.) On the morning of the 18th of June I was in Peter's-lane, and found 8 halfpence on the pavement—I found a hat at the station-house in Rosoman-street, in the cell where Beaumont was locked up—this handkerchief was in it—Lee had taken the hat off his head over night.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prosecutor claim the hat? A. Yes—I cannot tell whether the prosecutor had Beaumont's hat.

JAMES LEE re-examined. I saw Beaumont with the hat on going to the station-house—when he came from the cell I said, "Where is your hat?"—he said, "It was not my hat that I had on"—there was a handkerchief in the hat—I took the hat off his head at the station-house when I searched him.

Cross-examined. Q. What condition did the prosecutor appear in? A. Very much frightened—he appeared as though he had had a small portion to drink, but I consider it was more excitement than liquor.

Beaumont's Defence. The prosecutor changed hats with me where he had the quartern of rum—when we came out we both fell down—I said, "This is not my hat"—he said, "You may as well have that, and let me have yours"—that is the way I came by it—his handkerchief might have been in it at the time—I will swear the four half-crowns were my own, which I worked for.

BEAUMONT— GUILTY . Aged 22.

HYMNS— GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Two Years.

ABRAHAM DESIS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1911
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1911. ABRAHAM DESIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Jones, about the hour of four in the night, on the 21st of June, at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 1 pair of stockings, value 4d.; 1 handkerchief, value 2d.; 18 pencils, value 2s.; 11 pence, and 14 halfpence; his property.

SARAH JONES . I am the wife of John Jones, and live in Pye-street, St. John, Westminster—we occupy a room in the house—it is let out to different tenants. About half-past four o'clock in the morning of the 22nd of June, I and my husband were in bed—I saw the prisoner standing at the head of the bed—I crouched down, and awoke my husband, who said to him, "Come out, and let me see who you are"—he came out, and my husband asked what he did there—he said, "I don't know, I have come up here, and lost my way in the dark"—my husband let him go—we then missed 18d. in copper money off the table—I went after him, overtook him, and gave him in charge—he was taken to the station-house, and I saw a dozen and half of pencils and 18d. in copper taken from him—the pencils were on another table when we went to bed, and the door shut—I missed a handkerchief off a chair, and a pair of stockings from the floor—the door fastens with a latch, and I had put a chair against it—I went to bed about half-past twelve o'clock—the door was open when I saw him.

JOHN CARTER (police-constable B 151.) On the morning of the 22nd of June I saw the prosecutrix holding the prisoner in Peter-street—he was trying to get from her—I found on him a dozen and half of pencils, 18d. worth of copper, a pair of stockings, and a handkerchief—one of the stockings was in the flap of his breeches—he said he took the stockings from the room, but nothing else—I found 4d. in a different part of his dress, which he said was his own money—the house is in the parish of St. John the Evangelist.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .* Aged 42.— Transported for Ten Years.

GEORGE LEWIS, JOSEPH LEWIS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1912
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1912. GEORGE LEWIS and JOSEPH LEWIS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Burdett Norbury, about two o'clock in the night of the 6th of June, at the hamlet of Mile-end Old town, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 160 handkerchiefs, value 30l.; 3 shawls, value 2l. 12s.; 12 pairs of gloves, value 16s.; 390 yards of ribbon, value 12l.; and 24 pairs of stockings, value 1l. 10s.; his property.

MR. PAYNE conducted the Prosecution.

FRANCIS BURDETT NORBURY . I am a linen-draper, and live in Wentworth-place, in the hamlet of Mile-end Old town. I locked up my house on Thursday night, the 6th of June, about half-past eleven o'clock—it was quite safe then—I was awoke at four o'clock the next morning by a policeman, and found a gimlet on the parlour table—I found the back kitchen shutter had been bored with a gimlet, and a hole made sufficient to enable a person to draw the bolt from the shutter—it was quite open, and the window was open—I found the parlour strewed with goods of various description, spoons and forks broken to pieces—I went to the stop, and under the counter found all the drawers emptied—about 160 handkerchiefs were gone entirely, and all the articles stated in the indictment, amounting altogether to between 50l. and 60l.—I have recovered nothing but two handkerchiefs—there were marks of two or three persons having been in the garden—I discovered them that morning at four o'clock, and they were covered over within two hours, not only in my own garden, but the third from us—

(looking at two handkerchiefs)—one of these has a particular mark, which I can positively swear to, besides the pattern—the mark is a damage mark—we had all the piece laid by on purpose to have an allowance made on it—the piece is cut in two, one piece has three, and the other four—the piece of four was taken, and there is a corresponding damage mark—I have not a doubt this handkerchief is one of those taken that night—I will swear to it—I was present when some shoes were compared with the footmarks, and they corresponded exactly, heel and every thing.

Cross-examined by MR. LORD, Q. Is there anything peculiar in the mark on that handkerchief? A. Yes, very—you will not find one like it in 5000—I do not swear to the other one—I have seen other handkerchiefs of the same pattern—I saw these two in the policeman's possession—I do not know where he got them from—there were five persons before the Magistrate on suspicion besides the prisoners—I observed a handkerchief round the neck of one of the five, like what I had seen in the house, but very different from this—I could not swear to that—I examined every part of my house when I went to bed, and it was quite safe—I have a wife, a brother, a lad, and two maid servants—the 160 handkerchiefs I lost were of different patterns—I had seventy of this pattern, and two of them were damaged in the same way—one of the footsteps was rather smaller than the others, as if it were a boy's—there were marks of three different persons—the shoe which was compared did not agree with the smallest—they were all three different sizes—the policeman covered them over that they might not be disturbed—I never saw the prisoners before.

THOMAS NORBURY . I am assistant to my brother—I know this handkerchief by the damage mark on it—I saw it on the premises between eight and nine o'clock that night—I have not a doubt of it.

Cross-examined. Q. What induced yon to notice it that evening? A. I saw the piece it belonged to—I never saw any before with this mark on them—we had seven of this pattern, but had sold none of them.

DENNIS POWER (police-constable H 18.) I met the two prisoners at a quarter to twelve o'clock, on the eight of the 10th of June, in Cock-lane, Shoreditch, in company with two females—on seeing us the women separated from them—I went over and searched both the prisoners, and said to George, "I will take you to the station-house"—his brother followed us to the station-house, using very abusive language, and obstructing me in taking George—he followed us to the station-house door, and insisted on coming in, and finding we could not get him away, I said, "You must come in, and I will charge you"—I took them for being in the streets for round their necks, apparently new, I said to George, "Where did you get this handkerchief?"—he said, "I bought it"—I said, "Your brother has got one of the same handkerchiefs"—he said, "Yes, I gave it to him, I bought them in Petticoat-lane"—I said, "What did you give for them?"—he said, "7s."—I said, "Did any body see you buy them?"—he said, "No," and that he had bought them about a fortnight ago—I said, "You did not wear these handkerchiefs last week"—he said, "No, I put them in pawn about a fortnight ago, and took them out about nine days ago"—he said he had pawned them at Castle's, in Church-street, Bethnal-green—I made inquiry there, and found he had never pawned a handkerchief of that description—I took the rightshoe off George's foot, and Joseph left, and compared George's right shoe with the footmarks in Mr. Norbury's garden-one

in particular was covered over—I saw my brother officer make an impression close by the side of that, and it corresponded with the mark—I compared both marks with George's shoe, and they corresponded—I did not find any mark to correspond with Joseph's left shoe, but in an adjoining garden I found a mark corresponding with George's left shoe—I could not positively swear to that one, as a portion of it was broken away.

Cross-examined. Q. You first took George into custody? A. I stopped them both together—I knew George well—I did not know Joseph—I cannot be mistaken in Joseph's person—his shoe did not fit any mark in the garden—there had been a slight rain, but the mark was covered over with oil-cloth and board—I had seen George in a different hat and handkerchief, and I noticed this being new, it was unusual—the prisoners were the only persons taken by Teakle and myself—several others were taken and brought to different police offices—there was a person who was originally in Mr. Norbury's employ, taken up—he was discharged after being remanded.

GEORGE TEAKLE (police-constable H 8.) I was with Power when the prisoners were apprehended—I marked the handkerchief which was taken from George's neck at the time—I said to Joseph, seeing his was the same pattern, "Where did you get this?"—he said, "I got it from my brother, I gave him 4s. for it"—George said he bought them together, and cut them apart himself—I was present when the footmarks were compared with George's right shoe—it was eight or ten yards from the kitchen window—there was not more than one that I could fit exactly, as, owing to the dry weather, they had become dry, except this one which was covered.

Cross-examined. Q. What was there peculiar in the foot-marks? A. They were rights and lefts—we fitted the left foot in the garden adjoining—the heel was quite visible and fitted exactly—there were 30 or 40 foot-marks, but most of them were dry—I tried it to three or four—I did not count the nails—they are quite common shoes—I saw both the prisoners—I am sure Joseph was in company with his brother.

GEORGE LEWIS— GUILTY .* Aged 22.— Transported for Fifteen Years.

JOSEPH LEWIS— NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, June 25th, 1839.

Fifth Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

JAMES BURTON.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1913
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1913. JAMES BURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June, 6 lbs. weight of soap, value 4s. 6d., the goods of John Fitzgerald Booth, his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Confined One Year.

CHARLOTTE MAY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1914
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1914. CHARLOTTE MAY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June, 1 looking-glass and stand, value 3s., the goods of James Francis Thompson.

JAMES FRANCIS THOMPSON . I live in Crown-street, Finsbury, and am a pawnbroker. On the 15th of June, the prisoner was at my shop with a little boy—I saw her leave immediately afterwards with my looking-glass—she got two or three doors off, and I fetched her back.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Where was this? A. On the board outside my window—the boy said he was ten years old—I did not see it taken up—the boy could take up this glass—she told me she

had just taken it from the child's hand, but it was in her baud before she left the house.

HENRY SMITH (police-constable G 44.) On the 15th of June, I was called to take the prisoner into custody—she said she was very sorry for what she had done, and hoped Mr. Thompson would forgive her.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure she did not say the child took it up? A. She did not say so in my presence.

GUILTY .* Aged 35.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.— Confined Eighteen Months.

WILLIAM HALL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1915
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1915. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June, 1 bag, value 3s. 6d.; 1 napkin, value 6d.; and 1 smelling-bottle, value 1s.; the goods of a person or persons unknown.

JOHN EATON (police-constable S 193.) In the afternoon of the 17th of June, I was on the Hyppodrome race-course—I saw the prisoner near a carriage with this reticule in his hand running away—I took him, and found in it this napkin and smelling bottle—he ran some distance, and put it under his coat—then turned and saw me—he threw it under a carriage and ran on—I pursued him, cried "Stop thief!" and took him—I went back to the carriage, and got the reticule—I then went back to the carriage, and the ladies in it claimed their reticule—I asked their names—they would not give me their names—I told them I was going to take the prisoner to the station-house—they never came near—they wanted me to give them the reticule, but I would not.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you ask the ladies to go with you? A. Yes—it is not likely in the confusion this could have been thrown on the course—there had been a great rush before—I did not hear of different persons losing things—I first saw the prisoner standing outside, against the carriage—there were four ladies in it, and I spoke to the coachman—none of them said they saw the prisoner near them.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM EDEN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1916
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1916. WILLIAM EDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June, 5 yards of cloth, called gambroon, value 7s. 6d., the goods of George Dearberg.

ROBERT NEWMAN . I live in Upper-street, Islington, and am shopman to Mr. Charles Dearberg. At half-past nine o'clock, on the 20th of June, I was at the back of the shop—a little girl came and gave me information—I ran out, and saw the prisoner running down Islington-green with these five yards of gambroon under his arm, which I had seen safe about half an hour, before, inside the shop.

HOLMAN JARVIS . I was in the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner running down the Green with this piece under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy running with this under his arm, he dropped it, I picked it up and ran after him—I turned the corner, and then missed him.

GUILTY .* Aged 19.— Confined Three Months.

JAMES ARNOLD.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1917
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1917. JAMES ARNOLD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May, 1/2 lb. weight of cigars, value 6s., the goods of Eliza Crapp.

ELIZABETH CRAPP . I am a widow and a tobacconist, and live at Hemmings-row, St. Martin's-lane. About four in the afternoon of the 25th of May, I was in my back parlour—I looked up, and saw the prisoner leaning over the counter as far as he could reach—I got up and came into the shop—he was leaning over the right side of the counter—I passed him and saw a

box of cigars moved from the window, and placed on the glass case which he was near—I said, "What have you been doing with these, you have moved them from the window?"—he said he had not—I said, "I am certain you have, and I will send or go for a policeman"—I looked in the window, and saw the bundle was moved—I said, "There is a bundle gone from the window, what have you done with them?"—he said, "I have not taken them"—I felt about him, and felt something under his arm—I opened his coat, and all the cigars fell into his apron—I am sure they were mine—I turned and shut the street-door, and pushed him farther from the street-door, till I got him to another door, and during that time a person came down stairs, hearing a noise—the prisoner cried, and said, "Pray don't give me in charge, my mother has got nine children"—with a good deal of trouble I got him to this other door—the person staid with him while I went out and got a policeman.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Just show us the way you felt him? A. I felt round about him—the prisoner cried and made a great uproar—these things were never taken out of the shop—he did not ask to buy any thing—he said before the Magistrate that he went in the shop—the bundle of cigars was on the ground, and he picked them up.

SAMUEL RICHES (police constable F 96.) I was sent for and took the prisoner.

GUILTY .* Aged 16.— Transported for Seven Years.

JOHN CASEY, JAMES SULLIVAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1918
VerdictsGuilty > unknown; Not Guilty > unknown
SentencesImprisonment

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1918. JOHN CASEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May, 1 coat, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John Boswell: and JAMES SULLIVAN , for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JANE BOSWELL . I am the wife of John Boswell, of Plumtree-court, Shoe-lane. This is a morning dress-coat that I had to cut up for my children's things—I had a great coat and trowsers stolen out of the same place, but those we could not find—the coat was safe on the Thursday, about the 30th of May—Casey is my brother, and I have seen Sullivan with him.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You did not see your brother give any thing to Sullivan? A. No, but I missed my brother on the Thursday.

MART BIRD . I live in Plumtree-court. About six or seven o'clock in the evening of that Thursday, I was in Cow Cross, about ten minutes' walk from the prosecutor's, and saw the two prisoners together—Sullivan had a bundle under his arm—I cannot tell what it contained.

JUDITH ISAACS . I live in Harrow-alley, Houndsditch. About five or six o'clock that evening, the prisoners came along the Fair—Sullivan asked me to buy this coat—he asked 1s. 6d. for it—I offered him 6d., and bought it—Casey was with him.

Cross-examined. Q. How much is it worth? A. Sixpence—I gave the full value—I sold it to a woman for 6d.

Casey's Defence. This man is innocent—I took it—it was lying on the ground—I sold it to the woman.

CASEY— GUILTY . Aged 16.— Confined Three Months.

SULLIVAN— NOT GUILTY .

JAMES DUNLAP.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1919
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1919. JAMES DUNLAP was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May, 1 purse, value 1s.; 2 sovereigns, and 11 shillings, the goods and monies of Charles Howes, in a certain vessel, in a certain port of entry and discharge.

CHARLES HOWES . I am apprentice on board the Narcissus—the prisoner was on board the same vessel in the London Docks—I was there on the 19th of May—I had 2l. 11s. in a purse in my chest—I saw it safe on the 12th of May—on the morning of the 19th, the prisoner brought on board this suit of clothes, and a shirt and braces—I asked him where he got them—he said his uncle, Mr. Boyd, bought them—I then missed my purse and money, and found my chest open—I told the prisoner I was certain either he or the other lad on board had stolen it—on the 26th the prisoner was there again, and left about six o'clock that evening—I found the clothes in the other lad's chest—I asked the prisoner afterwards where the purse was, and he said in the forecastle, under one of the berths, but it was not there.

CHARLES FREDERICK SAYER . I am a salesman. On the evening of the 15th the prisoner came to me, and I measured him for a suit of clothes, they were to come to 2l.—he bought a shirt and handkerchief, and after that he had the clothes.

Prisoner. The prosecutor said he had left his chest open on the Thursday—I brought some shirts from the East Indies and sold them—he knows that a boy brought me 10s. on board, and I bought these clothes out of my own money.

GUILTY .* Aged 15.— Transported for Ten Years.

GEORGE HASELUM.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1920
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1920. GEORGE HASELUM was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May, 1 pair of trowsers, value 16s.; 1 waistcoat, value 9s.; 1 purse, value 1d.; 1 sovereign, and 2 half-crowns, the goods and monies of Thomas Perry.

THOMAS PERRY . I live in Upper Greystock-place, Fetter-lane, and am a bricklayer—the prisoner lodged in my house for five weeks. On the morning of the 27th of May, I got up about half-past five o'clock, and left the, prisoner in bed—he told me when I left that he should not be at home that night, I should have the bed to myself—I returned from work in the evening as usual, and went to my box—I unlocked it, and the lid fell off—the hinges had been broken, and my purse and trowsers, waistcoat, and other things were gone—the officer found the prisoner about a week after—these are my articles.

Prisoner. Q. Is there any mark on the purse? A. I know it by one of the ends being peculiar—I can swear to these other things.

FREDERICK POOLE . I am in the service of a pawnbroker in Shoreditch—these trowsers and waistcoat were pawned by the prisoner on the 27th of May.

JAMES CHARLES PATTEN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found this purse in his trowsers pocket.

(The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he left his lodging, being unable to pay his rent; that the purse was his own property, and when first found on him the prosecutor did not claim it; he denied having pledged any of the property.)

GUILTY .* Aged 23.— Transported for Seven Years.

LOUISA MAHONEY.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1921
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1921. LOUISA MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June, 5 half-crowns; 16 shillings; 8 sixpence; 4 peace; and 4 half-pence; the monies of John Long, from his person.

JOHN LONG . I am a baker, and live in Coram-street On the evening of the 3rd of June, I was at the Crown tavern, in Museum-street—I had five half-crowns, and sixteen shillings, eight sixpences or more, and some

halfpence—I went to sleep there, as I had been up all night, and at work during the day—I had observed the prisoner and two other women standing at the bar—when I awoke, my money was gone.

Cross-examined by MR. PRICE. Q. How long had you been there? A. Half an hour—I went in about seven o'clock in the evening—I spoke to some women there—I cannot say How many—I was not very drunk—I had drank a little—I knew what I was about—I think I gave one woman a cup of ale—I did not treat the women to more than one pot of ale—I saw three women altogether—I might be asleep ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

WILLIAM WHITTLE . I am bar-man at the Crown, in Museum-street. I saw the prosecutor there between seven and eight o'clock in the evening—there were a number of persons drinking in front of the bar—I saw the prisoner handling and searching the prosecutor's pockets—I went and asked if she knew the man—she replied, it was her husband—I then went away—I returned in a few minutes—she was gone, and the prosecutor was standing talking—I gave him information, and went after the prisoner—I gave her into custody—she was brought back, and three shillings, three sixpences, and 4 1/2 d. in copper found in her hand.

Cross-examined.Q. How long have you lived there? A. Three months—the prisoner was drunk—I cannot tell whether the prosecutor gave her any thing to drink—he had been drinking—when I saw him he was asleep, and several women were there—I had not seen him treat any of them.

ROBERT WARNER (police-constable E 161.) I was in Museum-street, and saw Whittle running after the prisoner—I took her, and found 4s. 10&½d. in her hand, and on the road to the station-house I saw half a crown fall from her bosom, and, in going further, 2s. 2d. more fell from her.

Cross-examined.Q. Was the prosecutor very drunk? A. He was in liquor—the prisoner was much the worse for liquor.

LOUISA MANFORD . I searched the prisoner, and found 13s. 6d. under her left arm.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.— Confined One Month.

MARY OWEN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1922
VerdictNot Guilty > no prosecutor

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1922. MARY OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May, 1 coat, value 25s. the goods of Robert Walker.

(The prosecutor did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

ELIZABETH FURNELL.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1923
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1923. ELIZABETH FURNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June, 3/4 lb. weight of bacon, value 6d., the goods of William Tipper.

GEORGE CHURCHHOUSE . I am shopman to Mr. William Tipper, cheesemonger of King-street, Hammersmith. On the 19th of June, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop—when she left, I missed two pieces of bacon—I went after her about fifty-yards, brought her back, and in the shop she dropped this piece of bacon—the other was found behind a cask near where she was.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Where were you standing when you saw this piece drop? A. Behind the counter—she was about four yards from me—it dropped from her pocket—she lives in the neighbourhood, and dealt at our shop before—she had ordered some butter, and

after I had been down in the cellar to fetch it, she said she would come back for it after she had been to the snuff-shop—she was going in that direction—I found the second piece after she was given in charge.

NOT GUILTY .

MARY SULLIVAN.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1924
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1924. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June, 1 cap, value 2s., the goods of William Grove, from his person.

WILLIAM GROVE . I am a sailor. I left my chest at the Angel public-house, in the Back-road, on the 18th of June—I had been drinking that day with many people whom I know—I was drinking with the landlord, and the prisoner drank out of my pot—I do not say she took the cap, it was on my head.

ROBERT CHEESEHAN . I keep the King's Arms public-house, Back-lane. The prosecutor was at my house, with a man—I heard the prosecutor complain of the loss of his cap—I turned him into the street for making a noise—I went into the tap-room, and asked if any one had the cap—the prisoner said he had left it at the Angel—she went out—I followed, and taxed her with taking it—she said she had not got it—I found it under her gown.

WILLIAM HOLDING . (police-constable K 293.) I took the prisoner, and have the cap—I had seen the prosecutor with it half an hour before.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the prosecutor, and drank till the evening, and the last public-house he left without his cap—I took it up intending to follow him with it.

NOT GUILTY .

SAMUEL WILLIAMS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1925
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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1925. SAMUEL WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May, one half-sovereign, fifty half-crowns, and five shillings, the monies of Henry Blandford.

HENRY BLANDFORD . I am a chimney-sweeper, and live in North-row, Bethnal-green—the prisoner lodged there—on the 26th of May I left home—I had placed 7l. behind some loose bricks by the fire-place—it consisted of fifty half-crowns, five shillings, and one half-sovereign—my brother saw me put them there—I put the bricks back again—I returned on the 1st of June—when I came home my wife had removed—I went up stairs, and found the things gone, bricks and all—the landlord of the prisoner would not let him stay—I asked the prisoner about the money—he said he knew nothing about it—but I found the bricks brought down to his place.

ANN BLANDFORD . I am the prosecutor's wife—he left town on the 26th of May—he did not tell me of this money—I removed in the mean time—the landlord came on the? Wednesday, and told me he would seize my goods if I did not remove—I took the goods out—I said, "I am uneasy, as I know there is money in the place, but I don't know where it is," as my husband had left in a hurry, and in half an hour I saw the prisoner in the room—he was in great distress, and I had lent him half-a-crown on the Sunday afternoon, the day my husband went.

THOMAS COOK . I live at Pleasant-row—I saw the prisoner on Saturday, 1st of June—he said to me, "Are you sold out?"—I said, "No, I have a penny-worth of rhubarb left"—he said, "I will have it"—he pulled out some silver and half-pence altogether—I saw some shillings, half-pence, and about four half-crowns.

JOHN FREDERICK EDWARDS . (police-constable K 118.) The prisoner was given to me on the evening of the 1st of June—I asked him what he had done with the man's money—he said he had earned 13s. 6d. and out of that he had

paid his landlord 5s., and all he had was 5s. 6d., and 3s. he had spent—I found 5s. 9&½d. on him, and on searching him further I found a silk handkerchief—he said a sailor gave it him—I found four half-crowns and one shilling in his fob—he said he lived at No. 4 Stony-stairs, Ratcliff—I went there, and found his mother—she said a sailor lived there, but she did not know where he was, nor when he would be home.

Prisoner. Q. What did I say about the handkerchief? A. You said you had had it given you, and your wife said, "No, I had it lent me to wrap round the child's hand."

Prisoner's Defence. On Thursday a man named Jackson, who has gone to Shields as mate of a ship, came and gave me an order, for which he paid me 13s. 6d.—I then had two pairs of boots to sole and heel, which came to 4s. 6d. a pair, and a pair of slippers I had to heel, which produced me altogether 24s.—I put 11s. in my fob for my stock money, and part of the other I spent.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM GRAVES.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1926
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1926. WILLIAM GRAVES was indicted for embezzlement.

JOHN BIFFEN . I am a tailor, and live in Plumtree-street, Bloomsbury—the prisoner was in my service—I sent him to Mr. Cope, No. 1, Russelplace, with a bill—it was bis duty to bring back 2l. 16s. if he received it—he did not bring it to me.

HYPPOLITE POLLINGER . I am servant at No. 1, Russel-place, Fitzroy-square—Mr. Cope lodges there—the prisoner came with a bill on the 11th of June for 2l. 16s.—I paid him 3l., and told him to bring 4s. back—he did not.

GUILTY . Aged 17.— Confined Six Months.

THOMAS TURNER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1927
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1927. THOMAS TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June, 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of William Hentha Paul, from his person; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

WILLIAM HENTHA PAUL . I was passing over London Bridge at nine or ten o'clock at night on the 19th June—I felt a hand in my pocket—I turned, and the prisoner was close to me—there were two persons behind him, but not so close as him—I seized him, a scuffle ensued, during which I saw the handkerchief on the pavement nearer to him than to any body else—I do not know what became of the other two men—they had not spoken to him in my presence—the handkerchief has not been found.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see it in my hand? A. I did not—I will swear it was mine—I saw your arm come away from my coat as if you had had your hand in my pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing over the bridge—the gentleman turned, and laid hold of me—he charged me with picking his pocket, and twenty or thirty persons were round—I asked him to go over the bridge to see a policeman—I waited till he came up and gave charge of me.

PHILLIP PARISH . (City police-constable, No. 45) I produce the certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got from Mr. Clark's office—(read)—the prisoner is the man who was tried and convicted.

GUILTY .* Aged 25.— Transported for Ten Years.

WILLIAM HAYTER.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1928
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

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1928. WILLIAM HAYTER , was indicted for stealing on the 19th of June, 1 printed book, value 5s. 6d., the goods of James Little Barrett and others, his masters.

FREDERICK WILSON . I am of the firm of James Little Barrett and others, of Fleet-street—the prisoner was our errand boy—I have missed a prayer-book—this is it—(looking at one.)

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Did you miss it yourself, or was it merely from information? A. I missed it from personal inspection, by counting the number we had—I know the prayer book by the name of our firm in it, and the style of binding—we have other books of the same style of binding—this was found on the prisoner—I think I am justified in saying it was not sold, but I would not swear it.

COURT. Q. You have missed a book of that sort? A. I have, and I firmly believe this to be it.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am assistant to a pawnbroker—about seven or eight o'clock in the evening of the 18th of June the prisoner came and offered this prayer book in pledge for 1s.—I asked him where he got it—he said it was given him from St. Sepulchre's school—I saw the name of Barrett in it, which gave me suspicion—he told me afterwards that a boy had given it him, and I might go to his mother's—I said I should go to Mr. Barrett, and he said, "Very well"—I went to the door, and looked for a policeman, and while there he got up, and ran out—I caught him. (The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

THOMAS BROOKS.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1929
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1929. THOMAS BROOKS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June, 1 jacket, value 10s., the goods of John Pearson.

JOHN PEARSON . I am a coach-painter, and work for Mr. Charles Lowe, and live in Princes-street, Queen-street—on Thursday evening, 18th of June, I left my jacket in the workshop—I afterwards missed it—on Saturday evening I saw it on the prisoner's back in Seven Dials—this is it.

CHARLES LOWE . Pearson works for me—I saw the jacket safe in my workshop on 14th of June—I went out for half an hour, and when I returned it was gone.

WILLIAM CULLKN . (police-constable F 151.) I went with Pearson after the prisoner, and saw him with the jacket on his back.

Prisoner's Defence. On 14th June, at half-past eight o'clock, I met a boy in Seven Dials, who said he was in great distress, and asked me to buy a duplicate of a jacket which would fit me—I went to dinner at one o'clock, and pledged my diamond, the ticket for which I now have, to get money to get the jacket out.

(The prisoner received a good character.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.—Recommended to mercy by the Jury,— Confined One Month.

WILLIAM KING.
17th June 1839
Reference Numbert18390617-1930
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1930.