Old Bailey Proceedings.
11th April 1833
Reference Number: 18330411

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Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
11th April 1833
Reference Numberf18330411-1

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SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., MAYOR.

FOURTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 11th DAY OF APRIL, 1833, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY GEORGE TITTERTON, No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1833.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable SIR PETER LAURIE , KNT., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Thomas Denman , Knt., Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Vaughan , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , Bart.; and Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; William Taylor Copeland , Esq.; Thomas Kelly , Esq; Samuel Wilson , Esq.; Sir Chapman Marshall , Knt.; and James Harmer , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Charles Ewan Law , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; John Mirehouse , Esq.; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Samuel Bates

Thomas Bailey

Edmund H. Duval

Charles Cook

Burrows Becket

William Townly

John Davis

Thomas Gooch

Samuel Harman

Isaac Salter

Thomas Hope

John Carter .

Second

Joseph Sawyer

John Chatfield

John Benningfield

Edmund Manning

Thomas Gates

William Tomlin

Joseph Meck

Thomas Taylor

John Flowers

Thomas Eldred

Richard Lake

John Capey .

Third

Samuel M. Gilbert

William Imeson

Thomas Johnson

Charles Newman

Joseph Brooks

Nathanl. Jacobson

Charles Covington

Henry Penny

John Wells

Jonathan Legate

Edward Sabine

John Smart .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Wm. Hutchinson

James Love

Basilia Lane

William Manheek

George Morris

Wm. Chris. Mantz

Samuel Norton

John Oliver

George Pige

Henry Pige

William Poke

James Rasees .

Second

John Spooner

John Simpkins

William Soday

William Skirr

Thomas Shanton

Benj. Were, Jun.

James Wm. White

Thomas Williams

John Witterdon

James Lush

William Lucinea

John Luntley .

Third

Joseph Pullen

Humphery Sexton

Edward Tann

John Hanson

William Chevalier

Wm. Chipperfield

John Constable

James Daniels

John Goulden

James Love

Samuel Martin

Thomas Page .

Fourth

Thomas Crosland

William Burnett

James Bunn

George Cadogan

Evan Jones

John Cornack

Richard H Ashford

Samuel Butler

Thomas Brown

John Brown

Thomas Baker

James Brown .

Fifth

John Argent

Job Bigmore

Henry Bradey

James Bright

Benjamin Clarke

Thomas Collyer

Frederick Cloke

Samuel Durrance

George English

Peter Gould

David Griffiths

Wm. Goodman .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, APRIL 11, 1833.

LAURIE, MAYOR. - FOURTH SESSION.

* A star placed against the verdict denotes that the prisoner has been previously in custody.

THOMAS JONES.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-1
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

Second London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

672. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Isaac Leplastrier , on the 11th of April , at St. Martin, Ludgate, and stealing therein 2 watch-cases, value 4l., the goods of the said Isaac Leplastrier and another .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of the said Isaac Leplastrier and another.

ROBERT CURRY . I live at No. 45, Dean-street, Soho, and am a turner. On the 11th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going down Ludgate-hill, and saw the prisoner force his hands through the window of Mr. Leplastrier's shop - I could not perceive what he took out, but I saw he had got something; I took hold of him, and took him into the shop - the shop door was not shut at the time; I saw him endeavour to conceal what he had got, and I found a watch-case in each of his hands - I marked them, and delivered them to the constable; he forced his hands through a very large square of glass, which he broke.

MR. ISAAC LEPLASTRIER. I am a watch-maker , and live at No. 20, Ludgate-hill . When I returned from the country the morning after this happened, I found one of the panes of glass in my shop window broken into one hundred and fifty pieces; my son lives in the house, and I carry on the business in partnership with my son; the lease of it is mine - the rent and taxes are paid out of the profits of the business.

JAMES SNOW . I am a constable, and live in Holyday-yard. I received the prisoner in charge, and produce the watch-cases, which I received from Curry.

MR. LEPLASTRIER. These are my cases - they are worth about 4l.; the door which opens to the street does not at once admit you into the shop - there is a lobby, and on the right there is a door which enters the shop; the outer door is always open - the house is in the parish of St. Martin, Ludgate.

ROBERT CURRY re-examined. Q.Which door did you mean was open? A. I meant the outer door - the inner door was closed, and the window was closed, but the street door was open.

Prisoner. I did it through distress - I had been out of work a long time, and did not know what to do to get a bit of bread.

[April 13th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25*.

WILLIAM JONES.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-2
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

673. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Solomons , on the 25th of February , at St. Botolph without, Aldgate, and stealing therein 1 coat, value 12s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 16s.; 2 shirts, value 10s.; 3 studs, value 5s.; 1 brooch, value 16s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s.; 2 table-cloths, value 16s.; 4 napkins, value 10s.; 1 sovereign, 2 crowns, 6 half-crowns, and 16 shillings, the property of Samuel Barnet .

LEAH SOLOMONS . I am the wife of Henry Solomons - we pay our rent weekly; we inhabit the whole house - it is No. 2, Barnes-buildings, Gravel-lane, Houndsditch , in the City: Samuel Barnet, my nephew, lodged on our ground floor - he had only one room: he is a dealer in clothes . On the 25th of February he went out about eight o'clock in the evening; I fastened the street door on the single lock, about ten o'clock at night - every thing was safe then, and I put a light up for Barnet in the room - his room was not locked, but shut too; I went to bed at ten o'clock, and Barnet came home about one o'clock, and gave an alarm that he was robbed - the prisoner was taken the same evening; I did not know him before - he was quite a stranger; I saw some of the property before the Justice - the house is in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate.

SAMUEL BARNET . I occupy a single room in Mr. Solomon's house - I left it about eight o'clock on the 25th of February, leaving every thing safe; I had a coat and a pair of trousers, and all the articles stated in the indictment; (enumerating them) also a sovereign, two crowns, six half-crowns, and sixteen shillings - they were all in my box together, and the box was locked; I took the key with me - I pulled my door too, I am certain, but did not lock it; I came home at one o'clock - I was quite

sober: when I came up to the street door I found it wide open, and my own room door wide open; the street door must have been opened by a false key - I found a parrot lying on my bed, covered over with a tablecloth; it would make no noise then - I went up to my box, and found it had been forced open, and a poker laid on a chair; all these articles were taken from the box - I do not know the prisoner - he had no business in the house; I saw him next day before the Magistrate at Worship-street - my coat, a pair of trousers, and a napkin were then produced - I am certain they are mine: it was my own coat, I had worn it about two years, and I had worn the trousers at a wedding; the napkin was marked "No. 6, Miles;" I have not a doubt of the property - I have not found the rest.

THOMAS COOPER . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the 25th of February, about half-past twelve o'clock at night, in Brick-lane, Spitalfields; I saw him with a small bundle, which he appeared to wish to conceal from me: I stopped him, and asked what he had got - he said he had got a pair of trousers: I asked if they were his own - he said they were; I then asked where he bought them - he said in Globe-road; I asked the person's name he bought them of - he could not tell me, nor the number of the house: there was nothing but the trousers in the bundle - I took him to the station-house, searched him, and found the coat on his back, which Barnet afterwards claimed at Worship-street; I found the napkin in his trousers pocket - Barnet described it before he saw it, and gave me the name and number; there were two companions with the prisoner, who ran away when I went to lay hold of him; they went off both together - they had no bundle: I took him to Worship-street, and that afternoon found out the prosecutor - I saw the box which had the staple broken; the street door had no marks of violence on it.

Prisoner. The other two were not with me. Witness. I am certain there were two persons in his company, and when I stopped him he was trying to hide himself behind them with the bundle - when they got off they hallooed to him to come along, and asked what he wanted with that fool.

SAMUEL BARNET . I am certain these things are mine - the value of the property lost is 8l. 10s.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home at eleven o'clock, and in Globe-lane a man in a fustian coat asked me to buy these things of him - he said he was going into the country, and it was too late to pawn them; I at last gave him 26s. for them, which was all I had in my pocket - I expect the young man is here, but I do not know his name.

JAMES HALE . I am a carpenter, and have known the prisoner from a child; I live at Bethnal-green - I did not attend before the Magistrate. I was coming up Globe-lane about half-past ten o'clock on Monday evening: it is about a mile from Gravel-lane, and comes into he Mile-end-road - I met a man with a bundle under his arm; he accosted me, and asked if I would buy a coat and a pair of trousers - I said No: he was a stranger - I told him I had no money, and did not want to buy any thing; he walked on up the lane, and I lost sight of him - in less than three minutes I met the prisoner coming on; I was coming up the lane, towards the Rising Sun public-house - the man was going in an opposite direction; the prisoner had nothing when I met him - I wished him good night, and walked on; whether he saw the man I cannot say - I saw the man make a stop, and I walked on - the man made the stop before I met the prisoner, and I passed him; I did not see the prisoner again - I was desired to come here last Saturday; I cannot say whether the prisoner ever saw the man.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

[April 15th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

EDWARD MARTIN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-3
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

674. EDWARD MARTIN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Augustine Scheuren , on the 27th of January , at All Saints, Poplar , and stealing therein, 1 painting, framed, value 15s., and 1 tea-pot, value 2s., his property . - To which he pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21. April 11th.]

EDWARD MARTIN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-4
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceDeath

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675. EDWARD MARTIN was again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William James Reeve , on the 1st of March , at St. Anne, Westminster , and stealing therein, 2 pairs of shoes, value 8s.; 2 shirts, value 6s.; 1 pen-knife, value 1s., and 1 night-gown, 18d., his property . - To which he pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21. April 11th.]

EDWARD MARTIN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-5
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceDeath

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676. EDWARD MARTIN was again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Pinkney , on the 26th of February , at All Saints, Poplar , and stealing therein, 1 shirt, value 1s., and 1 trunk, value 18s., his property . - To which he pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21. April 11th.]

GEORGE DAVIS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-6
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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Before Lord Chief Justice Denman.

677. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Anne Harrison , on the 19th of January , at St. George, Hanover-square, putting her in fear and taking from her person, and against her will, 2 shirts, value 6s.; 4 pairs of stockings, value 2s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 3 collars, value 1s.; 1 jacket, value 3s., and 1 apron, value 6d., the goods of Samuel Barrow .

MARY ANN HARRISON . I live with my parents, at No. 36, Marshall-street, Golden-square; my father is a boot-closer, and my mother is a milliner and dressmaker. On the night of the 19th of January I was in Oxford-street , about a quarter after eight o'clock; the prisoner came behind me struck me, and took a bundle which I had in my hand, containing two shirts, four pairs of stockings, two handkerchiefs, three collars, one jacket, and one apron, which belonged to my uncle Samuel Barrow - I was taking them to him.

Q.How was it taken? A.The man came behind me, pushed me, struck me, and snatched the bundle from me; I turned round and cried Stop thief! I followed the man who I saw with the bundle in his hand, and called Stop thief! - I saw him stopped - he had dropped the bundle before he was stopped; I am sure the man who was stopped was the man who took my bundle - he ran across out of Hereford-street into Quebec-street; a man picked the bundle up and gave it to me; I followed the man quite close, and never lost sight of him - the prisoner is the man.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am a policeman. On the 19th of January, I was in Seymour-street; I heard the cry of Stop thief! and I ran into Old Quebec-street; I saw the prisoner run into a soldier's arms, and presently I saw the prosecutrix come up - she said he was the man who took her bundle; I did not see the bundle till I got to the watch-house - the prosecutrix herself brought it there; the prisoner ran against the soldier, and he stopped him - I have the bundle here.

JANE HARRISON . I am mother-in-law to Mary Ann Harrison. I identify the property as being my brother's, Mr. Samuel Barrow ; I sent my little girl out with it about half-past seven o'clock from Marshall-street to Park-place.

MARY ANN HARRISON re-examined. I gave the bundle to the Policeman - this is it.

[April 11th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

MARY BROWN, CHARLOTTE SMITH.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-7
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceDeath; Death

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Before Lord Chief Justice Denman.

678. MARY BROWN and CHARLOTTE SMITH were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Charles Gates , on the 16th of February , at St. Pancras, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, six shillings his property .

JOHN CHARLES GATES . I am a journeyman baker , and live at No. 5, Prospect-terrace, Gray's Inn-road. On Saturday-night, the 16th of February, I was in Johnson-street, Somer's-town with some bread, and as I was coming home in Weston-place, by the Small-pox Hospital, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner Brown came up to me at the corner of Weston-place, and asked me to go and give her some drink; I accompanied her to her house in Haddon-place , and gave her a shilling to fetch some drink; while she was gone, I laid my hands on the table and fell asleep; two men came in, and asked me what I did there, and asked me if I had any money - I said No; they knocked me down and kicked me about, and while I was on the ground Brown came in (while the two men were there) and then the two men ran away; and after they were gone, she put her foot across my throat, and took 6s. out of my left-hand trousers pocket; I saw her, and am certain of her person; there was another female there; who I took to be Smith - I did not know her before; that female held my hands while Brown took my money - she held both my hands - I was on my back; after they got my money, Brown ran to the door and called Police - he did not come - she then came to me, and told me I could not be there, I must be off, and she pushed me out - I met the Policeman about forty yards off, and told him - he went back with me to the house; Brown and Smith were both there - it is a house of ill-fame; I was only in the parlour - there are several rooms in it - the Policeman took them both to the station-house, and in going along they said it would be all right; I told them when they got there, if they would return me the 6s. they should go about their business - they said it would be all right; the inspector asked them if I had been there - they acknowledged that I had been there, and that two men had been there, but they denied all knowledge of the two men at the station-house, and at the office they acknowledged that I had been served out by two men - they said I had been injured by two men, but they had nothing to do with it; they said they saw the scuffle between the men and me - I had had a glass or two, but knew what I was about; I did not observe the features of the second woman - she was the only female besides Brown that was in the room; they were both there when the Policeman went in.

Brown. Q.When you came into my house, you asked if I had got a fountain in the house - I asked what you meant? A. I did not ask that question.

Brown. He ran through, and ran into the kitchen - the two men rushed in after him, and one of them attempted to strike me. Witness. I saw no violence offered to her by the two men.

Smith. What Brown has stated is the truth - I was not in the house.

WILLIAM BOWHILL . I am a Policeman. On the night of the 16th of February I saw the prosecutor in Battle-bridge, about forty yards from Haddon-place - he told me he had been robbed; his account appeared sensible and correct - he said two women had robbed him; I went with him to the house, No. 3, Haddon-place, which is kept by the prisoner Brown - I know that; I found her there - Smith and her were both in the room when I went into the house; Gates went into the room with me, identified them, and said it was the room they had been in, and that they were the persons who robbed him; I asked Brown what she had to say to it - she said she knew nothing about the robbery, that some man came into the house, and ran away, and she had called out Police - Smith said she was not in the house at the time, that she had just come in - I took them to the station - Brown had 6s. 6d. in silver and 9d. in copper in her pocket; the prosecutor had said he had lost about 6s. 6d.; she said she had had the money before he came to the house - I found nothing on Smith.

Brown. Q.Do you not recollect my calling you into the house, before you saw the man? A. No you did not call me in.

Q. I said the man ran in with his basket, and two young men rushed in after him, and desired you to look after them? A.No; I had not spoken to you that evening. The prosecutor said Brown robbed him, and Smith held his hands the while.

Brown's Defence. The man came into my house and asked if I had got a fountain. - I said I thought the street was the best place for him; two men rushed in and wanted to strike him, and said, "Jack come out;" I went to the door to look for the Police, and saw Smith - I asked her to go and look for a Policeman; she came in; the two men ran away - he took his basket and ran after them, then returned with the Policeman, and said we had robbed him; he was asked which had robbed him, and pointed to Smith - he said the same at the station; I said she was not there, and then he said I assisted to rob him.

Smith's Defence. Brown fetched me into the house; I found this man scuffling with two others; the Police was called - the prosecutor remained in the house, and presently he took his basket and went out - he came back in about twenty-five minutes, with a Policeman, and charged us with robbing him; I was not in the house at the time; he said at the station that I had robbed him, and then accused Brown of it.

WILLIAM BOWHILL. He gave the same account at the station as he has now, that Brown took his money, and Smith held his hands.

BROWN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 40.

[April 11th] SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

JAMES SMITH, JOHN SMITH.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-8
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceDeath; Death

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Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

679. JAMES SMITH and JOHN SMITH were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alexander Thompson , on the 4th of March , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing therein 3 vices, value 12s., his property; and that the said James Smith , before the King's said felony was committed, to wit, at the delivery of the goal of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, at Justice-Hall, Old Bailey, on the 18th of October last, in the name of James Parcells , was convicted of felony .

ALEXANDER THOMPSON . I am a saw maker , and live in Old-street-road , in the parish of Shoreditch. - I keep the house. On the 4th of March these tools were in my shop - I saw the prisoners cross in a direction from Kingsland-road to my shop, a little before four o'clock - I afterwards left the shop, and went into the cellar; I was absent about a quarter of an hour, and while I was in the cellar James Smith stood before the cellar window, appearing to be resting himself (as he is a cripple); when I came from the cellar a person came in, and gave me information - I looked at my window, and found it broken; it was sound before - it had been cut on the Friday before, and mended with putty and glass, which entirely fastened it - I missed three vices from the window, near the aperture; they had cut the putty, removed the glass, and took the vices out of the hole - I immediately suspected James Smith ; I ran down Curtain-road, and saw the prisoners turn into Goff's timber-yard - I threw James Smith down while I collared the other; I secured them both, and told them what I took them for - John Smith immediately put his hand into his pocket, and tried to throw a vice over the paling, and James took a vice out of his pocket; they had each part of the property - they were taken in custody; this is my property.

WILLIAM GOULD. I am a coal dealer. About four o'clock on Monday afternoon, the 4th of March, I was standing in my own shop, and heard somebody cry Police! I ran out of the shop, and saw the prosecutor holding the two prisoners - I picked up the vice.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . The property was given to me - I found two vice handles in John Smith 's pocket.

SILVANUS GILL . I am a Policeman. I produce a certificate of the former conviction of James Parcells , which I procured from Mr. Clark's office - (read) - I was a witness against him; the prisoner James Smith is that man I am certain.

James Smith 's Defence. I met John Smith in Shoreditch: turned down Old-street, and in the Curtain-road he picked up the things, and put them into his pocket; the gentleman came running and caught hold of us; he said we had stolen them out of his window.

John Smith 's Defence. I met this lad; we turned down Curtain-road - I picked up the hand vices, and went under the archway to look at them - this man came and said, "You have got some of my property;" I threw them down myself, and he took me.

JAMES SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 12.

JOHN SMITH - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.[April 12th.]

JAMES SULLIVAN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-9
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

680. JAMES SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Agnes Gilfoy , on the 8th of April , at St. James, Westminster, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 1 bag, value 3d.; 1 handkerchief, value 3d.; 1 key, value 6d.; 1 half-crown, 3 shillings, 2 sixpences, and 2 pence, her property .

AGNES GILFOY . I am single . I live at No. 6, New Cross-place, Golden-square. I was walking near Bond-street on the 8th of April, about half-past two o'clock in the morning; I was in Burlington-gardens - I had a bag, containing a key, and some money; the prisoner knocked me down, and robbed me of it - I am sure he is the man; he was walking in front of me; he struck me on the breast, knocked me down, and took it from me; he did not speak a word - my bag was on my left arm; he took it away - my handkerchief was not in my bag, but in my hand; he took that also - I do not exactly know how much money I had: there were five shillings, at least, in silver; I called Police, and Stop thief! he ran towards Bond-street; when I came up I found him in the custody of the Policeman - I never lost sight of him; I have not a doubt he is the man.

Prisoner. Q. When I came up to you, did you not ask me for two shillings to go home with you? A.That is false, I did not; I never spoke to him.

NICHOLAS STAUNTON . I am a Policeman. I was walking in Bond-street, on the 8th of April - I heard a cry of Stop thief! by Burlington-gardens - I proceeded towards the cry, and saw the prisoner run down Burlington-gardens, towards Bond-street - when I came up to him I laid hold of him, and asked why he ran - he said it was all right; I looked round, and saw the prosecutrix running towards him, crying Stop thief! she said that man had knocked her down, and robbed her of a bag, some money, and a handkerchief; he was then in custody - I found her handkerchief and bag in his trousers pocket - the money, key, and glove were in the bag - here is 6s. 8d., and a key and handkerchief.

Prisoner. Q. Did not she say I was not the man? A. No; she said you had robbed her.

AGNES GILFOY re-examined. This handkerchief, key, and bag, and money, are mine, and what he took from me - I am not in any business.

Prisoner's Defence. I met her; she asked me to go with her, and give her two shillings - I said I had but one, which I gave her - she was as drunk as me; she fell down, and the bag fell down - I took it up, and she sung out Police.

[April 12th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

WILLIAM THOMAS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-10
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

Before Lord Chief Justice Denman.

681. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Bourner , on the 6th of March , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and stealing therein, 1 cap, value 10s.; 1 coat, value 4s.; 1 tea caddy, value 7s.; 1 table cover, value 2s.; 28 domi

noes, value 2s.; 1 sofa cover, value 5s., and 3 stockings, value 1s. 6d., his property .

HARRIET BOURNER . I am the wife of James Bourner , who is guard to a van ; I live at No. 2, Wetmoreland-place , in the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch. On the night of the 6th of March a Policeman brought the prisoner to our house; I then unlocked the parlour-door, went in and found the window thrown quite up, and the blinds open - I missed a tea-caddy, twenty-eight dominoes, a coat, a cap and a sofa cover, which I had taken off the sofa, and folded up, a table-cover and stockings, all of which I had seen in the room about an hour and a half before; they have not been found.

WILLIAM JAMES . I am a silversmith, and lodge at the prosecutor's house. On the night of the 6th of March, about half-past eight o'clock, as I came home, I saw a young man walk from the window, and put these articles very carefully under his arm; he had received the articles from the window - I had suspicion, went to the parlour window, which was wide open, and saw the prisoner in the parlour; I said, "Pray what do you do there?" he made no answer, but jumped out - I grasped at him, but missed him; he ran into the next street; I never lost sight of him - I called the Policeman, and saw him catch him; the other got away with the things - he turned two corners, and I might have lost sight of him for a moment, but not more - the gas threw a light on him in the parlour, and I know his features also.

Prisoner. Q.What distance was I from the Policeman when he caught me? A. At the end of Britannia-street - you was taken about one hundred and fifty yards from the house; I cannot say the exact distance.

GEORGE GREGORY . I am a Policeman. I was on duty between eight and nine o'clock on the evening of the 6th of March, in Britannia-street - I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running, and the last witness running after him; I caught him in my arms, took him back to the house, searched him, and found one shilling and sixpence on him; the window was open, and violence had been used to it by a crow-bar or chisel.

Prisoner. Q. How far did you take me back to the witness? A. I held you in Britannia-street till he came up.

[April 12th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

CHARLES SHADBOLT.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-11
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

Before Lord Chief Justice Denman.

682. CHARLES SHADBOLT was indicted for that he, on the 8th of April , at St. Luke, in and upon John Masters , wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did strike and wound him in and upon his head and face, with intent feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully to obstruct, resist, and prevent his lawful apprehension and detention, for feloniously assaulting the said John Masters, with intent to rob him, for which he was liable by law to be apprehended, imprisoned, and detained .

SECOND COUNT, stating his intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN MASTERS . I work at Mr. Girdler's, a machine-ruler . Early on the morning of last Monday I was going home; I was close at home - I was in Mitchell-street, St. Luke's ; the prisoner came up to me; I did not know him before - he said nothing to me; he walked with me a goodish distance; I then said to him, "I am close at home," and soon after that he put his foot out, and threw me down - I put my hand to my side, and he kicked me in the mouth, and tried to take my watch, by pulling at the chain - I put my hand down to prevent him, and he kicked me in the mouth several times with violence; I did nothing but hallooed out Murder! he put his hand over my mouth; the watchman came up; I was then bleeding, and could hardly stand; I am quite sure the prisoner is the man - I was with him some time - he gave me very violent blows: my face is bruised now by the side of my temple, and blood came from my mouth and nose; it was about one o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner. Q.Where did I first meet you? A.By St. Luke's church - Mitchell-street is close by the church; I did not put any questions to you, nor stop you at all - I did not ask you the way to Brick-lane; I was not drunk - I had but one pint of beer.

COURT. Q.Your face was bruised very much - was it cut at all? A. Yes, under my nose; the skin was broken, and the blood flowed very freely; there was a great deal of blood to be seen on the wall - my skin was mostly cut by my lips; it was broken a little about my eye.

JOHN THWAITES. I am a private watchman of St. Luke's. I heard a cry of murder in Mitchell-street - I went to the place, and found the prosecutor down, and the prisoner with his left-hand over his mouth, trying to stop him from hallooing; Masters was on the ground, all over blood; he was not able to stand when I picked him up - he said he had lost his watch, but it turned out that he had not; there was a great deal of blood about his mouth - he appeared very much injured indeed.

JOHN LAPTHORN . I am a Policeman. On the 8th of April I was on duty in Gee-street, about a quarter to one o'clock in the morning; I heard the cry of murder, and ran towards Mitchell-street - I saw the prosecutor, and the watchman picking him up; the prisoner was running - I followed him round St. Luke's church, and took him; he said, "It ayn't me - there he goes," but there was not another soul in the road; I brought him back, and the watchman said he saw his left hand over the prosecutor's mouth; I got a light, looked at both his hands, and found them covered with blood.

HENRY BEAN . I am a Policeman. I came up, hearing the cry of murder; the watchman was supporting the prosecutor, who could not stand; he said he had been kicked in the mouth - when the prisoner was brought back; I found blood on his shoe, and two small pieces of flesh and skin on his shoe, which is now to be seen - I produce it.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor says I met him in Old-street, took hold of his arm, and knocked him down, intending to rob him: the truth is, I overtook him at the top of Bath-street, when he asked me to show him the way to Brick-lane, and accompanied me - he stumbled down; I attempted to raise him up - he called out murder; I tried to get him up, and being intoxicated myself, I fell over him, and trod on him with my foot; I put my hand over him to endeavour to lift him - he

called out, and I endeavoured to make my way home, thinking I should get into trouble.

JOHN MASTERS . I am a cripple, and have been so all my life.

GUILTY - DEATH on the 2nd and 3rd Counts. Aged 30.[April 12th.]

JOHN GODWIN, GEORGE GODWIN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-12
VerdictsGuilty > with recommendation; Guilty
SentencesDeath; Imprisonment

Related Material

Before Lord Chief Justice Denman.

683. JOHN GODWIN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Emma Conway , on the 22nd of February , at St. Luke, and stealing therein 2 sovereigns; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 2s.; 4 pairs of ear-rings, value 40s.; 1 brooch, value 5s.; 1 cross, value 2s.; 1 thimble, value 6d.; 12 coral beads, value 3s., and 12 brushes, value 2d., her property ; and GEORGE GODWIN was indicted for feloniously receiving 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 20s., part and parcel of the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute.

EMMA CONWAY . I am a widow , and live at No. 3, York-street, Brick-lane , in the parish of St. Luke's - I rent the house. I left the house on Friday, the 22nd of February, about twenty minutes after three o'clock, and fastened the doors perfectly safe; I keep a little toy-shop - it is part of my house; I returned at twenty minutes to five o'clock, and found the back door wrenched open, the bottom hinge broken off, and a vacancy sufficient to admit a boy or a thin person - on going into the house I found a box had been taken out of a chest, placed on the bed, and emptied; there had been two sovereigns and a pair of sugar-tongs in it - a great many papers were strewed about, and a small paper box, containing a pair of gold ear-rings, a black brooch and black cross, a silver thimble, and twelve or fourteen coral beads were gone; I have since seen the paper box; I missed some paints and small brushes from the window; I saw marks of sooty hands or feet on the bottom of the little box, and sooty finger marks on the window curtains, and on a paper by the back door there was a quantity of soot; I know the prisoner John - he lives next door to me; his master is a chimney-sweeper - only a dwarf paling parts our yards; when I went home I saw him looking over the paling, and asked him if he had seen any body near my door; he said, No, nobody had been there, or he must have seen them; I said he must know about it - he said he wished God might strike him dead if he knew any thing of it, or had seen any body, and that nobody had been; (Slater here produced a black cross and other articles) all these things are mine; I have had the cross many years; here are the ear-rings and paints - they were taken from my house that day.

THOMAS FULLER . I live with Mr. Whitton, a chimney sweeper, in York-street - John Godwin is in my master's employ; I remember hearing of Mrs. Conway's house being robbed - John Godwin told me before, that he had seen some nice paints in the window, and he should like to have some; on Friday morning he was going to make his bed, and he told me to go and try to shove Mrs. Conway's back door open, and when I had shoved it open to come and tell him; he told me to knock at the door first, to see if Mrs. Conway was at home, and to buy a penny mouth-organ; I went to the back yard, and she was not at home - I tried to shove the back door open, but could not; I told him I could not, and then he came and shoved it open, and went in - he gave me two little boxes; I did not go in; he told me never to tell of him, and if I did he would give me a good hiding - while I was waiting at the back door I saw him looking into a box which had pieces of paper in it, in Mrs. Conway's house; I heard the sound of spinning something up and catching it, and I said, "Jack, have you got any money?" he said No; he gave me this paper box - there was a silver thimble in it and this brooch; he did not tell me what to do with it- I put them under my bed; I saw him take the paints from the shop window, and put them into his pocket - I saw something like two guineas in his hand; I said,"Why, you have got money?" he said "No, I have not got no money;" I said, "Are not they two sovereigns?" he said, "No, do you think Conway is worth two sovereigns?" I said I did not know; the prisoner George was out in the big yard - he did not see or hear what passed between us; I was taken by the Policeman on the Monday; I did nothing with the box but looked at it- the Policeman asked me if I had a little box; I said Yes, and pulled it from under my bed, and gave it to him - I was in prison for a week, and while there I heard John Godwin asked if he stole the money; he said Yes, he had stolen two guineas - that he gave them to his brother, and his brother gave him 8s. out of it.

ELIZABETH GILLMORE . I live at Clerkenwell. I have known George Godwin three or four months. I gave these two pairs of ear-rings to the Policeman; George Godwin gave them to me on the Sunday evening, when we were playing; I do not know what month it was in; he gave them to me the Sunday before I went before the Magistrate.

JOHN SLATER . I am a Policeman. I received the box and the property in it from Fuller - I took John Godwin, and found 9d. on him; I told him the charge - he denied it, but going to the station-house he told his master and me that he had robbed the house; his master told him to tell the truth, and it would be better for him - I took George Godwin afterwards, and asked him if the ear-rings belonged to Mrs. Conway, and said his brother John had told me he had taken Mrs. Conway's ear-rings, and given them to him; he denied it, and I took him to the station-house, and on the road he said he could not find them till to-morrow morning; he never told me what he had done with them - I received these ear-rings from Gillmore.

John Godwin . My brother knows nothing about it; he asked where I got the things, and I told him I found them.

George Godwin 's Defence. I asked where he got them - he said he found them.

J. GODWIN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his youth.

G. GODWIN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

[April 12th] Confined One Year .

WILLIAM WITHERS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-13
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

Related Material

Before Lord Chief Justice Denman.

684. WILLIAM WITHERS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Hudson , on the 20th of March , at St. Dunstan Stebonheath alias Stepney, and stealing therein 1 chest, value 3s.; 1 dress, value 10s.; 2 petticoats, value 6s.; 2 shifts, value 6s.; 14 handkerchiefs, value 1l. 7s.;

4 bags, value 12s.; 2 aprons, value 6s.; 3 combs, value 1l.; 2 knives, value 13s.; 1 punch-ladle, value 1l.; 1 opera glass, value 4s.; 1 lamp, value 4s.; 1 buckle, value 5s.; 1 box, value 5s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 12s.; 3 fire screens, value 1l.; 10 pairs of stockings, value 1l.; 1 pair of gloves, value 2s.; 1 pair of sleeves, value 2s.; 3 books, value 4s.; 50 shells, value 3s.; 1 miniature, value 1l.; 25 prints, value 5s.; 1 bottle of otto of roses, value 5s.; 1 brush, value 1s.; 1 pair of scissars, value 1s. 6d.; 1 scarf, value 5s.; 1 pair of drawers, value 3s.; 28 ivory counters, value 4s.; 1 purse, value 5s.; 1 shoe, value 2s., and 14 yards of ribbon, value 5s., the goods of John Wyeth .

ELIZABETH HUDSON . I am the wife of George Hudson , and live at Mile-end New-town , in the parish of Stepney. On Wednesday, the 20th of March, I lost a box - I had seen it safe ten minutes before seven o'clock in the evening, standing under the window, close by the parlour door; there is a little entry; it is the property of my sister, whose name is Wyeth, and she had the key; I missed it about ten minutes before eight o'clock that night, when a boy gave an alarm - my husband came down stairs - I followed him, and the box was gone, and the parlour and street doors were open.

GEORGE HUDSON . This is my house, and in the parish of Stepney. I missed the box, and took the prisoner on suspicion of stealing it, just before eight o'clock, near my own door - he passed me as I went towards the street door - I let him go by, as the place was no thoroughfare he went to the end, and stood in amaze - I went up to him, and said, "What do you want?" he said he wanted a pair of prickers - I asked him how long it was since he had been down there before - he said he had not been down there for six months - I said, "You have been to my house and taken a box" - he said he had not;" I took him to my house and asked him what trade he was - he said he was a weaver; I asked where he lived - he said at Coulan's, Swan-street, Bethnal-green; I took him there - Coulan said he worked there, but did not lodge there; I then asked where he did live - he said he was not bound to answer, but he lived at in Cadman's, John-street; I saw Cadman, and afterwards told him Cadman had not seen him for three weeks - he then said he lodged at his mother's; the officer has got the box.

HANNAH WYETH. I am the wife of John Wyeth . This box was at my sister's, and contained this property - I was lodging in her house at the time; there was a nankeen dress, petticoats and a variety of articles, as stated in the indictment in it - it was locked up, and I had the key.

ALEXANDER KNIGHT . The prisoner is my brother-in-law. I know Mr. Hudson - I worked for him; I know Mrs. Wyeth left some trunks to be kept in his parlour - on the 20th of March I was at work at Hudson's, and left work at ten minutes to eight o'clock - as I came down stairs the street door and parlour door were both open, and the top box was gone; I called master - he came down; I did not see the prisoner - I fetched the beadle; the prisoner had been at the house on the Saturday, night before, to pay me 6d. - he came to the outer door; the trunks could not be seen where he stood talking to me, for I stood with the door shut.

CATHERINE COULAN . I live in Spitalfields, not far from the prosecutor's. Withers lodged with me for about a fortnight and four days, and he brought in a box on the 20th of March - he never brought one in before; he brought it into my place - I was in the kitchen; I said,"William, what have you left your mother?" (because he used to live with his mother, and sleep at my house at night); he said "No, I am not coming in yet;" and he put the box down and went out - I never saw him again; the officer found the box at my house exactly in the state as he brought it in.

DANIEL COULAN. I am son-in-law to the last witness - I live with her. On the night in question, when I came home, my mother told me the box had been brought in by Withers, and showed it to me: I know nothing more about it.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. I received the box from the witness - I was eight or nine days finding out where the prisoner lodged; he gave various statements - he never referred me to the witness; I found the box in the kitchen - Mrs. Wyeth produced the key; it is now in the state I received it, and contains the articles in the indictment.

MRS. WYETH. This box is my husband's, and contains all the articles stated in the indictment; every thing in it belongs to me, and was in the box when I left it with my sister.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my work at dark, and went to call for my brother-in-law; a young man met me in the street, and asked me to take care of the box for him till next night; I said Yes; and he helped me to carry it to my lodging, and gave me something to drink - I went on to call on my brother-in-law, and the door being open I went by, not liking his master to see me; and when I passed he came out and said I had taken the box from his house.

[April 13th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

MICHAEL HAGAN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-14
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

685. MICHAEL HAGAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering, on the 10th of April , at St. Andrew, Holborn, the dwelling-house of Abraham Davis , and stealing therein 1 coat, value 10s.; 3 waistcoats, value 10s.; 1 cloak, value 12s.; 1 gown-piece, value 11s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 1s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 30s.; 1 bonnet, value 2l., and 1 pack of cards, value 1s., his property.

ROSETTA DAVIS . I am the wife of Abraham Davis , who keeps a glass-shop on Great Saffron-hill , in parish of St. Andrew, Holborn - we rent the house. On the 10th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was going up stairs, with the key in my hand to open the room door, and saw the prisoner on the first floor stairs, with a bundle under his arm - he was a stranger. I asked where he had been - he said up stairs. I said, where there - he said, up stairs - I asked him again, and he made no reply; I turned round and saw the room door open - I seized hold of him, and called my husband, who secured him; the bundle contained the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth 6l. 12s. at least - it was taken out of the first floor front room, which I had locked, and had the key in my hand - he showed my husband the key which he had opened the door with - five keys were found on him - he was quite a stranger.

ABRAHAM DAVIS . I am the husband of Rosetta Davis - my wife's evidence is correct - these articles are mine.

JOHN NESBIT . I am an officer. When the prisoner was given in custody I found on him five skeleton-keys - I opened the door with one of them.

[April 16th.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

THOMAS EVANS, JOHN PIKE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-15
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceDeath; Death

Related Material

686. THOMAS EVANS and JOHN PIKE , alias JOHN PRITCHARD , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering, on the 11th of October , at the liberty of the Rolls, the dwelling-house of Francis Francis , and stealing therein 50 ozs. of gold, value 150l.; ten ozs. of silver, value 2l. 10s.; 17 spoons, value 7l.; 500 cornelian stones, value 25l. - 300 turquoise stones, value 8l.; 300 garnet stones, value 4l.; and 70 sovereigns, the property of Joseph Halfpenny , and two Bank notes. value 200l., his property .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH HALFPENNY . I live near Islington, and carry on business in Serle's-place, Carey-street, in the liberty of the Rolls - I occupy the back parlour, the workshop, and the yard; I rent them of Francis Francis , who lives there; Evans was in my employ as errand-boy , and had been so about three years - I paid him weekly; I kept the key of the warehouse - I always locked it up myself, and Evans came up to my residence every morning for the key, unless I told him not to do so. On the 11th of October I locked the warehouse and left the premises between two and three o'clock, leaving him on the premises, with May and McDonnell; I gave Evans directions to bring me some oil that evening to my residence - I went home - he did not come with the oil - he did not come next morning as usual to fetch the key, which I had brought home, but I found he had absconded without even asking for his wages - four days' wages were due to him; I came to town about half-past ten o'clock in the morning of the 12th, and found the street door open, as it usually is; my warehouse door was open, and the padlock taken off - no violence had been used, it had been opened by keys, and I found the keys on the premises; I examined the workshop, that had been unlocked, and a key left in the door; I lost the property stated in the indictment out of the counting-house - the whole amount is between 1400l. and 1500l. I have recovered none of the property in the indictment; I did not see Evans until the 26th of March, when I saw him at the station-house - Pike was taken into custody on the night of the 15th of October; I saw him at the Police-office, and heard some conversation between him and Higgins, and heard him say to Higgins, that 50. or 100. was no object - that was all I heard; it was not intended that I should hear it at all: after some examinations Pike was discharged; but before that I went back in a coach with him to the prison - I asked him to tell me the truth about it - he said he could not do it there, but he would in prison, if I could get an order to see him, which I did; he then said he could do nothing about it in that prison, but if I could get him to Clerkenwell prison he might see his friends there, and something might be arranged; about a week after his discharge I met him in Hatton-garden, and said to him,"Well, Pritchard, we disturbed you again on Saturday night" - he said, "Yes, but if you keep disturbing us we shall not be able to do anything, but if you let us rest quiet a while, very likely there will be something done for you." There was a drawer belonging to a pair of scales in the warehouse; on the 11th of October I called Evans to that drawer - there was a parcel in it containing two old seals, an old chain, and an old key, which had been cleaned up; it was for Mr. Page - I called Evans' attention to that parcel; it is very seldom I keep property there; among other things taken that night, that parcel was taken out of that drawer - nobody knew it was there but Evans and me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you ever found these things since? A. No; the money was in an iron chest, about half a yard from that drawer. I never heard of a woman threatening to swear a child against Evans - I am a goldsmith and jeweller - I am also a hackneycoach master - my wife manages that for me - I keep seven hackney-coaches, but no coachmen, nor any weekly servants - I have men to take the coaches out - they never come to the premises in Serle's-place - I had two men in my employ at Serle's-place, and have had ten before now, but they had no knowledge of the premises - they were never in the room by themselves.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Did Evans know where your iron chest was, and that you kept your money there? A. Yes; the chest was under the counter - nobody could see it without going behind the counter; Evans knew I kept money in the iron chest, and where the precious stones and all the property was.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not the workmen go behind the counter? A. Not unless I was there - I never knew them behind the counter when I was there; I do not recollect anybody ever going there.

RICHARD MAY. I was in the employ of Mr. Half-penny on the 11th of October - I remember his going home that day perfectly well; I locked up the workshop, and put the key in a secret place in the passage - Evans knew where it was, because he put it there himself at times - it is a place known to me and the persons in the establishment, but to nobody else, to my knowledge, except to the prosecutor; John McDonnell, who is about forty years old, was there also; about four o'clock I sent Evans with a seal, to take with a parcel given to him by Mr. Halfpenny - he left the workshop for good at four o'clock - he was to take some oil to Mr. Halfpenny's house at Islington, but not to return; his work was over at four o'clock; I left the premises at half-past five, as it was impossible to see to work, and we had no lights at that time - when I left, the back parlour (which is the counting-house) was safe as Mr. Halfpenny had left it, when he took away the key - the padlock was on it, and it was to all appearance safe; McDonnell left about five o'clock - I was the last person there; about half-past seven next morning I went to the premises, having a job to do - I went to where I had placed the key of the workshop the preceding evening - it was gone; I crossed the yard, and found the key in the lock of the workshop, and that lock was unlocked: Evans generally came to work about nine o'clock, but he never came at all that day; I discoverd about half-past ten that the counting-house was open - I went and looked at the cupboard, which was open - I found a phosphorus-box on the counter, and some gold filings about - the place was rausacked; I went and told McDonnell; I then looked at the iron chest, and

found that open - Mr. Halfpenny came in about ten minutes.

Cross-examined. Q. How many apprentices has Mr. Francis? A. I do not know; he has young men working for him, I cannot say how many - I was working there as a jeweller; I am a jeweller now and a cheesemonger - I set up a cheesemonger's shop in Kingsland-road on the 12th of November, and from 1829 to May, 1832, I was also a cheesemonger; I do not consider mine an extensive trade.

JOHN McDONNELL . I was in the service of Mr. Half-penny. I left on the 11th of October about a quarter to five o'clock - all was safe then; I came in the morning about half-past nine, and found the premises as May has described.

JOSEPH HIGGINS (Police-constable F 35). I know Pike; I heard of this robbery on the 13th of October, and on the 15th of October I saw Pike in Middle-row, Holborn, with the prisoner Evans - I knew Pike well before; I had seen him a few days before in a fustian jacket very shabby - on the 15th of October when I saw him with Evans; they both had new clothing on - apparently every thing was new, shirts, stockings, clothes, and every thing; they walked very quick past me - I was in company with our serjeant; they did not run, but walked very fast past us - I ran and got up to them; Evans put a handkerchief before his face, and turned back as if to pick something up - they turned back down as far as Glo'ster-court; they then both ran off like a shot as fast as they could run, and in Fox-court I lost Evans all in a moment; I secured Pike, and asked him who it was that was with him - he said he had no knowledge of him; I said, "Your name is Pike" - he said, "What do you want with me? my name is not Pike; I know nothing of the name;" I said, "I want you on a charge of felony;" he said,"I am a respectable man, and live at a bookseller's in Bow-street;" I said that was all in my way, and he would have an opportunity of seeing his friends, for I was going to Bow-street; we went along, I and Stace having fast hold of him - he said he was very thirsty, and in Long-acre I consented to his having some porter, and in the house he took a purse out of his pocket - he refused to let me look at it - I forced it out of his hand, and found four sovereigns in it; we went along, and I said, "Now this is the shop you say you live at, I will go in with you" - he said,"It is of no use telling a lie, I don't live there at all;" I took him the following morning before the Magistrate, and in the outer office he said, "It is of no use your pursuing the charge, and if you don't there will be a friend of mine here in ten minutes who will stand 50. or 100.;" Mr. Halfpenny was close by me (I wanted him to hear it) - I said, "What did you say?" and he repeated the words again; he was examined and remanded from time to time for six weeks - he told me at two different times, in Mr. Halfpenny's presence, that it was no use keeping him there, for the man who had the property he should not have an opportunity of seeing as long as he was kept there, but if they had him turned up, or let him out on bail, he had no doubt he could make it all right; I was unable to apprehend Evans up to this time - I had been looking for him all the time; after repeated examinations the Magistrate discharged Pike; I saw Evans in custody afterwards, and Pike was taken the same evening again.

COURT. Q.When you took him you told him it was for felony - he made various excuses, and said if he could get out, there was a man who would stand 50. or a 100., and he could do no good in that prison; but if let out on bail he could make all right? A. Yes; I had charged him with being concerned in breaking into this house - I charged him with Mr. Halfpenny's robbery - he made these observations afterwards; he was present when I signed the charge.

JAMES STACE (Police-serjeant F. 12). On the 15th of October I was with Higgins, and saw Evans and Pike, and followed them - I saw Evans run away, and I ran after him - Higgins' evidence is correct; Pike said he lived in Bow-street.

GEORGE HADDINGTON . I am a constable of Hatton-garden. On the night of the 26th of March I took Pike into custody, hearing that Evans had been taken; on the 27th they were both brought to Hatton-garden, and locked up separately - I went with Mr. Halfpenny into the lockup place, and asked Evans what he had to say about his master's property; he said he could not say any thing till he saw his uncles, Joe and Jem, and asked me to go after them - he said, would Mr. Halfpenny lend him any money, and if he behaved well to him he might not be at all the loss - Mr. Halfpenny would not lend him any; I took out 1s. and lent it him - he was at that time charged with this robbery, and Mr. Halfpenny was present.

Cross-examined. Q. Had any body sent him 6d. worth of brandy? A. No; I had the keys of the place, and am satisfied nobody went in to him - I knew his friends, but know nothing of his father quarreling with him, or taking his wages from him, which made him go to Birmingham - I have known Evans about eight months, but did not know he was in Mr. Halfpenny's employ - I know his uncles, and went to them for him.

Q. Did you not tell the boy he was sure to be bellowsed? A. I did not; I have heard the phrase - I never said he was likely to be hanged, nor try to terrify him in the least.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You are the gaoler of the lock-up place? A. I am; he had no brandy at all.

ELEANOR FRANCIS . I am the wife of Francis Francis ; we live at No. 8, Serle's-place - we let the back parlour and workshop to Mr. Halfpenny. On the evening of the 11th of October, a little after six o'clock, I heard a voice, which I knew to be Evans' - I knew it perfectly well - the voice came from the passage which leads to the counting-house or warehouse; it appeared to be about six yards from the counting-house - the voice was speaking to somebody else, and I heard another voice answer; but I did not hear what they said - I can be certain the voice I heard was Evans' - I stated that at Hatton-garden; and while I was saying that, Evans replied that he could account for being there - I knew nothing of the robbery till Mr. Halfpenny came in the morning.

Cross-examined. Q. How many apprentices has your husband? A. Three boys; he has no men - the first door in the passage is my husband's counting-house, where our apprentices work till nine o'clock at night - further on in the passage there is a middle door, which you must pass

through to get to Mr. Halfpenny's counting-house - the kitchen stairs are between that door and Mr. Halfpenny's.

COURT. Q. Did any of your apprentices abscond? A. No.

FRANCIS FRANCIS . I am the husband of Eleanor Francis. I was at home on the evening of the 11th of October, and saw the reflection of a light over the shutter of Mr. Halfpenny's counting-house; the shutter does not come within six inches of the top - there was a light, certainly, in Mr. Halfpenny's warehouse - it was from ten minutes to a quarter after six o'clock; it was a very unusual circumstance - I went down and mentioned it to my wife.

MR. MALLET. I am clerk to the Magistrates at Hatton-garden. I took this examination of Evans from his own mouth, and afterwards read it over to him, and it was signed by Mr. Rogers, the Magistrate - Evans did not sign it; he was not asked - (read)

The prisoner. Evans, says, "I went for the gallon of oil that evening, and to the two places, Mr. Evans states; I left at a quarter to four o'clock, and, on account of it being so early, I thought I must come back again, and I just went to the yard door. - I saw the shop was locked; I could see no key in the door, and went out again; that convinced me there was nobody at work - it was about half-past five o'clock. I took the oil bottle home to my father's. I might have muttered something to myself in the passage; when I came to the middle door in the passage it was open, and I recollect saying to myself - oh! this door is open for a wonder! that is all. I am quite innocent of the robbery."

MRS. FRANCIS. I heard two voices - I cannot tell one word that was said.

Cross-examined. Q. Then it must have been something like a muttering? A. No, it was not; it was ten minutes or a quarter-past six o'clock - I am certain I heard two voices.

JOSEPH HALFPENNY . Evans had no business whatever at my warehouse at six o'clock; the job he was about was to be done about half-past three - he was to take it home, fetch the oil, and bring it to Islington.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am an officer. I went to the prosecutor's premises about half-past ten o'clock on the 12th of October; here is the padlock of the outer door, and the key in it; I found a crow-bar or jemmy, a phosphorus-box and matches, and three skeleton-keys, one of which fitted the padlock of the warehouse door, and the other opens the iron chest; the other will not fit the iron chest - there was a wax candle, which was not lighted, but one seemed to have been burnt.

MR. HALFPENNY. These skeleton-keys do not belong to me.

Evans' Defence. I am quite innocent.

Pike's Defence. I have very much to complain of the prosecutor and Policeman making the statements they have - it is very easy to impute words to me, and very difficult for me to reply to them; there has been a gross perversion of words: Is it likely I should offer an officer 50l. or 100l., in the presence of a prosecutor, not to press the charge? Is it consistent with common sense? it appears Mr. Higgins is always offered money by every body he takes; when I first met him I said my name was Pritchard which certainly was false, but that is my mother's name, and she actually lives in Bow-street; Stace said he thought there was a bookseller of the name mentioned in Bow-street, and when they took me to Bow-street I requested them to let me call on my friends, but they refused till they went first, and it is not very probable I would allow them to alarm my friends, unless I went with them - I said I would not let them go at that time of night, but next morning I asked if he had been - he said he had not; he says I said I expected a friend in ten minutes - now, he knows I could not send out to any body at all: as to my promising to make it all right, I appeal to Mr. Flower the solicitor, whether I said so; he came accompanied by Mr. Halfpenny to the House of Correction; Flower asked whether I was able and willing to give them information - I said it did not lay in my power, and that I had said over and over again I knew nothing of the robbery: Halfpenny said, "You have said so twenty times, but I know better"- Flower said, "Are you willing to give us information?" I said I was willing if able, but I knew nothing about it - I was always beset by somebody; I said if I was at liberty and could get information, I would certainly do it, if able- I had several with me about giving information; but as to saying if I was out I could see the man who had got the property, it does not stand to reason that I should say so: I was eight or nine weeks in custody, and then discharged - since that there has not been another shadow of evidence produced but what was on my examination then; as to being with Evans on the 15th of October, it was not Evans; there was a witness at Hatton-garden who was of consequence to me, but they found her deposition was not of advantage to them, and she is not here; she could prove Evans was actually destitute, and in want of victuals and money, and she supplied him with food and 7d., instead of being in new clothes that day.

JAMES STACE . I knew Evans before, and am quite sure the man with Pike was Evans; they were both dressed in new clothes from top to toe, and Evans held a pocket-handkerchief up to his face of the same pattern as Pike had on.

JOHN McDONNELL . I was with the officer when Pike was taken, and am sure Evans is the man who was with him - they were both dressed in new clothes.

Pike. That man has worked for the prosecutor three years; he did not come to any of the examinations to state that Evans was the boy.

Evans. What Higgins says is false; he apprehended me once for picking pockets.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. HALFPENNY. Q. Is this paper your hand-writing; it has just been sent to me anonymously - look at the name but do not unfold it? A. I do not think it is - it is not.

Q.Read the document now, and tell me if you will swear it is not your hand-writing? A.This appears like my hand-writing - it is mine; I did not lose any houes; I signed this paper to get part of my property back - I got some of it back, but none of that which is stated in the indictment; I believe the person's name who I signed this for is Jackson; I did not think it was my writing at first.

COURT. Q.This is dated 21st December, 1832, and says "I hereby agree not to prosecute any party connected with the robbery of my house, which took place on the 11th of October," who did you sign that for? A. A man named Jackson, because he promised to bring me my property back; I signed it with that view,

and to get a conviction against him and all the parties; I expected to see all the parties; I have recovered about 170l. worth of my property; I obtained it from a cabman, who rode up my yard, and rang the bell - it was stones of different descriptions; when I said I had recovered none, I meant none of the property in the indictment - I understood that to be the question asked me. EVANS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

PIKE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

JAMES CONNOLLY, HENRY COOKE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-16
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceDeath; Death

Related Material

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

687. JAMES CONNOLLY and HENRY COOKE , alias RICHARD BEACHMAN , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Green , on the 23rd of March , at St. James, Westminster, and stealing therein 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 purse, value 1s. 6d., and three sovereigns, the property of James Balcombe .

MARY BALCOMBE . I am the wife of James Balcombe , who is a hair-dresser ; we lodge on the first floor in Blenheim-street , in the parish of St. James, Westminster, in the house of Thomas Green, who lives in the house. On the 23rd of March, at ten minutes before seven o'clock in the evening, I went out, I locked my room door, and left the key in the landlord's room down stairs - I was absent about twenty-five minutes; when I came home I took the wrong key up by mistake, and could not open the door; and as I went down to change the key I heard a noise, and looked round and saw two men come out of my room. I called out, "Hallo, what do you want there?" they said they were only going to inquire for a friend, and at the same time they were rushing past me; I caught one by the coat, and followed them down stairs, calling thieves - Mrs. Green opened the door of her room, with a light in her hand - she alarmed the men in the shop, who ran into the street - she came to my assistance, and we stopped both the men in the passage, by the door, but they got out - I followed one to the corner of the house, where I saw my husband take hold of one of them - he had ran out on hearing the alarm - he took Connolly; the other was followed as far as Blenheim-steps, and was not taken that night. I have no doubt about Connolly, for he was taken in my sight. Cooke was the other man, I swear positively - I knew him to be the same man when I saw him, and I swore positively to him; I was present when Connolly was searched - nothing was found on him, but in a pitcher of water, which stood in the shop under where he stood, a purse was found containing three sovereigns, a silk handkerchief, and three skeleton-keys - I lost nothing from the room but the purse, handkerchief and three sovereigns - it was my purse, and contained that money - it was left in a drawer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long after the transaction was Cooke taken? A.More than a fortnight - I never said I did not think he was the man - it was dark when I came home - I was rather confused - I kept hold of the skirt of one of their coats till I got to the bottom of the stairs, but I saw them both plainly when they stopped in the passage - the struggle lasted not more than ten minutes - we had a candle in the passage.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How far is your house from Blenheim-steps, where Connolly was taken? A. It is not more than ten houses from our house - I only took hold of one of their coats - Connolly was brought into the shop after he was taken - there was only one person in the shop, whom my husband was shaving - there was a crowd round the door, and a man came in before he went out - nobody else came into the shop - other people stood by the door - there might be four or five persons altogether in the shop when the pitcher was searched, but there was no more at that end of the shop; they had not been round the prisoner - I cannot say who might have gone near the pitcher - when I came down there was not more than five persons in the shop - he denied all knowledge of the things in the pitcher, but I saw him put something down - I told the Magistrate so - I never said, that when I went out I found the street door open.

COURT. Q. Are you sure your door was locked? A.Quite sure.

JAMES BALCOMBE . I am the husband of the last witness. When this happened I was in the shop, at work as hairdresser, and heard my wife give an alarm; I ran out, and the moment I got to the corner I caught Connolly; my wife was close behind him - I saw the landlady running up towards the steps after Cooke - I cannot swear to him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How far are the steps from your house? A.About ten houses.

FRANCES GREEN . I live in this house. I had a child in my arms; on hearing the alarm I went into the pass age with the candle in my hand - it is a narrow passage; I can swear to both the prisoners - I went out in pursuit when they ran away - I have not the least doubt of them in the world.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You was not frightened? A. I was rather alarmed - the passage is about ten yards long - the prisoners rushed by me as quick as they could - I instantly followed them, and saw their faces - they could not get out of the door so quick as they wished - they stood sideways, and looked me in the face, both of them - the candle was not above a yard from the door - I had it in my hand, and my child in my arms - I was rather alarmed - the child is four years and a half old - I did not see Cooke again for more than a fortnight - I cannot tell the colour of his coat or cravat, I took most notice of his face - he had a black hat on - I saw his face and his hat too.

FRANCIS PARTINGTON . I am a tailor. I live two doors from Green. On the evening in question I went from home about five minutes after seven o'clock, and as I went up New Marlborough-street I passed the two prisoners about twenty yards from the house - they were walking up and down the street.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you know Cooke? A.Not before - I did not speak to him - it was darkish.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. About half-past seven o'clock I was sent for from the office - I ran round to Blenheim-street and found Connolly sitting in the shop, on a form, by himself - I made him stand up to search him - I found nothing on his person except a latch key - the prosecutor's wife said, "I think he has dropped something, for I think I heard him drop something; and he seemed to be doing something before I came in;" I took a candle, and the prosecutor drew a

pitcher of water from under where he sat; he put his hand in and drew out this purse and silk handkerchief, quite wet, and one skeleton-key; I found two other skeleton-keys in the pitcher; the prosecutor afterwards gave me a crow-bar, a dark-lantern, and a phosphorous-box; and on the Monday morning I went to the place, opened the street door with the latch-key, and the room door with the skeleton-key.

JOSEPH HIGGENS . I apprehended Cooke on this charge and another charge, on the 29th of March, at a new beer-shop in Crown-street, Soho; I found a phosphorus-box and a crooked chisel in the room he lodged in.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How do you know he lodged there? A. The key I found in his pocket opened the room door; he told me it was the key of his room door - he did not say where the room was; I went there by information.

MRS. BALCOMBE. The handkerchief is my husband's, and the purse is ours, and contains the money we had.

Cooke's Defence. I never saw Connolly in my life.

CONNOLLY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

COOKE - GUILTY * - DEATH . Aged 24.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-17
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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OLD COURT. THURSDAY, APRIL 11TH.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

688. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away a forged 5l. note' with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , well knowing it to be forged . - To which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 45. - Transported for Life .

JONATHAN LANGLEY.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-18
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

689. JONATHAN LANGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 6 rings, value 20l.; 1 fruit-knife, value 10s.; 1 gold chain, value 2l.; 1 gold cross, value 15s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 30s.; 1 bracelet, value 2s.; 1 oz. of coral beads, value 12s., and 4 shirtstuds, value 4s., the goods of Frances Williamson Susannah Lea , in the dwelling-house of William Lester . - To which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Life .

EDWARD EVANS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-19
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

690. EDWARD EVANS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David William Hall , on the 29th of March , and stealing 4 coats, value 2l.; 5 pairs of trousers, value 2l.; 2 pairs of breeches, value 10s.; 4 waistcoats, value 30s.; 1 sheet, value 3s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 3s.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 3s.; 1 knife and fork, value 1s., and 1 pair of gloves, value 6d., the goods of Daniel Hubbard .

DANIEL HUBBARD . I lodge in Russell-court, in the parish of St. Paul, Covent-garden ; I rent the room of Mr. Hall - I do not know his Christian name: I am a waiter at a gentleman's house; I have the back room in the upper part of the house - I keep the key of it. I left my room about eight o'clock in the morning of the 29th of March; I locked the door, and put the key into my pocket - I have not a doubt that I locked the door; I swear I locked it - I returned about half-past twelve at night; I found my room door open - there did not appear to have been any force used to the lock; I missed this property when I came to examine; it was worth 6l. or 7l. - I also lost two tea-spoons, two salt-spoons, and three shirt-pins; I did not see them again till the Sunday following, when I saw him at Stone's, (the officer) house - I saw the whole of the clothes there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it not because you usually lock your door that you say you did so that morning? A. I will not swear it positively, but to the best of my recollection I locked it; I have not found the spoons and pins.

COURT. Q. Does your door shut with a catch lock? A. A common lock, with a handle - I am certain it was shut, and to the best of my knowledge it was locked.

DANIEL STONE . I am a Policeman. On the 29th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing at the bottom of St. Martin's-lane, and saw the prisoner in Hemming's-row, with a bag and a handkerchief; I had seen him before, and followed him - I saw him first go on one side of the street, then on the other, and look behind him; I followed him as far as Green-street, Leicester-square; I then went up, and asked what he had got - he said clothes; I asked him whose they were - he said they were his own: I asked where he brought them from - he said that was another man's business; I said I should stop him on suspicion - I did so, and took him into a public-house; he remained there till I got more assistance - he was very resolute, and said he would not be stopped; I got further assistance, and secured him; I took possession of the bundle, and now produce it.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not tell you he had bought them of a gentleman's servant? A. Yes, when he got to the station, but not till then; it is not above ten minutes' walk - he said he bought them of a gentleman's servant that day, for 2l. 8s.; I did not find the spoons - I found no housebreaking implements on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY of larceny only . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

ELIZABETH MYDDLETON.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-20
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

691. ELIZABETH MYDDLETON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 1st of March , 2 pairs of shoes, value 8s.; 2 shirts, value 6s.; 1 penknife, value 1s., and 1 night-gown, value 18d, the goods of William James Reeve , well knowing them to have been stolen . (See the case of Edward Martin , page 330.)

WILLIAM JAMES REEVE . I live in Lamb-street , in the parish of St. Ann, Limehouse. On the 1st of March my father fastened my house up; I did not see him do it: I only know when the prisoner was taken into custody, on Saturday, the 2nd of March, a pair of shoes were produced by a Policeman, which are mine; when I got up at six o'clock on the morning of the 2nd of March, I found my apartments, which are in front of the house, all disturbed, and things scattered about; I missed a variety of articles, but nothing but the shoes and penknife belonging to me were found.

CATHERINE REEVE . I am the wife of William James Reeve , and live at No. 4, Lamb-street. On the night of the 1st of March I went round the lower part of the house, and it was all fast - the front and back doors were

locked and bolted - the front and back parlour windows were fastened; the kitchen window was shut, but not fastened - it is a hanging sash, and opens in and out; I saw that it was shut when I went to bed - I was the last person up; my mother and father have part of the house; my husband's father came down first in the morning - he is not here; I came down after my husband, about a quarter after six, and found the house as my husband has described; a desk was taken from the sideboard, and the contents taken out and strewed about the floor - the drawer was taken from the table and laid on the floor, and four pocket-handkerchiefs taken from that drawer, and four pairs of gloves, two linen aprons, a pair of shoes belonging to myself, which had been worn, and two pairs of shoes belonging to my husband; the house had been entered by the back kitchen window - a mug and several other things which had been placed there were removed, and laid on the floor - I had left the mug on the windowledge, and other things, as usual, when I went to bed; the window was shut as when I left it - my father had found the street door open, and the back door also; I lost two shirts of my husband's, and one night-gown, which the Policeman brought to our house on Saturday morning, with other things; I knew nothing of either of the prisoners before.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.How far do you live from Mill-wall? A.About three quarters of a mile.

EDWARD WILLIAM WIGGINS. I am a pawnbroker, and live at No. 80, Broad-street, Ratcliff-cross. I have two shirts, a bed-gown, and pin-cloth, which I took in pawn from the prisoner in the name of White, on Saturday morning, the 2nd of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock - she said they belonged to herself; I live about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know her before? A. Yes, for four years - she often pawned at another shop where I had lived, but not at this shop; she then pledged in the name of Myddleton - I did not recollect her, not having served her for a considerable time; grown people generally say things are their own.

COURT. Q. Did she ever before pledge in any name but Myddleton? A. No, I have left the shop she used to pledge at fifteen months.

JAMES LAWSON . I am a Policeman. I searched Myddleton at her house, on the 2nd of March, about three or four o'clock in the afternoon, and found two pairs of shoes and one pair of boots in her pocket, and a shirt in her hand; she said the shirt belonged to her husband and the shoes to her daughter; I found the table-cloth in the house, that belonged to Reeve's mother - Myddleton rented the house, and Martin lodged there, and slept in the next room to her.

Cross-examined. Q.This was at Mill-wall? A. Yes; I understand she has a husband who is employed by Mr. Fuller, a builder; she knew Martin was in custody when I took her; the house has been a lodging-house for seamen, but Martin was the only lodger at that time.

MRS. REEVE. These shoes are mine; I had seen them the night before the robbery, under the table by the window; the night-gown is mine - I know it by a mark on it; I had seen it the night before - it was taken from the back of a chair; this shirt is my husband's, and was there the night before, and another shirt also.

Prisoner's Defence. Martin lived four years and a half with me - he was absent about four months, and then returned; he gave me the things to pawn for him, saying his sister was dead, and had left them to him; he gave me his monthly note to pawn them for him - the shoes belong to my daughter.

NOT GUILTY .

ELIZABETH MYDDLETON.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-21
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

692. ELIZABETH MYDDLETON was again indicted for feloniously receiving 1 painting, framed, value 15s., and 1 tea-pot, 2s., the goods of Augustin Scheuren (to the stealing of which Edward Martin pleaded guilty), well knowing them to be stolen .

AUGUSTIN SCHEUREN . On the night of the 27th of January , at eleven o'clock, when I went to bed, my house was all fastened; I got up next morning about half-past seven - my daughter was down stairs before me, and called me down; I found the till broken open, and some halfpence gone - I missed a table-cloth, a picture, and china tea-pot; the house was entered by four iron bars being taken out of the cellar window, and a door which was padlocked was forced open - they had then got up stairs; I found all the doors open - the tea-pot was taken, and the lid of it had fallen off at the door, and a penny loaf which laid with it; I found the painting in Myddleton's lower room, hanging up, and a piece of writing paper was pasted over the name of the Dutch vessel which the picture represented - we took the piece of paper off, and the name of the ship and the captain was under it; I keep a beer-shop - I saw Martin there two days before the robbery.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the picture hang in the room? A. Yes - the tea-pot stood on a sideboard.

JAMES LAWSON . I went to search Myddleton's house on the 2nd of March - I found the painting hanging up, when I took Martin there; I afterwards took the prosecutor to the house - he identified it; it hung in the front room - a piece of plain paper was pasted over the name of the vessel; Myddleton was not at home then - I saw her afterwards; she said she had bought it twelve months ago.

Prisoner. I said two months. Witness. I am sure she said twelve months.

Cross-examined. Q. How long after you apprehended Martin did you take it in your possession? A.About an hour and a half - I noticed it there when I took him; I am sure she said she had had it twelve months, and the tea-pot the same time; she had got forty duplicates.

AUGUSTIN SCHEUREN. It is my picture, I am sure - I have had it fifteen years.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the picture about two months before, with the tea-pot, as I told the man; that is my lid on the teapot - I gave two shillings for it.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM DAVIS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-22
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Before Lord Chief Justice Denman.

693. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Hutchinson , and with a certain sharp instrument striking and cutting him, with intent of his malice aforethought to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable or do him some grievous bodily harm.

JAMES HUTCHINSON . I live in Tudor-place, Tottenham-

court-road. The prisoner was articled to me for three years; he had been with me three times - the last time he came was the latter end of September last, I think - I am a journeyman carpenter . On the 22nd of February , in the morning, I set him to work, to smooth over part of the new floors of two houses adjoining mine - I went to call him to breakfast, and found him talking to a man named Pearse, a bricklayer, who has been his ruin, for he has led him into a great deal of bad company, and he has come here to swear for him - the prisoner had not began his work; his conduct has been very bad for some time - I told him, while at breakfast, if he would be a good boy in future, I would look over his past conduct, and not to talk to that man; he said nothing, but went to work, and about eleven o'clock, I found him laying his full length on the floor he was to work at; he had not even opened the shutters - I said I had better fetch him a pillow; he gave me a saucy answer - I said, if he persevered in his conduct, as he had done, he should go about his business - I was going to open the shutters; he jumped up - I thought he was going to his work, and before I had got them half open I felt a blow or stun against me, behind my hip bone - it was done so quick, that before I could turn myself round, I caught another stab in the middle of my thigh, and he swore and d-d his soul, and said he would murder me; and when I turned myself round, he was coming to catch me in my body, and he struck me with a chisel again - (it was that he struck me with at first) - I caught the chisel from him the third time, and knocked him down; I was obliged to wrest it from him - I had some struggle to get it from him, and was obliged to throw him down to get it - I received two very severe wounds from him; he stabbed me twice before I could turn round - the first blow was a stab, and the second a stab in the thigh; when I got him down I fell on him - I was confined to my bed several weeks with the blows; I did not turn him out of the house - I believe I pushed him out at the door, but I fell backwards in a faint, and was obliged to hold my thigh.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He was apprentice d to you? A. He was articled for three years; I received 5l. with him, and 3l. they owe me - I was to have 12l., but I never knew where his mother lived; I sent to her for the money about Christmas - the prisoner did not tell me he had desired her not to give me the money, because I did not teach him any trade; I did not take him to Political unions - he belonged to one before I knew him, which is fifteen months ago; he belonged to one at Benbows' Commercial coffee-house - I have seen him there, but do not believe I ever went with him; his mother has found him money to buy arms with, but not tools - I have got a fowling piece, and a brace of pistols; I had a weapon called a macharoni - I sold it to a person who made many hundreds of them; I bought it for 8s. 6d. - I bought it to protect my premises.

Q. It was invented, I believe, by Colonel Macharoni , to fight against the government? A. I do not know; I never saw one until the boy brought one into my house - my wife took a pistol from him, which he attempted to shoot me with; I believe he got his weapon broken at a public meeting, and it was of no use - I was persuaded, like many more, to have one; I never said I would murder the Duke of Wellington with it - I was never taken up; I got into a scuffle with Mr. Lee, the head clerk of the ordnance department, and took him to the office with a warrant - I was once taken up for striking a Policeman, who insulted me one morning; I was bound over to keep the peace towards Mr. Lee, as I called him an old coward on leaving the office; he went back and swore the peace against me - after I wrested the chisel from the prisoner, I jumped up; my trousers and shoes were all bloody, and I pushed him out at the door - I cannot say whether he left the house, for I fell back fainting; I believe he fell with his face on the joists; I cannot say whether his face bled - I never struck him, nor did I say I would murder him; he did not cry murder three times - I believe he did once, when he fell, and me upon him, and I wrested the chisel from him - I never wanted to compromise this; his mother has been to me fourteen or fifteen times, and brought a witness with her - I never offered to compromise it for 20l., and say I would go to America; nor that I would take half my recognizance; the witness Saunders was never in my house - I never saw Sarah Ray; a young woman came to the institution one night - I never saw her with my eyes.

Q. Are you blind with one eye? A. Yes; I never saw her at all - I cannot say who Mrs. Davis might have on the landing, but she only brought one woman into my room - I never said, if I made a flaw in the indictment that would blackguard me - Mrs. Davis came to me when I was in bed, before I went to the Magistrate; I then said I did not want to injure him, and, if she paid the doctor's bill, I would not go before the Magistrate; I did not kick the prisoner in the presence of West - it is West's son and Pearse who have ruined him - West keeps a disorderly house; one of my apprentices was convicted yesterday.

EDWARD PARKER . I am a Policeman. On the 22nd of February, I went to the prosecutor's house in Tudor-place, and saw the prosecutor laying on two chairs, bleeding, with two severe wounds in his thigh and hip; I found a chisel there all bloody - his clothes were cut in various places; I saw no other cuts on his person - he made a charge against the prisoner; I looked for him, and found him on Monday, the 26th of February, in Oxford-street, and told him I wanted him to go with me - he said he would go; and in Tottenham-court-road, he told me he had stabbed Mr. Hutchinson; I did not tell him what I took him for; he told me he had done it; I said before the Magistrate, that in Tottenham-court-road, he said he had done it, and I should hear the rights of it at the watch-house - he said he had stabbed him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate he said he had stabbed him? A. No; I did not give it a thought - nobody was present; I told the Magistrate he said he had done it, and I thought that was just the same, and I did not think of it.

JOHN FREDERICK ABRAM. I am assistant surgeon to Mr. Griffiths. On the 12th of February, I saw the prosecutor at his house, in Tudor-street; he had received some severe wounds from a sharp instrument - they were clear incised wounds, one near the joint of the hip, the other about the centre of the exterior of the thigh; I found cuts about his clothes, but no other wound on his body - they were not dangerous wounds,

not calculated to do any great harm - they would not maim him; they were about three quarters of an inch deep, and must have been inflicted with great violence, I think.

ANN HUTCHINSON. I am the prosecutor's daughter-in-law. I was sweeping the passage down stairs in my father's house, and heard a noise next door, about ten o'clock in the morning; I heard William Davis say to my father "D-n your blood, I will murder you;" I looked out to see what was the matter; I saw my father take William Davis by the collar, and throw him down; I looked into the door of the building - I saw my father have the boy by the collar, and throw him down on his back; I saw my father struggling with the chisel to take it out of his hand, and he attempted to stab him in the breast while he was attempting to take it out of his hand; my father jumped up, and Davis jumped up - father pushed him out of the door; I rang the bell for my mother to come down, and my father fell down from loss of blood (fainting); the prisoner went up stairs, came down again, and went away - he was not up stairs a minute; he had nothing in his hand when he came down - he did not say what he went up stairs for.

Cross-examined. Q. You saw him after this took place? A. Yes - his face was not bleeding.

JOHN BISHOP. I am an upholsterer and cabinet-maker. My daughter came to me rather terrified, and said, "Father, Mr. Hutchinson is lying bleeding to death, the boy has stabbed him;" I put on my coat and hat, and went and found the prosecutor in his own room.

EMMA BISHOP. I am the daughter of the last witness. On the day this happened I saw William Davis give Mr. Hutchinson the wounds - he was in the building, working there; I do not know whether Hutchinson had his face or back to him - I did not see Davis strike him, but I saw him bleeding - the blood came from his thigh; I heard the bell ring as I was going down stairs; Mr. Hutchinson was then laying down; I heard nothing said between them - I went to my father, and said the boy had stabbed him; I said so because I saw Mr. Hutchinson on the floor bleeding - I said the boy had done it, because I heard somebody say William Davis did it; Davis was by the door when it was said - he said nothing; I do not know whether he heard what was said - Mrs. Hutchinson came down stairs, went up again, and brought some clothes, and as she came down Davis went up; Mrs. Hutchinson laid hold of him, and asked him, what he did that for - he said, "D-n your eyes, if you don't loose me, I will serve you the same;" I saw Mr. Hutchinson go up stairs, and lay on two chairs, bleeding - Davis went away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say Hutchinson had struck him? A. I think he said Hutchinson had kicked him and knocked him about - the prisoner had a little cut on his lip; it was only bleeding a little - he wiped it off with his handkerchief; it did not bleed much.

Prisoner's Defence. My master was in the constant habit of ill-using me, ever since I refused to go to the Political unions with him - he restricted me to come home by nine o'clock, and if not at home then, he locked me out; he was constantly quarreling with me because I would not write to my mother for money - I was kneeling down to my work, which I was obliged to do, he came and kicked me, and accused me of telling tales, which I denied; I got up to prevent his hitting me again, he knocked me down, kept kicking me in the ribs, and told me to be gone and never come near the place again.

JAMES WEST . I am a cabinet-maker, and live in the same house as the prosecutor. I was coming out of my room door and heard a cry of murder, in Stone's house adjoining; I went to the parlour, and the prisoner was laying across the rafters or joists - the prosecutor was standing over him; he said, "D-n you, get up," and gave him a kick - I saw that; the prisoner said, "Let me get up," and as he attempted to rise, I saw the prosecutor strike him in the mouth with his fist, but at that time the prosecutor was wounded; I did not see the wound given - the prosecutor said, "The rascal has stuck an inch and a half chisel into my thigh;" he kicked the prisoner in the side, and struck him in the the mouth - I have had no quarrel with the prosecutor; he claims 9s. 6d. for work which Stone, my landlord, has paid him.

GEORGE PEARSE. I am a bricklayer and plasterer, employed by Mr. Stone, at his house, in Tottenham-court-road. On the 22nd of February the prisoner came and asked my leave to open the shutters of the house, to let some light in; I was on the scaffold at work at the time - the prosecutor came and ordered the prisoner in, but what he said I cannot tell: in about ten minutes I heard a scuffle, and heard Hutchinson say if he did not get out he would murder him, and I heard the prisoner cry murder three times distinctly; I was at the window of the room: it was certainly the prisoner's voice, for there is a great difference between them; I got off the scaffold, went round and heard the prisoner say, "Give me my shoes, and I will go;" I then returned to work; I have known Hutchinson two years, and know he had a macharoni.

JAMES HUTCHINSON . Pearse was not within twenty yards of the place - he was quite on the other side of the premises.

ELIZA LOWNDES . My husband is a porter. I saw the prisoner on the day in question; his mouth was bloody, and his cheek quite black - I was with his mother on the 3rd of April, at the prosecutor's house, and heard him say twice that he would take half his recognizances and leave the country.

JAMES HUTCHINSON . I do not know that woman - I never saw her.

ELIZA LOWNDES. I was in his presence for half or three quarters of an hour, and told him the mother was a poor woman.

SARAH RAY . I am single, and live at Knightsbridge, with my father, who is a carpenter. I saw the prosecutor at his house when I went with the prisoner's mother, about a week ago; we were there an hour - it was evening, and there was a candle in the room; I do not know that I spoke to him - I spoke to Mrs. Davis in his presence; he said he would compromise the matter for 20l., and go to America; he said if he made a flaw in the indictment he should only get scandalized, and the boy would only get off with transportation; but if he had 20l. he would go to America: I also saw him at the Political union.

JAMES HUTCHINSON . I do not know that it was her. but a young woman brought a young man to me in Red Lion-square.

SARAH RAY. I went to him with a young man named Green, to a coffee-house adjoining Red Lion-square, but did not speak to him there; I did not hear what passed - a Political union is held there.

JAMES PEARSE . I am the cousin of George Pearse . I was on the landing of the top floor of this house, and heard a boy's voice distinctly cry murder three times.

JAMES HUTCHINSON . I asked him where my boy was that morning, and he said he did not know.

JAMES PEARSE . I was going to work about half-past eight o'clock, and met the prisoner at the door; he saw the shutters shut, and went round and asked the witness when he would allow him to open them, as he was doing compo' at the window; the prosecutor met me, and asked where his boy was - I said, "Round the corner;" he went round and ordered him away - they had some words, and he said if he knew him in conversation with Pearse again he would knock his brains out; I am positive I heard the boy cry murder three times.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN BARTON, WILLIAM SAUNDERS, JOHN CARTER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-23
VerdictNot Guilty

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694. JOHN BARTON , WILLIAM SAUNDERS , and JOHN CARTER were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Gates , on the 25th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 2 purses, value 6s.; 14 sovereigns, 3 half-sovereigns, 30 shillings, and one 5l. Bank note, his property .

WILLIAM GATES . I live at Harefield, and am a carrier from there to London, or Uxbridge. I was at Uxbridge fair on the 25th of March, at the Falcon public-house, and had some victuals and beer; I was in and out from one o'clock until nine, and at nine I left the house to go home; I saw the three prisoners there - I am quite sure they were there - I did not join their company, but their beer was pushed round to me; I pushed mine round to them, and they drank with me - I had 22l. about me: I pulled my purse out to pay for my beer, and they might see my money: I had gone to the fair to buy a horse, and I told a person so, in their presence, and said I should not mind paying 18l. or 20l. if I could find one to suit me - I left the house about nine o'clock, to go to Harefield; my son and Richard Herring were with me - they left with me - the prisoners were in the house at the time I left; I turned to the right, along Page's lane, on the right-hand of Uxbridge , and in about three minutes, when we had got about two hundred yards; I was followed by a gang of men; there might be from seven to ten of them - they ran right in upon me, about two hundred yards from the town; they all ran in of a body all round me, and said, "Give us your blunt, give us your money - you know what we mean;" I said I had none; they said they knew I had, and be d-d if they would not have it; they began holding me on both sides, and searching my pockets - I was not thrown down at that time; they began searching for my money, and in the struggle I sprang on one side, released myself, and ran towards Uxbridge - they followed and overtook me, abused me, and kicked me, threw me down, and threatened to gag me; they said, "Gag his mouth, gag him and Barke him;" they jammed my head against the ground, and said, "Keep his head down" - they took from me 22l.; there might be nearly all the gang round me; I was kicked, beat, and held down - I know the three prisoners; I saw them about two hundred yards from the house, and am certain they are three of the gang - they took from me fourteen sovereigns, three half-sovereigns, 30s. in silver, and a 5l. Bank note - I did not know the prisoners before that day, but am not mistaken in them, having seen them at the public-house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What sort of a night was it? A.Rather dusk, not very dark; I did not see the moon; Saunders was brought to me at the Falcon in custody, about half-past nine o'clock or twenty-five minutes to ten that night; but I cannot say what I stated then, for I was so knocked and beat about; I did not say he was not one of the men; when I had recovered myself I said he was one of the men - I did not say I could not tell them; I told the Magistrate they ran so close together I could only speak to these three; I did not say Herring robbed me - I blamed him for not assisting me; he ran away: I did not say I could not swear to Saunders.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you remember Darvill, the officer, bringing Barton to you at the Falcon? A. They were taken there; I do not recollect saying he was not one of them: I cannot recollect what I said that night - I knew the men perfectly well, but I was kicked, beat, and jammed; I had hardly a bit of life in me; I never said Barton was not one of them - I am sure of them all.

Carter. Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate you did not recollect seeing me before, but the men had on dark jackets who robbed you? A. Yes, and a jacket was put on you, which was the one you robbed me in; I had been in your company all day, and when you put the velveteen jacket on I knew you again - I did not know you so well before; I told the Magistrate it was nearly dark, but they were the men.

COURT. Q. Did you swear to them before the Magistrate, or say to the best of your knowledge they were the men? A. To the best of my knowledge - I was beat about so, and was weak and faint; I know these three, but not all the party; I was not so sure of Carter till he put the jacket on, but I did not say he was not one of them.

MOSES GATES . I was at the Falcon with my father. I left about nine o'clock - I saw all three of the prisoners there; Barton drank with my father; I saw my father take his purse out - I could not see his money; we left before the prisoners - Herring, the fiddler, left with us - the three prisoners were then in the house - we went down Page's-lane; when we got about two hundred yards, a gang of about seven or eight men followed us - it was a dark night; they all came, and ran on the top of my father, and threatened to gag and Burke him; they got him down; he got up again and ran towards Uxbridge, and then they followed and stopped him again - I cannot tell what they did then; one of them was holding my mouth, and I could not see what they did - I know Barton is the young man who held my mouth - I knew him by his voice; he called me a young b-r; I am quite sure he was one of them; while he was holding my mouth, I got away from him, and ran back into Uxbridge; I am quite sure that before the Magistrate I spoke to all the three prisoners, as being all three together - the other two prisoners were helping to rob my father; I could see that.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose it was so dark it would require a person to speak before you knew him? A. Yes, but I saw them in the public-house; I knew the other two by their dress - Barton had a short velvet jacket on; I should have known him if he had not spoken, but you speak so fast I hardly know what you say - it was darkish; they all made a rush on my father, and threw him down.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Did you hear Barton say more than the two words you mentioned? A. No; the gang came from behind us; Barton was brought to the Falcon that night, but I do not know what my father said of him - I took no notice; I said he was the one who stopped my mouth - my father did not say he was not one of them.

COURT. Q. Had you known any of the men before? A. Yes; I had seen them dancing at the Falcon that afternoon.

Carter. Q. Did I not ask you if you saw me near the door when your father came out of the house? A. No; I did not say you were not one of them - a cap was produced; I knew nothing of that - you had a waistcoat with sleeves on before the Magistrate; the Magistrate asked me if it was too dark to know them - I said I was pretty well sure they were the men.

RICHARD HERRING . I am a fiddler. On the 25th of March I was at the Falcon with Gates and his son - there were a dance there; I did not see either of the prisoners at the house - I drank with Mr. Gates about eight o'clock; I did not see any body else drink with him - there was about twenty people in the room; the dance was there - I came out about nine o'clock to go to Harefield with Gates and his son, but before we had been out of the house five minutes, a gang of seven or eight overtook us in Page's-lane, about three hundred yards towards Harefield; they seized Gates, and threw him down - about five of them ran up together and got round him, and in my fright I ran back to Uxbridge, calling Murder! as I went along; I could not identify either of them - before I could get assistance, Gates came back and complained that he was robbed; I cannot swear to any of the party - it was a dark night; there had been a little rain before we started - it was so dark that I could not distinguish a person; it would be impossible to swear to a person - when I came back to the Falcon, Saunders was there; (I had been to call Darvill, the constable;) Darvill was not at home - then I went to the Falcon, and found Saunders, and Gates complained that he had been robbed; I rather think the three prisoners were present at the robbery - I saw two of them with velvet frocks on, who I think were Saunders and Carter; I could distinguish the velvet frocks - I do not venture to swear they are the men; Saunders had a velvet frock when I saw him, and a velvet frock was found in Carter's bundle when he was apprehended next morning; all of them might have had velvet frocks.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long after the robbery did you get back to the Falcon? A. It might be twenty minutes - I found Saunders there; I ran back to Uxbridge, being in danger of my life; the principal of them wore velvet jackets, to the best of my knowledge.

Carter. Q. Did not Mr. Gates say he could not swear to us it was so dark? A. He might - I did not notice what he said; I do not recollect seeing you at the Falcon; Gates accused me because I ran away, but he was so agitated he did not know what he said.

MICHAEL POWELL . I was at the Falcon, and saw Gates and his son there with Herring, and saw them go away - all the three prisoners were there; Gate went away about nine o'clock - Herring went with them Gates went out first, and the prisoners went out close after them - at the same time the doors were open; I was giving charge at the door to a constable - there was a row in the house; I let Gates in again when he came back; when the prisoners went out, Saunder said, "Bill make haste - he is gone - come on;" it might be twenty or twenty-five minutes after that when Gate came back and complained that he had been robbed, and a very few minutes after there was a knocking at the door, and Mr. Murray said, "It is me;" I let him in and then Saunders and Barton came in - Gates was in the room then, but I was keeping the door; nothing was said about the robbery in my hearing; I had to assist to take two men to the cage for a row, and I do not know what passed - I never saw Carter afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Carter go down to the cage of his own accord? A. Yes, his father had broken a glass, and was put in the cage for it; Saunder came there, and was searched - 10s. or 11s. was found on him; I do not know who Bill is - velveteen jacket are very common in the country; Saunders remained in the house about three minutes, and then went to the cage.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Was young Gates in the public-house when Barton came in the last time? A. I do not know, for I was gone then.

Carter. Q. At what time did you see me at the Falcon? A.About ten minutes to nine o'clock; I let you out with the rest - you had a velveteen jacket, and a hairy cap on - there were not above a dozen people in the room where Gates and Herring were - there were more in the parlour.

CHARLES JAMES MURRAY . On Monday, the 25th of March, I was going home - I live next door to the Falcon. I heard a terrible noise at the Falcon, and went to see what it was; it was about twenty minutes after nine o'clock - I saw Saunders, and I believe Carter, knocking with their feet at the door, to get in; Saunders said, "We must get in, or else they will murder my father - I went to the door and shook it; they knew my voice, and opened it, and Powell let me in - Saunders and the other pushed in, and two boys ran by and said, "A man has been robbed in Page's-lane" - when we got inside the house there was a terrible scuffle about a glass; the constables were bleeding, and some people in the house were bleeding - in about ten minutes Gates came in, very much exhausted and agitated, and said he had been robbed - the constables at that time had just handcuffed some men for an assault; Gates went and sat down for about ten minutes before any body took notice of him; but, after the other men were sent out in custody, Gates began to describe the men that robbed him, as being dressed in dark clothes - I pointed to Saunders, and said"Why, surely this must be one of them?" - Gates said he

was one of them; he was given into custody; and when the other prisoners were taken to the cage, my father, not knowing Saunders was charged with robbery, said, "You may let that man go;" he was let out, and he followed the other prisoners to the cage - I told my father he was charged with robbery; I went and sent a constable after him, and he was brought to the Falcon - Gates would not positively swear to him; he said he believed him to be one of the men, but he was agitated very much, and would not then swear to him - next morning Carter was brought to the Falcon, on suspicion, and I said to the young man, Why you was here last night, keeping the door, and you was differently dressed last night?' - he then had a sleeve jacket on - the constable handed his bundle, and there was a black velveteen jacket in it; I said, "Put it on," - he did so; and I said, "Well, surely you were here last night" - he said, "Well, I was very drunk, and I do not know whether I was or not" - I meant he was the man who had come in at twenty minutes after nine o'clock,

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You found Saunders' father in trouble about a row? A. Not at that time, Saunders was discharged after I pointed him out to Gates; he went down to the cage after that - he was about ten minutes in the house before I directed Gates' attention to him, but there was a row; he was twelve or fourteen feet from Gates, and several people were passing and a crowd round him; he was agitated and flurried.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know Darvill, the officer? A. Yes; he came to the Falcon after Gates - I did not see Barton there for a considerable time after some others were taken to the cage - Moses Gates said that he was one of them, but did not speak positively that night; he said that night, some time after he was searched, that he had held his mouth - he said he believed him to be the man, and then that he was sure of him.

Carter's Defence. I was at Uxbridge fair and got drinking; I went to the Jolly Ostlers about half-past eight at night, and never left it but for about five minutes, to go into the yard.

JOHN JONES. I am a pig-dealer, and know Saunders - I saw him about four o'clock in the afternoon, at the Lion, and went with him to the Falcon about nine; I did not go in there myself, but about nine a person came into the Lion and said Saunder's father had got into a row at the Falcon - he and another or two directly went down to the Falcon; I walked down, and when I got there he was kicking at the door to be let in - he got in at last; I left him - he had been at the Lion more than half an hour when he was fetched from the Lion; I had been in and out of the Lion, and he was sitting there every time I went in.

JAMES DARVILL . I am an officer. There was a row at the Falcon, and I took Saunders' father to the watch-house for breaking a glass - Saunders followed him, and was taken into custody; it was from half-past eight to ten o'clock - it was above half-past nine when I went to the Falcon.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you know William Simpson ? A. Not by name. I saw Barton at the Falcon that night- he asked me for a night's lodging at about a quarter or twenty minutes past ten o'clock, after the charge of robbery; he was not in custody at the time - he was at the cage when he asked me for a lodging; I took him to the Falcon and saw old Gates, who said he could not speak to him - if young Gates had said he was one of them, I should have taken him into custody; I then told Barton to go about his business - I searched him, and found 3 1/2d. upon him.

COURT. Q. Was young Gates asked if he knew Barton, at the Falcon? A. Yes he said he could not speak to him; he said nothing about his voice there.

WILLIAM SIMPSON. I was in Barton's company on the 25th of March, at Uxbridge, at the Red Lion - we remained there till half-past seven o'clock, and went from there to the Falcon; I did not see Gates there - we staid there together till half-past nine, or a quarter to ten; I saw Thomas at the Falcon - he staid there till near ten; Barton did not go out of the Falcon till he left at half-past nine, or a quarter to ten - he followed old Saunders to the watch-house, and asked Darvill for a night's lodging.

GEORGE VANHAM . I was with Carter, at the Red Lion, on the 25th of March, in the afternoon, and left him there - I saw him at half-past seven at the Jolly Ostlers; we staid there about half an hour, and then went to the Falcon together, and staid about a quarter of an hour - he then left me for eight or ten minutes, and returned; that was about a quarter-past nine - he came to me at the Red Lion, and asked if I was ready for bed; we both went to bed together about half-past nine, or rather later.

NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS MORRIS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-24
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

695. THOMAS MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 musical box, value 10s., the goods of Thomas Sawer , his master .

THOMAS SAWER. I am a silk manufacturer , and live in Aldermanbury . I had a mahogany musical-box, worth 10s. - the prisoner was my porter ; the box was kept in the dining-room, and a clock stood on it - I had it eight or nine years; it was very much out of order, and I moved it into the warehouse about the first week in February - I missed it; about the 16th or 18th of February; I told the prisoner it was extraordinary how it should be gone; and on the Thursday he was taken very poorly; I advised him to go to his parents for a few days, and when he got better, I would reinstate him in his employment - and during that time I felt uneasy about this - he came back on the Monday morning, and I told him I was satisfied he knew something about it; he denied it - I was determined to discharge him; he made out the balance of his account - I had not change to give him, and I gave my warehouseman a 5l. note to get charge; he returned - I received information from him, and sent for Henman, an officer, and gave the prisoner in charge; I afterwards saw the box in Henman's possession, and was certain of it - he had lived with me about nine months: I had a very good character with him.

THOMAS STEPHEN MACQUILLAN. I am publican, and live in Bath-street, Tabernacle-square. I have seen the prisoner at my house at times; and on the 18th of February he brought the box there, and asked if I should like to hear a tune; he put it on the bar, and it played three or four tunes - a person asked him if it was his; he said No, it belonged to a friend, of whom he had borrowed it - he staid about ten minutes, then left the box with me, and told me I might have a tune or

two; he called three or four days afterwards, and I asked if he would take the box - I gave it him; he put it on the counter, played two or three tunes, and said it was spoiled, and he could not return it to his friend till he got it mended; and on the Sunday his friend Mr. Coates called for it: I saw Mr. Sawer in about a fortnight, at Guildhall; the prisoner was there in custody - a box was shown to me; I could not swear it was the same box - it was wrapped in paper almost all the time it was with me; it looked something like it - it was open when it was playing, but I did not take much notice of it.

THOMAS COATES . I am a bed-sacking weaver. I have seen the prisoner at Macquillan's - he brought the box there on the 18th of February, and played a tune or two on it; I asked if he did not want it for a day or two, to let me have it - he said I might have it; I asked who it belonged to - he said he had borrowed it of a friend, whom he did not name; the box remained at Macquillan's about five days - I then took it home, and it remained there eight days; it was then delivered to Henman at my house - I afterwards saw it in his possession before the Magistrate.

WILLIAM HENMAN. I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner on Monday, the 4th of March- he was charged with taking away this musical-box; I took him into another room to search him - I cautioned him, and told him he might do as he pleased, he might say nothing, or he might save me a great deal of trouble; he denied it - I said it was useless denying it; he afterwards said I should find it in Old-street-road, at Mr. Coates' - a woman gave me the box there from between some bedticking on a shelf; I took it to Mr. Sawer - he put the clock on it, which exactly fitted it.(Property produced and sworn to).

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Strongly recommended to Mercy - Confined Three Months .

THOMAS HOLMES.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-25
VerdictNot Guilty

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696. THOMAS HOLMES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Nutting , on the 17th of March , and stealing therein 26,000 yards of Tuscan plait, value 200l., his property .

HENRY NUTTING. I am a straw-hat manufacturer , and live at No. 37, Noble-street . The prisoner is an entire stranger; this plait was on the first-floor warehouse - I had seen it safe on the Saturday, about six o'clock in the evening; the warehouse was secured by shutters to the windows, and one door was bolted inside, and the other door was locked on the outside - I am not certain whether the key was not left in the lock; I went to the warehouse on Monday morning, and found this property had been taken away - it was worth about 200l.; I saw it that morning in Seager's house - he is an officer; I was certain it was the same plait.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was there any mark on it by which you could identify it? A. It had; I was not the last person there on Saturday - I left one or two persons there; I left about six o'clock - I never recollect a customer taking plait away in a coach; it is usually packed in boxes or trusses.

HOWELL GODDARD. I am beadle of St. Ann and Agnes, which parish this warehouse is in. On Sunday evening, the 17th of March, I was going along Noble-street, towards the warehouse, and saw a hackney-coach coming towards me; I saw a man just ahead of the coach - I have not seen him since; another man was driving it; it was coming along at a very slow pace - I kept it in sight about three minutes; I cannot say who was driving it at that time, to be certain - the coach was beyond Mr. Nutting's house when I first saw it; I saw it come by the house - it did not stop; the man who was ahead turned his face to the wall at the corner of a passage, he looked at me, which made me take notice; the coach went down St. Ann's-lane, and the man crossed towards me, and turned up Maiden-lane - I did not see him again: the coach went to the bottom of St. Ann's-lane, returned back again, and came along Noble-street; I saw the number behind was plastered with mud - there were numbers on the side, but they were on very small round plates; I watched the coach into Falcon-square, and as it rained hard, I went in and put on my great coat, and went out into Falcon-street, and saw the same coach standing at the corner, close against Aldersgate-street; I am quite sure it was the same coach - the coachman was with it - I believe it to be the prisoner, but I do not speak with certainly - he had a drab great coat on; I went over to the watch-house in Little Britain for assistance - Seager came with me, and I found the coach was then gone; I desired Seager to go round through Falcon-square - I went down Aldersgate-street, and met the coach coming down St. Ann's-lane, at a quick pace; I said to the coachman, "What have you got here?" (the prisoner was the coachman then - nobody else appeared to have any charge of the coach;) he answered, there was a gentleman inside - I opened the door - there was nobody inside at all, but there were three large bags; I desired the prisoner to come down off the box - he said he was hired by a gentleman by the Post-office; I desired him to lead the horses to Little Britain, and I then gave him in charge - I found the bundles were straw plait; I left it at the watch-house while I went to Noble-street - I went in at the back door of Nutting's house, went to the front door, and found it on the spring lock; I went into the warehouse - the key was in the lock, inside the house; there was no violence on that door, but on going up stairs I found some large drawers broken open in the warehouse; I found this jemmy on the floor of the first-floor warehouse, and on examining the door which leads up to the second floor, on the stairs, I found it had been forced open - it was only fastened by a small bolt; I went up to the attic, and found the window open - I then went and got the key of an empty house, two doors off, and on the balustrade of that house, under a trap-door, there were footmarks, and the tiles were off the roof - that would give access to the window of Mr. Nutting's house; I went to the watch-house, searched the prisoner, and found on him a gimblet; on examining the bags in the coach, in one of them was found eight small skeleton-keys and one blank one, with was on it - and this large key was loose in the bottom of the bag, and that opens the door of the empty house.

Cross-examined. Q. You found the prisoner was a hackney-coachman? A. Yes; an umbrella was found in the coach - I heard so; I lost sight of the coach three times - I did not know any thing was amiss at first, but

had suspicion, as the number was daubed; I did not see any body inside the coach - while I was absent any body might have escaped; I had not the least reason to suspect the robbery was contemplated till I saw the coach; I first went to Mr. Daw's and then to Mr. Nutting's, they being the only persons in the trade; I asked the prisoner how many times he had been up Noble-street - he said only once, that a gentleman called him off the stand at the Post-office, put an umbrella into the coach, and told him to follow him - he never claimed the plait; I cannot tell when the warehouse was broken open; he said the gimblet was to make holes in his harness, which might be the case; the bag the keys were in was at the bottom of the bag the plait was in - the horses' heads were towards the empty house; I did not see the coach stop at the prosecutor's door - the prisoner did not attempt to escape.

THOMAS RIVERS. I am a patrol of Aldersgate ward. I was at the watch-house in Little Britain at nine o'clock, and saw Mr. Goddard bringing the hackney-coach along; he left it in my possession - on opening the door there were three bags of straw plait, which I took into the watch-house - the prisoner was sent into the watch-house first; under the coach seat was found this umbrella, wringing wet - Goddard left the prisoner in my care; he returned in three quarters of an hour, and Seager took possession of the property; I saw Mr. Nutting next day, and he claimed the property.

Cross-examined. Q. It had been raining? A. Yes, very hard.

SAMUEL SEAGER . I am superintendent of the nightly watch. On Sunday evening, about a quarter before nine o'clock, Goddard came to the watch-house; I went with him into Little Britain, and Falcon-street, to look for a coach, and on coming into St. Ann's-lane I saw Goddard turning a backney-coach round; I went up and looked in at the window - there was nobody inside; I saw straw plait protruding from one of the bags - the prisoner gave no account how he came by it; I went with Goddard to search the premises - his evidence is correct.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not say he was hired by a gentleman at the Post-office? A.That was not in my presence.

GEORGE WILLIAM GOLDER. I am porter to Henry Nutting. On going to the premises, on Monday, I found the plait taken away from where I had left it on Saturday night, and found the attic window open.

Cross-examined. Q. How late were you there on Saturday night? A. Till half-past seven o'clock; I left nobody there.

Prisoner's Defence. I stopped and got down directly he ordered me.

WILLIAM WELLER. I am a waterman. On the 17th of April, about half-past eight o'clock, I saw a gentleman call the prisoner's coach off the rank at the Post-office - it was very wet; the gentleman said, "Follow me to Noble-street" - the prisoner followed the gentleman up Falcon-street; he had been about a quarter of an hour on the stand - I did not see him again till he was at the watch-house.

COURT. Q. Do you know the number of the coach? A. No; I did not see the gentleman get into the coach, nor the bundles put in; it is Mr. Seabrook's coach - it was dirty, having been out all that wet day; I did not attend before the Alderman - I told Seager of this that night.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM NEEDHAM.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-26
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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NEW COURT. THURSDAY, APRIL 11TH.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

697. WILLIAM NEEDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 10 books, value 3l., the goods of Edward Boodle , his master . - To which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 13. - Confined Ten Days .

ELEANOR ROBINSON.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-27
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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698. ELEANOR ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , 5 bottles, value 1s.; 3 quarts of wine, value 8s.; - a pint of ink, value 10d.; 1 blanket, value 5s., and 1 pillow, value 5s. , the goods of Thomas Dykes . - To which she pleaded GUILTY . Aged 35 - Confined One Month .

MARY TILL.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-28
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction

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699. MARY TILL was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , 2 sheets, value 10s.; 2 shirts, value 10s., and 2 towels, value 2s., the goods of Benjamin Sandon , her master .

KEZIAH SANDON. I am the wife of Benjamin Sandon; we live in Bury-street, St. James' , and keep a lodging-house . I employed the prisoner as charwoman for three years; I missed different articles at several times.

BENJAMIN TITFORD. I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker, in High Holborn; I have a sheet and two towels, pawned by the prisoner on the 28th of December.

WILLIAM MARTIN. I am a pawnbroker. I have a shirt which I took in of the prisoner on the 16th of November.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am a Police-officer of Marlborough-street. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Confined Three Months .

JAMES TAYLOR.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-29
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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700. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , 1 tablecloth, value 6d.; 1 shirt, value 4d., and 3 yards of calico, value 2d. , the goods of Arthur Garton .

LETITIA GARTON. I am the wife of Arthur Garton, of Bowling-street, Westminster - he is a stone sawyer . On the 4th of April the prisoner and two other boys, came to my shop for a halfpenny orange - I served them; and when they were gone I missed a bundle containing a tablecloth, shift, and a piece of calico - I am sure they were safe when I gave the orange; the prisoner was brought back with them, and said he had found them.

WILLIAM TERRY . I lodge in the prosecutor's house. I followed the prisoner through Dean's-yard, and took him at the corner of Flood-street, with these articles - there were two boys running away.

JAMES HORNER (Police-constable B 144). I have the articles, which I received from the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along, and this man told me to come back.

WILLIAM TERRY. I stopped him running; he said he had found the bundle in Dean-street.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

ANN BROWN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-30
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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701. ANN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , 1 necklace, value 30s.; 1 reticule, value 5s.; 2 books, value 2s.; 6 knives, value 5s., and 6 forks, value 5s., the goods of George Cotton , her master .

GEORGE COTTON . I live in Grafton-street, Soho . The prisoner was my cook ; she came on the 3rd of September, and quitted on the 5th of January - I missed a gold chain while she was with me; I went, in consequence of information, to No. 17, Little Compton street; a box was brought from her room into the parlour - it was locked, and I believe the prisoner gave the key; this gold chain, two books, a reticule, and these dessert knives and forks were found in it - they are worth about 40s; we had a written character with her.

WILLIAM BOND (Police-constable C 24). I went with Mr. Evans' son to Little Compton-street, where the prisoner was then living - I saw Mr. Cotton there; the box was opened with a key which the prisoner produced, and these things were found in it - she said nothing about them

Prisoner. I did not furnish the key, the bar-maid got it.

Witness. The prisoner said she had lost the key, and the bar-maid went and fetched it from the room; she said it was under the bed, but I did not see it - the prisoner owned to the things.

COURT. Q. What did she say? A. She did not say any thing - I asked her where the key was, she searched her pocket, and then asked Mr. Evans' little girl if she had got it; she said no, she had given it to her again - she then searched her pocket again, and could not find it, and then the bar-maid went and got it - Mr. Cotton claimed the property; the prisoner said nothing. - Mr. Evans asked her if these were Mr. Cotton's property; she said Yes.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

ELIZABETH NEWMAN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-31
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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702. ELIZABETH NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , 2 pieces of carpeting, value 5s.; 5 yards of linen cloth, value 2s., and 1 sheet, value 1s., the goods of William John Richardson , her master .

ALBINIA RICHARDSON. I am the wife of William John Richardson ; we live at Upper Clapton ; I keep a boarding-school . The prisoner lived as cook with me for seven weeks; I missed some articles on the 11th of February, and on the 12th of February I went to the house of Eliza Newman , her sister-in-law, at Battersea, who had been at my house the whole of the afternoon before, but I did not see her, as I was ill - I found these articles there; she said her sister-in-law gave them to her - I had some trouble in getting sight of them; I said I would not leave the house till I got them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She said she had got them from her sister-in-law? A. Yes; I had not told her that her sister-in-law had acknowledged to giving them to her - she had the opportunity of taking them herself; I did not say, that if she gave them up I would not prosecute - I owed the prisoner seven weeks wages, at 10l. a-year.

COURT. Q. Did you not tell Eliza Newman that the prisoner had been robbing you, and you had come for the things she brought from your house last night? A. Yes.

ELIZA NEWMAN. I am the wife of William Newman ; we live at Battersea. I called on the prisoner, who is my sister-in-law, at Mrs. Richardson's; I think it was on the 12th of February; Mrs. Richardson came to my house, and found these articles - my sister gave me a bundle; I did not open it- I do not know whether these are the articles; I did not see what was in it - a man brought it to my house; I had not seen any articles at Mr. Richardson's - the bundle was given to me, but I do not know what was in it; I did not receive any thing in the prosecutor's house, but in the street, when the prisoner came out with me.

COURT. Q. Now, let me caution you; you will certainly be sent to Newgate if you do not give a true account? A. When the prisoner came out she gave me some things in a bundle, and a man took them home - I had not taken the man with me; he was a stranger to me - I went to the prosecutor's house about two o'clock, and came away about five - I did not see what was in the bundle; I walked part of the way with the man, and then rode home - the man carried the articles upon his shoulder, I suppose - I paid him for carrying them - when Mrs. Richardson came to my house she found the things up stairs in my bed-room- I had not opened them; she had no trouble in going up stairs - she said if the things were given up without a search-warrant, she would not interfere any more in it; she said she supposed I knew the business she came on; I said No, I did not - she said Elizabeth had been robbing her, and she had come for the things which were brought from her house last night; I said, I had not brought any thing - she did not claim a piece of carpet which was on the floor - I said I had nothing but that old piece of carpet, which Elizabeth had given me some time before, but I do not know when - I do not know whether there was a child's toy, called a Noah's Ark, at my house; I do not know whether the prosecutrix asked me for a piece of coarse cloth - I do not remember that I denied having it; I do not know whether she found it at my house, as the things were all in a bundle - she followed me up stairs, and the things were on the floor.

MRS. RICHARDSON. I knew her sister lived at Batterses, and for that reason I went there: the prisoner had been staying with her before she came to me - my French teacher came to me for my cook to have two hours' absence on the day her sister came to my house; when I went to the prisoner's sister's, I left word for the prisoner not to leave my house till I returned, but she ran away five minutes after I was gone; she came the next day to demand her wages - this old piece of carpet was on her sister's floor at Battersea; these other pieces, which were in the bundle, are pieces of my drawing-room carpet - I know this cloth by a cut which I made in it; I compared it with what remains, and it makes up the exact quantity I had.

Cross-examined. Q. You have heard Eliza Newman examined - is it true that you had considerable trouble before you saw the things? A. Yes, she said she had nothing of mine, and I had no right to come without a search-warrant - I said I thought she would like me better to come alone; the things were not tied up - I could see what they were.

WILLIAM ARKELL (Police-constable N 68.) I took the prisoner the next day - I went in at the back of the

house, and found her sitting in the passage in a chair, and this property by her side.

MRS. RICHARDSON. These are my property; they had been kept in the servants' bed-room, at the back of the kitchen.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS ROGERS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-32
VerdictNot Guilty

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703. THOMAS ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 1 bushel of oats, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Walker , his master .

WILLIAM WALKER . I live at Enfield-highway - the prisoner was in my service. On the 23rd of February I received a letter, and gave notice to the officer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is your son here? A. No - he was in the habit of giving the prisoner oats to feed the horses on the road; the prisoner had been fourteen or fifteen years in my service, and behaved well.

RICHARD WATKINS . I am an officer. I stopped a cart within about two hundred yards of the prosecutor's gate, between five and six o'clock on the morning of the 23rd of February; I found 22 lbs. of oats in a sack on the top of the load - there was another sack of chaff and oats, mixed, for the horses, but these were in a separate parcel; I took the prisoner back to the yard, and asked him what this was for the said to be mixed with the chaff, but I found the other was mixed; he then said somebody must have put it into the cart.

Cross-examined. Q.Where was this sack? A. On the top of the load - the tilt was folded over this, and over part of the load; the prisoner went back quietly - I had him in custody, but did not take hold of him.

JOHN MEAD . I am the beadle. I was with Watkins when the cart came out of the yard - we followed it to the King's Arms.

MR. WALKER re-examined. Q.What quantity of oats, or oats and chaff, do you allow your men to take with the horses? A.We give them a bushel every night for three horses - he had his chaff and oats mixed in a bag, and I should think he had three parts of a bushel in his nosebags; he had more than he ought to have had besides this- he had no business with this at all.

Cross-examined. Q. Then whether any of the other men might have put this on the cart you cannot tell? A. No - I suspected the others, but not the prisoner; I would take him into my employ again.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM PEERMAN, JOHN STEPHENS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-33
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation; Imprisonment

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704. WILLIAM PEERMAN and JOHN STEPHENS were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of February , 2 shoes, value 2s. , the goods of John Flynn .

JOHN FLYNN . I live in Crawford-street , and am a boot and shoe maker . On the 27th of February the prisoners came to my shop; Stephens asked to look at a pair of shoes - I showed him a pair; he said they were too small- I showed him another pair: he said they were too large- I showed him another pair, which he said fitted him; I asked 5s. 6d. for them - he offered me 4s. 6d., which I would not take; Peerman had been standing with his back against a board on which were some shoes - they then left the shop, and in consequence of what my lad said, I followed the prisoners, and called the Policeman; they then ran - I saw Peerman in a cook-shop directly afterwards.

EDWARD DAVISON . I am errand-boy to the prosecutor - I saw the two prisoner's in his shop; Peerman put his back against the counter, and took off a pair of shoes - I told my master when they had left the shop; we went after them, and saw them pushing them into their pockets - one of them ran up Seymour-place, and into Crawford-street, where the Policeman took him.

JAMES HYNDS (Police-constable D 141). The prosecutor called me; I took Stephens in Homer-street - I found only a shilling on him.

JOHN MANNING (Police-constable D 44). I followed Peerman, and saw him sitting at a table in a cook-shop, eating some pudding; I brought him out, but found nothing on him - I went back to the shop, and found these shoes under the seat where he had been sitting.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Stephen's Defence. In passing this shop I took notice of the shoes; I went in with this prisoner, and tried a pair on, but I did not take any.

PEERMAN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

STEPHENS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

GEORGE BAKER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-34
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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705. GEORGE BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , 12 pairs of stockings, value 12s. , the goods of Richard Telfer ,

WALTER STEREKE. I am in the employ of Mr. Richard Telfer , hosier , New-street, Covent-garden . On the 28th of March I saw the prisoner lurking near the door, about ten o'clock in the evening; he then came into the shop, snatched a dozen of stockings off some flannels, and went out - we pursued and took him about forty yards from the shop.

JOHN MILLS (Police-constable T 155). I watched the prisoner, and saw him take the stockings from inside the door; I took him with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN SHERMAN, MARY SHERMAN, LOUISA TURNER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-35
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty; Not Guilty

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706. JOHN SHERMAN , MARY SHERMAN and LOUISA TURNER were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 4 handkerchiefs, value 16s. , the goods of Robert Hodson .

HENRY BOOR . I am shopman to Mr. Robert Hodson , a linen-draper in Oxford-street . On the 1st of March, the three prisoners and another man came to the shop; John Sherman said he wished to purchase another silk-handkerchief for his brother, similar to one which he said he had purchased a few days before, but I have no recollection of the transaction - I showed him several, but could not find the pattern he said he wanted; the female prisoners looked at the handkerchiefs, and turned them over, as if they were of the same party, and then one of them said as they had given me so much trouble, they would purchase one - they purchased a blue one, for which the man who is not here, paid 5s.; I delivered it to one of these women, but I cannot say which - John and Mary Sherman then went out, leaving the other man and Turner there; they looked at a dress that was there, and asked the price of it- they then went away; I have since seen the blue handkerchief which I sold them, and four other handkerchiefs, which are my employer's, in the care of the inspector.

Cross-examined by MR. DUNBAR. Q. Has your shop two counters? A. There is one counter which goes round the shop; there was one other person serving at the time the prisoners were there; and one other man standing in the shop nearer the door than I was - these two women came in first, and the men close behind them; I should know the other man if I saw him - ours is not a regular haberdashers shop; we have not a great many customers- I did not know I had been robbed till the next morning; these handkerchiefs are part of what I showed them.

JOSHUA FREDERICK CLEMENTS. I am an inspector of Police. The female prisoners were given to me on the 1st of March - they objected to my searching them, and I sent for a woman; these four handkerchiefs were found on Turner, tied up in this blue one - John Sherman afterwards came to the station, and I took him.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the prosecutor's shop? A. Yes, I think it is half a mile from the station; I saw this property taken from under Turner's clothes - she had a cloak on, but it was under her other things.

HENRY BOOR . These are my master's property; I think I gave the blue handkerchief to Turner.

Cross-examined. Q.When did you take stock? A. On Good-Friday; this blue handkerchief has our mark on it, but the others have not - I have another handkerchief of the same pattern; the piece contained seven handkerchiefs, and two of them have been sold.

John Sherman. I and my wife were not aware of the property being taken.

Turner. I am quite innocent - the Policeman gave me the handkerchiefs to carry when they were found in the water-closet; they did not belong to me.

JOHN HARDY (Police-constable C 149). I took Turner and Mary Sherman as they were coming out of a water-closet at the corner of Poland-street; Turner had the bundle in her hand - I took it from her, saw what it was, and gave it her back to carry.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 34.

J. SHERMAN - NOT GUILTY .

M. SHERMAN - NOT GUILTY .(See Fourth Day.)

CHARLES FULLER, HANNAH FULLER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-36
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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707. CHARLES FULLER and HANNAH FULLER were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 10 china-plates, value 1l.; 1 writing-desk, value 1l.; 1 etwicke-case, value 5s.; 2 china bottles, value 5s.; 2 flowerpots, value 5s.; 1 print, value 10s.; 1 sheet, value 7s.; 3 china jars, value 1l., and 12 books, value 2l., the goods of Sir James Webster Wedderburn , Knt. ; and 1 salad-dish and stand, value 10s.; 1 butter-dish and cover, value 1l., and 5 books, value 1l. , the goods of James McDonald .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

LADY FRANCES WEDDERBURN . I am the wife of Sir James Webster Wedderburn, Knt. - we live in Chesterfield-street, May-fair : Hannah Fuller was our servant - she had to take care of the house, which was let to me furnished - I missed a case of diamonds, and sent for Goddard, the officer, who searched her box, in her presence, and found a pearl knife and some duplicates - I had missed a writing-desk, two china-bottles, two flower-pots, a print, three china jars, and some other articles; she said the duplicates were her husband's, and that he gave them into her charge to keep - he had come to the house on the Saturday before these duplicates were found; I had spoken to her about these books, and she said they were to be looked for: I had never permitted either of the prisoners to dispose of any of these things - I know this print to be mine, I had coloured it myself; I had not missed that - I thought it was locked up in my closet.

JAMES McDONALD. The house is mine: I let it furnished to this lady - the prisoner Hannah had been living in my service: this salad-bowl and butter-boats, some of the books and some knives and forks are mine - I never allowed either of the prisoners to take any of the property- the woman was there purposely to guard it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q.Was this part of the property which was assigned to you by Sir James Webster Wedderburn? A. No - I purchased some property of him; he assigned to me the lease of his house, but I purchased the furniture of him for 600l. - he has been in my debt upwards of fifteen years; there was no execution in the house at the time I purchased the furniture, which was I think in April last: Lady Wedderburn was residing in the house on the 23rd of February.

JOHN HAIGH. I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in South-street, Manchester-square. These china-plates, this saladbowl and stand, this glass butter-dish and writing-desk, were pawned at our shop, by Penelope May.

PENELOPE MAY. I am the mother of Charles Fuller: he gave me all these articles to pawn; I think he gave them to me about November - he said his wife's lady had made her a present of them; he told me to pawn them in my own name, which I did, for Mrs. Forhes; I had been in the habit of going to that pawnbroker's; I never saw Hannah Fuller about these things, but she told me repeatedly that her mistress had made her a present of these articles.

JAMES MOODY. I am shopman to Mr. Ross, a pawnbroker, in East-street, Manchester-square. This print was pawned by the male prisoner on the 13th of December, in the name of Charles May .

HENRY GODDARD. I am an officer. I was sent for by her ladyship, and found the duplicates in the trunk, which referred to this property - I went to the pawnbrokers and they were readily given up to me; the female prisoner said her husband gave her the duplicates to take care of; he was in the house at the time - I went to him, and asked him if he had any duplicates; he said No - I then showed him these, and asked if they were his; he said they were: I asked if he was quite certain of that, as her ladyship had missed articles of various descriptions - he said they were his; I said he had better go with me to the pawnbroker's, and in going along I again asked him if they were his - he said Yes; but when he got to the shop he said some of the property belonged to her ladyship; I then took him - the nine plates were pawned on the 13th of December.

LADY WEDDERBURN. The man came on the 23rd of February - he had no opportunity of coming to the house in November; I had seen him there in July, and desired him not to come - I believe the prisoners are married; I saw the certificate of their marriage.

Charles Fuller 's Defence. I was sent for by her ladyship's servant, to assist in getting some of the things away

at the time the execution was in the house; I was in want of money, and pawned these articles.

C. FULLER - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

H. FULLER - NOT GUILTY .

HANNAH FULLER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-37
VerdictNot Guilty > no evidence

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708. HANNAH FULLER was again indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 1 mother of pearl knife, value 5s., and 1 waist-buckle, value 5s. , the goods of Sir James Webster Wedderburn , Knt .

No Evidence. NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS JONES.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-38
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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709. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 4 silver spoons, value 2l. , the goods of John Cuff and another.

BENJAMIN BANKS . I am waiter to Mr. John Cuff and another, at the Freemasons' tavern, Great Queen-street - the prisoner was occasionally employed as assistant waiter there; this is our property, but we did not miss it till it was found.

JOHN JAMES SIMONS . I live at No. 47, Clerkenwellgreen, and deal in gold and silver. The prisoner brought these spoons to me on a Saturday, I think it was the 9th of March - I looked at it through a glass, and saw traces of"Freemasons' tavern" on it; I then gave information - he had brought two or three before this, which made me look at it more particularly.

JOSEPH HIGGINS (Police-constable F 35.) I took the prisoner into custody - he told me on the way to the station that he had taken the spoons, and it was of no use denying it - unless Mr. Cuff forgave him, without mentioning the circumstance, he would rather be transported; in searching the room to which he directed me as his (and of which I found the key in his pocket) I found two files, with silver filings in them.

MR. BANKS. These are our spoons - the prisoner had not been employed there that day; there are sixteen or eighteen spoons a year lost from there, for which the waiters are responsible.

GUILTY . Aged 43. - Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN GILES.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-39
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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710. JOHN GILES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 jacket, value 2s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 shirt, value 1s. 6d., and 2 shoes, value 2s. , the goods of William Parsons .

WILLIAM PARSONS. I am post-boy at the Castle public-house, Brentford . On the 7th of March I came to town by one of the coaches, and when I returned home I missed a shirt and these things from my bed-room at Brentford - the prisoner was "boots" at that inn; I found my jacket at a pawnbroker's - I then went to Hempstead, and found the prisoner; I said, "You did not expect to see me here to-night" - he said No; I then gave him in charge to the Policeman - he said, at the station, that there was a bundle in the cart, which the Policeman went and found in Taylor's errand-cart; my waistcoat and shirt were in the bundle - my shoes were on the prisoner's feet.

WILLIAM HUNT (Police-constable S 68). I was on duty at Hempstead on the 7th of March; the prosecutor gave the prisoner into my charge for stealing his clothes - I knew the prisoner, and asked what he had been doing; he said, Nothing of any consequence.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

JAMES BOND.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-40
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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711. JAMES BOND was indicted for embezzlement .

JOSEPH HANDLEY . I am a butcher ; the prisoner was in my employ, and was entrusted to receive money in his rounds. I had some money due to me from Mr. Tart; the prisoner said the cook would call and pay it - the cook afterwards came and said she had paid the prisoner.

Prisoner. I lost the first money, and was ashamed to pay the other till I had made it up.

ELIZA PERDUE . I am servant to Mr. James Tart , of St. James'-street. On the 16th of March I paid the prisoner 2l. 2s. 7d. for his master, and on the 23rd of March , 1l. 17s. 10d.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined One Month .

EDMUND DORE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-41
VerdictNot Guilty > fault

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712. EDMUND DORE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of February , 1 angler's winch, value 6d.; 1 lb. of groats, value 6d.; - lb. of sugar, value 3d.; 2 ozs. of tea, value 6d., and - lb. of almonds, value 9d., the goods of Alexander Braden , his master .

The prosecutor's name being Alexander Samuel Braden, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

ROBERT WILSON, JOHN LEE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-42
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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713. ROBERT WILSON and JOHN LEE were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 10 lbs. weight of lead, value 2s., the goods of Daniel Sutton , being fixed to a building of his ; against the Statute, &c.

BENJAMIN SPUNLEY . I live in a cottage belonging to Mr. Daniel Sutton , in Seabon's-lane, Islington ; there are some carcases of houses there, which I took after - I received some information, and looked over the roofs of them with Charles Whittley, and found Lee, the prisoner, up the chimney of one of the houses; I think it was the fourth house - he was in the chimney of a back room on the top story; I told him to come down, it was no use for him to stop there - he said he would not have done it if he had not been out of work; I saw the other prisoner taken between the room and the cieling of the same house - we gave them to the officer, and next morning I examined the roofs of the houses; I found a knife in the chimney where we found Lee - it laid on the brickwork, a little way up; some lead had been cut off, and some had begun to be cut.

CHARLES WHITTLEY. I live in a cottage in the same lane. I heard a noise, went with this witness, and took the prisoners - I went on the roof, and found two pieces of lead cut off in the gutter, and another partly cut off.

Wilson's Defence. I know nothing of the lead being cut; I was laying on the straw - I heard a man call a dog; I got up, and a man came in with a gun, and said if I did not come down he would blow my brains out.

Lee's Defence. I went to sleep on the straw - I had no money to pay for a lodging.

THOMAS HOBBS KING (Police-constable N 248). I went and examined the house; I found this 10 lbs. of lead there - I found a small file in Lee's pocket.

DANIEL SUTTON . The houses are mine, and the lead is mine; it has done me a great deal of mischief - there were no floors in the houses; they must have climbed up the joists.

WILSON - GUILTY . Aged 21.

LEE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN SMITH, GEORGE HUGHES, ROBERT SETTER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-43
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation; Guilty > with recommendation; Guilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > whipping

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714. JOHN SMITH , GEORGE HUGHES and ROBERT SETTER were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February , 4 sets of dominoes, value 12s., and 6 balls, value 2s. , the goods of William Else .

RICHARD DEVKIN. I am an inspector of lamps at Kentish-town; I live in Grenville-street. On the evening of the 19th of February, I saw the prisoners near the bridge on the Hampstead-road, and two others with them; I suspected them, as one of them had just come out of a shop, and I took Hughes, who was running from the shop; I found two domino boxes, and three balls in his pocket, which he said one of the boys had given him, and he had given him a knife; I left him at the Britannia, public-house, and went and took the other four; I found on Smith one of the balls, and a small domino box, and on Setter, this squirt - one box was found in the tap-room.

Smith. Bill Gardner and Fred Hughes came and asked if I would go to the penny play - they said they would treat me - Butcher gave me the things.

Hughes. I bought the things - I had no knowledge they were stolen.

WILLIAM ELSE. I keep a toy shop in Albany-street . On the evening of the 19th of February, between five and six o'clock, I was in my back parlour at tea; I went to snuff the candle in the shop, and found a large hole in the window, which had been cracked before, and I had put a piece of paper over it; I missed seven or eight domino-boxes - some of the lids of them were left behind, and they correspond with these boxes, which the officer brought me; I missed some balls at the same time, and this squirt.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 13.

HUGHES - GUILTY . Aged 14.

SETTER - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined 7 Days & Whipped .

ELIZABETH SMITH.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-44
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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715. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 26 yards of linen, value 1l. 19s. , the goods of Charles John Brooks and another.

GRIFFITH THOMAS . I am in partnership with Mr. Charles John Brooks, linen-draper , of Oxford-street . On the afternoon of the 7th of March, I was in the shop; I saw the prisoner there, in company with another person; in consequence of information, I stopped her, and asked what she had under her cloak - I found this piece of Irish linen; she wished to be let go, but I gave her to the officer - I thought she had been drinking.

THOMAS POWELL (Police-constable D 109.) I took the prisoner.

Prisoner. It was through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

DANIEL CANE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-45
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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716. DANIEL CANE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 10 handkerchiefs, value 40s. , the goods of Charles Fossett .

CHARLES FOSSETT. I am an assistant to my brother John, a hosier, who lives in Regent-street . I had placed some handkerchiefs of my own in the shop on the 27th of March; I saw the prisoner inside the shop that day - he then ran off; I pursued took him, and took these handkerchiefs from him - he said he picked them up.

Prisoner. I saw a young man running - he threw them down, and I took them up. Witness. I am positive I saw him in the shop.

JAMES GARROD Police-constable C 22). I took the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 18. Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM STUBBS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-46
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

720. WILLIAM STUBBS was indicted for embezzlement . - To which he pleaded GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Three Months .

HENRY TYER, THOMAS ELSTOLE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-47
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation; Imprisonment

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721. HENRY TYER and THOMAS ELSTOLE were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of February , 1 coat, value 1l. , the goods of George Harden .

GEORGE HARDEN. I am a butcher , and live in Drury lane. On the 25th of February I had my gig in Cottage grove, Mile-end-road , about four o'clock in the afternoon - I went into my sister's house for about a quarter of an hour, and left my great coal on my horse; while I was there my coat was taken off the horse; I went into the Mile-end-road, and saw a Policeman running after Elstole

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.For what you know Elstole might be running after the thief? A. Yes.

THOMAS HOLMES (Police-constable K 221). I was on duty about four o'clock, and saw the two prisoners run by me - Tyer had this coat under his arm; I watched them for about one hundred yards - they then turned the corner I kept on Mile-end-road, and saw them again running up the Bow-road and another person with them - the other two persons then got over a fence, and Tyer gave the coa over the fence to one of them; I got over, and pursued them across two fields - they dropped the coat, and as I was fatigued, I took up the coat and returned to the watch-house, as I knew that my brother officer had taken Tyer.

Cross-examined. Q.Had you lost sight of them? A. Yes, certainly; Elstole was taken about six o'clock, I think - he had run as far as Limehouse.

JAMES STILL (Police-constable K 35). On the 25th of February, between four and five o'clock, I was at my own door, two carpenters came and told me three men had run up the road with a coat under their arm - I ran and saw Tyer with the coat on his arm; I cannot say whether Elstole was one of the other persons, but Tyer gave the coat over to one of the two who got over the fence - I took Tyer, and asked him who the other parties were; he said he did not know - he was walking along with this crowbar up his arm, and his hands in his pockets; I found on him this candle and a knife - the coat was brought in about a quarter of an hour; Elstole was brought in between five and six o'clock.

THOMAS MATTHEWS (Police-constable K 198). I was on duty, and saw the three men running - I followed them; two of them got over the fence - I followed them as far as Bow-common-lane; Elstole and the other then placed themselves against a wall and showed fight - the other man then took up a brick, and threw it at me, as he said to knock my b - y brains out; they then ran off again - I followed them to the wooden bridge; I then saw a gentleman in a chaise, and I called to him to stop them -

he turned Elstole back, and I took him; the other got away.

TYER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

ELSTOLE - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Two Years .

SARAH MEKIN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-48
VerdictNot Guilty

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719. SARAH MEKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , 9 yards of ribbon, value 7s. , the goods of Moses Roberts .

MOSES ROBERTS. I am a haberdasher , and live in Oxford-street . I have seen the prisoner at my shop, but do not recollect what she bought; this ribbon is mine, and it was brought to my house by the officer.

WILLIAM HORSFORD (Police-serjeant D 6). On the 28th of February, I took the prisoner at Mr. Simpson's for taking a piece of ribbon in his shop; I found this ribbon in a box which I got from No. 53, Connaught-terrace - I took the box to the station, and asked the prisoner if it was hers, she said it was; I found several other things in it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. I believe the things you found were advertised? A. Yes, but I found the owner of this ribbon by going to different shops.

MR. ROBERTS. This is my ribbon - I cannot tell when I lost it.

NOT GUILTY .

SARAH MEKIN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-49
VerdictNot Guilty

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720. SARAH MEKIN was again indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 13 yards of silk, value 1l. 5s.; 1 handkerchief, 1s. 6d., and 60 yards of ribbon, 15s. , the goods of John Crawley .

WILLIAM ABERDEEN. I was servant to Mr. John Crawley , haberdasher , Oxford-street . About the 23rd of February, the prisoner came to match a yard of black silk, which she had previously bought a dress of; after she was gone I missed thirteen yards of silk, which had been on the near counter where she had been - I saw the silk at the station, with some ribbons and handkerchiefs.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.You are sure she was in your shop about the 23rd of February? A. Yes; ours is but a small shop - we missed silk of this sort, but there may be more of the same sort; it has our mark on it.

WILLIAM HORSFORD. This silk was found in the prisoner's trunk.

Witness for the Defence.

WILLIAM PRENDLER. I am servant to Mr. Coiney. The prisoner was my fellow-servant; she lived in the family for fifteen years - we generally live in Staffordshire, but we have been in town ten months; the prisoner was in the habit of spending her money in finery - I have seen her buy things of a man who came to the door; I saw her purchase this piece of silk of him - there are thirteen yards of it; she asked if it would make a dress.

COURT. Q. Is your master here? A. Yes; I swear I saw her purchase a piece of silk of this description of a short man, of a dark complexion - she bought it ten days before she was taken: she paid 26s. for this and some ribbons: it was on the mat just inside the door - the man was there half an hour; I saw the silk in the kitchen - I do not know whether it was measured, but they said there were thirteen yards; I went out and got change for a sovereign for the prisoner to pay for it - she cut this bit off the end of it, before the man went away, to try if it would wash.

NOT GUILTY .

SARAH MEKIN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-50
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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721. SARAH MEKIN was again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , 64 yards of lace, value 2l., and 7 yards of ribbon, 16s. , the goods of George Simpson .

THEODORE KIRBY . I am in the employ of Mr. George Simpson - he is a linen-draper , in Crawford-street, Bryanstone-square . The prisoner came to his shop on the 28th of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening - she bought a trifling article, went out, and came in again in ten minutes, and asked for two or three other articles, which the lad was showing her - I saw him showing her some ribbons; he rolled up one, put it in its place, and showed her some others; he called me, and said he missed one - I went forwards to look for it; the boy said he was sure he missed one - I placed myself between her and the door, and looked for the ribbon, but could not find it in the drawer; I asked the prisoner if she had put it into her pocket-handkerchief by mistake - she said No; her umbrella was by her side - I asked if it had fallen into that; she said No, she did not carry things in her umbrella; I said a piece of ribbon was certainly missing, and as Mr. Simpson was out, and I was left in charge, I must detain her - I asked if she had any objection to wait; she said No - I asked if she would walk further into the shop and take a seat; she walked in, and sat down by the stove, in the middle of the shop; I still kept between her and the door - she seemed very uneasy, as though she could not sit quiet; I apologised for keeping her so long - she said it was of no consequence, and presently she slipped her shoe off her foot; she stooped to put it on again, and I saw her put her hand under the stove, which stood on her left - she then said she could not wait any longer; I sent for an officer - she then got up, and came towards the door; I still kept between her and the door, and told the other boy to look under the stove, which he did, and brought out this ribbon, from the very place where I had seen her put something; when the officer came she begged not to be sent with him - I told her it was her own obstinacy in denying that she took the ribbon; she then said,"Well, I did, don't let me go" - I understood her to mean that she took the ribbon; this lace was found on her at the station - it is my employer's.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long have you been in the service? A. Three years - I had seen the prisoner several times before, but did not know where she lived; I was serving other customers when she first came in, but not the next time - I was then two or three yards from the boy who served the prisoner; I was doing nothing.

JOSEPH HOWES. I am in the employ of Mr. George Simpson . I have seen the prisoner at my master's - she came on the 28th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening; she first asked for stay-laces - I served her, and she paid 2d. for it; she then asked for blood lace - I showed her some; she told me to cut her a yard off at 8d.; she gave me 1s. - I gave her the change; she then left the shop, and returned in about ten minutes - there

were some muslin handkerchiefs by the door, marked 6d.; she told me to cut her off one, which I did; she then asked for some band-ribbons for the waist - I showed her a drawer of them, and opened four or five pieces: she said there was none that suited her - I turned to get another, and saw her put her hand to the drawer, take it out, and put it behind her; I looked, and missed one at 2s. 6d. a yard - I then called Mr. Kirby, and told him; he asked her if she had any objection to take a seat - she said No; and she took a seat - Mr. Simpson did not come, and she got uneasy; I was sent for an officer - the other boy took this ribbon from under the stove; I was at the station-house, and saw the officer take her cloak off, and under her arm was this other piece of ribbon, which is not my master's - I did not see the lace found on her.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you and your fellow-servant talked over this matter? A. No; I have certainly spoken to him about it.

WILLIAM HORSFORD (Police-serjeant D 6). I took the prisoner, and searched her at the station; I found on her a roll of ribbon, a sovereign, three shillings in silver, five keys, one yard of blond lace, two yards of net, and a net handkerchief - this roll of ribbon was given me by the shopman.

Cross-examined. Q. Did she not tell you where she lived? A.She told me at No. 15, George-street, which I found was not true; but by a letter found on her I discovered her address.

THOMAS BURTON (Police-constable D 14). I searched the prisoner after she had been confined about an hour; she was brought out of the cell, and asked if a trunk belonged to her - as she was sitting before the fire she pulled up her petticoats to warm her legs, and I saw something hanging down, I asked what it was, she said her garter; I took hold of it, and about two yards of this lace came down - I said, "You may as well give me this?" she said "You may take it, it is gone as far as it can" - there were three other charges against the prisoner, but the parties would not prosecute.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

MARY ANN HARRIS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-51
VerdictNot Guilty

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722. MARY ANN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 3 sovereigns, the monies of John Hodge , from his person .

JOHN HODGE . I am a stone-mason . I fell in with the prisoner between ten and eleven o'clock at night, on the 23rd of March, in Buckeridge-street, St. Giles' - I think I spoke to her first; I was not tipsy - I went with her to a house opposite, to a public-house in which I had been - we were shown into a room; I was not with her more than half an hour - I had nothing to do with her; I had not given her any thing, nor promised her any thing - I had treated her with some ale about an hour before; I then missed three sovereigns and some silver, which I had felt safe when I was going up the stairs to the room; she had been sitting close to me on my right-hand side - I can swear to one of the sovereigns; I had had it some time - I went to the station, and gave information.

JAMES WILLIAM ALLUM (Police-constable F 81). The prisoner was brought to the station - I found two sovereigns on her.

JOHN HODGE . I know one of my sovereigns by a bruise on the edge of it; this is not it - it is not the one I saw.

NOT GUILTY

MARY ANN HARRIS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-52
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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723. MARY ANN HARRIS was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , 1 sovereign; 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence , the monies of James Murnane .

JAMES MURNANE . I am a mason's labourer . I met the prisoner in a public-house on the morning of the 24th of March, about five o'clock, when I went to have a pint of beer - I had a sovereign and 1s. 6d. in my pocket; the prisoner stood on my left - I did not feel her hand go into my pocket, but I felt it drawing out, and I made a grasp at her hand - she got it from me, and ran out; I followed her out, but was knocked down by three or four persons, who used me very cruelly - she was afterwards taken by the officer; she said "Give the man his money, it is all there but one 6d., which I have spent."

WILLIAM RANDALL (Police-constable F 8). On Sunday morning, the 24th of March, I was informed a man had been robbed, by a girl who had crossed the road - I followed the prisoner, and took her in George-street - I saw she was trying to swallow something; I took hold of her throat, and put my other hand to the back of her head; a sovereign and a shilling dropped from her mouth, which were taken up and given to me - she desired me to give it to the man, and said it was all she had taken from him, except 6d., which she had spent.

JURY to JAMES MURNANE. Q.Was the 6d. expended in drink, of which you partook? A. No; it was not spent to my knowledge - I had not been in company with her.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

FRANCES HOLLIDAY.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-53
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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724. FRANCES HOLLIDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 10 lbs. of bacon, value 5s. , the goods of John Marriott .

JOHN MARRIOTT. I am a cheesemonger , and live at No. 8, Coppice-row . I was not at home when this happened, but I met the Policeman and the prisoner in the street, and went to the office; I know this bacon to be mine; I do not know the prisoner.

MICHAEL MAHONY . I was sitting in the back parlour of the prosecutor's shop - I saw the prisoner walk in and take the bacon; I followed, stopped her, and brought her back.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say at Hatton-garden that you did not know where it fell from? A. It was under your shawl, and you dropped it; I believe the Policeman took it up.

JOHN HULL (Police-constable C 220.) I was passing and saw the prisoner come out of the shop, and this witness following her; he stopped her, and took her back to the shop, and I believe she dropped this bacon from under her shawl - I took it up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to buy some cheese; I waited some minutes - no one came; I went out, and got four doors off - this man asked me to go back, which I did, and this bacon fell off some butter-flats in the shop.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM COLLINS, GEORGE ADAMS, FREDERICK STEWARD.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-54
VerdictGuilty; Guilty; Not Guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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725. WILLIAM COLLINS , GEORGE ADAMS , and FREDERICK STEWARD were indicted for steal

ing, on the 6th of March , 1 pair of trousers, value 4s. , the goods of George Treadaway .

GEORGE TREADAWAY . I am a tailor , and live in the Harrow-road . On the 6th of March I lost a pair of trousers from my shop; I had seen them safe, and missed them from twelve to one o'clock - I had seen the prisoners before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Where had the trousers been? A. On the door-post, not outside, but they could be reached from outside.

GEORGE TILLEY . I live in Harrow-road. I was at a picture shop, next door to the prosecutor's - I saw the prisoners there; Collins laid hold of one leg of the trousers, and Steward the other; Adams stood looking into the picture shop - I said, "There goes two boys with something;" Adams said he would give me a spank of the nose if I did not hold my mouth - Allen then went away, but did not run; I went after them with the prosecutor- the trousers were found at a pawnbroker's.

WILLIAM SMITH (Police-constable T 59). I took the prisoners; Collins said he had thrown the trousers away, but he afterwards said he had pawned them - he told me where; I went and got them.

WILLIAM LETTER . I was looking out of a window, and saw the prisoners standing about our place, for half an-hour - they went to some old men's pick-axes, and pulled them about.

CHARLES PORTER . I am a pawnbroker. I took in these trousers from Collins.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

STEWARD - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

ADAMS - NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM HALFORD, WILLIAM ROWLAND.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-55
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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726. WILLIAM HALFORD and WILLIAM ROWLAND were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 handkerchief, value 4s. , the goods of Frederick Parsons .

GEORGE POWELL (Police-constable E 75). On the 1st of March I was in the King's-road, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I saw the two prisoners following the prosecutor - Halford put his hand into his pocket, took something out, and gave it to Rowland, who was about a yard off him; I secured Rowland, and found this handkerchief at the back of his coat - he was in the act of putting it into his back coat-pocket, I think; I took him into a shop - he said, "Oh God! and burst into tears;" my brother officer brought Halford back - and Rowland said, "See what you have brought me and my family to;" Halford said, "Do not drop down, it is all right;" that was because he was crying, I suppose.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you stated all he said? A. Yes, to my knowledge; I have not been drinking to night - I have had no spirits; I had only a pint of half-and-half.

HENRY BAKER (Police-constable E 44). On the 1st of March I was with Powell; I saw the prisoner Halford take something from the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to Rowland - I followed Halford, and took him in Liquor-pond-street; I brought him back to the shop where Rowland was - Rowland said, "See what you have brought me to; you know my father is respectable;" Halford said, "Do not drop down upon your luck, it will be all right, keep your own counsel."

Cross-examined. Q.Rowland seemed very much shocked? A. Yes, he cried, and on the road to the watch-house also.

FREDEKICK PARSONS. I am assistant to a wholesale druggist on Snow-hill. I was walking down the King's-road on the evening of the 1st of March; Halford passed me and ran off - the Policeman followed, and took him; I saw my handkerchief found on Rowland.

Cross-examined. Q. Are your initials on it? A. No, but here is R. P. which is my father's name; he had given me the handkerchief - Rowland seemed quite overcome.

Halford put in a written Defence, stating that he had found the handkerchief in the King's-road; that he gave it to Rowland to look at, and was running to avoid being run over by a cabriolet.

Rowland's Defence (written). The young man who is charged with me for this offence, was introduced, about three months ago, by a schoolfellow of mine, named Robson - I met him on the day this occurrence took place, and we walked on, conversing together, when, suddenly, Halford was a few paces before me, and, turning round, placed a handkerchief in my hand, saying something, but what I did not know, in consequence of the hurried manner - at the same moment the Policeman seized me, and accused me of stealing the handkerchief - I went with him, and Halford ran away - whether Halford saw the Policeman cross the road, and so gave the handkerchief into my hand to save himself, I cannot tell; but I most positively, though humbly, protest my innocence, and declare that at the time the handkerchief was placed in my hand I was totally unconscious with what object it was so done, and believing at the moment that it was Halford's own.

Rowland received an excellent character.

HALFORD - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROWLAND - NOT GUILTY .

JOHN MEADOWS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-56
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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OLD COURT. FRIDAY, APRIL 12TH.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

727. JOHN MEADOWS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Squire , on the 23rd of March , and stealing 1 pair of shoes, his property .

JOHN SQUIRE. My dwelling-house is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; I keep the house, and am a lady's shoemaker . On the 23rd of March, about ten o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner take a pair of shoes from my window; I was at work in the kitchen underneath - I got up, looked up, and saw the shoes in his hand; he went away - I went up, went out, and secured him in Finsbury-passage, and gave him into custody; a square of glass was out of the window before, and a piece of pasteboard was nailed in instead of the glass, all round, with about a dozen nails - I had noticed it quite secure that morning; it covered the whole space, and was nailed regularly round - he had pushed that down; these are the shoes.

GUILTY * of stealing only . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS JONES.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-57
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Before Lord Chief Justice Denman.

728. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously

breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Dorothy Pawson , about four o'clock in the morning of the 26th of March , with intent to steal .

DOROTHY PAWSON. I am a widow ; I keep the White Horse public-house, Spital-street, Mile-end New-town , in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney. On the 26th of March my house was broken into; I fastened it up myself, and my lodger and I examined all the house at a quarter-past eleven o'clock; all the doors and windows were fast - I then went to bed; next morning I found the house broken open, the shutters, the glass, and the bolt of the door broken - I heard a noise of wrenching in the night, and we got up; a lodger got a light - I was lame, and could not come down myself; I have not lost any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did your daughter live with you? A. Yes, she was not out that night - it snowed a good deal next morning, and a little the night before; I did not go to bed till the house was secure.

EDWARD WOOD . I lodged at the White Horse on the 26th of March - I went to bed about ten o'clock, and about twenty minutes to five in the morning I heard a noise, which seemed to be in the back part of the house; I laid still for ten minutes, and then heard a bolt burst, as I thought, at the front door - I got up, looked through the window, and called the watchman and the Police; I heard nothing after the bolt went - my wife got up and struck a light; I took a poker in my hand, went to the front door, opened it, and let the Policeman in - I found the front door fast, and the back door was fast; I put my hand against the back parlour door - that flew open, and the shutters and the window of the back room were open wide enough to let a man in - the bolts of the shutters were undone; two great holes had been cut through the shutters, the bolts unfastened, and two squares of glass broken - there were footmarks in the snow in the yard; I saw the prisoner in custody afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you observe the footmarks of one person or more? A.Only one - it did not snow when I came home at night; thirty-seven holes were bored in the shutters by a center-bit - I went to bed before the prosecutrix.

ZACHARIAH BAKER. I am a Policeman. I was in Spital-street early on the morning of the 26th of March, about one or two hundred yards from the White Horse- I heard Wood call out Watch and Police; I went to the White Horse, and called my serjeant and other assistance - we were let in by Wood; his description of the shutters and window is correct - I saw footmarks in the snow in the yard, and I followed those footmarks immediately; they led me over six or seven fences at the back of the house, and I heard a rustling at the door of a house in the eighth yard - I traced footmarks to that door; the serjeant and I tried to force the door in, but could not - I heard that door bolted before we got up to it; there was a back window - I broke two or three squares of glass, unfastened the hasp, and got in; I heard footsteps going from the ground floor to the first floor front room, and there I found the prisoner, sitting at the foot of a bed, where a male and female, and a young child were in bed; the prisoner was sitting with his legs across, his arms folded, and his coat and his hat off, which were all wet by the side of him - he appeared to be asleep; I disturbed him, and found in his pocket two street door keys and a box - I took him to the station-house, and afterwards to the watch-house; he would not give us his address - I took his shoes off his feet, and compared them with the marks in the snow, both right and left, all the way, and they corresponded all the way; they were new left and right shoes - I compared them with the snow, they fitted exactly; the marks were deeper than above the soles - I did not compare it by making a mark by the side of the footmark, but I put the shoes into the footmarks.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it snowing when you were called? A. A little; it was about twenty minutes to five o'clock - the snow ceased a minute or two after I got into the house; the prisoner was found about one or two hundred yards from the prosecutrix's - I got over seven wooden fences and a wall, following the footsteps, and my serjeant followed with me; the serjeant of the patrol went round the front way - I wear right and left shoes, but mine had hob-nails; I compared his shoes about half an hour after I secured him - the water did not drip into the footsteps; it was light enough to see that - I knew the person by sight in whose room he was found; I have not been there since - the prisoner was pretending to be asleep, sitting in a chair at the foot of the bed, all over wet; no housebreaking implements were found.

COURT. Q. From what part of the house did you trace the footsteps? A. From the shutter of the back room, where the breaking had been.

JOHN McWILLIAM. I am a Policeman. I went with Baker to the White Horse; I got there about twenty minutes to five o'clock; I did not hear any noise till I heard the alarm; I then went into Mrs. Pawson's house - we went through the house, and traced the footmarks through the snow to the other house, and I heard the door slammed in and bolted - he got in at the window; I got in, went up, and took the prisoner: when Baker aroused him I looked under the window, and saw his shoe laying there, wet - I said to Baker, "Take him to the watch-house;" he said he would be d-d if he went without his shoes: I said,"Are these your shoes?" he said Yes, and put them on - we took him to the station-house; I afterwards took his shoes off, and compared them with the footmarks - they corresponded.

Cross-examined. Q. You must have been at the person's heels when he got into the house? A. Yes - he went into that house, but he was never in my sight; I only say so from hearing the door slam while I was in the yard - I examined the room, but found no housebreaking implements; I have no reason to think the person who lives in that room has gone away - the prisoner said he could prove by the man in the room that he had not been out all night, except for a pot of beer - I said, "That man knows me better than to come up and say so."

COURT. Q.What did the man say? A.He made no answer; my footmarks were almost as large again as the prisoner's, and Baker's had hob nails - the prisoner's had small brads; there were no other footsteps to be seen in any direction.

JAMES WALTON . I am a Police-serjeant. I went with McWilliam to the house; I observed him take the prisoner's shoes there, and there was snow sticking to the heels, and the bottom of his trousers were quite wet, and his hat appeared as if rain had sprinkled on it; the drops stuck to it.

NOT GUILTY .

EDWARD PHILLIPS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-58
VerdictNot Guilty

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Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

729. EDWARD PHILLIPS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Willocks , on the 12th of March , and stealing 1 table, value 20s.; 1 bolster, value 4s., and 2 pillows, value 4s., his property .

SUSANNAH WILLOCKS . I am the wife of Thomas Willocks- we live in Wentworth-street, and rent a house at No. 1, George-street . I locked the door of that house safe at half-past seven o'clock, and about nine I went across, and found the street door open - knowing nobody was in the house, I got a light, and pushed the street door further open; I saw a man's hat laying down, with the padlock and staple off of the parlour door, which was on it at half-past seven o'clock, when I had locked it; I called a Policeman, and went into the parlour with him - I found the dining-table moved out of the back parlour to the front parlour door, and the pillows and bolsters shifted from their right place - I had made the bed all in order before I went away; I found the pillows and bolsters doubled in two, and laid at the foot of the bed - the prisoner was laying on the bed, with his face downwards; he was in a most deplorable state, without any shoes on - he pretended to be asleep; nothing was missing, the property was only removed - I am quite sure the table, pillow and bolster had been removed; I had polished the table, and put it under the window - the bolster and pillow were on the bed when I went out; only one lodger lived in the house, and she was out - I had left nobody in the house.

SAMUEL GREEN. I am a Policeman. I was on duty in Wentworth-street on Tuesday, the 12th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening - I went to the house, in consequence of the alarm, and found the prosecutrix holding the street door; the lock and staple laid by the hat in the passage - I went into the front room, then into the back room, and saw the prisoner laying on the bed- he appeared to be very heavy asleep; I shook him - he did not take any notice; he appeared to be sound asleep - I laid hold of his legs, and pulled him off on the floor; he then said, "Halloo! halloo!" I said, "How came you here?" he made no reply; I said, "I shall take you to the station-house;" the pillow and bolster were laying on the bed, doubled up, and the table was moved from the window towards the door, about three yards - I took him to the station-house, and when he got there he answered every question put to him, and did not appear so drunk as when I first found him; he gave no account how he got there in my hearing - the staple had been drawn.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me before? A. Yes, once, in the same room; I took him out of it about a month before, on suspicion of coining - he was sitting there with a woman who then occupied the room; she had nothing to do with the house at this time - the house is let out in rooms to girls, but at this time only one lodged there, and that was up stairs; she slept there - they call her Jane.

SUSANNAH WILLOCKS re-examined. The woman who lodged in the house at that time was Jane Smith; she was a weekly lodger, and lodged there five years - her husband is at sea; I gave the house up after the robbery, I was so frightened - she lodged there till I gave it up, and she now lives with me in Wentworth-street; my husband is a journeyman slaughtering-butcher: I had seen the prisoner once before, walking by the place, and asked what he did there - he said he did not know; Smith is twenty-eight or twenty-nine years of age, I think - she does not receive visitors that I know of; she receives none at my house - I cannot say how she gets her living; she is out all day, almost - the house is furnished very comfortably.

JOHN BURROWS. I was with the Policeman - his evidence is correct; we found the prisoner on the bed, apparently very heavy asleep.

Prisoner's Defence. About a week before this I was in the room with the woman who rented it: the prosecutrix came in intoxicated, and demanded her rent - an altercation ensued; she called in the Police: she had given them some secret information concerning me - the room was searched, but nothing found.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM GAYWOOD.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-59
VerdictNot Guilty

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Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

730. WILLIAM GAYWOOD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Claridge , on the 26th of February , and stealing therein 1 cloak, value 10s., 4 towels, value 6s., 8 spoons, value 21s., 1 pepper-box, value 2s,, 2 pairs of sheets, value 1l., 1 gown, value 15s., and 1 shawl, value 15s., her property .

JANE CLARIDGE . I am a widow , and live at Finchley . On the 26th of February I fastened the house up at night, and went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock - we all went to bed together; the door was bolted and chained - the windows were fastened by a shutter and a bar; I got up about half-past six, and found both the front and back windows and the back door all open - it is a house standing by itself; my wardrobe was open, and a great deal of property gone - the lock of the parlour door, where the wardrobe was, was, broken open - it had been locked - the box of the lock was taken off; two large damask tablecloths were taken, and three small ones, two large dimity curtains of a four-post bed, with the tester and back, and drapery, a black cloth cloak, a patchwork counterpane, a crape shawl, two coloured gowns, a pair of very large fine holland sheets, and a pair of very large Russia sheets, four pairs of calico sheets, nine pillow-cases, ten towels, and a great many articles, and a great deal of pork, ham, bacon, butter, eggs, and every thing taken; I have seen some of the property since, at the pawnbroker's; my little girl was at the Sunday School, and on the Sunday after the robbery I saw a pocket on a girl who was there - she gave her name as Stacey; I had often seen the prisoner in the neighbourhood - he had nothing to do with my house; he is a bricklayer, and lived with the man who built my house, which was built about five years ago - he lives in the neighbourhood.

THOMAS MORTON . I am a Bow-street officer. I went

down to Finchley, and examined the house, on the 26th; I found it had been broken into, and found some marks of a very large shoe or ancle-boot, with nails, in front of the front parlour window; I apprehended the prisoner, and it was very much like the shoe he had on - I have examined the prisoner's shoe since; I thought it resembled the mark - I did not compare it; it had very large nails in it; the house had been entered at the back kitchen window - the lower sash was thrown up, and the bottom hinge wrenched off the shutter; on the 3rd of March the Magistrate sent for me to apprehend Stacey and the prisoner - I went to their house, but neither of them were at home; I searched the house, and found property belonging to Mrs. Claridge - it was in Stacey's house, where the prisoner lodged; Stacey has never been apprehended yet - he lives at Finchley; I know the prisoner lodged there, from information which I received - I apprehended the prisoner the same night, near the Saracen's Head Inn, at Finchley; he never acknowledged that he lodged at Stacey's - I found in Stacey's house a centre-bit and other articles; I took the prisoner before a Magistrate - he was remanded for a week; I found eleven duplicates in the house, in Mrs. Stacey's pocket.

JOHN LAMAR . I am a carpenter. I was required by the Magistrate to attend the officer to look for the property; on the 4th of March I found property, which I knew to belong to Mrs. Claridge, at Castle's, the pawnbroker's, in Camden-town, and more at Mr. Wells', Hampstead-road, and at Griffiths', Ossulton-street, and at Blackburn's, Skinner-street; when I returned home with the officer, I went to Mrs. Stacey's, at Finchley - Mrs. Stacey was in custody at the time, by order of the Magistrate; Stacey and his wife have absconded - I know the prisoner was acquainted with Stacey and his wife; the prisoner was making his escape when he was apprehended, for he was two miles from home - he held out some threats to us, and I said it was a pity he should hold out threats, when he had robbed so many people as he had - he said he did not care a b-r about it; I stated before the Magistate (Mr. Ray), in his presence, that Mrs. Stacey had informed me, when we returned from town, that Gaywood and her husband had furnished her with the property which she had pawned - that they had given it to her to pledge for them - and she also said she wished her husband would come forward and clear her; the prisoner made no reply to it.

- STACEY, aged ten years, not appearing to be aware of the obligation of an oath, was not examined.

JOHN LAMAR re-examined. I know the prisoner lodged at Stacey's; I have seen him at the house daily, at Finchley - I saw them together on the morning after Mrs. Claridge's robbery, standing at Stacey's door (him and Stacey). I was only passing, and saw them standing there; I am in the habit of frequently passing Stacey's in my business, and I know he lodges at Stacey's - this was the day after the robbery, on the 26th of February, and on the 28th I saw him and Stacey, and Stacey's wife, and a person named Smith and his wife, passing my house, (as if coming from London), going towards Stacey's house; Smith and his wife had only been discharged for a case of burglary, the Session before.

MRS. CLARIDGE. This pepper castor, and book, was found in Mrs. Stacey's pocket - these housebreaking implements were found in Stacey's house, and on the evening I found the petticoat on Stacey's child, I went with the men to search the house, and this property of mine was found in it - here are a bolster, two tablecloths, a flannel-petticoat, and a napkin, which were safe in my house on the night of Monday, the 25th; I found them the Sunday after that, and the petticoat was on the child - Stacey has absconded.

JOHN TATTAM . The prisoner Gaywood applied to me for relief. - I am overseer of Finchley; he applied to me several times before Mrs. Claridge's, and Mr. Burton's robberies, and a few days previous to his apprehension, I inquired of him where he was lodging, or living - he said he was lodging with Stacey round the corner, meaning the house where this property was found.

THOMAS MORTON . There are two rooms in Stacey's house. I found the property in the bed-room; where Stacey sleeps; there was only one bed in the room - it was not occupied by the prisoner; there was no other bed in the house where the prisoner appeared to sleep - there was only one bed in the room, and a sort of place for the children to sleep in.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM GAYWOOD.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-60
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

731. WILLIAM GAYWOOD was again indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Burton , on the 12th of February , and stealing 3 shirts, value 14s.; 3 hams, value 20s.; 7 boots, value 7s.; 1 shawl, value 4s.; 8 gallons of wine, value 40s.; 2 table-cloths, value 4s.; 5 spoons, value 20s.; 6 handkerchiefs, value 6s., and 1 pepper-box, value 7s., his property .

MARTHA BURTON , I am the wife of John Burton, who is a builder , and lives at Finchley . On the 12th of February I fastened the house up myself the last thing at night; the doors were locked, and the windows fastened - we went to bed at nine o'clock, and got up about half-past seven o'clock; we found the great gates open in front of the house - the doors and windows were all fastened; they had entered by a cellar flap in the garden, which had been fastened by nails - it was safe on the night of the robbery; we found it lifted up, and the nails wrenched out - it was large enough to admit a man; they had then got up stairs - the passage door was open; I missed the articles stated in the indictment - I have only found one shirt.

THOMAS MORTON . I apprehended the prisoner on the 3rd of March; he had 2s. 4d. in money in a purse, and part of a loaf - I took a shirt off his back, before the Magistrate, on the 11th of March; the Magistrate asked where he got it - he said Mrs. Stacey washed for him.

MRS. BURTON. I know this shirt to be my husband's: it was one of those missing that night.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Stacey washed for me; she had none of my shirts clean, and told me to put on this of her husband's.

JOHN LAMAR. I know he lodged at Stacey's on the 12th of February; the Magistrate told him he had got quite a smart shirt on to what he used to wear - he said, "Oh, I have got four better than this, I bought one in Kent;" he did not say where he got this one - when it was taken off

his back, he did not say he borrowed it of Mrs Stacey, or give any account of it.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM SMART.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-61
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

732. WILLIAM SMART was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William James Morris , on the 1st of April , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, and stealing therein, 1 coat, value 40s.; 1 half-sovereign, and 10s., his property .

SARAH SEAMAN . I live in Great Garden-street, Hackney-road , with my son, William James Morris, in the parish of Bethnal-green; I have known the prisoner about nine years - he is a sawyer ; when he has been out of employ he has called on me. On Monday the 1st of April, between two and three o'clock, I saw him in the garden soon after three o'clock: he said a person wanted me, to take a child to nurse - he told me to go to Mrs. Robinson's house; I went, and found there was nobody at home - she lives about half a mile from me; on my return I met Mrs. Robinson, and she said she had not seen the prisoner - I returned home, and found the window had been opened; I had left it fastened, and a piece of round iron put through the casement - I had double locked the door, and found it on the single lock; I went up stairs, and found my son's box broken open, and half a sovereign taken out, also 10s., and a new black coat.

CHARLOTTE ROBINSON . On Monday, the 1st of April, nobody said any thing to me about a nurse child; I had not seen the prisoner that day, and sent no message by him.

GEORGE ARNOLD. I am apprentice to Mr. Hewitson, pawnbroker, Kingsland-road. I produce a black coat, which I took infrom the prisoner, on the 1st of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, for 13s.; I said I thought it was too small for him - he said it was his son-in-law's, and that he had it to make up money for his club; I am quite sure he is the man - I live about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutrix's.

MRS. SEAMAN. It was between three and four o'clock that I set off to go to Mrs. Robinson's; I am quite sure this is my son's coat - I know it by the make of it; he never wore it - he bought it of a person who made it, and it had a fault in it: a piece was cut off, which is off here.

Prisoner. Q.Did not we live together as man and wife for three weeks? A. We never lived together.

GUILTY of stealing the coat only . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOSEPH WILLIAMS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-62
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Before Mr. Baron Vaughan.

733. JOSEPH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 26 sovereigns, 8 crowns, 40 half-crowns, 10 shillings, 3 sixpences, 1 tin box, value 6d., and 2 purses, value 6d., the property of John Brown , his master, in his dwelling-house .

CATHERINE BROWN . I am the wife of John Brown. On the 18th of February my husband kept the White Swan in Breams-buildings ; the prisoner was our potboy - on Monday, the 18th of February I left the bar for a short time, and went into the cellar, between eleven and twelve o'clock, leaving the prisoner outside the bar; I turned the key of the bar door, and told him to look to it till I came up again - I was gone about four minutes, and when I returned I found the door as I had left it; I had occasion to go to the cupboard, where I keep the cash-box, and missed the box immediately - it was a tin box; I asked the prisoner where he had been while I was down stairs - he said he was standing there all the while; I asked him if he saw any one come into the bar - he said Yes, a tall man came in, dressed in black; I asked if he went inside the bar - he said he thought he did, but he could not say, and that the man asked if I was at home, and he said I was only gone down stairs, and the man said, "Never mind, I will call again," and walked out; I told him I had been robbed, and accused him of it, which he denied - a person came out of the tap-room, and said they thought he was guilty, and Lloyd, the officer, was fetched; they took him up stairs to make a search - the tin box contained a purse with twenty-six sovereigns, and a little bag with 7l. 11s. 6d.; the box was brought to me in about half an hour by Lloyd.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. Where was the closet? A.Inside the bar; customers do not go there - the tap-room is between the bar and front door; there were three men in the tap-room - I locked the bar door and left the key in it; I persuaded the prisoner all I could to tell me where it was.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody; the witness Fleet handed the box to me.

EDWARD FLEET. I searched by the direction of Lloyd; I went into the yard and saw two or three persons looking for the box - the prisoner was in the yard, doing his work - I asked him if he knew any thing about the box of money which was lost; he said he did not - he did not point out where it was; I found the tin box up in a loft where lumber was kept - I had been up there once or twice before for a former landlady who lived there, and I thought it might be thrown there, and there I found it; I called to Mr. Brown to come and receive the box from me, but he did not, and I handed it down to Wheeler, who gave it Lloyd.

ANDREW LLOYD re-examined. Whether Wheeler or Fleet gave it to me I do not know, but the prisoner kept his eye on the loft, which made me suspect it was there, or in the cess-pool.

Cross-examined. Q. He kept his eye on the loft, and yet you thought it was in the cess-pool? A. Yes; the loft and cess-pool are both together; I meant the place where the water comes in; Fleet was reaching up there when the prisoner was looking up.

COURT. Q. The prisoner did not tell you where it was to be found? A. Just at the moment it was found, he told me where it was, and when it was found he told me he had stolen it to buy him clothes; he said, "You will find the box under the rafter on the left-hand side," and at that instant Fleet called out,"I have got it."

MRS. BROWN. This is our box - it contained twenty-six sovereigns and 7l. 11s. 6d. and this purse; I left no servant in the room with him - the maid servant was up stairs.

Cross-examined. Q. How long before you lost it had you seen it? A. Ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and it was found in about half an hour; I could

not exactly say how much was in it, but I know there was as much as this.

COURT. Q. You left him in charge of the bar, and found him still there? A. Yes; he said he had never lost sight of the bar; he was only four weeks in my employ, and slept in the house.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Life .

WILLIAM RIDGE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-63
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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Before Lord Chief Justice Denman.

734. WILLIAM RIDGE was indicted for feloniously receiving 6 rings, value 20l.; 1 fruit-knife, value 10s.; 1 gold chain, value 2l.; 1 gold and coral cross, value 15s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 30s.; 1 bracelet, value 2s.; 1 oz. of coral beads, value 2s., and 4 shirt studs, value 4s., the goods of Frances Williamson Susannah Lee , well knowing them to have been stolen, and to which William Langley pleaded guilty of stealing . (See page 340.)

FRANCES WILLIAMSON SUSANNAH LEE. I live at Mr. William Lester 's, No. 10, Cirencester-place; Langley was employed to do jobs about the house, and on the 20th of February, I missed from my scrutoire a morocco box, containing a variety of property - I know nothing of Ridge.

DANIEL MOBBS . I am a Policeman. In consequence of information, I went to the prisoner's house, in Bear-street, Leicester-square, on the 22nd of February, and apprehended him; I asked him if he knew Langley - he said he did; I asked if he had received any rings from Langley - he said he had, and had sold them to Mr. Davis, of Belton-street, Short's-gardens; I asked if he was not to have 10s. for his trouble - he said he was, and that he had received the money; I got a warrant, and searched Davis's premises, but did not find the rings.

WILLIAM LESTER . I know nothing about Ridge, except that he acknowledged to the Magistrate that he had been in company with Langley, and sold five rings for 35s. - he said he had been with Langley, and had received 10s. for selling them at No. 11, Belton-street, Short's-gardens - that there were three females in the place, and they sold them to one of them; the rings were mentioned as having been stolen from my house by Langley - none of the property has been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I went with him to sell them, but knew nothing of the robbery.

DANIEL MOBBS. He told me he had sold the rings to Mrs. Davis, in Short's-gardens - I went there, and found a woman answering to that name; it appeared a broker's shop outside, but we found things there which should not be at a broker's.

GUILTY .* Aged 19. - Transported for 14 Years .

WILLIAM PEARSON.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-64
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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Before Mr. Baron Vaughan .

735. WILLIAM PEARSON was indicted for that he, having in his possession, a certain bill of exchange, as follows; viz: -

London, 28th March, 1833.

Three weeks after date, pay to my order the sum of 30l.

W. PEARSON .

To Mr. Mark Cadbury, Cheesemonger, Conduit-street, Bond-street.

feloniously did forge an acceptance to the said bil with intent to defraud Robert Graham .

TWO OTHER COUNTS verying the manner of laying the charge.

ROBERT GRAHAM . I have known the prisoner about two years - he used to buy colour of me. On the 29th of March, he applied to me, saying he was doing work for Mr. Cadbury a cheesemonger of Conduit-street, repairing some houses; he said he had got a bill of a short date of three weeks, and he should want 10l. out in money, and the rest he was to take out in goods; he asked if I knew Cadbury - I said No, but I knew there was a cheesemonger there, and at all events I would take the bill and make inquiry; and as it was not endorsed, I took a copy of the bill, and returned it to him; I went and saw Mr. Cadbury - I saw the prisoner on Saturday morning - I did not advance him any money on the bill.

MARK CADBURY. I live at No. 24, New Bond-street, at the corner of Conduit-street. The prisoner has transacted business for me as carpenter, painter, and glazier; I never authorized him to accept any bill of exchange for me.

JOHN TRUEMAN. I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday week, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning - I searched him, and found a bill on him, which I produce; I took him to the watch-house, and there took out of his pocket two other bills; I told him he was charged by Mr. Cadbury and Mr. Graham with forging a bill; he began to pull papers and things out of his pocket, and this bill was in one of the pocket-books; Cadbury and Graham came up directly - this was in St. Ann's watch-house - the bill was produced; Cadbury said to the prisoner"William, this is not your writing;" he said "It is," and I think he said by G-d; nothing farther passed; Cadbury alluded to the acceptance only.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Are you the person who said to the prisoner "Come along, I will give you a lift if it is in my power?" A. I never said so to him; Cadbury and Graham were within hearing when he said it was his own writing - it was about a hundred yards from Graham's house; I had received information from Cadbury in the street; he said he wanted me to take a man into custody, and I took him.

MARK CADBURY. (Looking at the bill) This is not my writing - I never gave the prisoner authority to put my name to it at all; I appointed to meet Mr. Graham; I met the Policeman, told him what I wanted him for, and went with him to the station-house; when I saw the bill, I knew it was his hand-writing, but I said,"Pearson, this is not your hand-writing," (pointing to my acceptance), he said it was.

Cross-examined. Q. Mr. Graham called on you about the business before you gave orders to the officer? A. Yes, I understood the prisoner was coming to Graham that morning, and had the officer ready - the bill is not endorsed.

MR. GRAHAM. This is the bill the prisoner presented to me, on which I was to advance him 10l. on the Saturday morning - I should have done it if I had not seen Mr. Cadbury.

Cross-examined. Q. You never agreed to take it? A I was to be satisfied by my inquiries first - if I had taken it the drawer must have endorsed it.

MR. CADBURY. There is an account between me and the prisoner - he now owes me a considerable sum.

Prisoner's Defence. My solicitor heard the Policeman say he never said I had said I forged the acceptance.

Four witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Life .

EDWARD HARDY.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-65
VerdictGuilty
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

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First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

736. EDWARD HARDY was indicted for stealing on the 15th of March , 1 crown, 3 half-crowns, 25 shillings and 5 sixpences , the monies of John Eayres .

MARY ANN HURST. I am housekeeper to my brother, John Eayres , who keeps a public-house , at Queenhithe . The prisoner came there on Friday, and asked for six quarts of ale to be put into a bottle, and said he had a number of persons at the docks to pay, and wanted some silver - he paid for the ale; he said he had a number of men working at the docks, and one of them should fetch the bottle after the ale was disposed of; he told me he had been recommeded to our house by an intimate friend of Mr. Eayres, as a customer - he paid for the ale, and asked me if I had a man to send to Islington, to fetch his horse - I told him there was a man who could go: he was then in the bar, and asked me for a piece of paper - I had some paper in the bar, locked up in a drawer, and there was money in a bag in the drawer, which was locked, and I had the key in my pocket; he asked for the paper to write a direction for the man to go for his horse - he was sitting down in a chair, close by me; he remained in the bar, and after giving the man the direction, he said, "I will send one of my men for the ale," and went away - he had been in the bar about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour - the bag of money was locked up in the drawer, and I had the key in my pocket; after sending the man away from the house, he returned again in less than ten minutes, and said he wanted another piece of paper - I gave him some, and he wrote something; he then asked if I could let him have 20s. worth of change - I told him I could; I opened a drawer, and took out a bag, with a quantity of silver in it- he could see there was money in the bag; I counted him 20s., and he said "Let me have 2l. worth, as I have got my men to pay" - this was on Friday, the 15th of March; he took the silver off the table, and put it into his pocket - I said, "You have not given me the two sovereigns for the change;" he said, "Oh! I will give it you presently - I have been recommended by a friend of Mr. Eayres." - I said,"You may be known to Mr. Eayres, but not to me;" he said,"Have not I sent your man for a horse, detain the horse when it comes, if you are afraid;" and he went out without my consent - when I asked him for the sovereigns, he said,"Do not I tell you I am intimately acquainted with a friend of Mr. Eayres, detain the horse when it comes, if you are afraid, it is worth 30l." - when the man came back no horse was to be found; on the Sunday following he came again, and said, "I suppose you thought I was lost" - I said,"I did not know what had become of you, as you had forfeited your word;" he said, "Well, I am come to pay you" - I pressed him to give me the two sovereigns; he said, "I wish you to do something further for me, and will pay you altogether" - I told him about the man, and in the mean time I sent for an officer - he had a paper in his hand, and said he wanted to send to Islington for 7l. 19s.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I should return in half an hour, and give you the two sovereigns? A. You said you should return in a short time - he did not appear at all drunk; there was a crown, three half crowns, and several shillings and sixpences among the money.

THOMAS ARCHER . I am a fellowship-porter. The prisoner employed me to go to Islington, and promised me 2s. 6d. to fetch a horse - I found there was no horse there; and on Sunday he came again, and told me to go to the Peacock, at Islington, and I found no horse there.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am beadle of Queenhithe. I apprehended the prisoner, by desire of Mrs. Hurst, for stealing 40s. in silver - he said he had come down on purpose to settle with her, but I found only 8s. 6d., and a written order for 9l. 10s. on him.

Prisoner's Defence. It does not look suspicious to borrow 2l. on Friday and return on Sunday, when I need not have gone there - I wrote to my executor, and if he had remitted the money I should have paid it immediately if they had not been so hot tempered.

GUILTY. Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy. - Judgment Respited .

ABRAHAM ISAAC MONK.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-66
VerdictNot Guilty

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737. ABRAHAM ISAAC MONK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 1 bag, value 1s.; 20lbs. of horse-hair, value 14s., and 10lbs. of cow-hair, value 4s. , the goods of John Simmonds .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, but a confession which had been extorted from him, he was ACQUITTED .

WILLIAM SMITH, WILLIAM LLOYD, JAMES ATKINSON.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-67
VerdictGuilty; Guilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation; Transportation

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738. WILLIAM SMITH , WILLIAM LLOYD , and JAMES ATKINSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person; and that William Smith had before been convicted of felony .

GEORGE SALT TUCKER . I live in Birchin-lane; I am an insurance-broker. On the 27th of March, about a quarter or half-past six o'clock in the afternoon, I was in an omnibus, going down Skinner-street , towards Farringdon-street - my attention was drawn to the three prisoners following a gentleman, who was a stranger - this induced me to watch them, and I saw one of them lift up the gentleman's pocket, and take a handkerchief out - I cannot say which of them it was, they were all concerned, and close together, and must have seen what the other did - the one who took it was inside, next the houses; he immediately passed the handkerchief to the middle one, and the third one was covering the other two - I was not above six yards from them; they turned round and looked into a shop, and I could then see their faces so as to be able to swear to them distinctly - I am quite sure they were all concurring in the act, and in company together; seeing them going down the hill towards Farringdon street, laughing to themselves, I stopped the omnibus and got out, and then went down the hill a few yards untill I came to Farringdon-street - there I saw Chidzey, the officer, and asked if he had seen it; he took two of them, and I took the other - the gentleman went up towards Newgate-street- if I had followed him I should have lost them; after giving them in custody I went up Newgate-street, and

found the gentleman - he said he was subpoened as a witness before the House of Commons, and he did not give his name or residence - I do not know who he was; he told me he had lost his handkerchief - I asked him to describe it; he said it was a dark red handkerchief, with yellow spots - he claimed the handkerchief at the station-house, but would not swear to it; one of the prisoners said it was his - it had snuff on it, which the gentleman said we should find.

GEORGE CHIDZEY. I am one of the City Police. Tucker came and asked me if I saw these three boys coming down the street; he told me to take two, and he would take one - I did so; I saw the gentleman whom the handkerchief was taken from at the station-house, but he went away - I have not the least knowledge who he was, or where he lives; I found this silk handkerchief on Smith, and a cotton one on Atkinson, and a black silk one on Lloyd - they said the handkerchiefs were their own.

MR. TUCKER. This silk handkerchief is the same colour as the one which they took from the gentleman, who described the handkerchief to me before he saw it, as being red and yellow, wet and snuffy, and on being produced he claimed it.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am an officer of the City. I know Smith; I was present in this Court last September, when he was triedand convicted here of a robbery in St. Martin's-le-Grand; here is a certificate of his conviction -(read) - he is the man. I have no doubt of it.

Smith's Defence. The handkerchief is my own.

Atkinson's Defence. I was not in company with them; I was at a broker's at the corner of the street when it happened.

Lloyd and Atkinson received a good character.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

LLOYD - GUILTY . Aged 19.

ATKINSON - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

WILLIAM HOWARTH.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-68
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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739. WILLIAM HOWARTH was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of March , 41 yards of printed cotton, value 24s. , the goods of John Southgate .

JOHN SOUTHGATE . I am a calenderer and packer , and live in Crown-court, Old 'Change . The prisoner worked for me, and I discharged him for neglect - after that I found a piece of printed calico cut in half, and the half was gone; I discharged him on Monday, the 4th of March, and discovered this a few hours after - I then counted my calico, and missed ten pieces and a half; I ordered my grandson to mark the other pieces, and to notice when the workpeople left the premises - next morning, at six o'clock, the prisoner came as usual, and the workmen thought I had engaged him again; my young man saw him going out of the warehouse - this was before I was up; the calico cost me 25s. a piece - he had worked for me about six months.

RICHARD ABBOTT. I am the prosecutor's grandson. On the morning after the prisoner was discharged, he came to the premises at five minutes before six o'clock, but the afternoon before that, we found half a piece of calico secreted; I put it into the same place - it was safe at ten o'clock at night - I had marked it; on Tuesday morning, the prisoner came in before six - there was but one man in the place; the prisoner went to where the piece was secreted, and went out again in about three minutes; I then went to the place, and it was gone - I went out in pursuit, and saw him throw it down facing our door, in the Old 'Change; there was a piece and a half together, but only the half piece was marked; he was secured, and when we brought him back to the door he wished me to go in first - I refused, and he then threw down the property; I took him into the premises - I have not a doubt of the property.

JAMES RENSHAW . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner for stealing two pieces of printed calico; he said nothing - I have had the cotton ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

JAMES TALBOT.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-69
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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740. JAMES TALBOT (THE YOUNGER) was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , 1 canvas bag, value 1d.; 100 sovereigns, 6 half-sovereigns, 8 crowns, 24 half-crowns, 20 shillings, 40 sixpences, 2 10l. and 4 5l. Banknotes, the property of James Talbot , the elder , in his dwelling-house .

Mr. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JAMES TALBOT , SEN. I am the prisoner's father; I keep the Ship afloat public-house, Beer-lane, Tower-street . On the 8th of March the prisoner resided in my house - I had an account to settle that day with my brewer, and had up-stairs a bag of money; I take it up every night, and bring it down in the morning - I took it up on Thursday night, the 7th of March; it contained from 150l. to 160l. - there were two 5l. notes, and a 20l. note; I came down at half-past six in the morning of the 8th, and as I came down the prisoner was standing at the bottom of the stairs - I have no doubt he saw the bag in my hand; I had the key of the bar in one hand and the bag in the other - he was opening the shutters of the house; I unlocked the bar-door, and could not find the key to lock the money up; I put the bag down on the seat, put a parcel over it, and went to take down the shutters of the bar, to enable me to get light - the servant was lighting the bar fire at the time; I was absent about a minute and a half, and on returning to the bar I went to the seat to take the money to lock it up, and it was gone- I spoke to Thorogood, the servant, and in consequence of what she said I looked about for my son, and he was gone; I could not find him - I found him that day fortnight; in consequence of information I went to Offley, in Hertfordshire, expecting to find him, but he had left there - in consequence of information there, the officer went with another person further; I remained at Offley - the officer returned to me in about an hour with the prisoner; he searched him, and found on him thirty-four sovereigns, four half-sovereigns, and two 5l. notes - he could not come honestly by such a sum; I examined the two 5l. notes, and I know them to be part of the money which had been in the bag, as I put a private mark on every note I take - I am sure they were part of the money I had in the bag.

ANN THOROGOOD. I was in the service of Mr. Talbot. On Friday morning, the 8th of March, I was lighting the

fire in the bar - I remember master being in the bar; my back was to him - I did not see him place any thing on the seat; I was not in the bar till master left it - I came in while he was taking the shutters down, and I saw the prisoner come into the bar, as I have seen him on other mornings; I cannot swear that he went to the seat - he passed by me, and I never turned my head to look at him; I saw master looking, and I asked what he was looking for - I learnt from him that he had lost his money; I said the prisoner had been in the bar - nobody but the prisoner came into the bar from the time I went into the bar, till my master lost his money.

WILLIAM RAY. I am constable of Allhallows, Tower-street. I went with Mr. Talbot to Offley, in Hertfordshire, on Friday, the 8th of March, and in consequence of information I went to Luton, Bedfordshire, nine miles further, and the prisoner came to the Red Lion there, on horseback, while I was there - I took him into custody, and found on him two 5l. notes, which I produce; the other money I gave to the prosecutor by direction of the Magistrate - he had thirty-two sovereigns, four half-sovereigns, 5s. 6d. a brace of pistols, a silver watch, and a great quantity of wearing-apparel; I had received a caution as to the mode of securing him, and in consequence of that, as he came in, I turned round, laid hold of his hands, and handcuffed him, then drew the pistols from his pockets, and one was loaded with ball - he told me it was a good job I had secured his hands, or else I should not have gone back to my wife and family again.

MR. TALBOT. These 5l. notes are mine; I have marks on them, which I made myself before I put them into the bag - they are two of the notes I put into the bag; it is my dwelling-house.

Prisoner. I am guilty, my Lord.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

WILLIAM SMITH.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-70
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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NEW COURT. FRIDAY. APRIL 12TH.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

741. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 1 copper, value 1l., the goods of William Chamberlain , and fixed to a building ; against the Statute, &c.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of a person unknown. - To which the prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 62. - Confined Six Months .

WILLIAM SMITH.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-71
VerdictNot Guilty

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742. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of February , 1 bridle, value 2s.; 1 pair of hames, value 2s., and 1 pair of traces, value 2s. , the goods of William Faulkener .

JOHN WEST (Police-serjeant G 2). On the night of the 28th of February I was in Goswell-street, and stopped the prisoner with a portion of harness - he said it was his own.

WILLIAM FAULKENER. I live on Lambeth-hill, Upper Thames-street. This bridle, hames, and traces are mine; I lost them on the 28th of February from my stable, in Red Lion-yard, Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell - the lock of the stable had been forced.

JOHN CHILD . I am servant to the prosecutor. I left the stable safe, and locked, and four o'clock - I know this bridle.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a young man in Goswell-street; he gave me these articles, and told me to go and sell them - he told me where to go, but said he did not like to go there himself, as he had borrowed a bridle there; they offered me 4s. 6d., which he would not take - I brought it out, and he told me to carry it, which I did.

WILLIAM FAULKENER. I do not think the prisoner knew my premises, but there was another man who did.

NOT GUILTY .

CHARLOTTE BRIDGMAN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-72
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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743. CHARLOTTE BRIDGMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , 2 gowns, value 20s.; 2 caps, value 2s.; 1 collar, value 1s., and 2 aprons, value 2s. , the goods of Bridget Lee .

BRIDGET LEE. About Christmas last I lodged in Queen-street, Seven-dials , and left my box there, containing my wearing-apparel; on the 24th of March I called for it, found the box broken open, and missed these articles - I know nothing of the prisoner.

CATHERINE MADDEN. I keep the room at No. 25, Queen-street - the prosecutrix left her box there; the prisoner came to lodge there after her.

SAMUEL HASLOCK. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Long-acre. I have a gown, which was pawned by the prisoner on the 7th of March.

JOHN WILLIAM ADLINGTON . I am shopman to Mr. Daniels, a pawnbroker. I have a gown, pawned on the 11th of March, in the name of Charlotte Bridgman - I cannot say by whom.

THOMAS MADDEN (Police-constable F 42). I took the prisoner in Moor-street - I found two caps and a collar on her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I am very sorry; I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Six Weeks .

EDWARD BECK.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-73
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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744. EDWARD BECK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , 1 sovereign, the money of William Taylor , his master .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a tailor , and live in Wimpole-street - the prisoner was in my employ. On the morning of the 4th of April I met him on the stairs leading to my own room; I had received information, and took his jacket off - I shook his clothes, and a sovereign fell out; I had asked him if he had any money belonging to me - he said No, nor to any one else; I had sent my coat down by him that morning to be brushed, and my bunch of keys was in the pocket - one of the keys would open the desk in my counting-house; I found my desk unlocked - it had been locked the night before, and I had left four sovereigns in it and three half-sovereigns; the lock of the desk was always difficult to lock - a stranger could not well lock it, but I could; I could not lock it after that morning.

JOSEPH INGLETON. I am apprentice to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner about seven o'clock that morning brushing my master's coat; the keys were on the board where the coat was - I went down stairs, and when I came up again the prisoner and the keys were gone, but the coat was still there; I went into the counting-house, and saw the prisoner near the desk - I asked what he wanted there;

he said he had lost his pen - I asked him where the keys were; he said they were in the coat - I went to the coat, and they were not there; I told my master.

WILLIAM BLOOMFIELD (Police-serjeant D 9). I took the prisoner - he said he had saved the sovereign out of his wages; he had 7s. a week and allowed his mother 6s., and had saved 1l.

Prisoner. I did not say I had no money - I said I had none of his.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . He said he had none at all.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined One Month .

JAMES SPENCER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-74
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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745. JAMES SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 20 yards of silk, value 2l. , the goods of Richard Nelms .

THOMAS STEELE. I am a porter, and live in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell. On the 8th of April, I was going along Wimpole-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner, who threw from under his apron a roll of silk; a gentleman ran after him, and called to another person, who stopped him in my sight - the silk was taken up by a gentleman who was following, and he gave it to the officer.

JOHN LEGG (Police-constable D 149.) I saw the prisoner in custody of a gentleman in Wigmore-street; he delivered him to me, with this silk.

RICHARD NELMS. I am a mercer , and live in Oxford-street . This silk is mine; I had it safe on the morning of the 8th of April - the officer came about one o'clock, and then I looked and missed it; it has my mark on the end of the roll.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing up Oxford-street, and heard a cry of Stop thief! I ran, and a person threw this down at my feet, and the gentleman took me.

JURY to JOHN LEGG. Q. How far was the prisoner from the prosecutor's? A. About two hundred and fifty or three hundred yards; there was a shop bill on the paper, which the prisoner tore to pieces.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

GEORGE MILLER, CHARLES SPAUL.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-75
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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746. GEORGE MILLER and CHARLES SPAUL were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , 1 bed, value 50s.; 1 bolster, value 4s.; 2 pillows, value 6s.; 2 blankets, value 5s.; 1 quilt, value 3s.; 1 tea-caddy, value 6s.; 1 tablecloth, value 3s.; 1 beer glass, 1s., and 2 pillow-cases, value 2s. , the goods of John Jackson .

MARY JACKSON . I am the wife of John Jackson, who keeps a house in Marshall-street, St. James', Westminster . The prisoners lodged in our first floor back room for about three weeks; in consequence of receiving some duplicates, I examined their room, and missed a bed, bolster, two pillows, and the other articles stated, which had been let to them with the room - they had not left the room; the door was locked, and I had it forced open.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I believe Miller was not there more than a day or two? A. Yes, he was there all the time; I saw him in the evening of the day on which he was taken - I had the conversation with him when they took the room, but the other was present.

JOHN JACKSON. The prisoners lodged three weeks in my house; I was not there when they took the lodging - I have since seen the bed at Mr. Grafton's.

JOHN MILTON . I am apprentice to a pawnbroker in Berwick-street. These two blankets were pawned on the 12th of February by Spaul, also this caddy and goblet.

DANIEL CHAPMAN (Police-constable C 38.) I took Miller and then Spaul; I went to No. 22, Exmouth-street, Hampstead-road, where Spaul told me he lived, on the 28th, and found some duplicates, but I have not brought them here.

HENRY LAMBERT . I produce a bolster and a tablecloth pawned, at Mr. Harrison's, in Wardour-street; I do not know who by.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Spaul. I returned all the duplicates in a letter.

MRS. JACKSON. Yes, and then we had the door opened.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

SPAUL - GUILTY .* Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

GEORGE MILLER, HENRY JOHNSON.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-76
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation; Transportation

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747. The said GEORGE MILLER and HENRY JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of December , 4 blankets, value 16s.; 4 drawings, value 2l. 6s.; 2 sheets, value 2s.; 2 goblets, value 2s.; 1 looking-glass, value 12s.; 2 pillows, value 10s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 1 bolster, value 6s.; 2 towels, value 2s., and 1 quilt, value 4s. , the goods of Simon Antonio Brunette .

VICTOIRE ELIZABET FRANCES BRUNETTE . I am the wife of Simon Antonio Brunette; we live in Gloucester-street, Queen-square . I let a lodging to Johnson under the name of Bolton; he took three rooms on the second floor, ready furnished - he took it for himself and another person, but I do not recollect the other; he came on the 19th of December and left on the 26th - I saw a person go up stairs with him the day before Christmas day, but did not notice him; I heard something from my servant, then went up to their rooms, and missed the articles stated from the lodgings - I did not see Johnson again till he was in custody.

Johnson. I took the lodging for my cousin; he absconded and I left out of fear.

ELLEN MORIARTY. I was in the prosecutor's service on the 19th of December; I recollect Johnson coming there, and the same evening Miller and another came with Johnson - they went out presently after; I have not seen the other since - Miller came again the third night, and remained there; I saw him three times in the room - I waited on them with the tea; Johnson went out on the 26th, and called to me to get his breakfast ready - he did not return till half-past ten; I then took up his breakfast - he said, "I cannot have my bed made to-day, in consequence of my cousin's illness," (he called Miller his cousin,) but I did not see him there at that time; I went down and told my mistress of it - when we thought it time for them to ring for tea, we went up; they were gone, and we missed these articles - we saw no more of the prisoners till they were taken; I had seen Miller there the night before as late as nine o'clock - I do not know whether he went out after that or not; I think he slept three times in the house - I saw him two nights and one morning; I was going down St. James'-street afterwards - I saw the prisoners and Spaul, and had them taken.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long was Johnson there? A.Seven days; three persons came on the first night - I should not know the third person, I only got a

glance of him; he was tall - Johnson said he took the room for himself and his cousin; the two prisoners are the only persons who slept there.

HENRY LAMBERT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Wardour-street; I have a looking-glass, and four drawings pawned by Johnson, for 14s. - I had seen him before.

MRS. BRUNETTE. These are my property; they were to pay 4s. a week for a dressing-room, sitting-room, and bed-room - I only received 2s. as a deposit.

DANIEL CHAPMAN (Police-constable C 38). I took these two prisoners and Spaul.

Miller. I never was in the house.

MILLER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years longer .

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN FARROW.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-77
VerdictNot Guilty

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748. JOHN FARROW was indicted for bigamy .

ANN RUSSELL . I am the wife of John Russell; we lived at Upton, near Bexley Heath, in Kent. On the 25th of November, 1828, I was at the church of St. Martin's in the Fields, and saw the prisoner married to Sarah Sellers ; I had known her before; I saw them living together for three or four weeks after at Mr. Farrow's; she is still alive - the prisoner told me he was then nineteen years old; they were married by banns - I had been in the church once before; the banns were put up in her maiden name, Sarah Nott - they altered them and put them up afresh.

Prisoner. Q. You know that Sellers is not her name? A.Her name is called Sellers, about us, but her name was Selwood; she married Selwood at Bexley church, and the certificate is in the school by the Obelisk, where one of her little children is.

Prisoner. Her husband was transported in the name of Selwood; he had not been gone seven years, and they sent her to her first husband's parish, and they were obliged to keep her. Witness. Yes, she was sent to their parish, her husband left nine years ago - I do not know whether he is dead.

NOT GUILTY .

HENRY WILLIS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-78
VerdictNot Guilty

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749. HENRY WILLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , 2 pieces of timber, value 7l. , the goods of Thomas Druce and others.

LUKE ROGERS . I live in Wellington-street, Chelsea, and am clerk to Thomas Druce and others, of Swan-wharf . On the 28th of March I missed a piece of red pine from there - and by looking for that we found another piece of ours, at Mr. Scott's, and the other opposite his pit.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.They had not been disguised? A. No; one was cut into boards, but the top piece laid on it, and had the mark on it; the timber had been rafted together in the dock, but they sometimes separate by winds - I once knew a man named Somerhall; I have heard he is now a carpenter and builder at Hammersmith.

JOHN SCOTT. I live at Kennington, and am a carpenter and builder; I have known the prisoner ten or twelve years. On the 14th of March, he came and asked me if I wanted to buy any timber, as he had a stick or two to dispose of, and wanted to make up some money - he asked me 2s. 3d. a foot for it; I said I did not want it, and could get it any where for 2s., but I would give him that for it if it was good - he brought one the next day, and I paid him 3l. 15s. for it; I had it cut into boards, and put it out to dry - he came on the Wednesday following, and asked if I would take the other stick; I said I had no objection, and he brought it about ten o'clock - I told him to get a receipt; he went away, and a person came and claimed it- I got an officer, and took the prisoner; he said he bought it of Somerhall, and asked me to do every thing in my power to have Somerhall taken - my premises are a mile and a half from the prosecutor's.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you used your best endeavours to find Somerhall? A. Yes, and have offered a guinea reward for his apprehension; I do not know him - I know the prisoner well: the timber was brought openly in the day time - he gave me the receipt in his own name; I knew where to find him, and took the officer to him.

JOHN GUMM. I am in the service of Joseph Harrison . The prisoner came to me, told me to go to Crabtree dock, and draw a stick of timber from there - Somerhall overtook me, and said they had got the timber up; he helped me to load it, and it was taken to Mr. Scott's.

NOT GUILTY .

MICHAEL SHAW.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-79
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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750. MICHAEL SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , 2 hats, value 18s. , the goods of John Dando .

WILLIAM DEARMAN (Police-constable C 154). I lodge at No. 4, Queen's-gardens. On the 26th of February I was in Holborn, and saw the prisoner go to Mr. Dando's window, which was open, and take a hat - I told the shopman.

LEWIS NICHOLSON . I am shopman to Mr. John Dando, of High Holborn . This is his hat, and was taken on the 26th of February; when the prisoner was brought back I asked him about a hat which was stolen the day before; he said he took it, and pawned it at Mr. Nicholls' - I found it there.

WILLIAM WILSON . (Police-constable E 74). I live in Cirencester-place. I received the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 10. - Transported for Seven Years .

JAMES COGAN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-80
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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751. JAMES COGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 lb. of vermillion, value 5s.; 1 lb. of Prussian blue, value 5s.; 4 ozs. of crimson lake, value 1l.; 1 lb. of emerald green, value 2s.; 200 leaves of gold, value 12s., and 1 brush, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Barnes .

THOMAS GARDENER . I am foreman to Mr. Thomas Barnes , an oil and colourman , who lives in Clark's-place, Islington . On the 6th of March the prisoner came for 14 lbs. of white lead; I had known him for years - I watched him, stopped him, and brought him back to the shop - I told him he had stolen two parcels; he said Yes, they were in his pocket - I saw Turner take 1 lb. of vermillion and 1 lb. of Prussian blue from him, and 4 ozs. of crimson lake were found on him at the watch-house; I had seen them on the counter - we knew where he lived, I went there, and found two hundred leaves of gold and 1 lb. of emerald green.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE Q. I believe he had bought things at your shop for years? A. Yes.

JOHN DOBAR (Police-constable N 253). I saw the

vermillion and Prussian blue taken from the prisoner, and the lake at the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a very good character.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

CHARLES VIMPANY.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-81
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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752. CHARLES VIMPANY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , 1 pair of boots, value 5s. , the goods of Eliza Jones .

ELIZA JONES. I am single , and keep a haberdasher's shop in Stockbridge-terrace, Pimlico . On the night of the 3rd of April I missed a pair of woman's boots from my window, which I had seen safe five minutes before.

JAMES NICHOLLS. I live in Webster's cottages, Westminster, and drive a cab. I was at Stockbridge-terrace on the evening of the 3rd of April - I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutrix's shop, with a pair of ladies boots, which he gave to another boy, and they ran off; I gave notice of it; I am sure the prisoner had them.

Prisoner. He is a thief himself; he told me to go and take the boots - I would not, and he went and took them - because we would not give him any of the money, he said he would tell of me. Witness. I had never seen him before.

STEPHEN SAMUEL SHEPPEY . I lived at Mr. Jones, a pawnbroker. On the 3rd of April these boots were pawned, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, by Elizabeth Cryer , in the name of Perry.

GEORGE SPOTTISWOOD PECK. I am an officer. I took the prisoner in his father's house, on the 4th of April; he told me where the boots were pawned; I took the prosecutrix there, and she identified them.

ELIZABETH CRYER. I live in St. Alban's-mews, and am a flower-maker. I was going out on an errand, and met the prisoner, who asked me to pawn the boots - he said they were his mother's; Taylor and Harris were with him.

JAMES NICHOLLS re-examined. Q. How came you not to stop him? A. I knew he had not got them, for he gave them to another boy in a fustian jacket.

Prisoner. He took them, and gave them to me. Witness. I did not - I was in the middle of the road.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY *. Aged 24. - Transported for Seven Years .

HENRY BROWN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-82
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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753. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Jenkin Edward Tappenden , from his person .

JENKIN EDWARD TAPPENDEN. I live in Milbank-street, Westminster. On the 29th of March, between three and four o'clock, I was in the New-road ; I missed my handkerchief, which I had safe a few minutes before - I had seen the prisoner repeatedly at my heels, and suspected him; I followed him, and gave him into custody; my handkerchief was found on him at the station.

DENNIS KEAYS (Police-constable D 113). I took the prisoner, and found this handkerchief on him.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

MARY ANN HARWOOD.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-83
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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754. MARY ANN HARWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 2 spoons, value 13s.; 1 table-cloth, value 3s.; 1 coat, value 12s.; and 1 pair of trousers, value 6s., the goods of Matthew Proctor ; and that she had before been convicted of felony .

ANN PROCTOR . I am the wife of Matthew Proctor and live at No. 168 1/2, High-street, Shadwell . In October last the prisoner came into my service, and on the 18th of February I went to my wardrobe, and missed a tablecloth; I spoke to the prisoner about it - she said it would be found in the house; I then missed a suit of clothes which she had been employed to brush, they had been left in my charge, and belonged to a youth who was gone to sea; I afterwards received some duplicates.

GEORGE CURTIS. I live in Church-row, St. George's and am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of trousers, a coat a table-spoon, and tea-spoon, pawned by the prisoner a different times - the first was on the 20th of November; they all amount to 1l. 8s. 8d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was in the habit of assisting my own family with my wages.

MRS. PROCTOR. She told me so; there were no wages due to her - she was paid by the month; I told her I wished her to lay out her wages for herself.

WILLIAM DICKINSON (Police-constable H 11.) I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark's office; I was present at her trial, and know she is the person.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

EDMUND HOLBOURN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-84
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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755. EDMUND HOLBOURN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 1 live tame fowl, price 4s. , the property of Richard Chinnock .

WILLIAM PANTING . I lodge in Tottenham-court-road. On the 23rd of February I saw the prisoner take a line fowl up from Mr. Chinnock's door; he put it under his arm and went off with it - I gave information.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What are you? A. I live with Mr. Brown, who keeps a china shop; I had not seen the prisoner before - he passed by quickly, but he is the man; I was sent for on the 2nd of March, and saw him again - I know he is the man.

JOHN JONES . I live in George-yard, Crown-street I bought this fowl of the prisoner for 2s.; he named a respectable tradesman who he said sent him to me - this is the fowl.

CHARLES CHINNOCK . This fowl is mine; I live with my father - his name is Richard.

Cross-examined. Q. Do your fowls run about the street? A. Yes; my father gave me the money to buy them - I feed them with barely, which my father pays for.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Seven Days .

JOHN JONES.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-85
VerdictGuilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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756. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of March , 2 saws, value 16s., the goods of James Hibberd ; and a bridle, value 2s. , the goods of George Jemmett .

JAMES HIBBERD . I live in Charlotte-street, Somers'-town. I lost two saws on the 23rd of March from Mr. Jemmett's yard, in St. Martin's-lane .

GEORGE MURTON . I work for Mr. Jemmett, No. 67 St. Martin's-lane. He lost a bridle on the 23rd of March; I saw it when the prisoner was taken.

SEPTIMUS BALL (Police-constable F 127). I took the prisoner, with the two saws buttoned under his great coat and this bridle in a sack, he was coming down the yard

where the property was taken from, about two o'clock in the day.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, pleading poverty. He received a good character, and a witness engaged to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

ROBERT TAYLOR.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-86
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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757. ROBERT TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Michael Kelly , from his person .

MICHAEL KELLY . I live in Stratford-place. On the 1st of March I was walking along Oxford-street ; I put my hand to my pocket, in consequence of what I heard, and missed my handkerchief - Garnett produced it to me.

HENRY GARNETT (Police-constable D 148). On the morning of the 1st of March I was in Oxford-street; I saw the prisoner opposite Marylebone-lane, with a lad of fifteen or sixteen years of age - they walked behind the prosecutor; the prisoner took the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket and put it into his own - I took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .* Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

AARON AARON.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-87
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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758. AARON AARON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of February , 1 pair of carriage wheels, value 25s. , the goods of Stephen Palmer .

GEORGE KEMP (Police-constable N 82). On the night of the 21st of February I was in Hackney-road , and saw the prisoner near Mr. Palmer's door, walking backwards and forwards - another person was standing close by; the prisoner went and spoke to that person - the prisoner then took one wheel, took it into the road, and then took the other; they then watched their opportunity, and took them away - I took the prisoner with these wheels.

STEPHEN PALMER . These are my wheels; they were outside my house, for sale.

Prisoner's Defence. A boy came and asked me to carry a wheel, and said he would give me a penny; he took me into the road - there were two wheels; I took one, and he the other.

GUILTY Aged 16. - Confined Three Months .

CHARLES ANSELL.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-88
VerdictNot Guilty

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759. CHARLES ANSELL was indicted for embezzlement .

SARAH MEAYERS . I paid the prisoner 5d. for beer, on the 24th of February, for Mr. Scott, his master.

ANN HUNTLER . I paid the prisoner 1s. 6 1/2d., for the Sunday's beer, on the 25th of February.

THOMAS SCOTT . I keep the Blue-coat-boy public-house at Islington . The prisoner was in my service - he was employed to receive money for me; he never paid this 5d. or this 1s. 6 1/2d.; he was to account in the evening, or in the morning before business - he left me on Monday, the 25th of February.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long had he lived with you? A. Two years; I allowed him 3d. a bottle on wine, and 1 1/2d in a shilling on beer - this paper is an account of more than a week; but on the 27th of January, he left me, and never accounted to me for what he took - he came back, and I said I would give him a chance, of retrieving himself by his coming back, if he would pay me the money every night, or in the morning; he is in my debt, 19l.; I cannot tell to whom he might sell beer when he took it out - I delivered him beer and liquor to sell; when he came back to me, I allowed him his commission, but it was to be applied to the reduction of the debt he owed me - I received this letter from the prisoner - (read.)

To Mr. Scott.

SIR, - I take the earliest opportunity to drop a few lines to you, as a personal interview would most probably lead to an altercation, which I wish to avoid - and as I cannot, consistently with my present circumstances, return to your employ under our present arrangements, therefore if you will take the credit on your own responsibility, I will return again to your service, but to pay daily for the goods I receive from the bar - and to be unavoidably obliged to give credit is more than I am able to do in my present situation; if you do or do not approve of my proposal, if you will send an answer back by the bearer I should feel much obliged - respecting the difference between you and me, I will endeavour to collect the money I have owing to me, and pay you as soon as I possibly can. I remain your humble servant, C. ANSELL.

COURT. Q.When did he last account to you? A. On the 23rd of February - if he had then paid me more than he received, I do not know whether he might not have had recourse to this very money to have made it up.

Cross-examined. Q.Upon your oath, do you not know it was his custom to supply the people every day with beer on credit? A. I have no other way of knowing but from him, and I would not believe a word he said; this paper is dated the 24th of February, and it is when I received the money of the 23rd - when he returned, after leaving in January, he owed me 20l.; I treated that as a debt, because he begged I would do so - on the evening of the 24th of February he made an excuse, and did not settle with me; on the morning of the 25th I went into the City, and when I returned he had left - he took every thing belonging to him away, but an old coat and an old pair of trousers; I had nothing to do with the credit - he was to pay me.

SARAH HALL . I am servant to Mr. Proctor, of Owen's-row. I paid the prisoner 5s. 5d. for two bottles of wine and some porter on the 25th.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know Mr. Scott? A. We received the beer from Mr. Scott, and I have paid Mr. Scott at the bar, but we often paid the prisoner.

GEORGE LEEKE . On Tuesday, the 26th of February, the prisoner came to the prosecutor's, about five o'clock in the morning; he fell down drunk, and slept for two hours; he took a bundle away with him - I knew he had been absent the afternoon before, as he had changed his clothes in the tap-room.

PETER FLANAGAN (Police-constable C 183). I took the prisoner at his lodgings in Seaward-place, which is about four or five minutes' walk from the prosecutor's - I went three times before I found him.

JURY to THOMAS SCOTT . Q. Did you not consider the goods delivered to the prisoner, a sale from you to him? A. No, I held him responsible for the goods sold; I considered whoever the goods were delivered to were liable to me - I told him he was to give no credit; he was to pay me the money.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you ever tell him he was to give no credit? A. I never told him to give credit - he was to pay me over the money; if he paid it me he might do as he pleased about credit - when the letter was

brought to me, I said I should give no answer; I do not recollect saying I should take a day or two to consider of it - I asked the man who brought it, where the prisoner was, and he would not tell.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN STRONG.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-89
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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760. JOHN STRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 3 sovereigns, the monies of Thomas Mostyn , from his person .

THOMAS MOSTYN . I live at No. 23, Castle-street, Southwark, and am a waterman ; I ply at the Temple stairs, and act as a supernumerary watchman in the Temple. On the 26th of March I received my pay, which was 3l. 4s.; I met the prisoner at the Temple stairs that afternoon - I took him to a public-house in Wych-street , and treated him with a quartern of gin and some porter - I fell asleep about a quarter before three o'clock, and awoke at half-past seven; I then found my clothes unbuttoned, and my money gone - I had about 3l. 3s. when I went in; there were three sovereigns among it - the prisoner was then gone; - I afterwards had him taken; when I first took him to the public-house he said he had no money, and I gave him some halfpence to fetch some tobacco - I told him I had received my money that day, and no one else knew it.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time did you go to the Sol's Arms with him? A.About a quarter before three o'clock; I was able to know what I was about - some other person might come in there while I was asleep; the prisoner is a waterman at the same stairs that I am - there were two modest young women in the public-house; when I missed my money I went home - I saw the prisoner the next morning, and told him of my loss; I did not go and have any refreshment with him; I gave him in charge, but the inspector discharged him, not having sufficient proof to detain him - I then went to his house, and staid there perhaps an hour; I had him taken again the same day by the Thames Police-officer - I asked him for my money when I went to his house after he had been discharged; I did not search his place.

FRANCES SMITH . I live in Clement's-lane; my husband is in the employ of a master-tailor. I was in a gin-shop in Pickett-street, between four and five o'clock, on the 26th of March - the prisoner came in rather intoxicated; he said he had left Mostyn asleep; I knew Mostyn - there were several other persons in the gin-shop; the prisoner said to me,"Fan, will you have a drop of gin?" I said I did not mind if I did; he went to the bar, put his hand into his pocket, and brought out three sovereigns and three shillings; he changed one of the shillings, paid for the gin, and four of us drank of it - I went with the prisoner to a club to which he belongs, at the Rose and Crown, New-walk, Whitefriars, and there he took two sovereigns out of his pocket to give me some halfpence to get something to drink.

Cross-examined. Q. You are married? A. Yes, and I have three children; I was not at the Sol's Arms at all - I saw the sovereigns in the prisoner's hand, but I did not touch them.

ANN TOLLETT . I keep the Rose and Crown, Whitefriars; there is a Turnway Society kept there. On the 26th of March the prisoner came there to pay his club-money; I went to give him a light to go up stairs; Smith asked him to give her some money to get something to drink till he came down, and he pulled out two sovereigns.

HENRY CHRISTOPHER PULLUM. I live at No. 36, Fetter-lane; I am steward of the Turnway Society - it is the Temple watermen's society. On the 26th of March the prisoner paid me 4s. 8d. for himself, and 2s. 4d. for his father; he changed a sovereign to pay it.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a Thames Police-surveyor. I took the prisoner at Pitt's-place, Bankside; I told him it was for robbing Mostyn of three sovereigns and 3s., and that he had changed a sovereign at his club - he said that belonged to his father, but he afterwards said he got it from Mr. Clark, a barrister, in the Temple, for rowing him: I said, "You were seen with other money;" he said, "I had no more - them that says so are liars."

Witnesses for the Defence.

MARTHA RICKARDS . I am the prisoner's landlady. - On the night of the 26th of March he came home very much intoxicated between eight and nine o'clock at night; I assisted his wife to get him up stairs, and when he got up he fell off the chair; I was present when his wife searched his pockets - he had a half-crown, a crown, and two bright farthings; he had no other money about him at all - I have one of the farthings here - it is very bright: by candle light, and amongst silver, a person might mistake them for sovereigns: he gave this farthing the same night to my little girl, and sent the other to buy some tobacco - this is a great deal duller than it was.

COURT. Q. Did the prisoner owe you any thing? A. Yes, 5s. 6d., for three weeks' rent, and his wife paid it me that night; I have known him carry bright farthings about him often.

- LANGLEY (Police-constable M 117.) On the morning of the 27th of March I went to the prisoner's house, about twenty minutes past six o'clock; I searched every part for money, but I found none but 3 1/2d. on his person; I did not search his wife - he was taken to the station, and discharged.

COURT. Q. I suppose these two women were not examined then? A. No; I saw Rickards - she did not produce this farthing to me, nor has she since - I was at her house this morning, and she did not mention it.

MARTHA RICKARDS re-examined. Q. When did you first learn that the prisoner was seen with two sovereigns? A.When the officer came on the 27th to take him - I opened the door; he asked if Strong was at home - I said Yes; the prosecutor then went up stairs, and came down with the prisoner: the officer asked him what he had done with the gold he had been seen with the night before - he said he had no gold but what he had paid at his club; I did not say they must have meant the bright farthings, but I said I had seen his wife search his pockets, and she found no gold - I did not mention about the farthings, except at the solicitor's.

Prisoner. When I went from home I knew it was my club night; I brought a sovereign with me from home - the prosecutor and I had been at variance for five months, and when I got to the water side he pushed me about, and said he had got his money; at length he prevailed on me to go and drink with him at the Essex Head - he then took me to the gin-shop, where Fan Smith stands and drinks gin from morning till night - we had some gin there, and

then went to the Sol's Arms; there were two women there whom he seemed to know - we had some beer, and he gave me a sixpence and some halfpence to get some tobacco; when I returned he was hugging one of the women, who called herself Young; a man then came in, who called him Thomas, and he told him he had better go to sleep: I then left, and went to the gin-shop, where I fell in with this Fan Smith .

THOMAS MOSTYN . I did not go to any other public-house but the Sol's Arms.

H. C. PULLUM re-examined. To the best of my recollection I gave him three half-crowns, but no crown - I gave him some shillings, and I think a sixpence; I gave him 13s. in all.

GUILTY .* Aged 40. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

JOSHUA TATTON.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-90
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

761. JOSHUA TATTON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February , 1 watch, value 40l.; 1 watch-chain, value 7l., and 2 seals, value 2l. , the goods of George Pitt .

GEORGE PITT . I live at Nos. 3 and 4, Portman-street, and am an ironmonger . On the 23rd of February I was walking through Bainbridge-street ; the prisoner came from behind me, and snatched my watch from my pocket; I saw him have the watch hanging up before him, but I did not see his face; I followed him for half a mile at least, and round two corners; I saw the watch in his hand for the length of this Court; I followed him so close he had not time to put it away; I heard some persons running behind me; I lost sight of the prisoner, when he turned a corner, and I have no doubt he went into some house - my watch was gold, that, with the chain and seals cost me sixty guineas; I had a full view of the figure of the man, and his general appearance from his running that distance, and saw his dress; I gave a description of him at the station in less than three minutes; he had a blue close-bodied coat on; I saw the prisoner at three o'clock the next morning, at the station, and I have no doubt of his being the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you were twice before the Magistrate? A. Yes - I do not think I said I would not swear he was the man; I said as I have now - I spoke from his figure and dress; there is nothing particular in his figure; I said I did not notice his trousers, but I thought they were drab; I have never seen my watch.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe you were twice before the Magistrate? A. Yes - I do not think I said I would not swear he was the man; I said as I have now - I spoke from his figure and dress; there is nothing particular in his figure; I said I did not notice his trousers, but I thought they were drab; I have never seen my watch.

WILLIAM JAMES (Police-constable E 17). I live at No. 19, Charlotte-street. I took the prisoner between two and three o'clock on the morning of the 24th of February, at Mr. Skull's soup-shop; he was sitting in the front shop, with a Brighton-beaver great coat on, and when he saw me go in, he dashed over the top of the table to make his escape to the back of the house; I had not spoken to him - he got throught one door, but I was close after him; he shut to the door so as to impede my following him - he then went to another door, which was bolted, and when he got to that he sat down with his hands over his head - it was quite dark; I stooped down, felt him, and sprang my rattle; we took him to the station - he made great resistance against being searched; I found on him a new Brightonbeaver coat - also seven sovereigns, and two half sovereigns in the stocking of his left foot, and two half-crowns in his pocket.

Cross-examined. Q. Was he drunk? A. I should not think him so - he had been drinking; I cannot say whether he was drunk or sober - I saw nothing to indicate that he had been drinking - I took the blue coat off him.

ANN GOMER . I am the wife of William Gomer ; we live at No. 22, Buckeridge-street. I was attracted to the door by the cry of Stop thief! between nine and ten o'clock in the morning of the 23rd of February; I saw a gentleman who I have no doubt was Mr. Pitt, but he had a great coat on - he was pursuing a young man; I have known the prisoner seven or eight years; I believed then, and I believe now, that he was the young man, but I did not see his face; several persons called out Josh Tatton - he ran down Carrier-street; he had a blue coat on; from his dress and general appearance, I think he was the man - I have seen him often at my shop.

Cross-examined. Q.Though the name of Josh Tatton was called, he did not stop nor turn his head? A. No; if any one had called me I should have looked round - I did not see any watch.

MICHAEL BRYANT. I lodge at No. 2, New-street, St. Giles' - I attend the markets with a man named Hamilton. On the morning of the 23rd of February I was in the Hand and Crown public-house, Church-street, St. Giles'; I heard a cry of Stop thief! I went out, saw the prisoner running up Buckeridge-street, and the prosecutor following him - I pursued; I had known the prisoner well - he turned into Carrier-street, and I lost sight of him in Church-lane, at the bottom of Carrier-street; there is a house there - I went into the passage, saw a young man there, and the prisoner was showing him a watch; I waited, and saw him come out with an old raggerty white coat on, and go down Church-lane - I did not try to get him taken, as it is a bad neighbourhood, and several persons were following him; I should perhaps have got killed.

Cross-examined. Q. You know what a bad neighbourhood is? A. Yes, I have been in the habit of living in one - I told Mr. Pitt afterwards that I had seen the prisoner showing his watch; plenty saw it besides me, but no one else would come forward - I was in danger of my life for giving information; I have had two or three cracks through it, in my face from one man; I have been at the Horse and Groom, but not lately - the landlord never threatened to have me taken into custody: I have been charged with stealing a bottle of brandy - I was sent from Marlborough-street, but was not tried; I had a hearing before the Magistrate - I went before Mr. Laing at Hatton-garden on this charge; I never was there against my will - I have been there to hear about other persons, but I never was committed from there as a reputed thief.

MR. PITT. I called Stop thief! and a great many persons followed me, who had come out of their doors - at least one hundred people must have heard me - many looked out of their windows, but did not assist me.

EDWARD LYONS. I live at No. 16, Belton-street, Longacre. On the morning of the 23rd of February, I was in Buckeridge-street, and saw the prisoner running down- I have known him seven years, living in the neighbourhood; he had a watch in his hand, and ran down Church-street - he turned his head round once, and I saw his face:

there were three or four persons running after the prosecutor; I gave information to the Policeman Baker, and we all went together, and I saw the prisoner in the soup-house - when he was running with the watch he had this blue coat on.

Cross-examined. Q. How near was the prosecutor to the prisoner? A. I suppose six or seven yards; the prisoner turned round - Mr. Pitt was the nearest person to him - he must have had a pretty good opportunity of seeing his face; when I saw the prisoner in the soup-house; he appeared as if he had been drinking - there were several persons there; I am a smith: I went to a shop once to buy a penny worth of something, and it turned out to be a bad sixpence - the people not knowing me gave me into custody; I know Mike Bryant, but I did not know that he had been taken there - I never heard of the brandy - I was sent to Tothill-fields from Friday till the following Thursday; I was never at Clerkenwell, only to find this bill - I never was employed by the Mint, but I gave information to the officers, and caused a party to be taken; I was not examined as a witness, and I got nothing - it was in the case of two women; it was eighteen months after I was taken up myself.

HENRY BAKER . (Police-constable E 44). I assisted to take the prisoner - he made great resistance to being searched.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you have any conversation with Lyont - A. I went into a coffee-house about eleven o'clock on the morning of the robbery - I saw Lyons, and he went with me; he had given me information before on a Mint case, about three months ago - I have heard that he has been taken up himself, but he did not tell me; he gave information to another officer in a Mint case, I think the Session before last; I have seen him examined as a witness.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was taken to the office they sent him after Mr. Pitt - he came, but could not swear that I was the person; he said I was about the same height and appearance - I wore drab trousers and a blue coat; I had a blue coat on, and a Brighton beaver coat over it - Mr. Laing remanded me, he made me put my hat on and turn round, and he said, "Is not that him? look at him now?" and then he said Yes; there were two or three more witnesses, and the Magistrate said they were parties concerned - I was rather intoxicated, and as I was too late to go home I went to the soup-shop, and asked if I could have a bed; I put my money in my stocking for safety, as I am not my own master - Bryant was looked upon as a party concerned with me, and I sent him with 6d. to get a breakfast.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

JAMES SIMPTER, HENRY OXLEY.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-91
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

762. JAMES SIMPTER and HENRY OXLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Soward, the younger , from his person; and that the said James Simpter had been before convicted of felony .

JOHN SOWARD, JUN. I am a statuary and mason . On the 9th of March I was with my father, in Skinner-street, Snow-hill , about ten o'clock in the evening - I felt a tug; I turned, and saw Simpter draw my handkerchief from my pocket, and pass it to Oxley; I caught them both as well as I could, but they got from me - my father caught Simpter, and the officer caught Oxley; he was close to Simpter when he took the handkerchief, and Oxley threw it on the ground - I picked it up.

Simpter. Q. You stated at the watch-house that Oxley took your handkerchief? A. No, I stated what I have now.

JOHN SOWARD , SEN. I was walking up Skinner-street, with my son; he cried out, turned, and said "They have stolen my handkerchief" - I turned and saw Oxley running away; I caught Simpter, and told my son to run after Oxley, which he did, and an officer took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE WILLIAMS. I am a constable. I produce a certificate from Mr. Clark's office of the former conviction of James Simpter, on the 5th of July - he was sentenced to six month's imprisonment in the House of Correction; I was the officer who took him - I know he is the person.

SIMPTER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

OXLEY - NOT GUILTY .

ELIZABETH CARTER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-92
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

763. ELIZABETH CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 1 shirt, value 2s., and 1 apron, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Septimus Ocean Lamb .

CHARLES WILLIAM FREEMAN . I live with Mr. Septimus Ocean Lamb, of Poppin's-court, Fleet-street . On the 6th of March, between eight and nine in the evening, I was sent up stairs with a pint of beer, to a lodger - I saw the prisoner coming from the room where this property had been; I thought it had been Mrs. Lamb - but the person I took the beer for, opened their door and showed a light; I then saw the prisoner and stopped her - she dropped this shirt and apron, which had been on a chair by the window.

MARIA LAMB . I am the wife of Septimus Ocean Lamb. These are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to inquire for a person, and had forgotten the number - I went to a hair-dresser's shop, and said, "Is there one Mrs. Smith lives here?" they said they did not know - I went up stairs, and there was a door opposite me, on the same side as this room was, but I did not go into the room; this young man then came, and said I had been in that room - I said I had not.

GUILTY . Aged 65. - Confined Six Weeks .

JOHN WOODWARD.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-93
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

764. JOHN WOODWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Robert Rogers , from his person .

ROBERT ROGERS. On the 20th of March I was near the corner of Chancery-lane , about twelve o'clock; I felt something go from my pocket - I turned, and the prisoner and two others were going off - I ran and seized the prisoner in the road, and said he had got my handkerchief; he said he had not - and called God to witness that he had not; but I opened his clothes, and found it between his waistcoast and shirt - he then begged my pardon.

SAMUEL NEAL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman gave me in charge, and I asked him if he would get me into the Refuge, as I have no father, and my mother only takes in washing.

MR. ROGERS. He did so, and I promised to try if I could; but I have since heard his character.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

MARTIN WALLER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-94
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

765. MARTIN WALLER, (THE YOUNGER) was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , 35 account books, value 5l. 10s., and 8 other books, value 40s. , the goods of William Holborn .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HOLBORN . I am an accountant , and live in Lombard-street . The prisoner's father had been in my employ four years and a quarter - I had in my office, among other things, a great many books of a bankrupt's estate; I missed some of them - the officer called on me in a few days, and produced two books, which were part of what I had lost; I then made further search, and found some books at Mr. Durbin's, Mr. Catchpole's and Mr. Atkinson's - they were all my property except one, which I have a doubt about; whether they were all taken at one time I cannot tell - the prisoner used to come to his father in an evening; my books had been kept in a separate room.

WILLIAM EVANS (City Police-constable No. 60). On the 2nd of March I went to Mr. Durbin's, and found twenty-one books of accounts there - I found one at Mr. Catchpole's, and five at Mr. Atkinson's; these are the books.

JAMES DURBIN . I am a cheesemonger, and live in Rosemary-lane. I know the prisoner - he often came to my shop with books to sell; the officer came and took twenty-one books away, which I had bought of the prisoner - I never bought two at one time; I gave him 3d. or 3 1/2d. a lb. for them according to what they were; I asked how he came by them - he said they were his father's perquisites; he gave me his father's address, and said he was clerk to a solicitor of Bankrupts. I did not go to enquire, as a neighbour's boy came by at the time, and said he went to school with him; I bought some of them, and my shopman or wife bought some others; some of them are twenty-five, and some thirty years old.

COURT. Q. You did not inquire where he lived? A. No, as the other boy knew him.

ZACHARIAH RICHARD CATCHPOLE . I live in Cable-street, St. George's in the East, and am a cheesemonger; I bought one book of the prisoner about six months ago - I delivered it to the officer.

MR. HOLBORN. These books are mine; I have lost a great many, and one with the accounts of a gentleman who failed to the amount of 110,000l. is lost.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, soliciting mercy, and stating that Durbin had urged him to bring clean account books with very little writing, for which he would give 1d. or 1 1/2d. per lb. more.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Confined One Month .

MARTIN WALLER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-95
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

766. MARTIN WALLER (THE ELDER) was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HOLBORN . The prisoner was my clerk for four years and a quarter. I was concerned for the executors of Mr. John Berridge , and Mr. Evans was one of the executors; I had authority to receive money on account of that estate; the prisoner received some as my clerk, and it was his business to account to me for it; he from time to time furnished me with accounts of what he received; about January, 1832, I was called to give an account of my receipts, and the prisoner made out this account of 143l. 7s. 5d.; I believe I had received but two of these sums, which are here included; he drew out these other sums as being due, stating that Mr. Parry owed the estate 2l. 12s. 8d. and 3l. 3s. 2d.; he said Mr. Parry had a set-off against these sums, and they could not be paid; in January, 1832 Mrs. Berridge called on me.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q. I believe the prisoner had received a great deal of money for you? A.Not a great deal - he is married, and has three or four children.

MR. PARRY. I paid the prisoner on the 22nd of October, 1831, 3l. 3s. 2d. on account of Mr. Holborn - he gave me this receipt for it; it was for the estate of Berridge and Evans.

MR. HOLBORN. This receipt is in the prisoner's writing.

Prisoner's Defence. I expected Mr. Holborn would have called Mrs. Berridge, the widow, as he is aware from her own statement, that within a fortnight after I received these sums of money, she knew I had received them; and I told her I would pay her them when she called for them - she said very well, and I believe she waited on Mr. Holborn, as I told her when she wanted, to come to me; Mr. Holborn knows that I found three or four blank receipts in the name of Thomas Norman, which I could have received and defied the conviction - he says that I have received some money, but not much; he did not tell you that I had to collect 2000l. in one account, and he knows it was all collected right - he sent me out repeatedly with blank receipts, which I might have filled up; I had a wife and six children depending on the guinea a week I received from him - I was always at his office from nine o'clock in the morning till eight, nine, ten, or eleven o'clock at night; the reason I said there was a set-off against these sums was, because I had told Mrs. Berridge that I had received them.

MR. HOLBORN. These receipts are in the prisoner's hand-writing - I shall have to make the money good.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 3 Months .

JAMES HENRY.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-96
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

767. JAMES HENRY was indicted for feloniously uttering a forged order, for payment of 15l., well knowing it to be forged , with intent to defraud Sir Coutts Trotter , Bart. and others.

SECOND COUNT, stating his intent to be to defraud Mark Madder .

3rd COUNT, stating his intent to be to defraud Sir John Pirie and another. - To which he pleaded GUILTY . - Transported for Life .

JEREMIAH McCARTHY.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-97
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

768. JEREMIAH McCARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , 2 watches, value 5l.; 2 seals, value 10s.; 1 watch-key, value 1d.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s.; 5 spoons, value 28s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 1 pair of spectacles, value 5s.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 4s.; 1 silver mounted cork, value 2s.; - oz. of sil

ver, value 3s., and 20 pieces of silver coin, value 10s., the goods of Isaac Brown , in his dwelling-house .

ANN EVANS. I live with Mr. Brown, on Dowgate-hill . On the 20th of February I was in the kitchen, and heard a noise in the sleeping-room, which is one pair of stairs higher than I was then, which is one pair from the street - I paused a little while, and then went up stairs; I looked into the sleeping-room, but saw no one - I then went into my master's bed-room, and as I was coming out I saw the prisoner standing behind the door; I knew him well, as he had been taken into the house by my master out of compassion - I asked him what he did there; he said he had made a mistake - I called up my master, who found the property stated.

WILLIAM KEITH . I am an artist. I was then residing at Mr. Brown's for a few weeks, he keeps the Three Crowns, Dowgate-hill . On the evening in question I followed Mr. Brown up stairs, and when I got up I saw Mr. Brown pull the articles stated from between the bed and the mattress; he placed them on the table, and said to the prisoner, "You have robbed me of my spoons;" the prisoner said, "No, I have not;" there was nothing found on the prisoner, but Mr. Brown saw him putting the property under the bed - the prisoner afterwards said he had been put up to it by the pot-boy, and he took them; they were both taken to the station.

ISAAC BROWN . This is my property; I cannot say the value of it, it is perhaps 8l. or 9l. - it is my dwelling-house, and is in the parish of St. John the Baptist.

Prisoner. The pot-boy led me into it.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Life .

REUBEN GILBERT, GEORGE WOODGATE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-98
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

769. REUBEN GILBERT and GEORGE WOODGATE were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of Thomas Upton .

GEORGE DAVIDGE POPE . I know the shop of Mr. Filer - he is washer to Mr. Ryder, a livery-stable keeper. On the 1st of April I saw Gilbert come out of the shop with something under his coat; I did not see the other prisoner then - I said to Filer, "Gilbert is gone out with something under his coat;" he ran out, and I followed him - I saw Woodgate about two hundred yards off, in Maiden-lane; he ran into Filer's arms - I ran and took Gilbert.

GEORGE BAYLIS. I am an officer, and have the coat.

FRANCIS FILER . I had just left work; I had seen Gilbert near the premises - I took Woodgate with this coat, which is Thomas Upton 's.

GILBERT - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Three Months .

WOODGATE - NOT GUILTY .

RICHARD HOOPER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-99
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

770. RICHARD HOOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , 12 pairs of stockings, value 11s. , the goods of William Kipling .

WILLIAM KIPLING. I live at No. 47, Cheapside , and am a hosier . On the 26th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner ran into my shop, took this bundle of stockings off a stool in the doorway, and ran off; I ran and took him with them.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

GEORGE CROUCH.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-100
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

771. GEORGE CROUCH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of February , 1 boot, value 7s., and 1 golosh, value 3s. , the goods of James Smetzer .

WILLIAM SHAW . I know Mr. Smetzer - he is a bootmaker , and lives in Fore-street . On the 18th of February, a little before seven o'clock, a man asked me to assist in taking the prisoner, who was in Little Moorfields, about twenty yards from the prosecutor's - he had one boot on him.

JOHN HUGHES. I am an officer. I took him to the watch-house.

JAMES SMETZER . I am owner of the shop. This boot was taken from my shop door - I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q.Can you say I was near the shop? A. No, I was up stairs, and was called down.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Weeks .

JOHN HARDING.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-101
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

772. JOHN HARDING was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of March , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Philip Costin , from his person .

PHILIP COSTIN . On the 3rd of March, between three and four o'clock, I was near the corner of Mitre-street, Aldgate ; Wardley told me my pocket was picked - I saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's possession, he was about forty yards off; he threw it from him - he was running away.

GEORGE JOHN WEST (Police-constable C 53.) I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.

ALFRED WARDLEY . I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and put it up his breast; I told the prosecutor, and I saw the prisoner throw the handkerchief down.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

JAMES SUDDEN.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-102
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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773. JAMES SUDDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 1 coat, value 10s. , the goods of George Claapon .

GEORGE CLAAPON. On the 1st of April I was in a house at St. Mary at Hill ; I left my coat in my cart for about ten minutes - I was called out, and missed it; I saw it directly afterwards in Mr. Harrison's possession.

SWAINSTON HARRISON. I saw the prisoner take the coat off the cart; he came running up the hill, and I stopped him with it in his possession.(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

HENRY WELLS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-103
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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774. HENRY WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of February , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of George Lander Teanby , from his person .

GEORGE LANDER TEANBY. On the 23rd of February I was on Blackfriars-bridge , between two and three o'clock in the afternoon; I felt two persons pressing on me - I turned and found the prisoner with my handkerchief between his coat and waistcoat; I took him - this is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming over the bridge, and he accused me of picking his pocket: I never saw the handkerchief.

GUILTY .* Aged 19. - Transported for 14 Years .

THOMAS CARLISLE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-104
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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775. THOMAS CARLISLE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Henry Foreman , from his person .

WILLIAM HENRY FOREMAN . On the 1st of March I was

in Guildhall-yard ; I felt something behind me - I turned and a gentleman handed me my pocket-handkerchief, which he said the prisoner had taken, but I did not see it in the prisoner's possession.

CHARLES KING . I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief from this gentleman's pocket; I took it from him and took him.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, expressing his contrition for the offence.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

WILLIAM WHITE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-105
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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776. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of William Henry Cass , from his person .

WILLIAM HENRY CASS . On the 27th of March, at half-past five o'clock in the evening, I was on Blackfriars-bridge ; I felt a snatch at my pocket, and missed my handkerchief - I turned and saw the prisoner with it in his breast; I asked him to give it to me - he said he had not got it, and he asked what business I had to stop him; I kept hold of him, and at the foot of the bridge he threw it down and said he had found it - I still followed him; he then ran - I saw an officer, and gave charge of him.

GUILTY .* Aged 21. Transported for 14 Years .

JAMES BAILEY.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-106
VerdictNot Guilty

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OLD COURT. SATURDAY, APRIL 13TH.

Before Lord Chief Justice Denman.

777. JAMES BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , 1 mare, price 12l. , the property of Charles Bradfield .

CHARLES BRADFIELD. I am a livery-stable keeper , and live in Ropemaker-street, Finsbury. I have known the prisoner these twelve months - he was in my employ at the time in question (on the 13th of March) as groom , and has been so about a month; I was in the stable with him, when one Macklin came in, and asked me to lend him a mare to go to Clapham, and to let Bailey go with him - he was to ride her there, and to fetch two horses for a gentleman; I gave the prisoner leave to go - Macklin said he should be gone two or three hours; I knew he and the prisoner were acquainted - the prisoner had mentioned Macklin's name to me several times, and said he had to fetch horses from Clapham - he had told me he was a very respectable man, and had a good deal of property; in the afternoon I found the mare was gone - she did not come back that night nor next day; (the 13th was on Wednesday) - I saw the prisoner again on the Friday; he came back to the stables - I asked him where he had been, and where was Jem Macklin; he said he did not know that he(Macklin) had left him at Putney on the Wednesday evening, and said he should return soon - he was taken into custody, and I found the mare at the White Lion, at Putney.

CHARLES WENSLEY. I am a livery-stable keeper at the White Lion, Putney. On the 13th of March, in the evening, the prisoner and another person came to my place; the other man was driving the mare in a chaise - he desired me to take care of the horse; I took it in - he drove it into the yard, and the prisoner gave me orders to take care of it; I went into the house - I saw no more of the other man, but saw the prisoner in the tap-room, and he told me to take particular care of the horse, as they had drove him a great way - the horse had some gruel made; the prisoner stopped there till the Friday afternoon; he said he expected the other man back, he said he was gone to look at a gentleman's horse, and he expected him back every hour - that was the same evening, and on Thursday he said he wondered he did not come back; he offered the mare to me for sale, and to several other people, and asked 13l. for it; on Friday a gentleman came into the yard - I do not know his name; he came from Croydon - he had the mare out to try it; the prisoner was present, and borrowed a saddle and bridle of me to try it with - it was tried in the road by the gentleman; the gentleman did not buy it - about five o'clock that evening the prisoner went away; he said he was going to look after his master - the horse remained there; I asked him, if any body wanted to buy it, what I should sell it for - he said I was not to take less than 13l.; he said he expected his master every hour; I asked what I was to do with the horse and chaise if his master came; he said, "I suppose you would know him;" I said I did not know - that I should not suppose any body would come but the right owner; he asked me what the expenses were - I said about 13s.; he said that was right, and he must go and get the money - he went away, leaving the horse and chaise with me; Bradfield came that night he claimed it, and took it away next morning.

MR. BRADFIELD. Macklin had no conversation with me which the prisoner did not hear; he heard him borrow it, and must know he had not bought it.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I went to Mr. Bradfield's stables on Friday night - I saw him and the prisoner there; the prisoner said the horse, chaise, and harness were at Putney, and there were 14s. or 15s. to pay expences - I took him to the station-house; Bradfield went down to Putney; I have been after Macklin - he lived in Chiswell-street, and buys horses to go abroad for different gentlemen - he has run away.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had sold the mare I should have paid the expences, and taken the money home to my master; I had not 1s. to pay my expences - she was for sale.

CHARLES BRADFIELD re-examined. Q. Did you ever commission the prisoner to sell her? A. No; it was for sale, and the price was 12l. - the prisoner might have heard me mention that; he was only groom, and never bargains for me about horses.

NOT GUILTY . (See New Court, Sixth Day.)

FREDERICK MARCHELL, GEORGE EVANS, WILLIAM TAYLOR.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-107
VerdictNot Guilty

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778. FREDERICK MARCHELL , GEORGE EVANS , and WILLIAM TAYLOR were indicted for the wilful murder of Robert Paviour .

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JANE PAVIOUR . I am the wife of Robert Paviour . Last February I lived with him at 26, John-street St. Pancras, in the second floor of the house; we had lived there about three years; my son Robert was about thirteen years old - I remember last Shrove-Tuesday, the 19th of March, I went out that evening about six o'clock, leaving my little boy Robert, at home alive and well; he had hashed mutton and pan-

cakes for dinner that day - my husband comes home to supper every night, and Robert was to have boiled the potatoes for my husband's supper; I gave him directions to boil them before I went out at six o'clock - I left them with him to boil; when I left home, at six o'clock, there was no occasion for him to go out for any thing - he had his boots on when I left home; I sent him for the potatoes before I went out; and then he had had tea and bread and butter; I told him, as he had no occasion to go out, to take his boots off, as he should not dirt about the room - I did not tell him to clean them; I parted with him on good terms at six o'clock - he had no apple-pudding that day; he was very regular in his conduct - he was always a good lad, and always had very good advice given him; he had been in a little place, in service in the neighbourhood, and had left it about a month - he was not in the habit of going about the streets at all, with other boys, that I know of; he had a little rabbit in the back yard, which he used to amuse himself with - I went out that night to see a sick friend; I returned, I believe, between eight and nine o'clock - I believe it was after eight, because my daughter was home before me; when I returned the boy was gone - he had not been accustomed to be out so late; he was never allowed to be out at night except when he was at his place - he had a pair of slippers, which were missing; his boots were in the room - I had not seen him take them off; he had robbed the dirt off them in my absence, but not properly cleaned them - he has ran to the door before in his slippers, but has not gone out in them; my daughter arrived at home before me and my husband too; from what I heard when I came back, some search had been made for him in the house, and I went about to make inquiry for him, and my husband and my daughter went; we went in search every where - we walked the streets, and watched the people out of the play-house; we could not tell what to think - we had bills posted up, offering a reward, a few days after; we exerted ourselves every where to find him, but without success. I know a young man named Sparrow; I did not know his name then - on Tuesday, the 26th of February, the week after I lost my son, Sparrow came to me, and brought Marchell with him as his friend; I had seen Sparrow before, at Taylor's, which is next door to me- Marchell was a stranger to me; I did not know Taylor before - I knew he lived at next door, but did not know him; I had seen Sparrow at that house, but did not know his name - I went to that house to make inquiry, but did not see Taylor; when Marchell came to me, he said he had seen the bill at the colour shop, which was Mr. Reeves' - that is the first that I recollect his saying; I understood him to mean Reeves' shop in Chapel-street, where I had placed a bill - he said he had seen the bill, and then he described the child's dress, in every respect, to me, all but the slippers; he said he had seen the child on the Thursday before, at St. Katharine's-docks - I think he described his dress before he said that; he described every thing the child had on when I left home at six o'clock, all but the slippers - he said he had on a very old pair of boots; Mrs. Richardson was with me at the time this took place - Mrs. Richardson said the child was like me; she said, "This is the mother, and the child is like her" - Marchell said "Yes, it was exactly like her, eyes and all;" my eyes are dark, and the boy's eyes were dark - they were described in the bill as dark eyes; he said he saw him at St. Katharine's-docks, loitering about with marine boys, eating a crust of bread; Marchell said that he himself was going off by a ship the next day, and the sooner we began to search after the boy the better - this conversation was between twelve and one o'clock in the day; I went with Mr. Roe to the docks immediately - I do not know that the prisoner went to the docks that day; Roe and I took a cab and went down to the docks, and at the opposite corner as we went, stood Sparrow, Marchell, and Evans - we were going across the road to Tottenham-court-road to get the cab, and saw them standing by a potato warehouse at the corner of John-street, which leads into Chapel-street, leading into Tottenham-court-road; when we got to the docks we made all the inquiry we possibly could, but to no effect, we could learn nothing about him - as we returned from the docks, just before we got to my door, I saw Sparrow going into Taylor's, next door; I put a question to him respecting Marchell, and desired him to do something respecting Marchell; in consequence of that, in about a quarter of an hour, Marchell came to my room (Mr. Roe was still with me) and Roe, in my presence, said to Marchell, "We have met with no success at the docks," that we had been searching there (I cannot exactly recollect his words) - I had made inquiry at the docks about ships going out; Roe told him also that there were no ships going out there, and that there were no marine boys there,(as Marchell had described to me) as going out from there - he put his hand out and said, "The child is there now, he is exactly like your eyes and all;" he pulled a piece of paper out of his pocket, and said he would give us the name of the ship going out - he said the name of the ship was the Hereford; he wrote something on the paper, and tried to write something more, but could not - he said to Mr. Roe, "You write it;" Roe said, "No, you write it, we can read it" - I got up to get a pen, and before I could get the pen John Ellen came in; Marchell, before that, said he had written the name of Hereford on the paper, but I never saw it - and when Ellen came in he put the paper into his pocket and said he would go with Ellen; he and Ellen went out together - they said they were going to the docks; the centre prisoner (looking at him) is Evans - I was looking out of my window the next day, or a few days after the conversation with Marchell, (I do not know which, but it was the same week, I was looking out,) and saw Evans nearly opposite the window of Mrs. Smith, who lives opposite to me - I said nothing to him; I did not know his name at that time - I had seen him, I believe, the day they went to the docks - he was walking about the streets; he was standing opposite there, and Marchell with him, and I believe Sparrow and some other persons - Evans shook his fist at me, and said something which I did not hear, as the window was shut; he was looking up at me - the window was shut, and I was looking through it.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q. The boy was missed on the 19th? A. Yes; I made great search for him that night and the following day - I described his dress and person; I went to all the Police-stations, and spoke publicly of his loss, describing his dress and person, to know if any body had seen him; I had never

seen Marchell before he called; I offered, in a second bill, to reward any one for bringing him home - the sum was not stated; both the bills had been published before the 26th, when Marchell came; my son's slippers were black - they could not be easily mistaken for old boots.

Q. When Mrs. Richardson remarked that your son was like you, Marchell replied, "Yes, eyes and all"? A. Yes, those were his words; I told him I should go down to the docks - I saw him at the corner of the street, where we crossed; I gave him nothing to drink the first time he came - when he called the second time, he was asked to take a glass of wine - he refused; I did not discover the information he gave me about the docks to be correct.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.Where did you see Evans standing? A. In the street opposite our window; several other persons were about - it was about eleven or twelve o'clock, I think, but am not certain, and on the 27th, I think.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. He was standing nearer to Mr. Smith's window than to yours? A. Yes; theirs is an open shop.

MARY ANN PAVIOUR. I am sister of the deceased. I went home to my father's lodging on the evening of the 19th of February, at ten minutes after eight o'clock - nobody was at home in the lodging at the time; I found the fire burnt hollow in the middle, the candle burnt into the socket, and the wick long, as if the room had been left some time. I saw the body of my brother before the Coroner - it was my brother's body; I know search was made for him, and bills published - I was at home when Marchell came back from the docks.

GRACE RICHARDSON. I am the wife of Thomas Richardson - we live at No. 26, John-street, on the first floor. I knew the deceased Robert Paviour - I remember the evening on which he was missing; in consequence of what was said to me by his sister Mary Ann , I went into their room about ten minutes after eight o'clock - Mrs. Paviour had not returned home at that time; I examined the two rooms in which they lodged, but could not find the deceased; I noticed the fire - it was burnt quite hollow, and a saucepan was on it with potatoes in it; a candle in the room was burnt down into the socket of the candlestick - I should think the fire and candle had been neglected for about an hour - the snuff of the candle, I should think, was nearly two inches long; on the following Tuesday I was in Paviour's room, when Marchell was there - I do not recollect what passed in the room - there was a conversation; I opened the door to Marchell when he came in - I heard what he said at the door; he came in the morning - he said there was a boy of the description lurking about St. Katharine's-docks; I called Mrs. Paviour down to speak to him, and I said the boy was very much like Mrs. Paviour - he said, "Yes, what I could see of the person, he was very much like her;" I told him she was the mother of the boy - and he said, from what he observed of Mrs. Paviour, he was very like her - he said he had a child of his own, and did not know what he should do with her, for he seemed to regret very much the loss - he said he had a little child a year and a half old at home - he seemed to think it was a shocking thing; I was not before the Coroner.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q. Had you said any thing about the description before he said there was a boy about the docks answering the description? A. No; handbills had been printed, and I considered he alluded to them - he said he had seen a bill in Reeves' window, in Chapel-street - that the boy had not slippers on, but old boots, and was gnawing a hard crust.

Taylor. Q. Do you know me? A. Yes, by sight; you appeared a hard-working, industrious man - I have observed goods which had been japanned drying at your door.

CHARLES WALLER . I knew the deceased (Paviour) - I remember hearing of his being missing; the night before that, I saw him in Chapel-street - it was on Wednesday, I heard of his being missing, and I saw him on Tuesday - he said he was going to Ripley's shop opposite; he was dressed in his slippers and woollen trousers; I saw him go in the shop and come out - it was between six and seven o'clock.

CHRISTOPHER RIPLEY. I live at No. 8, Chapel-street, at the corner of John-street - I knew Paviour; on last Shrove Tuesday, in the evening, he came to my shop about seven o'clock - he had on slippers, and made a small purchase - he was in the shop about five minutes; I did not notice which way he went when he left.

Taylor. Q. Do you know me? A. Yes, as a customer; I have seen goods going in and out of your house - you appeared to be a working man.

PHOEBE PALMER . I live at No. 86, John-street, which is opposite No. 26 - I knew Robert Paviour . On the evening of Shrove-Tuesday, when he was missed, I heard a child cry out, right opposite to my door,"No, no, don't you, don't you;" I do not know whose voice it was - Taylor's house is next door to Mrs. Paviour's and opposite mine; I never heard that there was any curiosity or observation about Taylor's premises; I was at the bottom of the steps of my own house - the voice was in the street - I was not in the street; it was from a quarter to seven, to about half-past seven o'clock - I am certain it was before eight o'clock.

JOSEPH SMITH. I live at No. 86, John-street. I remember the loss of the deceased; the deceased left his home on the 19th of February, and on the 26th of February, about the middle of the day, I saw Marchell coming along the street, in a direction for Paviour's door; I saw him go into Paviour's door - I crossed over to hear if there was any news, and when I saw Marchell, I turned round and said, "My good friend, have you brought us any good intelligence about this little boy?" Taylor was present - Marchell said, "I think I have - I think from what I saw in the bill, the child answers the description, and when I saw the mother of the child, the two countenances struck me forcibly that he was the child;" I said, I hoped it would turn out so, but I had my doubts - he said, "Why do you have your doubts;" I said, I think, when the boy left his home with only slippers, coat and jacket on, I thought he was no more, I thought he had been burked - Marchell said, "You may rest yourself assured, that child is as well and as hearty as you are;" I said, "How do you know that?" he said, "I do" -

I said, "Then I hope we shall see the child to-morrow" - he made no answer to that; that was all the conversation I had with him then, but after he had left, I went over again in about half an hour, and said to Taylor, "Do you know any thing of this good man, that has brought this good account" - he said, "Yes, I know him very well, he has come of creditable and respectable parents;" I said, "I hope it will turn out to be all correct, that we shall see the child by to-morrow" - he made me no answer - my house is opposite Taylor's; after the child was missing I observed something unusual about Taylor's premises, but made no observation of that kind before, not till after Marchell brought the intelligence about the child; Marchell, Evans, Taylor, and a man named Sparrow wer repeatedly going to and fro, in and out at Taylor's house, sometimes very much in liquor; they were repeatedly watching my house and me, to see, as I supposed, if I was watching them - this occurred continually till they were in custody. On the Thursday previous to the Inquest, Evans was very much in liquor, and he got sky-larking with a young woman; I saw him dancing about - Mrs. Paviour was at that time at her window - he was holding his fist up, doubled, towards the window - he was leaning against my window, and holding up his fist up to her window, and the other parties were with him, altogether; I could not hear what he said, but I judged from the motion of his lips, that he was saying something - my wife saw and heard what passed.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q. After this poor boy was missing there was great excitement in the neighbourhood? A. Very great; almsot every body was running about making inquiry; I did not see Marchell before the 26th.

Q. You saw these four men walking up and down watching your house; were there not a great many people walking about, and talking of the occurrence? A. The neighbourhood, at that time, had noticed their proceedings - people were perpetually going to Paviour's, to make inquiries; I saw no drink given away - what was had, I believe, they got at the corner public-house - when Marchell said the child was as safe and as well as we were, he appeared to be sincere, as if he actually meant what he said, as if he actually knew it.

MR. CHURCHILL. Q.At what time of the day did you see Evans holding up his fist? A. About two o'clock; he was intoxicated, and had been dancing on the rails, and sky-larking with my servant just before.

Taylor. Q.How long have you known me? A.Two or three years; I never knew you any thing but a hard-working industrious man - when I came to your apartment I did not perceive that Marchell was in liquor; I have no recollection of saying he was drunk or foolish, as he went on in an erroneous way; Sparrow is in Taylor's employ, and frequently goes in and out on business.

COURT. Q.Were the appearances about Taylor's premises different to what you had seen them before? A. Yes, they would pop out one or two together; I never knew of any business Marchell or Evans had there - I never heard any thing to induce me to believe they had business there; Taylor is a japanner - I understood Evans is a French polisher; I never saw Evans take any work in there, or bring any out.

SARAH SMITH. I am the wife of Joseph Smith; we live at No. 86, John-street. The Thursday fortnight before the Inquest, (the 7th of March) I observed some men drinking in John-street and Pitt-street - there were five or six men; they were up and down the street all day - two of the prisoners were among them, but not Taylor; I saw Evans dancing upon his heels - he held up his fist at Mrs. Paviour, and said "You are a b - y old bitch, you shall be plagued a little longer" - I did not see Mrs. Paviour at her window, but I saw her open her window a few minutes after, when they were going up the street; Marchell was with Evans when he used these expressions - they returned back again, and went into Taylor's house; I did not observe any particular appearance about Taylor's house at any time.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q.After the occurrence, was there not people running up and down the street, making inquiry? A. A great many; I did not hear Marchell say any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.Whether Mrs. Paviour was at her window at this time you do not know? A. No, but she opened it soon after; Evans was very drunk, and had been riotous about the street all day - it was about one o'clock.

MARGARET JAMES . I am the wife of John James; we live at No. 5, John-street. On Thursday evening, the 7th of March, I had been out on an errand, and was coming home at ten minutes after six o'clock - as I returned home I saw Taylor and Evans at the step of my door, conversing together; as I entered the door I heard Evans' voice, but could not distinguish what he said - he was addressing himself to Taylor; I heard Taylor answer him "Hold your tongue, the boy is all right, he is safe enough now."

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.Did you hear whether Evans made any answer? A. No, I did not listen; I heard this as I passed.

Taylor. Q. Did we name any boy? A. No; you had been in and been down to Phillips, and as you came out you made a stop at the door - Phillips lives in the kitchen; I live in the parlour of No. 5.

COURT. Q.Was Evans drunk A. No, they appeared quite sober; I had let Taylor in twice to go into the kitchen - an old man lived in the kitchen.

WILLIAM WIGGENS . I live at No. 13, Ogle-street, about a quarter of a mile from John-street. I accompained John Ellen and the prisoner Marchell to St. Katharine's-docks, on Wednesday, the 27th of February; I had some conversation with Marchell on the road - I was asked by Marchell if I thought the money was safe; (the reward of 5l. which was offered;) I told him I thought it was, and if he would cause the boy to be brought back, or bring him back, I would pay the money without any further questions - this was on our road to the docks; he said nothing about the boy at that time - when we proceeded a little further, Sparrow, (who had accompained Marchell,) observed the father, Mr. Paviour, walking behind; he (Sparrow) touched Marchell on the shoulder, and Marchell turned round away from me, and he said something to him which I could not hear - Marchell replied directly, "It is no go;" Marchell came alongside of me again, and we got into conversation about the boy

and he said he thought the boy was not taken away for any other purpose but to become heir to some property, or for the use of some of those swells - he told me there was a man in the City who was in the habit of giving money for boys; and he told me about a captain that hung himself at Horsemonger-lane, and said he was one of those sort; he called them hoofe - I have heard of a captain who hung himself, but I do not know whether I had heard it at time; I did not understand what hoofs meant at the time - I now understand it means a person addicted to unnatural propensities; Marchell talked about a place which he had lost through getting intoxicated - and before that, on Tuesday the 26th, I went down to ask him concerning the boy (at Taylor's house,) by Mrs. Pavlour's desire; I went into Taylor's, and asked for Marchell - he was not there; they told me to call again in half an hour, which I did, and he was not there - I went again, saw him, and asked him about the boy, if he had seen him - he said Yes, he had seen him at the docks; (I did not say I had come by Paviour's desire) and he mentioned what part he had seen him; he mentioned some letter, I think it was C, but I will not be positive - I asked him if he could get the boy; he paused a bit, and said, "Yes - no doubt but I can, but I want some one to go with me to the ducks of a spirit;" he said, "I do not want any woman to go crying and sobbing with me;" for there were many creeks and corners he had to go into, that he did like to take a woman with him - he said the mother had given a wrong description of the boy; that she had represented him as having dark eyes, and he had grey eyes and dark eye-browns - I asked him again if he had seen the boy; he said Yes, he had seen him in the docks, and he was there then - I appointed to go with him the next morning, which I did, and have stated, what conversation happened on the road; when we got to the docks, Marchell did not appear to know any thing about the docks - he took me to the place where he said he had seen the boy, inside the docks, on the right-hand; I think the letter was C - he did not appear to know his way into the docks; from his conversation with me, I caused him to be given in custody the same evening, on his return.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q.On your way to the docks, did not you converse as to the cause of the boy being taken - gnessing the cause? A. Yes; part of the way; Marchell said nothing about his being carried to the Indies as heir to some property, in my hearing - before we went on the Tuesday evening he said, "I am steward of a ship;" and that he was going out as steward to the Indies, and that the boy was going out with him - I had said nothing about 5l. rewards before this conversation; it was after Marchell made the remak about the reward that I saw Sparrow speak to him, and after that Marchell said it was no go - he appeared to me to know nothing whatever about the docks.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Marchell said he was going out as steward to the Indies and the boy with him, did he name the ship? A. Yes, it was the Hereford; and he said we had better pursue the inquiry, for he was going out very shortly.

JOHN ELLEN . I live at No. 64, Molyneux-street; I lodge there with my father. I heard of the boy being missed about a week after he was missing - I had not seen Merchell until I came into Mrs. Paviour's room, to go down to the docks with him; I am acquainted with Mrs. Paviour - I went to her house on the Tuesday afternoon, in consequence of her message; I have been to sea, and have not been home long - when I got to Paviour's Marchell was there; he was writing something down on a piece of paper - I did not observe what he wrote; when I came in Mrs. Paviour said, "This is the young man who is going to the docks with you;" (meaning me) - Marchell agreed to go with me; Wiggens came in a little afterwards - we left the room together, and got down stairs to the door before Marchell said any thing; he turned into Mr. Taylor's, at the next door - he came out, called me inot Taylor's, and said he could not go to the docks without 2s. 6d. in his pocket, 15d. each, to spend; Taylor was present - I told him I had got no money at all; he had said nothing about money before, in my presence - Taylor kept at his work, and said very little; Marchell was lighting his pipe over Taylor's fire - (he had sat down as if he would not go at all) and while lighting his pipe at the fire, he made a reply, and said he would make 2l. of the boy yet; he said so to Taylor - Taylor said Hush! as much as to say there was somebody in the room to hear him - I had not, heard Taylor say any thing till Marchell spoke about the 2l., and then he said, "You are talking too fast;" Marchell asked Taylor what he thought, whether it would be best to take the 5l., or to take the boy to Plymouth, and write a letter home to his mother to let her know the boy was safe - I then asked Marchell whether he thought it was of any use my going to the docks; Taylor made a reply, and said, "Perhaps the boy is gone to hell or Halifax by this time;" I then went back, and went into Mrs. Paviour's again - neither I nor Marchell went to the docks that day; I agreed with Marchell, before I left, to go with him to the docks at nine o'clock next morning; next morning Wiggens and Sparrow accompanied us to the docks, and the father followed on behind at a distance; Marchell began a conversation of his own accord, by saying there was a gentleman who gave a great deal of money for boys - that the gentleman lived somewhere in Horsemonger-lane; he said he was a captain - he said, there was a gentleman in the City, too, that was one of, these poofs, as he called them - neither I nor Wiggens had said any thing to him to lead to these observations; I never heard the word poofs before.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q.When you went into Taylor's house did you enter into conversation about the boy directly? A.I only asked if he was going to the docks with me; I said if he had seen such a boy, to go to the docks with me to find him.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.When you went to the docks did you inquire for the Hereford? A. Yes; there was no such a ship in the docks, nor was there water for her to come up the river; there was a ship of that name laying at Black wall - she had been home from China about a fortnight; a vessel usually lays in port two or three months.

MR. WALESBY. Q.When you agreed to accompany Marchell to the docks, had you said any thing about a reward? A. No; he asked Taylor if it was best to have the 5l. &c. - I had said nothing about a reward for the boy, nor heard any thing said, more than the cause of the boy being taken away: one suggested one cause and ano

ther another - I do not recollect whether he mentioned about the captain as killing himself in Horsemonger-lane or living there; I never heard the expression hell or Halifax before.

Taylor. Q.Did not Marchell treat you with a share of a pot or two of beer at my premises? A. Yes, and a pipe; I was not there an hour altogether.

Q.When he talked about the boy, did I not say,"Don't talk too fast, but say nothing but the truth, because you are hurting the parents' feelings?" A. I heard you say something of that sort - when I think of it, you did say so; Marchell said he would go with me to the docks in the morning.

ROBERT PAVIOUS . I am the father of the deceased. Marchell and others went to the docks - I followed after them; I heard nothing of the conversation as they went along - when I got to the docks I inquired for the Hereford; there was no such ship there; she was laying at Blackwall - Marchell was quite a strangee to the docks; he knew nothing about them.

GEORGE BUNDAY. I live at No. 17, Shouldham-street, Bryanstone-square - I formerly lived at Hampstead; I was in the service of Mr. Keys, of Oxford-street, at that time. On Saturday, the 23rd of February, I was accompanied by my wife, going towards Hampstead, between seven and eight o'clock; I know the bridge over the canal, near the York and Albany public-house - it was in our way to cross that bridge; it is at the end of Albany-street, Hampstead-road - when we came near the bridge, I observed one man between the public-house and the bridge; the public-house is about twenty yards from the bridge - as I passed over the bridge, I observed two men on the right-hand side of the bridge, about fifteen yards from where I had seen the one man (I cannot recollect whether the man who was between the bridge and public-house, was moving or standing still); there is a parapat to the bridge; they were leaning forwards, looking towards the water - they had a largeish parcel between them; I did not particularly notice the size - they both appeared to have it between them, and it was resting, I think, on the parapet; they were standing before it, and I thought were endeavouring to conceal it from us as we passed; any thing large might have been in the parcel - I cannot tell whether it, would contain a child of thirteen years old; it was not a basket, it appeared like canvas - as I crossed the bridge, one of the men said, "Here is some one coming;" I did not take notice of the man, who I had passed before I came to the bridge - the observation made me look at the two men, but I took but little notice of them; my wife made some observations to me which I answered, and proceeded, over the bridge towards Oxford-street, and when, we had got twelve or fifteen paces from the bridge I heard a splash in the water - it must have been caused by something large being thrown in; the noise was considerable - I consider Marchell and Taylor about the size of the men I saw on the bridge - I cannot say whether the man, who was about fifteen paces from the bridge, was taller or shorter than the two on the bridge.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q.What sort of a night was this? A.Rather dark - I could not see the men's faces; I was several paces from them.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. They stood with their backs to you, and before the parcel? A. Yes; I saw the prisoners before the Magistrates, about three weeks afterwards.

SARAH BUNDAY . I am the wife of the last witness. On Saturday, the 28rd of February, I was going over the bridge with him, near the York and Albany, between seven and eight o'clock; I saw two men on the bridge - I had seen one man before we came to the bridge, and two on the bridge; the two outside prisoners are like the men on the bridge; they are the figure and size of the men on the bridge; I did not observe the man in the road - the men on the bridge were leaning forwards, with their faces towards the water, and they had a largeish bundle resting on the wall of the bridge - it was something dark, but what I cannot say - it appeared more like canvas than any thing else; I heard one of them say, "Here is somebody coming," and the reply was, "It is only a boy" - it was a dark night; I and my husband, passed on - I made an observation to my husband, and he made an answer; I thought they were throwing something in which was not right; I heard the splash of water, which must have been caused by something of considerable size being thrown in, for we were at some distance when we heard the splash; I should think the parcel was large enough to contain a thing of considerable size - I cannot say it was large enough for a child - a child might be put into it; I think it was big enough for a child ten or twelve years old.

Cross-examined by MR. WALESBY. Q.You were not near enough to see either of the men's faces? A. No; they were about the prisoners' size and figure, and were dressed like them, when I saw them - they both had dark clothes - the tallest had a frock-coat on, I am certain.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.When you say their dress was like the men when you saw them, where do you means? A. I saw them before the Justice - they then had clothes on like those worn by the men on the bridge.

DANIEL WILLIAMS . I am lock-keeper on the Regent's canal. Here is a sketch of the current of the canal about the York and Albany - it is correct an near as can be.

RICHARD SOMERVILLR . I knew Robert Pavioun when he was alive; I saw him the night before he was missed, but not that night - I was with him the night before Shrove - Tuesday, in John-street, and I think Taylor is the same gentleman that came up to Paviour - the man came out of Mr. Taylor's house - I had never seen Taylor but once before in my life; he lived at No. 27, next door to Mr. Paviour; I was on the other side of the way, coming home with my mother's bread, and saw the man come out of Taylor's house, and speaking to Paviour's boy - the person did not seen very pleased; I did not hear what he said; I saw Paviour's boy, as I was coming through Pitt - street, peeping through the key-hole of Taylor's door - the person came out about five minutes after that; I think the prisoner in the brown coat is the man that came out, but cannot say for certainty; the man held his hands, as much as to say "I will do something to you" warning him (holding his finger up) - I heard no words pass between them at all.

Taylor. Q.Was it an older man than me? because a schoolmaster lives up stairs? A.He was about your height, and in the same kind of dress; he did not touch

the boy - I saw the boy peeping through the street door, which was shut.

DANIEL WILLIAMS re-examined. On Monday morning, the 11th of March, I found in the canal the body of a boy, about twelve or thirteen years old; he had on a pair of speckled trousers, (pepper and salt or worsted,) a blue jacket buttoned close round, and no shoes nor slippers - he had stockings on, but no hat; I sent for the Police, and found both his arms were broken - I delivered the body to a Policeman, who is not here; I did not see the body before the Coroner - I should know the clothes again; by water the distance from the York and Albany public-house to where I found it is little short of half a mile, coming round by the water; there are no locks between the York and Albany and that spot - there may be some little shallows, but very little; the water is generally five feet deep about there - the barges draw about four feet of water there; the body coming in contance with a barge might drive it some distance - barges frequently pass up and down the canal; there is no raised water there - there is more draft of water where I found the body than at the York and Albany; the water runs both ways - the water would drift the body from the bridge towards where it was found.

WILLIAM FOREMAN. I keep a coal-wharf. I found a cap in Regent's-canal, the latter end of February - I do not know the date - I carried it home, dried it, and gave it to my mother - Keys, the constable, has it - I gave it to him; I found it between the top lock, and the first bridge going to Chalk-farm, facing the York and Albany, nearly.

FRANCIS KEYS. I am a constable of St. Pancras, From information I received, on Monday, the 11th of March, I took possession of these clothes, which I got from the body of the deceased boy Paviour, which was produced before the Counter.

DANIEL WILLIAMS. These are the clothes the boy had on - I know them very well by their appearance - the trousers were buttoned on; I only saw the jacket, waistcoat and trousers.

FRANCIS KEYS. I received a cap from Foreman, which I now produce; there is marks of blood on the back of the collar of this shirt, and on the hind part of the shirt tail, there is marks of blood just at the seat; the cap-lining had a mark of blood, and outside the cap there was the appearance of a blow - the cap is made of green cloth, and the nap appears to have received a sharp hit - and from the shape of the cap. and the lining, I should think the blow had been given on the forehead - and the blood in the lining comes just about the place where the appearance of the blow outside is; I saw the person of the boy before the clothes were taken off, about two hours or an hour and a half after it was taken out of the water; they were wringing wet, and had evidently come from the water - I saw it at the York and Albany public-house, in the morning, at half-past nine o'clock.

DANIEL WILLIAMS . I did not see the body afterwards at the York and Albany; I took no other body out of the water that day - I gave it to the Policeman and two men - they are not here, the Policeman has left the service; I took it out of the water about nine o'clock in the morning, and sent a person for the Policeman, who got two persons to take it to the tavern.

FRANCIS KEYS . I live near there, and hearing of this, went immediately.

MRS. PAVIOUR. I have looked at the clothes - they are the clothes of my deceased boy, which he had on at six o'clock on Shrove-Tuesday, when I left home.

MR. JOSEPH CURTIS . I am a surgeon, and live in Union-terrace, Camden-town. On Monday, the 11th of March, I was fetched to the York and Albany, public-house, about two o'clock, and saw the dead body of the boy - the clothes were then on his person; after they were removed I examined the body, and took notes of the examination; I conclude the fracture of the right arm had been effected before the blood had ceased to flow - that is not many minutes after death - the other might have been about the same period; a violent blow had been given on the right side of the head, and I should say it could not be given long after death, at any rate - it must have been inflicted while the blood was flowing, as there was extravasation - it was on the side of the head; I did not perceive much mark of a bruise; judging from the external and internal appearance, I should say decidedly, that the blow on the side of the head, if given during life, would have caused death; there were some indications of drowning, but I would not say they could not be caused by a blow, or apoplexy - there was no decided appearance of suffocation.

Q.Do you conclude, that either from the blow on the head, or that, and the drowning, the child had died? A.Certainly - I think the fracture of the arm could not be inflicted by a barge passing over the body in the water, as the bottom of the canal is very soft, and if it was done after the body was in the water, it must have been only a few minutes after; I should say the body had been in the water about a week, or it might be a fortnight - it certainly was not very recent; the eyelids were closed, which is not usual in cases of drowing, but that is not conclusive.

The witness read his notes, containing a detailed account of the post mortem examination, strongly stating particulars indicative of an abominable offence having been committed on the person of the child; which the witness stated must have been done not later than a day or two before death.

GEORGE BURROWS, ESQ. M. D. I am a physician, and live at No. 42, Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square. On the Friday after the Inquest I examined the body - I think it was on the 15th of March; Mr. Curtis had seen it before me, and he was with me at that time - I have heard Mr. Curtis' evidence; I concur with him in the external appearance, but he examined the internal appearances before me, and of course they were displaced before I commenced my examination - I do not know so much about them; I examined the hinder part of the boy very minutely, and suggested that they should be removed from the body for more minute examination - it is my opinion, from the appearance I saw about the fundament externally, and the gut internally, that some violence had been done to that part of the body previous to death - I observed the fractures of the arms, about the right arm there was the mark of a bruise, nearly the size of half-a-crown, and a considerable discolouring; and it was of that nature which I believe could not have been made after death; or if so it must have been while the blood was in circulation in the

smaller vessels; it could not have been made after the heart ceased to bleed - we divided the skin off the head, and, as far as I could judge, the appearance corresponded with what Mr. Curtis stated - I think the boy must have received a blow on the head, which stunned him, or probably killed him, and subsequently to that the arms were broken, but whether he was immediately afterwards thrown into the water there is nothing to enable me to say - the blow was quite sufficient to have stunned him and produce death, but I cannot say he might not have recovered from it - nothing that I saw or have heard detailed, except these two causes, can account for his death.

ROBERT PAVIOUR. I saw the body before the Coroner - it was my son Robert's body: I first saw the body about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 11th - the clothes were on then, it was my son's body.

PATRICK CRAWLEY. I knew Robert Paviour when he was alive; I saw his body at the Albany on the 11th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning - I did not know the body then; I told three or four men there that I did not know the body, but I would go and bring his parents - there was a canvas bag over him, it had been thrown over him - Wiggens saw the same body; I fetched him, and was with him - he saw it in my presence.

WILLIAM WIGGINS . I went to the York and Albany - I saw the body, and recognised it as the body of the deceased Robert Paviour; it was about twenty minutes to eleven o'clock.

Murchell's Defence. Two witnesses can prove where I was on the Tuesday night, and on Saturday night, the 23rd.

MARY ANN KENT. I am Marchell's landlady, and live at No. 5. Warren-street, Fitzroy-square; my husband is a shoe-maker. Marchell came to me last October, and he was lodging with me on the 19th of February; he was at my house on the 19th of February, between six and seven o'clock in the evening - he could not go out after that without my knowledge; he came in between six and seven o'clock - he did not go out before eleven, which was the time I retired; I recollect this by a funeral which he told me of on the Sunday before - his wife and him came to lodge with me together, in October; he has one child.

MR. CLARKSON. Q.Was he acquainted with Taylor? A. I believe not before the funeral - it was Taylor's wife's funeral; I believe he became acquainted with him by going to his wife's funeral to assist; he told me he was to have 2s. 6d. for carrying the corpse, and when he got there he was too short - I never saw Taylor at my house; I believe Marchell is supported by his wife - she had money when she left her situation, as housekeeper, to a gentleman in Hanover-square; he was never out later than ten or eleven o'clock - I heard of the Inquest, but was not told to attend: I was first asked to be a witness the week before last - Keys called at my house after Marchell was in custody, and asked if I could tell where he was on the night of the 19th of February; I said, I could not tell - he came abruptly to me - but when I recollected the funeral I remembered it was on the Tuesday following - Keys called six, seven, or eight times.

Q.Did you not tell him, on every occaion, that you could not tell about his being at home? A.He only asked me about that the first time, when he took Marchell - I told him, when he called afterwards, that I recollected he was at home; he often went into Marchell's apartment without speaking to me; my husband was not at the home on the 19th, he was out of town - I am not obliged to say where, it is not a fair question; he was in the Marshalsea prison - I had three lodgers besides Marchell; I cannot say whether any of them were at home that night, but Marchell's apartments joined mine; and he never had a key - I went to bed about eleven o'clock; I have not told an untruth by saying my husband was out of town - for the Marshalsea is not in town.

Q.Has not Keys repeatedly asked you where Marchell was on the night of the 19th, and have you not as frequently told him you could not tell? A. I do not know that he ever asked me more than once or twice; I was flurried when he came to apprehend Marchell.

FRANCIS KEYS . I know Mrs. Kent's house in Warren-street; I did not apprehend Marchell there - I took him at a public-house near there; I saw Mrs. Kent both before and after I took him, I asked her where Marchell was on the evening of the 19th of February; she said she did not know that - sometimes he slept out and sometimes at home; she invariably gave me that answer.

NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS GOODE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-108
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

779. THOMAS GOODE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of a man whose name is unknown , from his person .

JOHN ROGERS . I am a Policeman. On the 1st of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the corner of White Hart-court, Lombard-street , with another, following a gentleman up Lombard-street, and watched them; the other attempted to take the gentleman's handkerchief first - he took a handkerchief part of the way out of the gentleman's pocket, but did not get it quite out; then the prisoner took it quite out, and ran across the road with it - I went after him and secured him; I looked every where for the gentleman, and could not find him - I do not know his name or residence; I found the handkerchief on him - it is the same colour as that taken from the gentleman; he said it had been given to him - his companion went in a contrary direction.

The prisoner put in a petition for a lenient sentence.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

GEORGE EWER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-109
VerdictNot Guilty

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780. GEORGE EWER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , 2 pair of shoes, value 7s., the goods of William Josiah Mellidge , his master .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM SMITH, WILLIAM WADDILOVE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-110
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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781. WILLIAM SMITH and WILLIAM WADDILOVE were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Charles Greville Prideaux , from his person .

CHARLES GREVILLE PRIDEAUX. I am a student at law , and live at No. 15, Calthorpe-street. On the 30th of March I was in Fleet-street ; I did not feel my handkerchief taken - I received information, felt my pocket, and immediately missed it - I knew I had it on my person an hour before; it was produced to me, and I am certain it is mine - I know it by its appearance and wear; I am not aware that I saw the prisoners.

WILLIAM CUTTRISS . I am a City Policeman. On the 30th of March, between two and three o'clock, I was near St. Dunstan's church, and saw the prisoners, in company with another, following Mr. Prideaux and a gentleman who was with him; I saw Smith draw the handkerchief from Mr. Prideaux's pocket, and hand it to Waddilove - I immediately crossed over, and seized both of them; Waddilove immediately dropped the handkerchief by his side - I stooped and picked it up; I told a person to call Mr. Prideaux, which he did, and he claimed the handkerchief.

Smith's Defence. I was looking for a situation, and in Fleet-street this young man was before me. The Policeman took us, but I was not in his company.

Waddilove's Defence. I had nothing about me.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

WADDILOVE - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

MARY COLLINS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-111
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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782. MARY COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of March , 3 sixpences, 16 pence, and 7 halfpence, the monies of Robert Barnes Twelftree , her master .

JANE TWELFTREE . I am the wife of Robert Barnes Twelflree; we keep the King's Head public-house in St. Paul's Church-yard . The prisoner was in our employ; I was informed by a neighbour that I was being robbed daily, and next night when I went to bed I counted the money in the till in the bar - I counted it the last thing at night on the last day of February; the bar was kept locked, and I kept the key in the bed-room - there was 14 1/2d. in copper in the till at night, and next morning there was only 2 1/2d. remaining; and on the following night, the 1st of March, I counted the money and marked it - there was 2s. 6d. in copper and three sixpences in silver; I am quite sure I locked the bar - I came down about eight o'clock in the morning; my sister came down before me, and opened the bar door - the till was not locked; I examined the till when I came down - and the silver was gone, and only 4d. remaining in copper; I sent for an officer, and told him I suspected one of my servants - the prisoner was searched, and the whole of the marked money was found in her possession; she said she had taken it the week before in exchange on Ludgate-hill - she lived with me about ten months; I had a good character with her - I have lost several things while she has been with me.

HENRY KERRIDGE . I am an officer. I was sent for, and had the three servants up; I began to search the prisoner first - she immediately put her hand into her bosom, pulled out a paper and said, "I have money here, but it is my own;" I opened it, and the three sixpences and halfpence were all in it - every one of them was marked very particularly; they are all marked differently - I found on her twelve penny-pieces and seven halfpence; I took her to the Computer, got a woman to search her, and she found four penny pieces and three halfpence in her stays.

MRS. TWELFTREE. I have made different marks on the different coins; I am positive of them.

Prisoner. I am very sorry for it; it is my first offence - I have been fourteen years without father or mother.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

JOSHUA MOORE.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-112
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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783. JOSHUA MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , 48 yards of woollen cloth, value 22l.; 22 yards of kerseymere, value 5l., and 2 yards of canvas, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Worster Chandler .

SECOND COUNT, stated them to be the goods of Henry Kipping .

HENRY KIPPING . I am a carman . On the 15th of March I was employed to take some goods from Mr. Chandler's, at the George Snow-hill; they were packed in bales - I had them in my waggon; they were going to Leeds, in Yorkshire - I received them about ten o'clock in the morning; the prisoner is a stranger - I was going with them to the Bull and Mouth; I had two more smaller trusses; when I got a little distance down Aldersgate-street I missed them - I was driving the waggon, and walking by the side of the horses; this truss laid at the back of the waggon - I did not see the prisoner till he was at Guildhall, which was the same day, and the truss was produced, and contained woollen clothes; there was a little boy, about five years old, in the cart.

JOHN ARCHER . Kipping informed me he had lost this bale about a quarter to eleven o'clock; I was at work in Jewin-crescent, saw the prisoner run into a yard, and flag down the bale behind a gate, and then he tried to pull the gate too - he went and beckoned to a person dressed like a gentleman, and said, "Come along with it," and he (the prisoner) took it away; I went across the street and told my master I was sure they had not come by it honestly - I was not present when the prisoner was secured; I saw him in custody the same day.

JAMES WARD . I am a builder. In Consequence of information I followed the prisoner till he got into Monkwell-street; there was another man, more of a gentleman than himself; I think he suspected we were following him, and turned short round a corner - the prisoner popped into a public-house with the truss, and the other we lost in a moment; I went in and took the prisoner - I heard the truss fall on the floor of the public-house before I got in; I asked him where he got the truss - he said he found it; I went out to look for the other, but lost him - when I came back the prisoner said the gentleman put it on his back and wanted him to carry it, and told him to go into the public-house and have some beer; he said he was to carry it with the gentleman - he did not say where.

Prisoner. I put it on the table, and told you I was ordered to carry it by a gentleman, who was just gone down the street. Witness. I swear it was on the taproom floor.

STEPHEN POWELL . I took him into custody; he said he was employed to carry it by a gentleman - I opened it; it contained woollen cloths, and it had an invoice in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to St. Luke's workhouse at a quarter to eleven o'clock, to take my wife some tea and sugar, and as I came round Jewin-crescent, to inquire at Mr. Warner's for work, a gentleman said, "Will you carry this parcel for me?" I wished to earn a shilling, and said Yes - he said, "Take it up that gateway for a few minutes, till I come to you;" which I did - he then came, and said "Bring it along;" and in Monkwell-street

he said, "Go and get a pint of beer and I will follow you;" in two minutes the Policeman came and took me.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS HOMER.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-113
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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783. THOMAS HOMER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Wippell , from his person .

JOHN WIPPELL . I am a coal-merchant , and live at Red Lion-wharf, Wapping. On the 3rd of April, between one and two o'clock, I was in Thames-street , just before the Custom-house; I thought I felt something at my pocket - I turned round, and the prisoner had got my handkerchief in his hands, doubling it up; he saw me, and dropped it - I followed him, calling Stop thief! and he was stopped on St. Dunstan's-hill; it was safe not ten minutes before.

ROBERT HOWARD . I am an officer of Tower ward. - The prisoner was delivered to me with the handkerchief; I have had it ever since.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman was on the other side of the way; I saw a boy attempt his pocket - I crossed, caught hold of the boy, and he threw the handkerchief at my feet, and ran away - I ran after him, and the gentleman took me.

MR. WIPPELL. It is utterly false - there was a boy near him, who went away; he did not state this then.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for 14 Years .

MARY ROBERTS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-114
VerdictGuilty
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

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784. MARY ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , 5 1/4 yards of diaper, value 4s. 9d., the goods of Charles Terry ; and that she had been before convicted of felony .

CHARLES TERRY . I am a linen-draper , and live in Aldersgate-street . On the 6th of March the prisoner came into the shop alone, about half-past four o'clock - she bought 1/8 of a yard of muslin; that came to about 2d. - then she asked for some flannel, and while the shopman was getting it I happened to look off some goods I was measuring, and saw her convey something from the counter - I turned to the shopman, and asked what he had left there- he said Nothing; I detained her, and she produced this diaper from under her apron, which I should sell for 4s. 9d. - she said she had picked it off the floor, which she could not have done, for ten minutes before I had placed it under the flap of the counter, to press it.

ROBERT SPENCE . I am a Policeman. I was sent for, and took charge of the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT REED. I am a Policeman. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction in July last - (read) - I am certain she is the person; she was recommended to mercy on account of her youth.

GUILTY Aged 11. - Judgment Respited .

ELIZABETH BAKER, ANN MAY, JANE DAVIS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-115
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty; Not Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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785. ELIZABETH BAKER , ANN MAY , and JANE DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of April , 3 shawls, value 3s. , the goods of William Barwick Brown .

GEORGE WILSON . I am in the employ of William Barwick Brown, of No. 104, Minories . On the 3rd of April, between three and four o'clock, the prisoners came into the shop together, and looked some at shawls; no other customers were near them; I showed them a great many shawls - they bought none; I observed Baker move her clothes, which caused me to suspect them - they left without buying any thing, and I missed one shawl; one of them said the shawl was for her mother, and they agreed that the mother should come herself about it - I went after them, and found them together ten or twelve yards off; Baker dropped three shawls as I tapped her on the shoulder - I took them back; I am certain all the shawls were master's; they had a private mark on them - they said nothing.

JOSEPH STONE . I am a constable. I was sent for - the prisoners denied the charge; the shawls were delivered to me.(Property produced and sworn to).

May's Defence. I was not with Baker when the gentleman came up to her - she was by herself.

Davis's Defence. This young woman asked me to go with her to buy a shawl; I did not know what she had done.

BAKER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

MAY - NOT GUILTY .

DAVIS - NOT GUILTY .

HENRY PETTIT.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-116
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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NEW COURT. SATURDAY, APRIL 13TH.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

786. HENRY PETTIT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , 3 frock bodies, value 10s.; 1 veil, value 1s.; 2 pairs of stockings, value 10s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s., the goods of Charles Bowen and another, his masters .

CHARLES BOWEN . I live at Reading , and am a linen-draper , in partnership with Henry Bowen . The prisoner was in our employ in February last, and had been so about two months; he left us about the 13th or 14th of February- I was not aware of the loss of this property till I received a letter from Mr. Thomas - I then missed it.

THOMAS ANDREW. I am shopman to Mr. Boyce, of Theobald's-row, a pawnbroker. The prisoner came on the 14th of February, and produced this veil and two pairs of stockings, which he pawned in the name of John Johnson .

MR. BOWEN. I believe these to be mine, but cannot swear to them.

JAMES ATTFIELD (Police constable F 67). On the 18th of February I was on duty in James-street, Covent-garden - the prisoner came to me, and said he wished to give himself into my custody, as he had robbed his employers at Reading, of two lace squares, two pairs of stockings, and six yards of lace - I took him to the station, and he there said he had left a trunk at the Horse and Jockey, at Reading, to be forwarded to the White Horse-cellar - he told me he had pawned some things at Mr. Boyce's; I found the trunk at the White Horse-cellar, with this direction on it "Mr. H. Petch, London, to be left till called for at the office;" the prisoner gave me the key of it - I opened it, and found these other things in it.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Six Weeks .

JOHN CARTWRIGHT.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-117
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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787. JOHN CARTWRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , 61 lbs. of sugar, value 1l. 5s., the goods of Mary Ford ; and that he had been before convicted of felony .

ISAAC JOHN ISAACS (Police-constable H 69). On the 18th of March I was in Cable-street , at half-past nine o'clock - I saw a waggon at the corner of a street - the prisoner and two other men were with it; it stopped, and the men all got on the waggon - I watched them, and saw them opening the bags of sugar, taking out sugar from them, and putting it into a bag, which I have here - they were in the waggon a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes; the prisoner then got off - the other men remained on some time longer - they then got off and the prisoner got on, and put this bag of sugar on one of the other men's shoulder; they were taking it off - I went up; they dropped it - I took it, and secured the prisoner.

MARY FORD. I sent the prisoner to St. Katharine's-docks for a number of mats of sugar, for Messrs. Goodheart, on the day in question; I was sent for to the station, where I saw the waggon and the mats of sugar, five or six of which had been opened - the sugar found in this bag corresponds with that in the mats; there are 61 lbs. of sugar, worth 5d. per lb.

THOMAS GARTON. I am an officer. I got this certificate from Mr. Clark's office - I was present when the prisoner was tried in the name of John Tingay, in September, 1827 - he is the same man; he was tried for stealing sugar, and sentenced to be transported for seven years.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

MARGARET LENNESS.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-118
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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788. MARGARET LENNESS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , 1 coat, value 5s. , the goods of Edward Jones .

JULIA WELCH . I was servant to Mr. Edward Jones , of Sydney-street, Goswell-street - the prisoner had been servant there before me, and was still in the habit of coming as a char-woman . On the 7th of March I went up stairs to call her down to dinner; I saw something hanging under her gown - when she came down, I told her her petticoat was longer than her gown; she then went out the back way, came back, and went away out into the street - what I saw was something of a drab cloth.

MARY JARVIS . I live in Foundery-court, Golden-lane. I found a duplicate in a pair of stays, in the bed where the prisoner slept, in consequence of which I got a coat, which I carried to Mr. Jones.

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAINE . I am a dyer, in the employ of Mr. Brown, in Sydney-street, next door to the prosecutor's. I was in the yard one afternoon, the prisoner handed me a kind of drab coat over the pales - she told me to put ut in doors, and she would call for it in the evening, which she did.

EVAN DAVIES (Police-constable G 192). I apprehended the prisoner - she said she never took Mr. Jones' things; I received this coat from Mrs. Jones, and I heard the prisoner tell her she never took any thing but the coat; she said she had pawned it for 1s., and that the duplicate was at her lodging.

JULIA WELCH. This is my master's coat.

Prisoner. I did it from want; I did not receive my wages regularly, but only 1s. at a time, or half a crown.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined One Month .

JOSEPH MUNSHALL.
11th April 1833
Reference Numbert18330411-119
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

789. JOSEPH MUNSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , 9 shillings , the monies of William Ekins .

SARAH ANN EKINS . I am the wife of William Ekins , publican , of