Old Bailey Proceedings.
14th May 1838
Reference Number: t18380514

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Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
14th May 1838
Reference Numberf18380514

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SIR JOHN COWAN, BART., MAYOR.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

Taken in Short-hand,

BY HENRY BUCKLER.

VOLUME VIII.

SESSION VII. TO SESSION XII.

LONDON:

GEORGE HEBERT, CHEAPSIDE.

WILLIAM TYLER, PRINTER, BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

1838.

WILLIAM TYLER,

PRINTER,

BOLT-COURT, FLEET-STREET.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of the Peace,

OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY,

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

Held on Monday, May 14, 1838, and following Days.

Before the Right Honourable Sir JOHN COWAN, Bart., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Right Honourable Sir James Allan Park, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Patteson, Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's Court of Queen's Bench; Sir John Taylor Coleridge, Knt., one other of the Justices of the said Court of Queen's Bench; George Scholey, Esq.; and Sir William Heygate, Bart., Aldermen of the said City; the Honourable Charles Ewan Law, Recorder of the said City; Sir Chapman Marshall, Knt.; James Harmer, Esq.; John Pirie, Esq.; John Lainson, Esq.; John White, Esq.; and William Magney, Esq., Aldermen of the said City of London; John Mirehouse, Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin, Sergeant at Law; Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

LIST OF JURORS.

First Jury.

Richard Alliston

Thomas Codsbrook

William Lane

Thomas Bent

Joseph Adman

John Mascoe

George Borer

Thomas Briggs

John Arnold

Daniel Brice

James Boyngton

Frederick Briton

Second Jury.

Thomas Lewin

Joseph Bromley

Vincent Phillips

John Hooper

William Dobbins

John Glover

Joseph Vincent Tucker

William Bendal

Isaac Alexander

Frederick Adlam

Richard Corkhead

James Bradley Chamberlain

Third Jury.

George Musgrove

Thomas Hunt

James White

Nathaniel Avery

William Bennett

Robert Clapperton

John West

Edward Bradford

Thomas Chapman

Edward Latter

James Munroe

Lewis Adolph Dorien

Fourth Jury.

Litchfield Green

Justus Meredith

Charles John May

William Clarkson

Samuel Mumford

Joseph Clark

George Bruff

John Prince

Robertson Mumford

Richard Taylor

John Clear

James Snee

Fifth Jury.

James Aldington

Ebenezer Raven

Christopher James Davin

Richard Andrews

John Bray

William Dawson

J. Blacklock

W. Frame

J. Douglas

James Kibble

Robert Eldon

Jacob Beular

Sixth Jury.

Robert Foy

David Sangster

Marmaduke Drake

William Richard Dove

Edward Chapman

Stephen Poynter Day

Robert Brocker

John Ryder Bass

James Anderson

Edward Downes

Frederick Draycott

Samuel Medley

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

COWAN, MAYOR. SEVENTH SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that a prisoner has been previously in custody—An obelisk (†), that a prisoner is known to be the associate of bad characters.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, May 14th, 1838.

First Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN BELL.
14th May 1838
Reference Numbert18380514-1139
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation

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1139. JOHN BELL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 19th of February, 2 pairs of trowsers, value 12s. the goods of James Delor; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 1 gown, value 4s.; 1 yard of printed cotton, value 64., the goods of Elizabeth Harrison: 1 handkerchief, value 7s., the goods of Benjamin Williams: 2 pairs, of shoes, value 10s.; 1 shirt, value 10s., the goods of Samuel Andrews: 1 night-cap, value 64.; 2 decanters, value 2s.; 6 sheets, value 4l. 4s.; 4 towels, value 3s.; 4 pillow-cases, value 7s.; 1 table-cloth, value 7s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 4 dishes, value 4s.; 11 plates, value 3s.; 26 knives, value 5s.; 16 forks, value 3s.; 1 flannel shirt, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 1 pillow-case, value 3s.; 2 table-cloths, value 7s.; and 1 sheet, value 10s.; the goods of John Starkey, well knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN STARXEY . I keep the Four Swans, in Bishopsgate-street Elizabeth Starkie lived in my service about five weeks—I suspected her during that time, and on Saturday, the 17th of March, I detected her in stealing some money—she left that evening, and I watched her down to London-bridge, to Tower-street, Leadenhall-market, and various other places—I believe she saw me—I at last traced her to a house in Blacksmith's Arms-place, Whitechapel—I did not see her go into the house—I obtained information there, which led me to No. 8, Lower Chapman-street—I watched that house for several days, day and night, with assistance—on the Thursday I received information, and went and watched there, and in a short time the prisoner came home, he went into the house, came out again, and walked up and down the street twice—he then went into the house again, and brought out two wheels of a truck—he afterwards brought out the rest, and made up the truck—he then sent, his boy on with the truck into Anthony-street, which is just by—he followed the boy there, told him to take the truck up a lane, and while he did so, the prisoner went into No. 5, Anthony-street—he remained in there about five minutes; then came out, walked up and down the street two or three

times; then beckoned the boy, and the truck was taken to No. 5, Anthony-street—the prisoner brought out two boxes, placed them on the truck—he then took away the truck himself, and went towards St. Katharine's Docks—I spoke to Nicholas, a policeman, and we followed him to St. Katharine's wharf—I saw him take the boxes into the wharf, and he gave directions that they should be taken to Hull by the steam-boat—we asked him where he brought them from—he said, "Somewhere out of Anthony-street"—we asked him what number—he said he was not certain, but he thought it was No. 5 or 6—we asked who they belonged to—he said, "To a woman named Ann Cook"—I asked why there was no direction on the boxes—he said the woman was following him down, and was going to direct them—they had no direction to them—I then gave him in charge, and the policeman took possession of the boxes—the prisoner said he did not know the woman; that he was merely engaged to bring down the trunks, and she would pay him when she came down—we went to No. 5, Anthony-street, and saw a woman named Chason there—I inquired there about Starkie, but did not find her by Chason's account—I saw her found in the privy of the adjoining house—I left her in charge of a policeman, and went to No. 2, Lower Chapman-street, from where I had seen the truck brought—I saw some property there belonging to a Mr. Browning—I there found a woman named Bell, who has been convicted—she passed as the prisoner's wife—I gave her into custody—the prisoner said that the house No. 2, Lower Chapman-street, was his—I missed a great variety of articles belonging to myself and my guests while Starkie was in my employ.

JOHN NICHOLAS . I am a policeman. On Thursday afternoon, the 22nd of March, my attention was directed by the prosecutor to the truck which was drawn by the prisoner—I followed it to St. Katharine steam wharf—he was about taking the boxes out, and I asked Mm when he brought them from—he said from Anthony-street, either No. 5 or 6, he did not know which—I asked him why they were not directed—he said a young woman was following him down to direct them, and they were going to Hull—he was then about telling the man on the wharf that a young woman was coming down, who was going by the Hull steamer—they were asking him about their not being directed—I asked if he knew her name—he said he believed her name was Ann Cook, he did not know any thing about her, he was only employed as porter—I then took him into custody, and took possession of the boxes—they were not locked, but corded together, and nailed down—I afterwards went to the house, No. 5, Anthony-street, and made inquiry of Mrs. Chason—she said she knew nothing about Starkie, but I found her in the privy of the adjoining yard; she could get to that from No. 5, as the palings between the two yards were broken down—I knocked at the privy door several times, but could get no answer—I forced it open, and took her—Sarah Bell was brought to the house, and we took her, Starkie, Chason, and the prisoner, to the station-house, together—I asked Starkie for the keys of the boxes—she said she had no keys to them—I asked if they were locked—she said they were not—she treated them as hers.

ELIZABETH CHASON . I am a laundress—I live at No. 5, Anthony-street. I know the prisoner slightly, and also his wile, and Starkie—Starkie passed as the prisoner's sister—I gave her leave to be at my house for a day or two, as she said she wished to be screened from the anger of her husband—when the officers came and applied about her, I denied her being there—I was with her in my parlour when the prosecutor went by

the door, and she said that was the gentleman she w