Old Bailey Proceedings.
29th October 1829
Reference Number: 18291029

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Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
29th October 1829
Reference Numberf18291029-1

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SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., MAYOR.

EIGHTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 29th DAY OF OCTOBER, 1829, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By H. BUCKLER.

LONDON: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY HENRY STOKES , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED BY G. HEBERT, AT HIS LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE.

1829.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM THOMPSON , M. P., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir James Allan Park, Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; William Heygate , Esq.; and Anthony Brown , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City; Sir Peter Laurie , Knt.; and Charles Farebrother , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Lloyd Richard Beale ,

Edward Lake ,

William Float ,

Thomas Brockelsby ,

James Caldicot ,

John Poulton ,

Benjamin Crees ,

Charles Wedge ,

Charles Gould ,

Joseph Searl ,

John Dewis ,

David Dewar .

Second

James Faine ,

Richard Llewellyn ,

Thomas Chandler ,

Michael Ballard ,

Starr Wood ,

Thomas Savage ,

William Papperill ,

Edward Payne ,

William Wilson ,

Joseph Dunn ,

Daniel Alder ,

Richard Barton .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

William Trimmer ,

Thomas Thomas ,

Wm. Sidney Toone ,

George Vinal ,

Joseph Sanders ,

George Stevenson ,

James Wood ,

John Thomas ,

John Weale ,

Thomas Wells ,

George Shillibeer ,

William Stevens .

Second

James Tupman ,

Giles Woodyer ,

Edward Wynn ,

John Tavenor ,

Charles Turner ,

John Taylor ,

William Taylor ,

Thomas Toovey ,

Robert Spencer ,

William Ullathorn ,

Thomas Witherby ,

John Walker , Jun.

Third

William Storker ,

John Stevens ,

Thomas Seagrave ,

Richard George Spice ,

Richard Seaking ,

Joseph Storton ,

John Wickstead ,

Samuel Wilston ,

Abel Wright ,

William Williams ,

Thomas Sherwin

George Sands .

Fourth

Charles Bennick Stray ,

Zechariah Watkins ,

William Stratford ,

Joseph Tyler ,

William Upperton ,

George Wood ,

John Wilson ,

William Thomas ,

John Smith ,

Alexander Wylie ,

William Sims ,

John Westley .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 29, 1829.

THOMPSON, MAYOR. - EIGHTH SESSION.

GEORGE CLAREMONT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-1
VerdictNot Guilty

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OLD COURT.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Justice Park.

1842. GEORGE CLAREMONT was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , 1 coat, value 4l.; 1 cloak, value 2l.; 4 pairs of trousers, value 2l.; 5 waistcoats, value 10s.; 4 shirts, value 1l.; 4 cravats, value 4s.; 1 ring, value 1l.; 2 pins, value 7s.; 4 razors, value 4s.; 1 case, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s., and 1 guineas, the property of William Nicholson , in the dwelling-house of Richard Yeo .

WILLIAM NICHOLSON. I lodged at the Manchester coffee-house, Manchester-street, Marylebone . I went out of town at the latter end of May, leaving my clothes locked in my portmanteau, and some in the drawers which were not locked; I returned in a fortnight, found my portmanteau broken open, and missed the property stated - a cloak was taken from the drawers; my things were worth more than 10l. - I have found none of them.

CAROLINE YEO . My father kept this coffee-house; the prisoner came to lodge there on the 1st of June, and left on the 5th - he occupied the same room as Nicholson; I saw the portmanteau in the room on the Thursday, while the prisoner was there, as I was helping to make the bed- it was locked then; I examined it, as the prisoner was a stranger: the prisoner was at home almost all day on Friday, in the bed-room; he said, about five o'clock, he thought he should leave that night, and about eight he went - he brought nothing in when he came to the house- he brought in a shirt and handkerchief one day, and gave it me to carry up to the room; I saw him go out on Friday afternoon with a middling sized bundle - he might have come in and gone out again, when I was not in the bar.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Had you any female servants in the house? A. Only one, at that time - how often he went out on Thursday I cannot say; he might have gone out when I was not in the bar, and brought in a bundle; I believe the prosecutor's was a military cloak - the bundle he took out was not so large as that; my father has since discharged a chamber maid, because she did not suit us - not on any suspicion.

FREDERICK RICHARD YEO . The prisoner lodged at my father's house; I saw him there frequently - I remember his going away; I saw him take a bundle out - it was large enough to contain a coat, but I think not a military cloak- it was tied in a red and black silk handkerchief; it was too large to contain only two shirts.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know whether the servant discharged attended on the prisoner? A. She made the bed and cleaned the room - the bed room door was never locked; there was no other lodger - the prisoner could often have taken things in when I was not in the bar.

COURT. Q. Your father had but this one maid servant? A. No - a man attended in the bar.

JAMES STROWGER . I lived at Yeo's, and cleaned the boots - he does not keep the house now - I seldom went into the bed-rooms; I never went into the bed-room while the prisoner lodged there, nor when Mr. Nicholson did - I have seen the prisoner go out two or three times with bundles, but never saw him bring any thing in; I did not see him after he left, till the 1st of October, when I met him in Seymour-place, Bryanstone-square, and was certain of him- he went into the Prince Regent in Seymour-place; I went and staid at the bar a few minutes - the prisoner was looking through the blinds into the street; I asked him to step outside, as I wished to speak to him - he asked what I wanted; I asked him if he did not sleep a few nights at the Manchester coffee-house, near Manchester-square; he said No, he did not know such a place; he came out - he said he had been abroad eight months, and had just arrived in England - I asked him two or three times to go with me to master's, but he refused; he said he had got other business to do, and walked towards Edgware-road; I said he had better go with me if he was so confident he was not the man - he said he should not do any thing of the kind; that he should return in about an hour, if I would go back to the Prince Regent, for he had taken lodgings there; I saw two new Police-men, and gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. This was four months after the robbery? A. Yes; I never found the room door open when I took up the boots.

COURT. Q. You never carried any of Mr. Nicholson's clothes out of his room? A. No, I was never in the room.

RICHARD YEO . I kept the Manchester coffee-house. -I was not in the room during Mr. Nicholson's absence; I am certain the prisoner is the man who lodged there from the 1st of June to the 5th - he breakfasted and dined at our table - my daughter was present.

Cross-examined. Q. He paid his account? A. Yes.

I had failed twelve months before this time, and was put in to carry on the concern for the benefit of the estate, under a bond of 1000l. to leave the premises as I took them; I was not a bankrupt. The prisoner left a bundle at the bar, in my care, when he went away, and called for it in an hour or two, in my absence.

CAROLINE YEO . That is the bundle I saw him take away - he had left it in the bar.

WILLIAM FYSON . I am an officer of the new Police. Strowger gave the prisoner into my charge; he at first refused to go with me - as we went along I asked if he had any knowledge of this Manchester coffee-house; he said No - when I turned the corner of the street, and got within sight of the house, he said, "Oh, if that is the house, I may have resided there - I believe I have;" I took him into the room, and Mr. Yeo said he was the person who robbed the house - he said he lived at Liverpool.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to lodge at this house, and took a shirt, cravat, and stock; I went out about six o'clock in the evening, and bought two flannel waistcoats and two shirts, which I left in the bar - on Wednesday I took out a flannel waistcoat, shirt, and cravat, which I changed in Leicester-square, where I took a bath; I bought some hosiery on Thursday, and took to the house, and next morning bought more things, which I took there; I had taken my place to go into the country - I gave this bundle to the landlord, expecting a friend to call, but he did not, and about eight o'clock I fetched it away; when the witness accosted me, I did not recollect the name of the coffee-house - he asked if I did not live there in April - I said I was in Amsterdam then; he would not tell me what he wanted, and I refused to go back with him, but told him he would find me at the Prince Regent public-house in the evening - when I saw the house I recollected lodging there.

WILLIAM YEO ."Manchester coffee-house" is painted on my house.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN DUFFY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-2
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1843. JOHN DUFFY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Greenaway , on the 23rd of September , at St. Pancras , and stealing therein 1 clock, value 7s., and 1 shirt, value 1s., his property .

WILLIAM GREENAWAY . I am a labourer , and live in Mr. Herbert's cottage, Camden-town , in the parish of St. Pancras. On Wednesday evening, the 23rd of September, I went out at half-past six o'clock; my wife had gone out before me - I locked the door, and put the key in a secret place for her when she came home; the window was quite as safe as it had been for twelve months - it is a sort of casement window; I had nailed it up - part of two squares were broken in it; I had covered them with canvas, and pasted paper inside to keep the wind out. I left a clock close to the window, behind the door, and a shirt in the room; I heard something had happened amiss before I came home: I have known the prisoner six years - his father used to work with me; I met him about ten o'clock that night, told him my house was broken open, and I had a strong suspicion of him - he denied it, and I gave him in charge; he was taken to the watch-house - Jessopp, the watchman, searched him, in my presence, and found 1s. 6 1/2d. in his right-hand pocket, and in his fob a duplicate of a shirt.

CLARISSA GREENAWAY . I am the prosecutor's wife -I went out at half-past four o'clock, on Wednesday afternoon; I returned at seven, found the key in the place we used to leave it, and found the door locked, but the window broken open; there was plenty of room for a person to get in - I missed the clock and shirt: I have known the prisoner some time - this is the shirt (looking at one produced by Reeve) - I made it myself, and have repaired it; I left it in a little trunk when I went out - here is the clock, which I am quite sure is ours; we have had it four years - I used to wind it up.

WILLIAM GREENAWAY . This is my shirt - I am certain of it, and this is the clock.

WILLIAM JESSOPP . I am a watchman. I received the prisoner in charge at Camden-town, and took him to the watch-house - I found this duplicate of a shirt on him.

BENJAMIN BIRDSEYE REEVE . I am shopman to Mr. Lowther, a pawnbroker. On the 23rd of September, about six o'clock in the evening, I received this shirt in pawn from the prisoner, for 6d. - I am positive of him; I gave him this duplicate.

ANN BANNER . I live in Henry-street, Hampstead-road, and keep a small broker's shop. On the 23rd of September, about half-past seven or eight o'clock, I bought this clock of a person, whom I believe to be the prisoner; I saw him in custody next morning, and had no doubt of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the things; I was at my master's, and as I came home in the evening I met Greenaway, who gave me in charge for breaking into his house.

The prisoner's father gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

MARTHA GEARY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-3
VerdictNot Guilty

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

1844. MARTHA GEARY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , 2 sheets, value 8s.; 8 napkins, value 7s., and 22 table-cloths, value 6l. , the goods of the Earl of Aberdeen and others, to whom she was a servant.

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD MACGRATH. I am secretary to the AEthenium Club, Waterloo-place ; the Earl of Aberdeen is one of the trustees. The prisoner was appointed housekeeper to the club about five years ago, and an inventory of the linen was given into her charge; she had no authority to dispose of worn out linen.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are the initials of the club on the linen? A. Part of it is marked"Society," and part "Ethenium;" I marked off some linen as old and unfit for use. The prisoner had a good character from General Stapylton.

MR. LEE. Q.Was any of this linen marked off as old? A. I cannot tell till I see it; on the two last occasions that any was marked off, I objected to it being worn out too soon - she showed me some table-cloths, which she said could be cut into napkins, and used as dusters.

MARY GRAY . I am a charwoman, and was employed at the club-house by the prisoner. She sent for me about nine o'clock one morning about two months ago, and asked me to show her where her nephew lived; I went and

showed her the house, in Parker's-court, Drury-lane - she said she did not know where he lived, as he had moved; his name is James Roberts - I bought a pair of sheets of her in Bollond's presence, about twelve months ago; she said they were given to her, but did not say who by - I shewed her the club mark on them: I bought them with three blankets and fourteen yards of quite new bad furniture - I bought some table-cloths and napkins of her two years ago- I sold Ann Hood two table-cloths for her, the same day as I received them, I think.

Cross-examined. Q. You only think it was on the same day? A. Yes - it was the last thing I had to sell; when I bought the sheets I told her there was a mark of the club on them, and if any thing should happen I should say I had them from her - I cannot read, but I had seen the linen so much, I knew the mark: she said they belonged to the club, and were given to her by the club, or I would not have sold them - I sold the table-cloths for 2s. - they were very old; I gave her the money.

ANN HOOD . I bought two table-cloths of Gray for 2s., in July; the word "Society" was on them, and a date - I cut them into child's napkins; three of them are here - they were very old; there is no mark on these.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you use them? A. Yes - they were very old.

WILLIAM BALLARD . I am an officer. I was fetched to the AEthenium; the prisoner was called in before the committee - no threat or promise was made: I told her I was an officer - that the committee had reason to believe she had taken things belonging to the club, and sent them out of the house - that she need not answer any question unless she pleased - I said, "Have you sent any thing out?" she said, "No, I have not;" I said she was suspected of taking sugar, tea, meat, and things; I asked if she had sent out any linen - she said not; I then asked if she knew Mrs. Gray - she said she did know her; I said, "Have you not sent linen out by her?" she said she had not, nor had she sent any thing by her - Mrs. Gray and the linen were then brought into the room; I said," Do you mean to say you have not sent that out?" she said, "Oh, that was old linen, and I thought I had a right to it;" that Mr. Macgrath had looked it out, and put it by- Macgrath said, "Never such linen as that;" the napkins were not produced.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Did you ask if she had sent out old worn-out linen? A. No - she denied having sent an article out; she said nothing about perquisites - the napkins are old, but fit for the use they are now made for; she said she had herself cut them into napkins.

MRS. HOOD. I cut the two table-cloths up myself.

MR. MACGRATH. I cannot swear to these napkins.

NOT GUILTY .

MARTHA GEARY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-4
VerdictGuilty > theft under 40s
SentenceTransportation

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1845. MARTHA GEARY was again indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July, 1824 , 9 sheets, value 3l.; 14 pillowcases, value 2l.; 3 napkins, value 3s., and 1 towel, value 1s., the goods of Granville Anson Chetwynd Stapylton , Esq. , in his dwelling-house .

GENERAL GRANVILLE ANSON CHETWYND STAPYLTON. I live in Somerset-place, Strand . The prisoner was about six years in my service, at Hadley, and Somerset-place, as housekeeper - she bore the best character possible; when she left my service, by her own desire, I allowed her to remain in the house for a few days: I went out of town at the end of June, or early in July, till October - when I returned she had left; she went to the AEthenium without any intermediate service: the linen had been put away in a press, and was examined about a month after we returned - a considerable quantity was then missing; we did not suspect her till the discovery at the Ethenium, when I was sent for to Marlborough-street, and a great quantity of linen shewn to me, some of which I can positively swear to, being marked with my initials; I lost the articles stated in the indictment, among others - the value of them is about 5l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This was five years ago? A. Yes; I only know the quantity of linen missed, by what I was informed by my daughter, who is absent.

WILLIAM BALLARD . When I apprehended the prisoner I found these nine sheets, three napkins and towels, and fourteen pillow-cases, in her box at the AEthenium; when I found the sheets with C. S. on them, I said, "Whose service were you in prior to coming to the AEthenium?" she said General Stapylton's - I said, "Then these are General Stapylton 's sheets;" she said, "No, they are not"- I said, "Whose are they?" she said that they were her husbands's brother's, and after that, that they were her brother's; I said I was satisfied they were General Stapylton 's, and took them away - she was committed for reexamination, and before she went into the office, at the second examination; I told her General Stapylton had been written to, and had answered that he had been robbed of a large quantity of linen, and was coming to town to look at this - she then said Mrs. Stapylton had given it to her.

GENERAL STAPYLTON . Here are my initials on them, and what I was accustomed to see on my linen - Mrs. Stapylton died about fourteen months before the prisoner left my service.

Prisoner's Defence. I said they were my brother's, because I was frightened at the time, and did not know what I said - but Mrs. Stapylton gave them to me.

GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 39s.) Aged 66.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS TUOVEY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-5
VerdictNot Guilty

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Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1846. THOMAS TUOVEY was indicted for that he, upon Richard Painter , feloniously and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, did stab and cut him in and upon his arm, with intent to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable or to do him some grevious bodily harm.

RICHARD PAINTER. I live in Little Dean-street, Westminster, and am a labourer . The prisoner sells roasted potatoes about . On the 5th of October I went into the Rose and Crown public-house, Dartmouth-street ; I got up and stood on a coal-box to light my pipe by the gas - the prisoner was in the room, trying to sell his potatoes; a drunken coal-heaver reeled against me, and knocked me off the box against the prisoner, who had a knife in his hand to cut his potatoes; I made my way to get from him, but he followed me across the room with the knife; I had

got about two yards from him, and he stabbed me with the knife - I put up my arm, and received it in the arm; I had had no dispute with him - it was all on a sudden; I was not hurt much.

NOT GUILTY

JAMES MITCHELL.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-6
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

1847. JAMES MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , at St. Pancras, 2 coats, value 4l.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1l.; 1 waistcoat, value 8s.; 2 shirts, value 8s., and 7 handkerchiefs, value 5s., the goods of Samuel Phillips , in the dwelling-house of John Bloomfield .

SAMUEL PHILLIPS . I now live at Uxbridge, but at the time in question I lodged at John Bloomfield 's, Gray's Inn-road , in the parish of St. Pancras. The prisoner lodged in the same house, and slept in the same room, in the next bed: another person had slept in the room, but he left at five o'clock in the morning; I always sleep there when I come to town, and did so on the 26th of September - the prisoner had come there on the 22nd, stating that he worked for Mr. Cubitt, and was recommended by Cubitt's men to lodge there; I heard him say that: I got up at seven o'clock on the morning of the 26th, leaving him in bed in the room - he was awake; I asked him if it was not time for him to rise - he said he should get up directly; he had come to my bed at five minutes past five o'clock that morning, and told me it was past six, and time to get up; when I went down stairs I left two coats, a waistcoat, a pair of trousers, two shirts, three neck-handkerchiefs, and four cotton ones, all in a cupboard by the side of my bed - it was not locked; I missed them about six o'clock that afternoon - the prisoner was gone, without paying the landlord, and did not return; I never saw him again till I took him at Pimlico, about two o'clock on the 29th, which was the Tuesday following - I told him I had been looking for him ever since Saturday night; I took him to Queen-square, and gave him in charge to Woodbury, who searched him in my presence, and found three handkerchiefs in his hat, two of which were mine, and what my things had been tied up in the cupboard; I lost a drab great coat, nearly new - I gave 3l. 10s. for it, and have not worn it twenty times; a black coat, quite new, which cost 3l. 10s. not three months before - I had worn it four times; the waistcoat was new, and cost 12s., and the trousers 26s.; the handkerchiefs are worth about 5s. together, and the shirts 8s. at least. I have found nothing but the handkerchiefs.

Prisoner. The handkerchiefs are my property.

WILLIAM WOODBURY . I am an officer of Queen-square. I took the prisoner in charge, and found three handkerchiefs in his hat - the prosecutor immediately claimed two of them; the prisoner denied the charge.

SAMUEL PHILLIPS . I know these handkerchiefs - there is more than one mark on them, and a bit torn off the edge, and one has some blood on it, which dropped from a beef steak.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to lodge there, but on the morning the prosecutor went away I got up shortly after him; the waiter was sweeping the door when I went out- I went to look for work; Mr. Cubitt's foreman told me to call on Monday, and when I went he could not put me on - I went to Camberwell, got employ at a coal-shed, and the man gave me a bed at his house.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth and character.

JAMES BERTRAND.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-7
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1848. JAMES BERTRAND was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Sturdy , on the 21st of September , and stealing 1 coat, value 7s., and 1 hat, value 2s., his property .

WILLIAM STURDY . I lodge in Dorset-street, Spitalfields , and am a silk dyer - my landlord, Mallison, lives in the house; I have only one room - the prisoner is my wife's brother. On the 26th of September I went out at six o'clock in the morning, padlocked my door as usual, and left nobody at home; I returned at seven in the evening, and unlocked the door, which I found as I had left it, but on going in I missed the hat and coat, which I had left safe in the morning - I received information, apprehended the prisoner, and asked what he had done with my goods, and if he had pledged the coat - he voluntary said No, that he had sold them both, down Petticoat-lane; I have not found them - he did not live with me.

PETER ADAMS . I lodge in this house. On the day Sturdy lost his things I saw the prisoner in the yard - he asked me if his brother had been home to dinner; I said I had not seen him, and did not think he had - Sturdy's is the back room on the ground floor; I went up to my apartment, and heard the prisoner go into that room - I thought he had the key of the door, and took no notice; I left my room, and saw the prisoner in the room - I went out, and when Sturdy came home I told him the prisoner had been into the room; he missed his things - I was at home from the time the prisoner was there till Sturdy came home, and if any body else had gone into his room I should have known it.

JAMES BROWN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge, and asked what he had done with his brother-in-law's coat and hat - he said he had sold them both in Petticoat-lane; he did not know who to.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY (of stealing only) Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH OXLEY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-8
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

Related Material

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1849. SARAH OXLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Stratford , on the 13th of October , at St. Luke, and stealing therein 2 gowns, value 20s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 4s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 18d.; 1 yard of cotton, value 8d., and 1 handkerchief, value 3d., the goods of Elizabeth Stratford .

ELIZABETH STRATFORD. I am single , and live with my father Robert Stratford , at No. 13, Little Arthur-street, St. Luke's . I have known the prisoner six years, by lodging in the neighbourhood - she is single; I do not know what she is - I met her in Whitecross-street on Monday, the 13th of October, about a quarter-past three o'clock in the day time; she asked if my father and mother were well - I said they were very well; she asked if my father was at home - I said No; she said "Is your

mother?" I said No; she then asked if she might come home to my place - I said, "Yes, Sarah, you may - I am going to wash, will you come with me now;" she said No, she was going to Old-street-road with a cap - when I got home I was talking to a neighbour - a little girl came and said something, and when I got home I found our room door, which is on the first floor, unlocked; I had left it locked - the landlord does not live in the house; there are two lodgers - we pay 2s. 6d. a week; only my father, mother, and myself occupy that room - we have but one room; I went into the room, found my box open, and missed a gown, a pair of shoes, a yard of cotton, a pair of stockings, and a yard of blue cotton out of it - also a gown and a handkerchief out of a bundle on the bed; I am seventeen years old, and go to service, but was then out of place, and merely waiting there till I could get one; I pay nothing for my lodging - I keep my wages, and bought my clothes myself; I did not see the prisoner that evening - I had been absent about three quarters of an hour; Hands, the officer, took me to the pawnbrokers, where I saw my things, on the Friday - I lost them on Tuesday, the 13th; I was with Hands on Thursday when he took the prisoner - she said she would go and shew him where she had pawned the things; I found every thing but the stockings.

MARY GOODE . I live at No. 116, Goswell-street - my husband is a pawnbroker; I manage the business. I have two gowns, a piece of cotton, and a handkerchief, pawned for 5s., by a female, in the name of Ann Smith , No. 4, Compton-street, on Tuesday, the 13th, before one o'clock; I have not the slightest recollection of her - I gave her a duplicate.

JOSEPH BOOKER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker. On Wednesday, the 14th, a pair of shoes were pawned with me by a female, who I do not know; I think it was the prisoner - I gave her a ticket in the name of Betsey Smith, No. 18, Arlington-street, Clerkenwell; Hands and the prosecutrix claimed them next day.

EDWARD HANDS . I am an officer of St. Luke. I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday night, about half-past ten o'clock, in Fan-street, Goswell-street, at her mother's; I went with the prosecutrix into her mother's room - she asked the mother where her daughter was; she pointed to a little girl - Stratford said that was not the one; I said to the prosecutrix, "Are you sure she is here?" she said Yes, and the landlady said so too; I searched, and found her under the bed, with her clothes off - when she came down stairs she asked where I was going to take her; I said to the watch-house - she then said, "I will go and shew you where the pawnbrokers are where I pawned the things;" this was near eleven o'clock - she shewed me the witness' shops; I asked what she had done with the duplicates - she said she had torn them up, and thrown them into the kennel. GUILTY - DEATH Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be her first offence.

JOHN TOWERS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-9
VerdictNot Guilty

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1850. JOHN TOWERS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ellen Nagle , on the 2nd of October , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, 3 half-crowns, 2 penny pieces, 3 halfpence, and 1 farthing, the monies of Isaac Nagle .

ELLEN NAGLE. I am nine years old, and live with Isaac Nagle, my father, in Lower Chapman-street . On a Friday evening, about four weeks ago, my mother sent me to get some things out of pawn; she gave me a sovereign; I went to the pawnbroker's, and received in change three half-crowns, two penny pieces, and three half-pence farthing; I looked at them in my hand after I got out of the shop, and while I was doing so at the bottom of the street, the prisoner, came up, and said, "Mr. Latter says he has given you the wrong change;" I said, "No, Sir, I have got it right;" he knocked me down, forced my hand open, and took the money out - I was looking at it when he came up; he had a black crape on his hat: when he got the money he ran away - I got up, and ran after him; a witness came out of a house, and asked what I was crying for - I told him, and he followed; I had not lost sight of him - the young man brought him back in about half an hour; I had seen my mother before that, and told her he had a black crape on his hat, and so he had when he was brought back - I took sufficient notice of him to know him again, and think he is the same person; his face looked liked the face of the man, and he had a crape round his hat - he was within sight when I told the young man what had happened; I saw him afterwards before the Justice, and think he is the man; half a crown and three halfpence were shewn to me, as taken from him - there was a new halfpenny among it, and so there was among the money taken from me; it was such a new halfpenny as I was looking at.

FREDERICK JOHN SMEETH . I work at Billingsgate, and live in Lower Chapman-street. On Friday, the 2nd of October, between five and six o'clock, I was coming out of my door, and saw the prisoner running away very quick; I saw Nagle crying, and asked what was the matter - she said she had been robbed of three half-crowns, and some half-pence; I concluded it was him, by his running so fast - I pursued and overtook him, in about ten minutes, in Fieldgate-street, and gave him in charge; he had joined another person before I overtook him, and they were walking deliberately together - the prisoner is the person I first saw; he had a crape round his hat.

WILLIAM STRONG . I am an officer, and received the prisoner in charge. I found a half-crown, and 3 1/2d. loose in his jacket pocket; the child pointed out a new halfpenny before the Magistrate - her mother said, in his presence, that she had described him as wearing a crape hatband.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was brought back, the girl said, "That is not the man who robbed me" - a boy came up, and said a woman was looking out of window, where it was done; he sent for her, and she said it was not me, it was a man in a fustain jacket; the girl said at the office, there were two of us, that I had a fustain jacket, and when I crossed over I pulled it off, and gave it to the other, who put it on.

FREDERICK JOHN SMEETH . I never heard her say he was not the man.

WILLIAM STRONG . The child did tell the Magistrate the prisoner had a fustain jacket, and there was one or two more; she described the prisoner as the one who took her money - he had a green cloth jacket when he was taken. NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS KIRKMAN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-10
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

1851. THOMAS KIRKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 watch-case, value 7s.; 1 watch movement, value 7s., and 3 watch-makers' tools, value 5s., the goods of George Paull , his master .

GEORGE PAULL. The prisoner was in my service, as a journeyman watch-finisher . On Tuesday the 15th of September, I delivered him a silver watch-case, and a horizontal movement; he was to take the case to the maker's, to have the pendant soldered on, and to get a pendulum spring to the movement - he absented himself for eight days after, during which time I repeatedly called at his lodging, and saw his wife, but could not see him; on the eight day, the officer and I watched the house, from eight o'clock till one in the morning, when he came home, and was taken - he lived at No. 21 Earl-street.

HENRY ROLLS . I am a servant to Ashman and Son, pawnbrokers, of Long-acre; I have a watch-case, pawned on the 15th of September, by a female, for 6s. 6d., in the name of Elizabeth Brown , No. 21, Earl-street - I saw her at the office, and understood her to be the prisoner's wife.

PETER DIXON . I am a pawnbroker. I have watch movement, pawned for 4s., by a woman, in the name of Mary Brown , No. 21, Earl-street; I knew her before as a customer - I saw her at the office.

JOHN ANDREWS . I am an officer. On the 24th of September, at one o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner at No. 21, Earl-street, when he came home; Mr. Paull gave him into custody - I asked if he knew any thing of the property he had taken away; he said it would be forthcoming in the morning, and he should not tell me any thing at all about it - his wife gave me the duplicate of the case and movement next morning; he told me his wife had got them.

HENRY ROLLS . This is the duplicate I gave her.

PETER DIXON . This is the duplicate I gave her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in Mr. Paull's employ when he gave me the property; he had not sufficient work for me, and wished me to get other work: the case belonged to a repeater, which he wished me to finish - I was distressed, and pawned them, not intending to rob him, but to save my wife and children from being turned into the street; he said if I would tell him where it was he would not proceed.

MR. PAULL. I did not promise not to prosecute; I told him if he gave me the duplicate that night I would not, but I did not then know he had robbed me of my tools - he was still in my employ; I was paying him wages- I settled with him every Saturday, but he generally drew all his money before; he had 28s. a week, and his tea - I was not in his debt at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

DANIEL LEWIS, GEORGE LEWIS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-11
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation; Not Guilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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First London Jury - Before Mr. Recorder.

1852. DANIEL LEWIS and GEORGE LEWIS were indicted for killing and slaying Nancy Jones .

THOMAS PORTER . I am a surgeon, and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 24th of September , about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Nancy Jones - she was in a dying state, and vomiting blood very much, which would be the consequence of having been run over; she died in about two minutes, in consequence of the injury received.

ROBERT BISHOP . I live at Highgate. I was in Sun-street , and saw the prisoners fighting - the deceased was standing on the curb, two or three yards off; I saw Daniel make a blow at George, who ran back a yard, and knocked two children off the curb-stone - one of them was thrown under the fore wheel of a waggon, which was at that time in motion; the fore wheel went over its leg- the child in excruciating agony turned on its back, and the hind wheel went over its chest; she appeared about five years old - it was impossible for the waggon to stop; the child was taken to Mr. Porter's - I secured Daniel; George went away - I afterwards went to Mr. Porter's, and the child was dead.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.Did you see a basket there? A. A basket stood there; I do not know who it belonged to: Daniel had his face to the child, who was about a yard from them - he made a blow at the other, who reeled back against the child, who he could not see; Daniel has lost one eye - the carter could not see the child fall; her being knocked down was quite accidental.

COURT. Q. Had the carter got beyond the child, so that it was between him and the fore wheel? A. Yes, and his back was turned towards her; she was about two feet from the cart.

THOMAS WILSON . I am a boot-maker, and live in Paul-street, Finsbury. I was crossing, and saw the prisoner Daniel sparring with a shorter person, who either from a blow, or to avoid one, staggered against two children, one of whom fell, and the fore wheel went over her; they appeared to be sparring in anger - one was striking the other; the hind wheel also went over the child - there were seven or eight children looking at them.

Cross-examined. Q. What reason had you to think they were in anger? A.They appeared so; a basket stood on the curb - I did not see any walnuts taken from it; I did not know that any blows were struck - they were holding up their hands, and the shorter one was retreating from the aim; Daniel struck a blow, but whether it hit the other I do not know.

WILLIAM GARRATT . I live Dyer's-court, Long-alley. I was standing at the corner of Sun-street, about twenty yards from the waggon; I heard a cry, and on turning round, saw the child on the ground, and the wheel going over it; she was called Nancy Jones.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you hear many persons call her so? A. Yes, six or eight; she was called so in her mother's presence, in the doctor's shop, once or twice - I carried her to the doctor's.

THOMAS NOTTAGE . I am servant to Mr. Roberts. I was in Bishopsgate-street, and saw some apples in the road- the prisoner George picked them up, and asked Daniel how much they had lost; he said 3d., and that he had a basket of his, and he would have it - George said he should not; Daniel went to get a knife, to cut it from another it was fastened to - George went to push him down, and in the scuffle, George knocked two children down; one was taken to the surgeon's - Daniel tried to pick it up, before the second wheel went over it, but could not, he was so confused; he was attempting to strike George, who held up his hand to prevent the blow - but I cannot say he attempted to strike.

Cross-examined. Q.He could not see the child? A. No; it was done in an instant.

THOMAS CHISNELL . I am a painter. I was standing at the bottom of Sun-street, and saw some apples laying in the street; George picked them up, and dared Daniel to kick them down again - he said he would cut the string of his basket, and got a knife, but did not cut it; they seemed to be striking one another - I was about half a rod off, but could not see for the crowd; I saw Daniel raise up - two children were coming by; George knocked the child under the wheel - he did not see the child; he knocked it down with his back: it was thrown under the wheel by Daniel - I thought it appeared as if he was reaching after the other.

Cross-examined. Q. You are positive Daniel knocked the child down? A. Yes; I saw no blows struck.

COURT. Q.Did you see them fighting? A. I saw them struggling, and thought they were striking one another.

JOHN STARLING . I was driver of the waggon; my back was towards the child - I turned to see that neither of the prisoner's should get by the waggon, and saw two children on the ground, and this accident-happened.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am a street-keeper. I found Daniel in custody of the mob; I took him to the watch-house, and his first words were, the sooner I took his brother, the better, or he would be on the tramp: I went to Angel-alley, and took him.

Daniel Lewis' Defence. I saw my brother with my basket, and asked how he came by it - he said he got it from his mother; I caught hold of it, and accidentally knocked down his apples - I went to slap his head, but whether he knocked the child down, I cannot say.

DANIEL LEWIS - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Fined 1s. and Discharged .

GEORGE LEWIS - NOT GUILTY .

ROBERT BROWN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-12
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1853. ROBERT BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , 1 lb. of segars, value 10s., and 1 box, value 6d. , the goods of William Pluncknett Micklam .

WILLIAM PLUNCKNETT MICKLAM. I live in Fleet-street . On the 23rd of September, as I had just sat down to breakfast, I saw the prisoner come into the shop; I rose to serve him, and as I went out of the parlour door, I saw him go out very quick, with a box of segars, which I saw on the counter about a minute before - I followed and stopped him by my private door, in Fetter-lane; he kicked against a scraper, and fell down with the box -I gave him in charge.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

SOPHIA JEFFERSON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-13
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1854. SOPHIA JEFFERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 15 yards of muslin trimming, value 8s. , the goods of Thomas Hall .

THOMAS HALL . I am a linen-draper , and live in Bishopsgate-street . On Monday evening, the 5th of October, the prisoner was in the shop; I received information, and went round the counter, to see if I could observe any thing between her muff, and a picture frame, which she had, but she kept it so, that I could not see - while I was speaking to her, she had occasion to use her handkerchief, and instead of putting it up to her face, she put her face down to it; I then went and waited till she came out of the door - I asked her to allow me to satisfy myself, as my young man had said something; she lifted up the frame, and the muslin trimming was there - she said she did not know it was there.

ROBERT APPLETON . I am in Mr. Hall's employ. The prisoner came in; I shewed her some muslin trimming - she placed her muff, and a paper parcel on the counter, before her, and after shewing her two or three pieces of trimming, I observed her put something under the parcel- she wanted two yards of trimming; we do not cut less than three - I informed Mr. Hall; she left without buying any thing - she was brought back, and fifteen yards of trimming, worth 8s., taken from between her muff and the frame; two yards would come to 1s. 1d.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I took charge of her, and the trimming; she said she had not stolen it - 1s. 6d., and a number of duplicates were found on her; I think she said she had not enough money to buy more than two yards.

Prisoner's Defence. He would not cut less than three yards; I only wanted two - he left me and went to his master, who came and said he could not sell less than three- I said I had not sufficient money; he said he thought he had a remnant of half a yard - I said that would do; they looked about, but could not find it - I had my muff on one side of me, and the frame on the other; I took up the muff from my handkerchief, but never saw the trimming - I used my handkerchief, put it into my muff, went up the shop, and said to the gentleman, "Then you will not cut it;" he said, No - then seized me, and asked if I had not a bit of trimming with the frame; I said "Not to my knowledge" - I lifted up the frame, and saw it, but declare I did not know it was there, or I had plenty of time to put it into my muff. GUILTY . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Fourteen Days .

WILLIAM SMITH.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-14
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1855. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 coat, value 2l.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of William Dorling .

WILLIAM DORLING . I am ostler at the Four Swans, Bishopsgate-street . These things were in a gentleman's chaise, which stood under a shed, and were under my care- I went down the yard to finish my dinner, and saw the prisoner, who was a stranger, going up the yard with a black coat on; there were two coats in the chaise - he went towards the privy; I turned in again, and saw him come by the window, with a light drab coat on - I went after him; he got out, crossed the road, and ran - I ran, and collared him, with the coat on his back - the gloves and handkerchief were in the pocket; the owner would charge me two guineas if it was lost.

JAMES FREEMAN . I am an officer, and took him in charge; he said he did it through poverty.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

ANN BERRY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-15
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1856. ANN BERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 2 bed-curtains, value 1l.; 2 1/2 yards of drapery, value 6s.; 4 sheets, value 12s., and 1 shirt, value 3s., the goods of William Creed , her master .

WILLIAM CREED . I am a tailor and draper , and live in Abchurch-lane . The prisoner was five weeks in my service; I had a good character with her from Mr. Parker. On the 29th of September we missed a bottle of rum - she was so drunk she could not stand: we searched, and found some duplicates of property belonging to Mr. Parker, and duplicates of my property in her possession, for the bed-curtains, drapery, four sheets, and a shirt.

WILLIAM LANE . I am servant to Mr. Creed. I found part of the duplicates on the floor under the prisoner's bed, on the day she was intoxicated - she was the only female servant.

JOHN CLIFFORD REYNOLDS . I am apprentice to Mr. Smith, a pawnbroker, of High-street, Borough. I have two bed-curtains, two sheets, a shirt, and part of some bed furniture, pawned at different times; I took in the two sheets from the prisoner, in the name of Ann Payne , Long-lane, for 6s.; the others were not pawned with me; this is the duplicate I gave her for the sheets - the other is a duplicate of our shop.

JOSIAH EVANS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge - she was intoxicated.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

JAMES SMITH.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-16
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1857. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Bell , from his person .

WILLIAM BELL . I live in Duke-street, Aldgate, and am a tailors' cutter . On the 2nd of October, at twenty minutes past six o'clock in the evening, I was on the righthand of Fleet-street , going westward, and between St. Dunstan's church and Temple-bar; I am positive I had a handkerchief in my pocket - I felt something at my pocket near Chancery-lane, and immediately after found my handkerchief was gone; I turned round, and nobody was near enough to take it but the prisoner - I attempted to lay hold of him, seeing him putting something into the left breast of his coat; he ran about forty feet - I took him, and at that moment my handkerchief dropped at his feet: a handkerchief was found on him, which he said was his own.

THOMAS LIGHTFOOT . I am an officer, and received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

JAMES BROWN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-17
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1858. JAMES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 5s., the goods of Robert John Shedder , from his person .

MR. ROBERT JOHN SHEDDER . I live in Bedford-square. On the 9th of October, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was going home, walking with my father, and at the bottom of Snow-hill , he said, "Have you lost any thing?" I turned round, and my handkerchief was gone - the witness immediately gave it to me; I collared the prisoner - I cannot say whether he was nearest to me.

ROBERT FRAZER . I am a labourer in the London-docks. I was on Holborn-bridge, and saw Mr. Shedder; I did not see the prisoner near him, but saw him throw the handkerchief down close at my feet - nobody was pursuing him; three or four young lads were just before him - he was trying to make his escape: I collared him, and took the handkerchief up - Mr. Shedder owned it when he turned round; I was merely passing along.

JOHN HOLLAND . I am a street-keeper. I saw the prisoner standing at the end of Fleet-market, alone; I watched him for ten minutes - I saw him follow Mr. Shedder and a gentleman, and attempt his pocket; he did not succeed at first - I was crossing to see if he had picked the pocket, but a coach passing prevented me; when I got over I found him in custody - the handkerchief was delivered to me; the prosecutor's initials are on it: he tried to get away - I took another person, knowing him to be a suspicious character.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near the gentleman - there were four people between me and him; it is false to say he saw me for ten minutes: I had just come from St. Katharine's-docks.

JOHN HOLLAND . I am certain I saw him close to Mr. Shedder, and touching his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

LEWIS PHILLIPS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-18
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1859. LEWIS PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 12 pairs of shoes, value 16s.; 1 pair of boots, value 3s. 6d., and 1 pair of boot-legs, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Gibson .

ROBERT GIBSON. I am a shoemaker , and live in Goswell-street. I left this property in the care of Mrs. Dawson, at the Three Compasses, Houndsditch .

ELIZABETH DAWSON . I keep the Three Compasses. -Gibson left a parcel in my bar in a bag; I saw it safe about ten minutes before it was taken - the prisoner was in the house, and I served him with half a pint of beer at the bar door, not ten minutes before the bag was missed; I was very busy, as it was a clothes-fair; he was gone when they were missed - the bar door was open; any body could step in and take it.

Prisoner. I left a bag with her on the Monday - she told me to put it down. Witness. Never - if he left one there I never saw it; several bags were there - people are in the habit of leaving them.

MOSES BARNETT . I am a carver and gilder, and live in Redcross-street, Borough. I was at the public-house, and saw the prisoner at the bar door; Mrs. Dawson asked me for some halfpence to give him change, which made me notice him - I went into the yard, and shortly after was asked if I knew the man who had been at the bar; I went to look after him, and found him in Mr. Wilson's shop, Holborn-hill, that day - the boots and shoes were on the floor, by the side of the bag; I called him, and gave him in charge, saying he had stolen them - he said nothing then- Wilson keeps an open shop, and sells shoes.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me in the bar with a bag over my shoulder? A. No; I saw no bag - I did not notice when you went out.

ABRAHAM COLEY . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in charge with the property; the prisoner said they were his own.

Prisoner. I said I had bought them; I have sold the prosecutor many a pair.

ROBERT GIBSON . These are my boots and shoes, which I left in Dawson's care; they are old ones, which I purchase - I swear positively to them; I swear to every one of them - I do not remember buying any of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to buy clothes; people buy and sell in the house - I asked Dawson to mind my bag; there was another bag brought to the office, which I had left - she said she supposed it was what I had left: I came in and asked her for my bag; she said, "There it is, take it;" I staid there half an hour - I walked away with it, thinking I had old shoes in my bag, and took them to Wilson's.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

THOMAS BAKER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-19
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

NEW COURT, First Day.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1860. THOMAS BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , 12 pairs of boots, value 5l. , the goods of Joseph Reeve .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARY HULBERT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-20
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1861. MARY HULBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 4 pairs of shoe soles, value 2s., and 3 pieces of leather, value 10d. , the goods of John Bull and Edward Bull .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Fourteen Days .

DANIEL MANSFIELD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-21
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1862. DANIEL MANSFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , 4 half-crowns, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence , the monies of Philip Lawton .

PHILIP LAWTON . I am a pawnbroker , and live in Green-street, Leicester-square . On Monday, the 7th of September, I lost this property, and on Tuesday morning, Linscott, my foreman, gave me information; I called the prisoner into the parlour, and said I had been told he had robbed me - he denied it; I said I must search his pockets, his drawers, and his box, and if he objected to it I would send for an officer - he hesitated, then put his hand into his pocket, and took out a duplicate, which Linscott said he had taken and put into his pocket, that it might be written off in the book; when he gave the duplicate, I said,"Where is the money?" he gave no answer, but I found in his pockets two sovereigns and 1ls.; I questioned him about it, and he had about 13s. more than he could account for - he then said, "Sir, this 9s. is all I have ever taken from you - I put the halfpenny in the till."

Q. Did he hand over any money? A. Yes, three half-crowns and one sixpence; he said one of the shillings was the one, but he could not say which - I did not say any thing to induce him to confess.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You are sure you did not tell him if he would give you information you would not prosecute him? A. No, I did not - he had been about ten months with me.

THOMAS LINSCOTT . I am in Mr. Lawton's employ; the prisoner was in the same service. When an article was redeemed he should put the money into the till: I had settled the account on the Saturday night, with the prisoner, but on the Tuesday morning I called for the account again, and noticed the prisoner abstracting this duplicate; he saw me, and desisted, but I missed it afterwards, and named it to Mr. Lawton, who called the prisoner into the parlour, and he ultimately took the duplicate from his waistcoat pocket; he said it was the first money he had taken - I did not miss the money from the till; I took the account of the cash that day, but did not notice this morning what it was.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prosecutor say he would not prosecute him if he would confess? A. No - I was not there all the time.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 6 Months .

BARNETT MAGNUS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-22
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2863. BARNETT MAGNUS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , 1 coat, value 30s. , the goods of Benjamin Webb .

MARY WEBB . I am the wife of Benjamin Webb, who is a beadle - we live in Martin-street . The prisoner was quite a stranger, but I called him on the 14th of September to buy two coats of me - he bought one for 6s. 6d.; the other, which was a beadle's coat, he said was too dear - I asked him 2l. for that; 1l. 13s. had been offered me for it before - it had gold lace on it; when he laid down the 6s. 6d. for the other coat I was looking at the money, and he took the beadle's coat and left the one which he had bought of me - I did not miss it for an hour, till my husband came home; the prisoner had a brown coat, sewn in the sleeve with light thread - he lifted up his arm, shewed it to me, and said he was a very poor man; I met him on the Wednesday, and accused him of it - he said he knew nothing of me, and never bought any thing of me; I am positive he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? A. No - these old-clothes men are very much alike; I did say when I saw him that he was not the man, but I had not then had a good look at his face - I looked at him in the face, and then said he was the man; the beadle's coat was provided by the parish, but it is allowed to my husband - the prisoner gave his address correctly.

COURT. Q. How came you to say he was not the man? A.Because I was not sure, and he had not the same coat on - I do not swear to his coat, but to his features.

GEORGE OWEN . I am a constable. The prisoner was given to me - he told the prosecutor where he lived, and I went and searched his lodgings.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I went to where the prisoner said he lived, and found this old coat between the bed and the mattress.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you with your wife when she met the prisoner? A. Yes - I asked if she knew that man; she said, "I think that is the man, but I will not be sure" - I said, "Look at him, and be sure;" then she looked at him, and said, "He is the man, I could swear to him if I were on my death bed" - she was about four yards from him at first.

MARY WEBB . This coat which was found, is the one

he wore when he bought the coat of me - our coat has never been found.

NOT GUILTY .

FRANCIS HARTWELL.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-23
VerdictNot Guilty > fault

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1864. FRANCIS HARTWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , 2 stomach pumps, value 6l. , the goods of John Read and James Scott .

The goods in question being obtained by false pretences, under circumstances which only amounted to a misdemeanor, the prisoner was detained to he tried at Clerkenwell for the offence, and on this indictment. ACQUITTED .

JOHN PHILLIPS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-24
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1865. JOHN PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 guitar, value 4l. , the goods of George Rathmaker .

REBECCA SPICER . I live with George Rathmaker , a musical instrument-maker , in Charles-street, Soho . The prisoner came on the 20th of October, and said his name was Phillips, he was organist of Greenwich, and he wanted to hire a guitar for three hours; I said I could not let him have it, as Mr. Rathmaker was not in the way- he stood some time, and asked for a glass of water; I got him one - he drank it, and asked for another; I got that, and he asked for a third - when I got that he was gone, and the guitar he had been looking at; I ran out and gave an alarm - he returned with the guitar, and went into the next shop.

Cross-examined by MR. DUNN. Q. Had he not more time to run away the first time you went for the water, than afterwards? A. Yes, as I had to get the glass ready; there was no other person in the shop - when he came back with the guitar he said he had gone after a friend; I thought he was a singular character when I saw him in the shop.

MATTHEW DULLEY . I am one of the new Police. On the 20th of October I saw the prisoner at the top of Oxford-street, about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's - he had a guitar in his hand; a little boy gave me information - I went to the prosecutor, and found the prisoner in the next shop with the guitar; he said he only took it to run after a friend.

Q. You found him returned with it? A. Yes, but when I first saw him he was going from the house - he must have gone round to have returned.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .

HENRY FLOOD, MARY FLOOD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-25
VerdictNot Guilty

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1866. HENRY FLOOD and MARY FLOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 1 shirt, value 7s., and 1 gold pin, value 3s. , the goods of George Goulden .

GEORGE GOULDEN. I am a tailor , and lodge in Poland-street . I missed a shirt pin about the 15th of August, and my shirt I missed on the 30th; the prisoners lodged as husband and wife in the next room to me.

HERBERT JOHN CLARK . I am a pawnbroker. I have a shirt, pawned by the female prisoner on the 27th of August, in the name of Mary Flood - I have known her six or seven years.

GEORGE TURNER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Wood I have a pin pawned by the male-prisoner, I believe, on the 17th of August, in the name of John Moor , but I cannot be positive of him.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM BIRD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-26
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1867. WILLIAM BIRD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 2 pewter pots, value 2s. , the goods of George Osman .

GEORGE OSMAN . I keep the Horse and Groom in the Curtain-road . On the 8th of October the prisoner came to the bar, and asked for 1d. worth of beer - I served him with it, and he went into the tap-room; I saw him go out soon after, and a man called out that he had taken a quart pot - I went out, and saw him running; I took him - the officer found this quart pot in his hat, and this pint pot in his pocket.

Prisoner. I did it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

WILLIAM JOHNSON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-27
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1868. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 jacket, value 14s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1s.; 2 shirts, value 4s.; 1 hat, value 5s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 2s., the goods of Edward Wells : 1 watch, value 5l.; 2 seals, value 10s., and 1 piece of foreign coin, value 3d., the goods of George Tomlinson ; and 1 boat, value 10s. , the goods of John Nesbit .

JOHN EPTHORPE . I am a waterman. I saw the prisoner off Limehouse on the morning of the 29th of September, between three and four o'clock; he was in Nesbit's boat, and had a bundle with him - he was paddling with one paddle; I took him, and gave him to the constable.

JOSEPH ORGAN . I received the prisoner and this bundle from Epthorpe - I found the prosecutors; this watch and seals were in the prisoner's jacket.

WILLIAM JUDGE , I am an officer. I received the prisoner at the watch-house, and found this hat on his head - he said he bought it in Ratcliff-highway for 10s.

EDWARD WELLS . I am a sailor on board the Diana. This is my hat - I missed it at five o'clock in the morning, on the 29th of September; I know nothing of the prisoner.

GEORGE TOMLINSON I am mate of the Diana, of Scarborough. These articles are mine - they were safe at nine o'clock in the evening of the 28th of September, and this watch was in the binnacle; it is mine - no one could get on board without a boat.

JOHN NESBIT. I am a waterman . The boat was mine, and was safe at Pelican-stairs at half-past eight o'clock at night - the prisoner was taken with it about a mile from there.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN JEFFREYS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-28
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1869. JOHN JEFFREYS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 2 drinking-glasses, value 3s. , the goods of Edward Vale .

EDWARD VALE . I keep the King's Arms, at the corner of Moor-street, Soho . At half-past ten o'clock in the evening of the 15th of October, the prisoner who had lodged

there about three weeks, came in and asked if we could lodge a person he knew - I said not unless he paid what he owed; he said, then I will go and cadge for it - he then went into the parlour, came out soon afterwards, and went out - a person said, "He is stealing your glasses;" I went to the door, and the prisoner had his hat off - there was a person with him, who ran away - I took the prisoner, and found this glass on the threshold of the door.

SARAH ALLEN . I was at the house when the prisoner came in and asked if he could have a night's lodging for a friend; they said not without he paid - he said he would go and cadge for it; he went into the parlour and came out in five minutes - I saw him take two glasses from a shelf, and leave the house.

Prisoner's Defence. As I came out of the door, the prosecutor came and knocked my hat off; he said he suspected something, and he began to search me - some man then came in and said he found the glass at the door, leading up the other street; if there had been one in my hat, it would have fallen out.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

DAVID LLOYD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-29
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1870. DAVID LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 36 glass bottles, value 10s. , the goods of Samuel Smith .

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a surgeon , and live near the fourth mile-stone, on the Edgware-road . I missed some bottles on the 30th of September, from a shed, about three hundred yards from my house - it was not locked; they were such as we keep medicine in, not what we send it out in - they were safe the day before; I lost some fowls at the same time - I know nothing of the prisoner; these are the bottles.

PETER CONNER . I am a bottle dealer, and live at No. 10, Exeter-street, Lisson-grove. I have known the prisoner about three years; he keeps a marine-store shop , and deals in bottles - I went to his shop on the 1st of October; he said he had some likely to suit me, and reached me down these bottles, which are now in Court - we sorted them out on the counter; I asked what he wanted a dozen- he said 2s.; I said I would give 2s. a dozen for two dozen, and the others I would give 1s. 6d. for - his wife, who was in the parlour, said it was too cheap; I said I thought not, as they were inferior bottles, and the stoppers did not fit - I paid 1s. 6d. on the bottles, but did not take them then; I said I would call after dinner, but I did not call till next morning, and then I paid the money and took them away - these are the bottles; a Police-officer took me and found them on me, late in the evening.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe you were taken before the Magistrate? A. Yes - I then said I bought them of the prisoner; the prisoner came when he sent an officer for him - it might be near one o'clock when I was taken with them, in Baker-street, Portman-square; the prisoner told the Magistrate he knew me, but as to the bottles he knew nothing about them - I believe the worth of this bottle is about 4d.; if I gave an order for bottles I should be charged so much per lb. - there is no one here who saw me buy them, but I was seen to come out of the house with them; the prisoner said before the Magistrate he had not seen me at all at his house - I told the officer who I bought them of, the moment I was stopped; I have no business to tell whether I have been in trouble before.

TIMOTHY CANNING . I live at No. 26, Lisson-street. I know the prisoner's house; I saw Conner at his door with a basket in his hand - I do not know what was in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you known Connor before? A. Yes, about a year; I never heard of his being in trouble.

EDWARD BLAKE . I keep a shaving shop opposite the prisoner's; Conner came into my shop with a basket of bottles.

JOHN EDWARD WILDE . I am a tin-plate worker. I was in Blake's shop on that Friday morning; I saw Conner bring this basket of bottles from the prisoner's shop to Blake's.

MARY KENNY . I live at No. 22, Upper York-street. Conner's wife called on me on the 3rd of October, the day they had been before the Magistrate; I went with her to the prisoner's, he was at home - she said to him,"Did my husband buy some doctors' bottles of you yesterday morning?" he said, "Yes, and what of it?" "Nothing, (says she) but he was taken by one of the Police-officers, and is detained till you go to say you sold him the bottles;" the prisoner said, "Why could not he sell the bottles first, then go and drink."

Cross-examined. Q. Are you an acquaintance of Conner's? A. I have known him four or five years, but am no particular acquaintance; I do not know how often he has been in prison, for I have been in the country - the prisoner acknowledge he sold the bottles; I went before the Magistrate on the 3rd of October - I get my living by hard work - I do not buy bottles; Conner has been in that line - I cannot tell when I had work last; I have a brother who sends me money from India - I am a widow, and have three children; the families I work for are out of town-I have not had any thing for coming here; Conner was let loose after the prisoner was in custody.

ANN CONNER . I know Kenny; I went with her to the prisoner - I asked him if he had sold my husband any bottles; he said he did - I asked if he would come to the office; he said "Why did not he sell the bottles first, and go to drink afterwards?"

Cross-examined. Q. How often has your husband been in prison? A. He was in Tothill-fields prison for a debt of 30s. for my little child, which I put out to nurse- I have been married ten years; it was on the Saturday morning I called on the prisoner - he said at first he would not come, but afterwards did: my husband was discharged that day week - Mary Kenny was with me every day we were examined; I will swear she was there, and gave her evidence on the first examination.

JOHN HILL . I am a Police-officer. I apprehended Conner at one o'clock in the morning, in Baker-street, with two baskets of bottles.

Cross-examined. Q. It was at one o'clock in the morning? A. Yes; he said he bought them of David Lloyd - Conner had three examinations; Lloyd appeared on the Wednesday - I do not know whether he came voluntarily.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am a constable. Conner was brought to Marylebone office, on Saturday, the 3rd of October - it was stated that he bought them of the prisoner; some of his friends went to the prisoner's house, but he did not come - Stowell was sent to order him to the office, and he came; I went to the prisoner to see if I could get any more of these bottles, but I could not -Conner said they had been taken out of a fish-kettle; I saw two old fish-kettles there in the back yard, one is a very large one with a parting in the middle - when I went again on the Wednesday it was gone; the prisoner said he sent it away with some old iron.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the prisoner attend on the Saturday? A. Yes; he was sent for - these women appeared, but I cannot tell whether they were examined before the Wednesday; the prisoner was allowed to go home on his own recognizances - I went to fetch him on the Wednesday, and while I was gone, he came; I know nothing of Conner.

SAMUEL SMITH . These bottles are mine; they have the remains of some physic in them - I had some old fish-kettles there; I do not know whether I lost any.

Prisoner's Defence. I never sold the bottles, nor ever had them in my place.

THOMAS TOWNE . I was in the prisoner's service; on the Thursday before Conner was taken I saw him at my master's - he came for some draught phials, and had two baskets with him with something in them, but I do not know whether these are the baskets - he staid, I suppose, a quarter of an hour; I was paving in the yard, but I could see him - there was no sale of bottles of this kind, or I should have seen it; to my certain knowledge there were no such bottles as these in the shop - there are some fish-kettles there in which nails are put; I saw Conner go away and take the baskets which he brought - I took in the phials which he bought on the Friday; I had seen him before.

COURT. Q. Conner seldom came to the shop? A. He deals in bottles, and calls there sometimes - I went there on the 28th, but I have worked there before; I have seen Conner there twice - I do not know what was in his baskets when he was at the house - they were talking about the phials; he was to have them at 8d. a dozen - I took them on Friday, and brought my master the money - I never saw such bottles as these on my master's premises; I do not believe he would buy them, they are so very conspicuous - I have known him to turn away a great many things that came to the shop, because he was afraid they might be stolen - I never saw a doctor's bottle in his house; he deals in phials - these would not sell in his shop; he does not sell to doctors.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH McNAMEE.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-30
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1871. SARAH McNAMEE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 pair of trousers, value 1l., and 1 waistcoat, value 10s. , the goods of John Huntley .

JOHN HUNTLEY . I am an apothecary , and live in Duke-street . The prisoner comes occasionally to my house, where her mother resides; I lost these trousers from my bed, and the waistcoat from my drawer.

WILLIAM FOWLE . I live with Mr. Morris, a pawnbroker. This waistcoat and trousers were pawned with me by the prisoner, on the 14th of October.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Month .

GEORGE SHILLINGHALL.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-31
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1872. GEORGE SHILLINGHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 35 live tame fowls, price 3l. 10s., and 2 live tame geese, price 5s. , the property of Jeremiah Humphreys .

JEREMIAH HUMPHREYS . I live at Chingford-green, Essex . On the night of the 8th of October, or early on the morning of the 9th, my hen-house, which was locked, had been broken open, and between thirty and forty fowls taken; I have seen some of them since - the prisoner worked in the neighbourhood: they were safe on the Thursday night, at half-past ten o'clock.

THOMAS ATKINS . On Friday, the 9th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner standing by a man who was emptying a ditch; as we were approaching him he took to the field, and ran away - I saw him throw three fowls into a hedge; I pursued the prisoner about fifty yards, then came back, and took the fowls out of the hedge - this was about seven miles from Chingford. I knew the prisoner before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What became of the other man? A. He was emptying a ditch; I knew him - he was employed there; I do not know whether the prisoner spoke to him - a man named William Field was taken up for this, and Joseph Ford and Samuel Bigwell -I cannot tell how the prisoner came by the fowls.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer. I was with Atkins, and received the prisoner from a person who took him - these are the feet of the three fowls.

JEREMIAH HUMPHREYS . I saw the fowls, and could swear to two of them by their colour, and by having broken claws.

Prisoner's Defence. The fowls never were in my possession - I was in bed and asleep that night.

THOMAS POLLARD . I am a shoemaker, and live at Stoke Newington. The prisoner lodged with me about two months - on the Thursday night in question, I saw him at eleven o'clock, when I came in with a pint of beer; I asked him if they were all in - he said Yes; I locked and bolted the door - I had a pair of shoes to make that night; I began them at half-past eleven o'clock, and finished them about four - about three in the morning I went down, and asked him if he had a bit of candle; he jumped up in his bed, and told me to take it off the table - about five o'clock I went down again, to fill the tea-kettle, and saw him getting up, and putting on his smock-frock.

COURT. Q. Were you ever at Chingford? A. No - I did work at Mr. Plumber's, a shoemaker, at Laytonstone; I left the key of the door in the lock that night - my house is half a mile from Stamford-hill; I had nothing to do with the fowls - he left my house about half-past five o'clock on Friday morning; I did not give evidence before the Magistrate, but I was present. I am deaf, and did not hear when I was called.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH WILLETT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-32
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1873. SARAH WILLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 3 silver spoons, value 10s. , the goods of Frances Reyner .

FRANCES REYNER . I am single . I lost this property from the closet in the kitchen of my house at Stoke Newington ; the prisoner had come into my service on the Wednesday - I discharged her on the Saturday, and found the spoons in her box.

JOSIAS HOLMES . I am an officer. I was sent for - the prisoner denied having the spoons, but I found them in her box.

CATHERINE DAVISON . I was present when they were found.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN BURNHAM.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-33
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1874. JOHN BURNHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 2 boots, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas Saunders .

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I am a boot-maker , and live in Sherrard-street, Golden-square . On the 24th of October I went into the parlour to take my meal, and placed my chair so as to see into the shop; I saw three persons at my window - one of them came into the shop, took the boots, and gave them to the prisoner; I went out, and took the prisoner, who was walking along with them - the other two were walking behind him, so as to cover him; I gave the prisoner to the officer - these are the boots.

ISAAC STAINES . I am a Police constable. I came up, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and saw two men standing against the window - one of them accosted me in rather an abrupt manner; I went along the street, and heard a man running after me - I turned round; he dropped the boots, and ran off; the prosecutor then came up, and said they were his boots - I gave them to him: I had been drinking at the Queen's Head, and had had enough.

THOMAS SAUNDERS . They had never been on the ground; I took them as soon as the other gave them into his hands - he shammed drunkenness, but he was no more so than I am.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM BROWN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-34
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1875. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 pepper-box, value 7s.; 1 salt-cellar, value 6s., and 1 spoon, value 2s. , the goods of William Walker .

ANN WALKER . I am the wife of William Walker - he keeps an hotel in Green-street, Leicester-square . The prisoner, who was a stranger, came into the coffee-room on the 26th of September, and took these articles from the dining table - I missed them when he went, and sent a person after him; the property was found on him.

JOHN MORRISON . I am a tallow-chandler. I took the prisoner back to the hotel: he acknowledged taking these articles, and went to give them back to me, but I took him to the hotel.

JOHN HODGES . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 59.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM SMITH.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-35
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1876. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 book, value 4s. , the goods of John Thomas Cox .

JOHN THOMAS COX . I am a bookseller , and live in Red Lion-street, Holborn . I saw the prisoner on the 9th of October - he stopped half a minute at my window, and took this book from inside the window; I went out, and saw him running with it - I pursued; he threw it down, and I took it up, and still pursued him - he turned a corner, and I lost sight of him; I had taken notice of him, and am sure he is the man.

ROBERT DALTON . I was standing at my shop door in Red Lion-street, and saw the prisoner coming from Mr. Cox's shop - I heard a cry of Stop thief! I pursued, and took him, but did not see him drop any thing; he ran near half a mile - I saw Mr. Cox pursue him, and saw him pick up something.

JOHN MINIFIE . I am an officer. I pursued the prisoner, and saw him throw the book down; I lost sight of him, but saw him again.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Two Months .

THOMAS PHENY, JAMES JOHN TYLER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-36
VerdictsGuilty; Not Guilty
SentencesCorporal > whipping

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1877. THOMAS PHENY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 2 seals, value 3l.; 1 watch-key, value 10s., and 1 ring, value 10s. , the goods of John Hobart Caunter , and JAMES JOHN TYLER was indicted for feloniouly receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN HOBART CAUNTER. I lost a ring, two seals, and a key on the 26th of September, from Somerset-street , about eleven o'clock in the morning; I had seen them safe about ten - they were in a small compartment of a writing desk, in the parlour.

CHARLOTTE EVANS . I am servant to Mr. Caunter. On Saturday morning, the 26th of September, about half-past nine o'clock, Pheny came to the house with some fish; I said I thought it was a mistake, as there was none ordered - Miss James came out of the dining-room and said he might leave it or take it away, which he pleased - he left it and went away; he had not then been in any room - he came again in half an hour; I went up stairs to speak to Miss James, leaving him on the mat in the passage - I was gone about five minutes; when I came down I told him to wait a few minutes - a person came in, and I paid him for the fish; the parlour opened into that passage.

ELIZABETH JAMES . I am the prosecutor's niece. I was writing at the desk in the parlour - one seal with a crest on it was attached to the ring and key, and one seal was loose; Evans came and said there was a boy with some fish - I went and said I thought it was wrong; he might take it or leave it - he left it and came again; I was then in my bed-room - I had left the seals and key safe; I went out about eleven o'clock and returned about three; my uncle asked me if I had touched the seals and key - I said No; I saw Pheny the same evening; he had been brought to the house by his mother - I asked him why he had entered the parlour; he said he had not - I said it was of no use denying it - he then said he had taken them from the desk, and pointed to the place.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took Pheny - he said he had sold the articles at Mr. Jackson's, the corner of Chesterton-street and Maryle

bone-street; I went there, but Tyler was not there - I went to another house, and found him; I said, "I understand you have bought some seals to-day?" he said Yes, some common Birmingham things of a lad, resembling a sailor; I said, "What did you give for them?" he said 14s. - I asked what was the impression on them; he said one had a crest, and the other an arm - I produced an impression of the seals; he said that was right: I asked where they were - he said at Mr. Baylis', the pawnbroker; I went, and found them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Then he did not deny it? A. No - he said he bought them of a lad, who told him he had found them in some dirt or ashes.

SAMUEL SADLER . I am shopman to Mr. Baylis. Tyler pawned these seals, ring, and key, with me, on the 26th of September, for 1l.; if they are solid they are worth about 3l.

Cross-examined. Q. Would you like to give more than 1l. for them? A. If I was going to buy them, I perhaps might; I should not think these others are solid.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Tyler's Defence. I told the officer I gave 15s. for them - he knows I went with him freely; the lad came to me while I was working at my board: he said, "I have found two or three seals in some dirt, bigger than this one"- I said I could say nothing to it; he came in half an hour and brought them - he wanted 30s. for them; I kept him some time, while I tried them with aquafortis - I said I would not give more than 15s.; I gave him 2s. then, which I borrowed, and he was to come again for the rest, as I had no change - he came again just as I was going out.

PHENY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

TYLER - NOT GUILTY .

ANN TOWNSEND.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-37
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1878. ANN TOWNSEND was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 2vinegarettes, value 30s.; 7 rings, value 40s.; 11 watch-keys, value 40s.; 1 seal, value 12s.; 3 pairs of ear-rings, value 15s.; 5 breast-pins, value 20s.; 2 tea-spoons, value 8s.; 1 brooch, value 14s.; 1 pair of nut-crackers, value 5s.; 1 pair of snuffers, value 5s.; 1 snuffer-tray, value 5s.; 1 candlestick, value 8s.; 10 purse slides, value 7s., and 2 jewel-boxes, value 5s., the goods of James Rutland , her master .

JAMES RUTLAND. I am a silversmith , and live in Oxford-street . The prisoner was occasionally employed as monthly nurse ; she had been at my house within a month of the 10th of October; I saw these articles at Marlborough-street, and knew them.

JOHN ANDREWS . I am an officer. On the 10th of October I took a part of these articles from the prisoner's person; this vinegarette and four pins I found in her box at a relations', where she was lodging - she said, "They are all my own;" I went to the watch-house, and asked her how she came in possession of the property - she said they were given to her by a Mrs. Smith, a casualty sort of acquaintance, to whom she had lent 10l., and who, she believed, was then at Birmingham; she afterwards said she was very sorry, and it was all Mr. Rutland's, except the linen - I found duplicates on her which led to some of the articles.

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bulstrode-street. I have three rings, some ear-rings, and trifing things, pawned by the prisoner, on the 26th of February; a tea-spoon, a pin, and a brooch on the 16th of December - she said her name was Harris, and she was sent by a person named Smith, of No. 83, Mortimer-street.

JAMES SPENCER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have a ring, pawned by the prisoner, on the 28th of March.

JOHN WORLEY. I am a pawnbroker. I have two rings and four pins, pawned on the 20th of January - I have reason to believe by the prisoner.

JAMES RUTLAND . This property is mine. The prisoner was backwards and forwards at my house on all occasions - I am not aware how she was paid; my wife settled with her; I had not missed any of the articles - I had had a severe illness.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY (of stealing only) . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

ANN SCASE.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-38
VerdictNot Guilty

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1879. ANN SCASE was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , 1 pair of ear-rings, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Ann Casey , from her person .

JOHN ANDREW SIMPSON . These ear-rings were pawned with me by the prisoner, on the 23rd of September - the prosecutrix saw them at our house, and at the office, and claimed them; she said the prisoner and another girl met her, and said, "Will you give us some gin?" and she said No - that the prisoner then pulled her ear-rings out of her ears, and said, "We will have your ear-rings - they will fetch some gin;" the prisoner heard it, and did not deny it.

THOMAS SMEE . I am an officer. Ann Casey came and said the prisoner tore her ear-rings out of her ears; I took the prisoner in Earl-street.

Prisoner's Defence. We had been drinking together, and she said she had been trying to pawn her ear-rings, and could not; she asked me to take them - I pawned them for 1s., and came out; she quarrelled with a young woman, and said to me, "Where are the ear-rings?" I said, "I can't get them out without a halfpenny, and I have not one;" she took them out of her ears herself.

NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS JONES.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-39
VerdictGuilty
SentenceCorporal > whipping

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1880. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Henry Joseph , from his person .

HENRY JOSEPH . I was in Crown-street, Soho , on the 12th of September, a little after one o'clock; a person opposite told me my handkerchief was gone - I turned, and saw the prisoner running, and some persons following him - I did not lose sight of him for more than a minute before he was stopped; it was found on him.

ANGELIOUS BERTRAUN . I took this handkerchief from the prisoner's pocket, in Soho-square - I saw him run from Sutton-street.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Another boy gave it me.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged .

WILLIAM ADAMS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-40
VerdictGuilty
SentenceCorporal > whipping

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1881. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of John Hagger , from his person .

JOHN HAGGER . I was in Russell-street, Bloomsbury-

square , on the 2nd of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning: I lost my handkerchief, but did not know it till I was told of it - I went back, and found it and the prisoner in the hands of an officer.

CORNELIUS LEARY . I saw the prisoner and another boy following the prosecutor; the other took the handkerchief, and gave it to the prisoner, who put it under his apron - I took him, and took it from him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy drop it, and took it up.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Whipped and Discharged .

JAMES BROOMLEY, JOSEPH BROOMLEY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-41
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1882. JAMES BROOMLEY and JOSEPH BROOMLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 necklace, value 2s. 6d., the goods of William Sparks , from the person of George Sparks .

HARRIET SPARKS . I am the wife of William Sparks. On the 20th of October my little girl took out this baby - his name is George; he had a necklace on when he went out - she returned in about an hour, and the child had no necklace; I know nothing of the prisoners, but this is the necklace.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a constable. On the 20th of October, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw James Broomley looking into a window in Goswell-street; he went on - I followed him; the other prisoner then joined him: they went on to Pitfield-street , and I saw James take the necklace off the child's neck, and give it to Joseph - I crossed the road, and took hold of them both; they dropped the necklace on the ground - a witness came up, and I took the prisoners into a butcher's shop, and then to Worship-street.

THOMAS PETCH . On the 20th of October I saw the little girl with the child, looking into a grocer's shop - I saw James Broomley take the necklace from the child's neck; I assisted in taking the prisoners: I went with the little girl to her mother's house.

James Broomley 's Defence. We were going up Pitfield-street to wash our feet, and happened to look in a grocer's shop; this Police-man came and took hold of us, and we found these at our feet.

JAMES BROOMLEY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

JOSEPH BROOMLEY - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

HENRY PEARL.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-42
VerdictNot Guilty

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1883. HENRY PEARL was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS CULFF . I am a baker , and live in Brown's-lane, Spitalfieds . The prisoner was in my employ for about fifteen months - it was his duty to pay what money he received as soon as he came in.

MARY DINORD . I paid the prisoner 5s. 10 1/2d. for his master, on the 5th of September .

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How often do you pay? A. Every Saturday; I sometimes pay on Tuesday, but I have a recollection this was Saturday.

THOMAS POTTER . I paid the prisoner 4 1/2d. for his master, on the 14th of September .

Cross-examined. Q. How often do you take in bread? A.Every day, and in general I pay for it; I have let it go for two days, but I perfectly remember paying on that day - there was no memorandum given.

JOHN BARRS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he said he knew he had done wrong, and was very sorry, but he thought his master and he could make up matters.

THOMAS CULFF re-examined. The prisoner never accounted to me for these monies; he has taken out bread every day since, and brought the money home - I had not asked him about this money before I discharged him, and then I told his wife of it.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know he did not account for this money? A. By the book - that is not here; he was discharged on the 16th of September, and on the 23rd he was apprehended; if he had paid this money to me it would have been in the book - he has paid monies to my wife when I was not at home; he has very likely paid her 2l. - I have played at cards with him in the bake-house for a drop of drink.

COURT. Q. You say you discharged him on the 16th of September? A. Yes; he had for seven days before that brought me no money from Mr. Potter; I go by the book; when I went round to my customers I gave Mr. Potter a bill for seven loaves, and he said, "I don't owe you a farthing - I have paid every day;" I could recollect he had not paid for some days, independent of my book -I know he did not pay this money from the other witness, because they had owed eight loaves for some time, and he paid three loaves off.

Prisoner's Defence. He has not taken his scores regularly, but it has gone three or four days; if these persons have paid me, I am certain I paid it.

NOT GUILTY .

GEORGE COOPER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-43
VerdictGuilty
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

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1884. GEORGE COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , 3 handkerchiefs, value 15s. , the goods of William Nicholls and Thomas Nicholls .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am a linen-draper , in partnership with my brother Thomas; we live in St. James'-street . On the 2nd of October, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner in the shop - he gave me an order for his master, Colonel Stevens , and I saw he was trying to put a piece of handkerchiefs into his pocket; I questioned him about it, and sent for an officer; I saw the prisoner take these three black handkerchiefs out of his pocket - there were a great many on the counter: the officer came and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Have you made inquiries about him? A. Yes, and his friends are highly respectable - they have authorized me to say they will remove him from the country, and take care of him.

EDWARD HARVEY. I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Judgment Respited .

JOSEPH CASTLE.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-44
VerdictNot Guilty

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1885. JOSEPH CASTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 3 pints of brandy, value 10s., and 3 pints of rum, value 4s. , the goods of Samuel Tillett .

SAMUEL TILLETT . I keep the Salmon and Ball, in Lamb-street, Spitalfields . The prisoner called there now and then. On the 8th of October, a little before eight o'clock in the evening, I was going into my cellar, and saw two bladders, containing this liquor, a handkerchief, and a hat, which was cracked in the rim - I knew it was the prisoner's; I have seen him have a handkerchief of the

same colour - I took them all into my bar, and sent for an officer; we went and found the prisoner at the Ship, in Brick-lane - he had no hat on, but he went to the table, took a hat, and put on; we took him to the watch-house - he said he was innocent: we took him to the watch-house - he said he was innocent: I dipped my casks, and think I ought to have had a great deal more liquor.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say he had been at the Ship all the evening? A. He might say so; the hat he took off the table at the Ship was produced at the Police-office - it was not like the one which I supposed was his: one was beaver, and the other silk.

SARAH ANN PACKER . I was coming down stairs out of the kitchen, at Mr. Tillett's, and saw the prisoner stooping down in the passage; he pulled off his hat, and ran out at the back door - I called my father, and he came down; my uncle Tillett came out, and I told them it was Joe, the dyer - that is the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Was not his back to you? A. Yes - he ran out as fast as he could; I know it was him -I had seen him before: I am nine years old.

MARY BARKER . I was in the prosecutor's service on the 8th of October. I have known the prisoner about a month; I know this hat was his - I have seen a handkerchief of this pattern in his possession.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear the other hat is not the one you had seen on him? A. Yes; the Magistrate did check me, but I did not say it was that, or one like it - I will not swear I did not say so.

THOMAS COX . I am a constable. The prosecutor came to me - we went to the Ship, and found the prisoner there; another officer went in first, and I went in about two minutes afterwards - the prisoner was then coming to the door, with this hat on his head; I told him I took him on suspicion of felony.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you any conversation with him? A. Yes - he said he would go any where - that he was innocent, and had been at the Ship all the evening.

SAMUEL TILLETT re-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner take the hat off the table at the Ship? A. No; the officer told me so - I did not hear any one claim that hat.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN DRURY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-45
VerdictNot Guilty

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1886. JOHN DRURY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 2 planes, value 3s., and 10 shillings , the property of Joseph Atkins .

JOSEPH ATKINS . I am a cabinet-maker . I lost two planes on the 17th of September; the prisoner was once my apprentice .

WILLIAM HAYLOCK . I am an apprentice to the prosecutor - these planes were taken out of my box the last day of Bartholomew-fair; I had not seen the prisoner that day.

THOMAS HARRIS . I am an apprentice to Joseph Atkins . I saw the prisoner coming to his house, on the 17th of September, and I told him if he came, my master would send for an officer; he did not come - I then went to the turner's, in Long-alley; the prisoner went with me - my master sent me for an officer, and the prisoner went with me.

GEORGE GRAVES . On the 17th of September, the prisoner was in my custody; I charged him with having the prosecutor's planes - he denied it, but I heard him tell a fellow prisoner that he had stolen them; I then searched him - I could not find any duplicate, but he said he had pawned them at Mr. Attenboro's; I went there, but it was not right - I then went to another pawnbroker's, and found them.

JOSEPH BIRCH . I am an officer. On the 17th of September, the prisoner was brought to me; I went with him to his master - he said he had robbed him of 10s., some planes, and some saws; I found the saws.

JOHN BOURN . I have two planes pawned with me on the 28th of August, about the middle of the day - I believe by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN EVANS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-46
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1887. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 9 books, value 4s. , the goods of Richard Wales .

HONORA WALES . I am the wife of Richard Wales - we live in Carlton Place, Stoke Newington . These books were taken from the counter, but I did not miss them till the officer brought them in on Monday; I had seen them the last thing on the Saturday night - they are my husband's, as far as I can tell by the titles of them; they are plays, and there were nine missing - I do not see any difference between these, and those we lost; they are the same titles and authors.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I believe a great number of these are published? A. Yes; I do not know what edition they are.

JOHN WORKMAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner and found them in his pocket, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutor's, between twelve and one o'clock, on the 21st of September; I called and asked Mrs. Wales if she knew the man; she said Yes, he had been in her shop some time before.

HONORA WALES . The prisoner had been in our shop about twenty minutes before he was taken; he selected three plays, and then asked for Artaxerxes, and then he said he should like Virginia, and then Macbeth - while I was papering them up, he said he had not money enough, and would call again directly.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

GEORGE EASTGATE.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-47
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1888. GEORGE EASTGATE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 20lbs. weight of lead, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of James Lucas .

JAMES LUCAS . I am a builder and live in Cromer-street. The prisoner was clerk of my works , and was superintending three houses, which I was building near Battle-bridge - he had the overlooking of all the men. On the morning of the 10th of October, the cuttings of the lead of one of the buildings were put in the counting-house, under the prisoner's care; I went to Coleman-street, to sign a contract, and before I went I laid four pieces of the lead, in a particular position, to notice whether they would be moved - the gentlemen were not prepared for me, and I returned sooner than the prisoner expected; I was back a quarter before one o'clock - the prisoner and the plumber were there, but the greater part of the men were at dinner; I looked into the counting-house, and saw the prisoner loading himself with lead - I withdrew and waited in front of

the building; the prisoner came past, and I said "Where are you going?" he said, "To dinner;" I said, "Are you prepared to go to dinner?" he said Yes; I followed him to the end of Cromer-street - I took him to a house where I knew an officer resided; he was not at home, but his son took off the prisoner's hat, and found some lead in it, and the coat he had on (which was one I had given him) was loaded with lead - I told the young man to send for an officer, but before he came, the prisoner said he was very sorry he had lent himself to so trifling a theft - would I pardon him, he would go back and be a faithful servant; he had about 20lbs. of lead.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Was not this cuttings of lead? A. Yes - they fetch 1d. a lb.; I had set a person to watch him in my absence, but he was gone to dinner.

JOHN BLAKE . The prosecutor came to our house with the prisoner; he asked if my father was at home - I said No; I found the lead in the prisoner's hat and coat.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you before the Magistrate? A. Yes - I did not hear the prosecutor say he was not sure about the lead.

THOMAS PEARSON . I was sent for, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined Eight Months .

SARAH GIBBS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-48
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1889. SARAH GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 gown, value 13s. , the goods of Benjamin Coote .

BENJAMIN COOTE . I am a carpenter . My wife lost a gown last Friday week - I was at work at the time; when I returned I heard of the loss - next day I went in search of the prisoner, and on Sunday the officer and I found her; I saw the officer find this gown under the bed - she was in the room, and I saw her pushing it under the bed- her mother and brother were in the next room; the prisoner had lived servant with us till the Friday.

ELLEN COOTE . The prisoner was in my service, and left that Friday, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon - my gown had been safe at nine that morning, and when she was gone I missed it.

CHARLES CONSTABLE. I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's - I saw her pushing this gown under the bed; I called her into the front room, and asked what she had done with her mistress' gown; she said she knew nothing about it - I said, "I think it is under the bed," and pulled it out.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN HAWE.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-49
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1890. JOHN HAWE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 30 yards of flannel, value 30s. , the goods of William Taylor .

CAROLINE JEBOULT . I am in the service of Mr. William Taylor, haberdasher , of Lamb's Conduit-street . I saw the prisoner take this roll of flannel from the shop, between two and three o'clock, on the 9th of October - he ran away, and I followed him; he dropped it, and I took it up - he was brought back in a few minutes; I lost sight of him, but had seen him sufficiently to know he was the man.

Prisoner. Q.Did not a gentleman come in and say I was not the person? A. No, a person came in and attempted to interfere, but the officer would not let him stop.

WILLIAM MORRIS . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home to dinner in Ormond-street, and saw a person running with a roll of flannel under his arm; there was a cry of "Stop thief! he dropped the flannel in a door-way, and turned down a street before I got to the place - some persons came down Chapel-street, and took me; I said I was not the person, and I would go to the shop and prove it - a person went to prove it, and said he saw another person run with it.

JURY to CAROLINE JEBOULT . Q.Did the person who said the prisoner was not the person appear respectable? A. I should think not.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM MULLINS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-50
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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OLD COURT.

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30.

Second Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1891. WILLIAM MULLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 pair of stays, value 5s. , the goods of James Smith .

JAMES SMITH . I am a stay-maker , and live in Southampton-place, Camden-town . On the 17th of October, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, I left my niece in the shop for a few minutes; a neighbour called Smith! I ran down, and my niece said, "Uncle here is another pair of stays gone" - I had lost two pairs the day before; I saw the prisoner running across the road with them under his arm - I followed, and took them from him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went in for 1d. worth of pins, and as I came out the stays laid outside the door.

JAMES SMITH . That cannot be true.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN DOLING.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-51
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1892. JOHN DOLING was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 gown, value 10s. , the goods of Charles Taylor .

ALICE TAYLOR . I am the wife of Charles Taylor - we live at Chelsea ; the prisoner lived next door - his father is a sawyer; he frequently came to our house as a neighbour. On the 14th of October I missed a gown, which hung by my bed-side, up one pair of stairs - I found it in pawn.

WILLIAM BLAY . I am servant to Mr. Perkins, King's-road, Chelsea. The gown was pawned by the prisoner on the 14th of October.

JOHN HUMPHREYS . I am a constable. The prisoner told me he had taken the gown, and pawned it.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS GILL.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-52
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1893. THOMAS GILL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 piece of sole leather, value 4s. , the goods of George Hornsey Deed and James Deed .

GEORGE HORNSEY DEED . I am in partnership with James Deed - we are curriers , and live in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner is a shoemaker , and has dealt with us about two years. On the 6th of October he came and bought leather which came to 6d.; I was alone - he asked me to let him go back into the yard to look out some leather; he went, and returned in ten minutes with a piece in his hand, and was going to weigh it - I saw something concealed under his waistcoat, and asked what he had there - he said he had nothing; I caught hold of him, and in the scuffle two pieces of leather fell from under his waistcoat on the floor; he had a large leather apron on, with a bib to it, but I saw he was bulky.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I had nothing - he jumped over the counter; some pieces of leather lay there - he picked up these two, and said I dropped them; I said,"I have not" - I never told a lie since I was born.

MR. DEED. I swear the leather fell from under his waistcoat; I saw it there - part of it stuck out; it was not in the shop when he went into the yard.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined Six Weeks .

WILLIAM FRAY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-53
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

Related Material

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1894. WILLIAM FRAY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Kemble , on the 15th of October , at Hanworth , and stealing therein 1 handkerchief, value 3s., his property .

RICHARD KEMBLE. I live at Hanworth, and rent the house - I am a thrasher . On the 15th of October I had been out at work in a barn, just opposite my house; I have three children, who were out, and my wife was out at work; I had left the house at breakfast time, locked the door, and had the key with me - the windows were all fast; when I returned, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I found the iron bar of the back window out - I unlocked the door, and went in; the back window opens into the garden, which has furze round it - I found the prisoner up stairs; I secured him, and brought him down - he said he was looking for his money; he had no business in the house - he had lodged there, and left on the Tuesday; this was Thursday; he had not left any money there, I am certain - I took him to Whittingham; we went before the Magistrate, and brought him to the Swan - Whittingham searched him there, and found a silk handkerchief of mine on him; I am sure it is mine - he said it belonged to me, but did not say how he came to take it.

THOMAS WHITTINGHAM . I am a constable of Hanworth. The prisoner was brought to me - I took him before Mr. Manners, the Magistrate; I afterwards searched him, and found this handkerchief in his hat - I asked how he came by it; he said he believed it belonged to Kemble, who stood by, and said it was his, and that it was locked up in a box in his house.

RICHARD KEMBLE . I am sure it is my handkerchief by the pattern and every thing.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged. 44.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the small value of the property.

JAMES CUMMINGS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-54
VerdictNot Guilty

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Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1895. JAMES CUMMINGS was indicted for that he, on the 5th of August , in and upon Catherine his wife, feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did make an assault, and strike and wound her in and upon her head, with intent, feloniously, &c., of his malice aforethought, to kill and murder her .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to maim, or to do her some grievous bodily harm.

CATHERINE CUMMINGS . I am the prisoner's wife - we have seven children; he was always a good husband to me - we lived in Church-street, St. Giles' . On the 5th of August I was cooking the dinner - the prisoner and I had some words, in consequence of his not bringing me any money to get the children's breakfast in the morning; he had come in first at eleven o'clock with 2s. 4d. - I asked him why he did not bring it before; he said he could not get it - he threw it on the table; I was pressing a pair of trousers, and had an iron in my hand - he called me a bad name; I took the iron, and hit him first - this was at eleven o'clock; when I was cooking the dinner I began to jaw him - I called him some out of the way name, and he told me I had struck him with the iron, and he had a good mind to strike me the same; that is all that occurred; I put down the dinner, and dared him to do it - he took up the iron and struck me with it, and I dare say I struck him with my hand as well as I could; the first blow of the iron did not hurt me, but I screamed out, and strove to take my own part as well as I could -I fell at last; nothing happened to me on the ground.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM READING.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-55
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1896. WILLIAM READING was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 144 brass caps, value 6s. , the goods of William Black .

MOSES COHEN . I am an umbrella-maker. The prisoner came to my shop, about a fortnight before I was at the Thames Police-office, which was on the 15th of October, to sell a gross of open caps which he had - I asked what he wanted for them - he said 4s.; they are worth 7s.; he said he was sent by his master to sell them, and that he was going for some tin and wire - I knew he was in Black's employ, and suspecting him I said they were not worth more than 3s.; he said I might have them for 3s. 6d., and then said I should have them for 3s. - I kept the goods, and said I had no change, but if he called at six o'clock I would pay him; in the meantime I went to McLachlan, his master, and found he knew nothing about it - he had called for the money while I was gone; I kept the caps two days, and then took them to Black's.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say, "Bring the things to me, and I will buy them of you?" A. No.

WILLIAM BLACK . I am an umbrella-maker . The prisoner was in the employ of McLachlan, who worked for me out of doors; the prisoner came to my shop daily, and was there in October - I frequently missed things; Cohen brought this gross of caps to me - they are mine, and are used to put on the tops of umbrellas; McLachlan gave me information a week or ten days before I was at the office - the prisoner never came to my house after that; the caps were in paper, and this description of

handwriting was on them, "Six dozen open caps," - it is the hand-writing of the person I bought them of; he could easily have taken them when he came for work, as he was in the room they were in.

ADAM HIGH . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 14th of October, and told him he was charged with stealing some caps out of Black's shop - he said voluntarily that another boy took them as well as him, and I ought to take him also; on our way to the office I met the other boy, and took them both into Black's shop - the boy said, in the prisoner's presence, "I never took any myself; you took them, Reading, not me, and you sold them;" I asked the boy what he had given him out of them; he said 6d., which the prisoner did not deny.

Prisoner. He never said any thing of the kind.

WILLIAM BLACK . I heard the boy say he gave him 6d. - the prisoner did not deny it.

MARK McLACHLAN . The prisoner worked for me - he asked leave to go out on the evening that Cohen came; he said he wanted to go to Oxford-street to get some clothes mended - I was busy, and wished him not to go; he said he must go that evening - I gave him leave, and told him to come to work next morning, but he never returned; he was nearly two years with me - his character was very good, till lately he was very fond of going to the Theatres, and I told him he could not do it with my wages.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARY ANN NELSON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-56
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1897. MARY ANN NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 3 pinafores, value 1s., and 1 gown, value 2s. , the goods of Mary Forster .

MARY FORSTER . I am a widow , and live in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell - I keep a mangle ; the prisoner often came to have an apron or handkerchief mangled - she came on the 9th of October, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, with two shifts to be mangled, which my daughters proceeded to do; I went into the parlour, which commands a view of the shop, and saw the prisoner sitting on a basket of clothes - several bundles were behind the basket, ready to be sent out; I returned to the shop in three minutes, and the prisoner wished to have the things out of the mangle instantly, saying she had to go to Hammersmith immediately - I said they were not done; she gave me a halfpenny, and left immediately - a customer sent for some things in about three minutes, and I missed three pinafores, which were mangled about seven o'clock; I am confident they were there when the prisoner came in.

THOMAS CARPENTER . I am servant to a pawnbroker, in Turnmill-street. On the 9th of October, between five and eight o'clock, this gown and three pinafores were pawned by the prisoner for 2s. 6d. - I am certain of her person; I knew her before.

JOHN ROBERTS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner at eleven o'clock that night.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

CHARLES MEARS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-57
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1898. CHARLES MEARS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Francis Homan .

JAMES RIBBENS . I am warehouseman to Francis Homan, wholesale shoemaker , of Shoreditch ; the prisoner was apprentice to Brown, one of our journeyman, who works out of doors. On the 1st of October he brought some shoes from his master, and previous to his coming I had taken three pairs of shoes from another workman, and put them on a little shelf on the right hand; a few minutes after I was taking in more goods from a woman, and the prisoner came in unseen by me - I heard a noise where I had put the shoes, turned round, and saw his hand on the shelf; I asked what he was doing there - he then presented his master's work, saying he had brought that; I served the woman, then took his work, and gave him more - he was there about ten minutes; when he was gone I missed one of the three pairs of shoes off the shelf I had seen his hand on - I went about nine o'clock that night to his master's, in Bath-street, and charged him with it - he denied it.

THOMAS JUBB . I am foreman to Mr. Homan. I found the shoes in pawn at Harris', Hackney-road, near the prisoner's master.

GEORGE HYAM . I am shopman to Mr. Harris. On the 1st of October the prisoner pawned these shoes for 1s. 6d., in the name of Brown, Bath-street.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner - he said he had taken the shoes when he took the goods home, and pawned them in Hackney-road - I asked what he had done with the duplicate; he said he had torn it up, and thrown it away.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROBERT LATIMER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-58
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1899. ROBERT LATIMER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 watch, value 2l. , the goods of Samuel Woodward .

PRISCILLA WOODWARD. I am the wife of Samuel Woodward, of Galway-street , tinman ; the prisoner lodged at our house. On the 13th of October I saw him come out of the parlour - there was nobody in the room; I had been up stairs; he gave me some linen to wash for him, and immediately went out - I went into the parlour within a minute, and missed the watch within ten minutes, before I left the room again; I had seen it safe a quarter of an hour before - I did not know whether my husband had taken it; the prisoner did not come in till one o'clock that morning; I let him go into his bed-room, then got an officer, who took him; he then said he would make the watch good if we would not prosecute.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a constable. I was fetched to Woodward's at three o'clock in the morning, and took the prisoner; the prosecutrix said she only wished to have her property, and in consequence of what he said I went and found it at Baylis'.

ISAAC PUGH . I am a shopman to Mr. Baylis, of Aldersgate-street. The prisoner pawned this watch on the 13th of October - I am certain of him.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN MULLINS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-59
VerdictNot Guilty > no prosecutor

Related Material

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1900. JOHN MULLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , 2 rummer glasses, value 2s. , the good of Richard Crawley .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

JOHN JONES.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-60
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1901. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 3lbs. of mutton, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

WILLIAM SHEPHARD . I live in Skinner-street, Somers'-town , next door to Somers, who is a butcher . I saw the prisoner take a loin of mutton from the stall-board, and walk away with it; I informed the shopman - we both pursued; I saw him taken with the mutton under his coat- he begged I would not take him back; he had some silver money in his hand.

SAMUEL SOMERS. I was in my shop, and saw the mutton there just before.

GEORGE HAVELL . I received the prisoner in charge; he said he intended to take the mutton home to shew his wife.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know what I was doing- I am very much troubled with fits; I have been four days in the infirmary of the prison.

WILLIAM SHEPHARD . He did not appear in a fit when I took him; he was walking at a middling pace, but when I ran, he ran - I had called Stop thief!

GEORGE HAVELL . He seemed perfectly aware of what he was doing.

MR. WILLIAM JOHN BOX , JUN. My father is surgeon of the prison. The prisoner was in the infirmary with a common cold - there was nothing the matter with his head.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Three Months .

PETER GOODWIN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-61
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1902. PETER GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 door, value 15s. , the goods of Joseph Bradley .

CHARLES BRADLEY . I am the son of Joseph Bradley , dealer in shop fixtures , Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Innfields . This door was missed between eight and nine o'clock on Monday morning - I had seen it about an hour before; I saw it again on Thursday, in possession of Moseley, and knew it well - it is a large street door, and stood at our door for sale.

DAVID POCOCK . I am in the employ of Mr. Moseley, dealer in building materials, Cottage-place, City-road. The prisoner came to the yard, on Monday, the 5th of October, and asked for the owner of the yard; I asked what he wanted - he said he had a door to sell, and it was at the gate; I looked at it - it was on a truck; he wanted 15s., for it - master was not at home, and told him to come another time; he came twice, and was detained.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICHARD MOSELEY . Pocock called me to the prisoner on Tuesday, the 6th, when he came for the money for the door, which was in my yard - I detained him, and asked where he got it; he said it was his own - I sent for an officer; he then walked out of the place, and said he would show me his master, who it belonged to - I followed him, and in King-square he made a blow at me, knocked me down, and ran round the square; I followed, and took him in a minute, and am certain of his person.

MICHAEL CONNELL. I am a watchman. I heard a cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running, and took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM BURN . I live in King's Head-yard, Duke-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields. On Monday, the 5th of October, the prisoner borrowed a truck of me, and brought it back again - I did not know him before; he gave me a reference.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man, who said he had a door and a bedstead against the wall: he employed me to get a truck, and carry them to Old-street - when we got there, he said, "Take this door, and sell it at a broker's, and meet me here by the turnpike," and said, "Get 15s. for it, if not take what you can get;" I went to the yard - this man offered me 7s., and gave me 2s. - I was to call tomorrow for the rest, as his master was out; I went for it in the morning - he said his master was out, and the man said I was making a fool of him.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH FRANKLIN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-62
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1903. SARAH FRANKLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 6 sheets, value 2l. , the goods of Jonathan Hayne .

EMILY HARRIS . I am servant to Mr. Jonathan Hayne , who lives in Camden-street, Camden-town . On Monday, the 19th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner came to master's house, and asked me for the linen; I did not know her before, and asked her what linen - she said for Mrs. Nichols, who is our laundress; I gave her three pairs of sheets in a basket - she said her mother wanted to speak to me, and would call about twelve o'clock; I thought Nichols was her mother.

MARY BATES . I am cook to Mr. Haynes. I saw the prisoner, and asked who she came from - she said Mrs. Nichols; I never saw her before, but am certain of her.

ANN NICHOLS . I am a laundress, and wash for Mr. Haynes. I do not know the prisoner - she never worked for me; I never sent her for linen - neither the sheets nor basket came to my house.

ABRAHAM LORIMER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 21st - she said she never had the sheets - that it must be her sister, who was acquainted with a bad character, named George.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the witness before; I was not outside the door at the time they were taken- I was not up, and do not know where the place is.

DRUCILLA WILTSHIRE . I am a cloth cap-maker. The prisoner lives opposite to me, on Saffron-hill; she worked for me for about three weeks - I had sent her on an errand on Wednesday, when the officer took her. On the Monday, before she was taken, I sent my boy to tell her to come and assist me at work - she was in bed; she got up, and came about half-past ten o'clock, and was not out again till after ten at night - she was with me all day on Tuesday, from between twelve and one o'clock till bedtime.

- FRANKLIN. I am her father; she was not out

of my place last Monday week, till half-past ten o'clock in the morning. I am a shoemaker, and work at home; she went between ten and eleven to Wiltshire's, and returned about ten at night: I had got up between six and seven o'clock, and breakfasted about eight - she was ill in bed, and had no breakfast at all, and on Tuesday she went to Wiltshire's again, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning - I am certain of that; she then breakfasted with me: I have a daughter, who is servant to a laundress, named Wiltshire - she does not live with a nam named George; she is a decent good girl - she is very much like the prisoner in face, and two years older.

ABRAHAM LORIMER. I took the cook to where the sister lives - it is a decent house.

MARY BATES. I went to Wiltshire's, and saw the sister, on the 21st, they are very much alike: I think this is the girl - that is my firm belief; she was dressed in a black gown - the sister had a blue one.

ANN NICHOLS . Neither the prisoner nor her sister worked for me; I have seen the sister go up and down the steps of the next house - the sister might know that I washed for Mr. Haynes, from George Ballard , who took my linen out on Saturday night, which was the first time I had sent him there; I never knew any thing amiss of him.

NOT GUILTY .

HUGH BAGLEY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-63
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1904. HUGH BAGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 4 stoves, value 36s.; 1 pair of covings, value 2s.; 1 range, value 5s.; 1 copper, value 1l.; 5 locks, value 10s.; 2 brass cocks, value 2s., and 9 feet of leaden pipe, value 3s., the goods of James Reardon , and fixed to a building of his; against the Statute .

JAMES REARDON . I live in Sparrow-corner, and am proprietor of a house, No, 72, Regent-street . About a fortnight after Midsummer-day the prisoner called at my house with a man, who said his name was Trueman; Trueman said he wished to take my house - I let it to him at 26l. a year; they both called about a month after - Trueman said his father had died in Staffordshire, that he would pay me 15s. for rent, and that the prisoner would take the house from that time; I agreed to let it him for the rest of the quarter, at the same rent - there were six rooms, and a stove in each, a copper, a quantity of brass, and a leaden pipe leading from the sink; he was to have the use of them- I afterwards saw these articles at Miller's, in Orchard-street; I had never given the prisoner, nor any body, permission to remove them - I expected to find them as fixtures at the end of the quarter; I found two stoves at Miller's - I went to the premises, the leaden pipe and all the stoves were gone.

Prisoner. Did you see the house when I took it; I put the pipe there myself - it was in dreadful repair: I put a flooring down, and repaired the wash-house. Witness. After I let it to Trueman I went and saw all correct, about a month after I let it; I was not on the premises after that: when the prisoner proposed to become a tenant, he did not state that any thing had been taken away, or complain at all.

JAMES MILLER . I am a locksmith, and live at No. 38, Orchard-street. The prisoner came to my house on the evening of the 24th of September, and asked if I would purchase a range and stove; he said I must come directly, for he wanted to give up the key to the landlord, and I must bring something to carry them - I took a cart to the house in Regent-street, and purchased the stoves which stood in the fire-places, but unfixed: I bought nothing else -Reardon afterwards saw and claimed them.

Prisoner. There were two ranges; one remained - I acknowledge I had a private still in the house, and there was no place to fix the range.

JAMES REARDON. Four stoves were taken away - a range and a stove remained.

DAVID PHILLIPS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and heard him say he wanted more money for the stoves, and that Miller had not paid him.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a conspiracy against me, and useless for me to say any thing.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

GEORGE CURTIS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-64
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Before Mr. Justice Park

1905. GEORGE CURTIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 watch, value 14s., and 1 stand, value 4s. , the goods of William Hutchings : and that at the Delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, on the 15th of January, in the 9th year of His Majesty's Reign, he was convicted of felony.

WILLIAM HUTCHINGS . I am a gardener , and live at Crouch-end . The prisoner came to my house on Friday night, and engaged a bed for his father and himself; they slept there that night, and on Saturday - the prisoner was about the house all the morning, reading a book of his own; he went away about noon, and about half-past nine o'clock in the evening I missed a watch and stand from the mantel-piece of the room he slept in - he had returned two or three hours before; I charged him with it - he denied knowing any thing about it: I sent for an officer, and gave him in charge - a knife and comb, but no money, were found on him; he, wanted to speak to me privately - the officer would not allow it; he said if we would give him back what we had taken from him, he would tell us where the watch was, he would shew us the pond they were in; he tucked up his sleeve, and pulled the bottom of the stand out of the pond - the watch was found afterwards in the same place; he said he had put them there, seeing a woman coming up the hill - he thought it was my wife pursuing him. having missed the property: I believe I said if he told where they were I would let him go.

JOSEPH BRETT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; what Hutchings has stated passed in my presence.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a plumber. I went to the cage on Sunday morning, and in consequence of information from the prisoner, I went to the pond and got the watch.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no Defence.

JOHN BRADY . I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction; I was present at his trial, and know him to be the person - (read.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

WILLIAM WEBB.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-65
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1906. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for stealing, on

the 27th of July , one 20l. Bank note , the property of Godfrey Moore .

GODFREY MOORE. I live in Mansell-street, Whitechapel , and am a dealer in jewellery and a refiner . On the 27th of July, about four or five o'clock in the afternoon, Collingridge paid me a 20l. and a 5l. Bank note, three sovereigns, and 1s. 3d., for gold which I had sold him; when I went to bed I missed the Bank notes - I have no knowledge how I lost them; I am certain I neither paid them away nor gave them to any body.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.May you not have lost them out of your pocket? A. I missed them at eleven o'clock; I had walked home after receiving them, and cannot say I did not drop them from my pocket.

COURT. Q. What pocket did you put them into? A. My fob, I suppose, as I generally do.

WILLIAM COLLINGRIDGE . I am a refiner. I paid the prosecutor a 20l. and a 5l. Bank note; I have since seen a 20l. note in Barnes' possession - (looking at it) I know this to be one of the notes I paid him, by the name "Banner, Goswell-street," on the back, which I wrote before I paid it to him.

THOMAS BARNES . I am shopman to Mr. Dexter, a pawnbroker, of Whitechapel. I have known the prisoner fourteen years. On Saturday evening, the 8th of August, he came to redeem some apparel and plate, amounting to about 4l., some of which had been pledged about a year, and was forfeited, but we let him have them; he paid me this 20l. note - I have written on it, "W. Webb, 4, Three Colt-lane:" Mr. Dexter took it from him, and gave it to me to write the name instantly.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you know where he lived? A. I knew he lived in Dog row: he frequently pawned things - I had a very good opinion of him: he must know I knew where to find him.

COURT. Q.Did he give you that as his then present address? A. Yes; I expected I should find him there -I saw him about three weeks after, and the next day Moore applied about the note.

SAMUEL PRENDERGAST . I was fetched to Dexter's shop, and apprehended the prisoner there, on the 28th of September; I asked him how he became possessed of the note - he replied that a man in Whitechapel, who owed him 5l. had given him the 20l. note, and he went to Dexter's to get it changed; I asked the man's name and address, and he refused to tell me either - he said the man had owed him the money nearly twenty years, and he met him accidentally; he afterwards said the man lived in some part of Devonshire.

GEORGE GRAY . I have known the prisoner eight years; he rented a house of me in Colt-lane, and quitted it last May; he had given notice on the prior quarter, but left before quarter day, without my knowledge, and owed me 13l. 3s. 9d., for three quarters rent - he did not live there on the 8th of August; I was then in possession of the house - he had left it open.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that distress had caused him to leave the house, and contending that if he had stolen the note, he should not have passed it where he was so well known, and have called there three weeks after - and that not having a settled residence, he gave his address where he had last lived.

NOT GUILTY .

HENRY STONE.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-66
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1907. HENRY STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 4lbs. of bacon, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Brown .

GEORGE SADLER . I am in the employ of Thomas Brown, a cheesemonger . On Thursday, the 15th of October, I had been out with some things, and was returning about nine o'clock at night, and saw the prisoner coming down Grafton-street, Soho ; when he came to my master's window, which is in that street, I saw him put his arm into the window, take out a piece of bacon, put it under his coat, and walk away towards me - I took hold of him, and he then dropped it; I was about ten yards from the shop- my brother, who was standing at the window, came out, and picked it up - I took the prisoner into the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Have you always said he took the bacon from the shop? A.From the window, and that he put his arm in and took it - I am sure he did not hold it up, and call out that he had found it; several people came round.

COURT. Q.Had he any body with him? A.There was a man with him, who kicked the bacon when he dropped it; the prisoner was a little intoxicated - he was walking with a man when he came into Grafton-street.

STEPHEN SADLER . I was in Mr. Brown's employ at this time. I was in the shop, and heard a noise at the wire of the window - I turned, and missed the bacon, went to the door, and saw my brother holding the prisoner; I took the bacon off the ground, and took it in.

Cross-examined. Q. Is this a kind of projecting-place? A. No; it was in the window - my brother was coming up the street; I was standing with my back to the window: when I got out five or six persons were round.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day in question I had to receive a bill in the City; on my return I called on a person, and took a glass of ale - between five and six o'clock my wife came for me, thinking I was out late; we all drank tea together, eight of us, and left to go to the Theatre - as I passed this shop I saw the bacon on the ground, and not being quite sober, took it up, and said, "Here is a bit of bacon:" the young man immediately collared me, and I said I had just picked it up.

GEORGE SADLER . He did not hold it up - he put it under his arm.

The prisoner called several witnesses, who stated that they had been spending the afternoon with him, and walked with him to Grafton-street - but none of them deposed to having seen the bacon picked up, or anything relating to the transaction.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM SMITH.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-67
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1909. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 3 umbrellas, value 2l. 10s., the goods of Joseph Pryor and others, his masters .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM RUTTER. I am in partnership with Joseph Pryor and another, umbrella-makers , Holborn-hill - the

prisoner came into our service in March. About the 12th of October, in consequence of information, I went to Reeve, a pawnbroker, of Snowhill, and recognized three umbrellas in his window, as our manufacture; they had no ticket on them; I went into the shop and saw lvey, and from what he said I had the prisoner apprehended; Ivey came to our door and pointed him out - he recognized him immediately, and gave us every facility he could; the cost price of two of the umbrellas is 18s. and one 16s., that is rather under the cost price - the retail price is 25s. and 27s. - they would readily fetch that in the trade - we should have an intermediate profit; I charged the prisoner with stealing umbrellas and parasols; he said he had sold none to any body except Reeve; I never gave him authority to sell any.

Cross-examined. Q.Yours is rather a large business? A. Yes; we sell a great many of this description; the prisoner's father is a tube-maker, and worked for us - he makes frames.

WILLIAM IVEY . I am apprentice to Mr. Reeve, of Snowhill. The prisoner has been to our shop about twenty times within the last six months, to pawn and sell umbrellas and parasols; I produced to Mr. Rutter some umbrellas which the prisoner sold; I bought two of them myself of him. and paid him 12s. for the large one and 11s. for the small - I cannot say whether I bought the third - they are quite new.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know his father? A. Yes; but I do not recollect ever seeing him at our shop; he repaired umbrellas for us - he did not keep a shop; he has been dead about three years.

JOHN REEVE . I am a pawnbroker, and live on Snow-hill. I have bought umbrellas of the prisoner, but neither of these - here is one on the table which will not fetch 6d. more than I gave; the Magistrate sent for me three times before I went; as I knew nothing about it I did not think it necessary to go - I did not at all suspect the prisoner, and should not have objected to buy fifty a week of him; I knew him and his friends.

FRANCIS McLEAN . I took the prisoner in charge; these three umbrellas and a parasol were given to me by Ivey.

WILLIAM IVEY . These are the umbrellas I bought for 11s. and 12s.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose there are many umbrellas in your shop? A.Several; I know I bought these of him, because I had none others in the window, nor in the shop at the time; I do not consider there is 6d. a yard difference in the quality of the silks; I gave what I thought a fair price, and only asked 14s. for them when Mr. Rutter came to ask the price.

MR. RUTTER. These are our umbellas, they are the best quality that are made in London - I have stated less than the cost price; the frames are marked with the initials of our workman; and for eighteen years I have never seen a silk with this particular border except what was made for us; I cannot say they were never sold, but I believe not - I never allowed him to sell them.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

ANN CROWDER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-68
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

1910. ANN CROWDER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 sheet, value 4s., and 2 pairs of shoes, value 3s., the goods of John King (since deceased) her master .

MR. LEE conducted the prosecution.

JOHN KING . I was foreman at my father's manufactory - he died on the 20th of October; the prisoner was a cook in his service. In consequence of suspicion we searched her, and found on her person some pawnbroker's duplicates in a needle-case.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. What wages were due to her when she left? A. A quarter of a year, 3l. 8s. - there was 10s. 6d. due to a cash account which she had laid out besides - the family never borrowed money of her; I never borrowed 6d. of her - I borrowed about 3s.; she pawned her shawl for her own use to drink, not for ours; the 10s. 6d. was for things she had bought in the course of the week for the family - when she asked for money it was given to her; she never to my knowledge pawned things for our family; her wages were paid the day she was committed - there are twelve of us in family; we were in rather embarrassed circumstances; none of my brothers or sisters are here - they say they never authorised her to pawn things.

GEORGE BIGGS . I was present when the prisoner was searched; I think seven duplicates were found on her - there was one for a sheet and shoes.

Cross-examined. Q.What are you? A. A coal-merchant, and Mrs. King's brother-in-law; the family were not in circumstances to require aid from the servants; I should conceive the witness borrowed the 3s. for himself; although the prisoner at first said she pledged for the family, when I said that was easily proved by bringing Miss King and her face to face, she then said she had pawned to lend her brother and somebody else half a sovereign each.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Nichols, a pawnbroker. On the 17th of September the prisoner pawned a sheet and two pairs of shoes, in the name of Ann Harris - this is the duplicate of them.

JOHN KING . They were my father's; the sheet has"Bedford-square, Brighton," on it in full.

Cross-examined. Q. You will not swear your father never authorised her to pawn them? A. I will not; the shoes are new; she lived seven months with us, and had an excellent character.

The prisoner, in her defence, stated, that she was in the habit of lending the family money to purchase articles, and that she had pawned the property to procure beef steaks for them.

NOT GUILTY .

ANN CROWDER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-69
VerdictNot Guilty

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1911. ANN CROWDER was again indicted for stealig, on the 9th of September , a silver spoon, value 2s. 6d., the goods of John King (since deceased) her master .

JOHN KING . On the 28th of September I found a duplicate of the spoon on the prisoner; Biggs took it from her person in my presence.

Cross-examined. Q. When did your mother know the girl was about to be prosecuted? A. On the 28th; she is not here - I know the articles as well as her; I now know that the prisoner pawned her own gown and shawl - I got her examination remanded till Friday, because I had to attend my father's funeral.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . The prisoner pawned this teaspoon with me, on the 9th of September, in the name of Ann Harris .(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence: I did this for the same purpose -I never denied it.

NOT GUILTY .

ANN CROWDER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-70
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

1912. ANN CROWDER was again indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , 1 spoon, value 6s., the goods of John King (since deceased) her master .

JOHN KING . The duplicate of this spoon was found on the prisoner.

JOSEPH GODDARD . I am servant to Mr. Beecham, of Holborn; the prisoner pawned this spoon with me, on the 22nd of August.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I did it for the same purpose.

NOT GUILTY .

ANN CROWDER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-71
VerdictNot Guilty > no evidence

Related Material

1913. ANN CROWDER was again indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of August , 1 spoon, value 2s., the goods of John King (since deceased) her master; and on the 25th of September , 1 spoon, value 5s. , the goods of Martha Elizabeth King .

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM SCASEBROOK, MARGARET DYNAM.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-72
VerdictsGuilty; Not Guilty
SentencesTransportation

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1914. WILLIAM SCASEBROOK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 pair of trousers, value 19s. the goods of James Oram , and MARGARET DYNAM was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen .

SIMPSON NOAKES . I am a chymist. On the 17th of September, I was passing Newgate-street , and saw the prisoner Scasebrook take a pair of trousers, from the inside of Mr. Oram's shop door. as he stood in the street, and run down Bagnio-court with them; I went into the shop, told the young man, pursued with him, and saw Scasebrook about half way down Bagnio-court, about twenty yards from the prosecutor's, and secured him - he had not got the property then; I took him - I am certain of him.

CHARLES JARMAN . I am in the employ of James Oram, a tailor and draper. Noakes informed me these trousers were taken about one o'clock - I went with him to Bagnio-court; he pointed out the prisoner, who I secured and took to the shop; I afterwards saw the trousers at Guildhall - they were hanging inside the door.

JOHN HOWELL . I am a printer. On the 17th of September I was coming through Smithfield, and heard a man was taken up for stealing a pair of trousers, and a young man who was with me, named Ford, asked me to go to Mrs. Dynam's - in consequence of what he said, I went to her house in Field-lane, and asked her for a pair of trousers which Ford had left there - she asked me to come down to her other shop in Field-lane; I went, and she placed me in the back yard, fastened me in, and in two minutes they brought them to me, and as I came out of the door, she herself told me I was not to say where they came from, for they were a poor pair, not worth 2s.; I brought them to Scasebrook's mother, who was in West-street, and I was taken in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. You are in a respectable way of life? A. No; I am an unfortunate lad- I own I have been twice in Bridewell; the last time was twelve months ago - I was not out two days before I was taken to the House of Correction, and since that I have been twice at Guildhall; I am now in custody - I was in Newgate six months ago; I am seventeen years old.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SCASEBROOK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

DYNAM - NOT GUILTY .

RICHARD MATTHEW HOLT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-73
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1915. RICHARD MATTHEW HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 1 sovereign, the money of William Smith , from his person .

WILLIAM SMITH. I am a seaman , and have known the prisoner fourteen years, we were schoolfellows; but I had not seen him for five years, till last Thursday, when I took him home, gave him a good dinner, and spent some money on him - then bid him good night, and told him most likely I should receive my money to-morrow, and if he came next evening we would have some beer together; he came, and at night I went to the play with him, a girl, and two boys - I spent 1l. 18s. on them, besides the two sovereigns, and in the morning I only had 2 1/2d. left - I gave one of the boys 1s. to get me something to eat, and the boy took a sovereign out of my pocket; I grumbled about it all the way down Blackfriars-road, and we made it up when we crossed Fleet-market - they got in conversation with me, and the three others ran away; I said, "Dick now they are gone, I will go home, and see if my mother is come home-" we went, and she was not at home; as we came down Golden-lane, I asked if he could get me a bed for the night - he said he could; I had a sovereign, a farthing, and a shilling in my pocket - I said I should like to have some drink; he took me into a house, and had a quartern of rum - I then had a farthing and a sovereign in my trousers pocket; the buttons of my waistcoat were undone - when we got a little way down the lane, he took hold of my arm; we crossed Smithfield, and just before we got to Cow-lane, he let go of my arm - I felt my pocket, and could not feel my money- I said, "Dick I have lost a sovereign - there are two sovereigns gone between you, since seven o'clock; I have been with nobody but you" - when we got to No. 55, West-street, he asked if a girl who was with us, could sleep there- they said they did not take girls in, but we two were to have a bed; I said, "I have lost two sovereigns since seven o'clock" - Mrs. Jones said, "Are you sure of it? search;"- I took off all my things, searched all my pockets, and while I was so doing, the prisoner was putting his hand into his pocket, to pay for his bed; he pulled out a farthing, and offered it to the woman - he felt again, and pulled out a halfpenny; then said, "Stop a bit - I will be in in a moment"; he returned and gave her 1s. for our bed - we slept together, and next morning I had 2 1/2d., and went over to have a pint of beer; while I was at the public-house, he slipped out, went over to the lodging-house, and accused them of robbing him of 19s. - he came over to me, and said, the woman's daughter said she must see me; I went over, and she said, "Your friend says he has lost 19s." - I said,"How can that be, when he had but 1s. 6d. or 2s. when he came out with me, "and said I would send for an officer, for I knew it was my money, and that he had taken the sove

reign from me crossing Smithfield; he then went to run out of the room - we stopped him, and when he saw us determined to have an officer, he went on his knees, and begged my pardon; he confessed before us all that he had taken it, and changed it at Union-court, at his friend's, and said if I would go with him, I should have the change, and that he knew all about the first sovereign, and who had it.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not come over and say I had been robbed of 19s., and that it was your money, which I had taken, because you were rather intoxicated, and had lost one before, and were you not so much in liqour when I first took you out, that I gave you some vinegar? A. That was before we went to the play; I was quite sober when I went to the woman's house.

HANNAH JONES . These men came to my house, in West-street for a lodging; the prisoner asked for some girl - my husband said he allowed no girls there; they took a bed for themselves - the prisoner pulled out two farthings, and then a halfpenny to pay; he then said he would be back in a few minutes - he returned and paid me 1s.; the prosecutor said he had lost two sovereigns - one of which he had after every one but the prisoner had left; he wanted me to sell him some bread and cheese - the prisoner went out and brought in some beef and beer; they went to bed - my husband fastened the door, so that they could not get out, nor any body get in; in the morning they went over to the public-house - the prisoner returned and said he had been robbed of 19s.; my daughter said how could that be, when there was nobody there but his friend, and said he must fetch his friend and search him - I told him I understood neither of them had any money; he said he had changed a sovereign at the patten shop lower down, and tied it in his handkerchief, and we must have come in and robbed him; the prosecutor said, "How could you have a sovereign, when you had but 1s. 6d.?" my husband was called up; we sent for Pike - he acknowledged that he had changed the prosecutor's sovereign, and took the change to his friends, in Union-court; he fell on his knees, begged pardon, and said he would give up the change, which he had accused us of stealing - he was sober.

THOMAS PIKE . I took him in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. The sailor has promised my father he would do what he could to get me off, for he did not think me guilty.

WILLIAM SMITH . I saw his father at Guildhall; he said he wished he had seen me before I saw his son, and he would have told me what sort of a character he was since I had known him, that I might have kept out of his company.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOSEPH TAYLOR.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-74
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1916. JOSEPH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Franz Christian Grapel , from his person .

FRANZ CHRISTIAN GRAPEL . I am a German. On the 24th of September, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was at the corner of Mark-lane and Tower-street ; I had a handkerchief in my pocket, but did not feel it taken - the officer informed me of it; the prisoner was taken in two or three minutes - I have not found my handkerchief.

GEORGE WHITE . I am a Thames Police-officer. I saw three chaps walking from the corner of Thames-street, up Tower-hill, following the prosecutor, and in Tower-street he took his handkerchief out to use, and put it in again; the prisoner directly took hold of his coat, with his left hand and took the handkerchief out with the right - all three hustled together and ran across the way; I called the gentleman - he pursued the other two, took one of them, and the other ran away; the prisoner had run down Mark-lane - I let the other go, and presently the prisoner came right in my face, and I took him; I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. He said at Guildhall, that I took it and gave it to one of the others; that he took one, but could not find it on him - now if he had seen me take it, why not stop me at the time? or if I gave it to any one, why not take him? If I gave it away, why did he search me?

GEORGE WHITE . I said I saw them all hustling together, and saw him give it to one of the others, but could not see which; I swear he is the person who took it.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

HENRY WILLIAMS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-75
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

NEW COURT, Second Day.

Fourth Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1917. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 2 coats, value 2l., and 1 pair of boots, value 2l. , the goods of Stanhope Arnfield .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

CHARLES FERGUSON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-76
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1918. CHARLES FERGUSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 book, value 12s. , the goods of Francis Crew and Richard Spencer .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARY JONES.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-77
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1919. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , 2 pairs of stockings, value 4s.; 2 caps, value 4s.; 4 pieces of lace, value 10s.; 1 dress, value 3s.; 1 ring, value 3s.; 1 pin, value 3s., and 2 collars, value 4s. , the goods of Elizabeth Swail .

ELIZABETH SWAIL. I am single , and live with my father - the prisoner lodged at his house. I lost the property stated on the 2nd of October - part were in a bundle, and part loose in the kitchen drawer; I found part of them in her drawer in the next morning.

WILLIAM FOWLE . I am a servant to Mr. Morris, a pawnbroker. I have a gown, a shawl, a ring, a pin, and a collar, pawned on the 2nd of October, by the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

WILLIAM JOHNS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-78
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1920. WILLIAM JOHNS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , 2 sheets, value 8s. , the goods of Richard Billett Chivell .

REBECCA CHIVELL . I am the wife of Richard Billett Chivell . The prisoner came to lodge at my house on the night of the 2nd of September, and went away on the 3rd; when he was gone I missed this pair of sheets.

WILLIAM MORRIS . I am a Police constable. On the 1st of October I took the prisoner in Drury-lane - I found

two sheets on him, and some duplicates, one of which relates to these sheets.

WILLIAM IVEY . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pair of sheets pawned on the 3rd of September, by a man, who I believe was the prisoner, in the name of William Jones - I gave him this duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the country, and did not like to come back, as I had not money to pay the lodging.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

HENRY JONES.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-79
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1921. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 pair of boots, value 6s. , the goods of John Howard .

JOHN CRISPIN . I am in the service of John Howard , of St. Martin's-court . On the 24th of October a pair of boots were taken from his shop - I had seen them two minutes before my master said they were gone; I ran out and met the prisoner in custody of the officer with them; they had been just inside the shop, on a heap of others.

JOSEPH OSTELL . I noticed the prisoner lurking about some time, and watched him: I saw him go into the passage and draw the boots; some persons were passing at the time, and I could not take him at the moment - he went up the court - I ran and took him; he threw the boots down and fell on them - I took him and them.

Prisoner. You said you did not see me take them at the office. Witness. I saw you drawing them, but did not see you finish taking them; I did not say I saw you take a boot, look at it, and put it down.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He has sworn falsely; I saw the boots on the ground, and was going to take them up.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN LEIGHTON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-80
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1922. JOHN LEIGHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 1 plane, value 1s., the goods of John Hill ; 1 square, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Peter Darlington ; and 1 plane, value 2s. , the goods of Samuel Godfrey .

EDWIN SOMES . I am a pawnbroker. I have two planes and a square, which were brought by the prisoner on the 23rd of October, and we detained him, as we had received notice just before - he said they were his own.

SAMUEL GODFREY . This plane belongs to me; I left this and some other tools in a building on the 22nd of October, and when I went the next morning they were gone; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN HILL . I am a carpenter . I had been working at the same building; I went to the office and found this plane, which is mine.

PETER DARLINGTON . This square is mine, I had left it at the adjoining house.

WILLIAM FRANKS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner; I asked him how he got the tools - he said they were his own, and he lived in Earl-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person in Oxford-street, named Smith, with these things - he said he had tried to pawn them, but no person would take them in; he said he had had nothing to eat the whole morning; I gave him 6d., and went to offer them to pawn, and was detained; he lives at No. 110, Wardour-street - I have known him many years.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Three Months .

JAMES LEACH.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-81
VerdictNot Guilty > fault

Related Material

1923. JAMES LEACH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 7 portraits, carved in ivory, value 35s., and 1 frame and glass, value 6d. , the goods of William Caulfield .

The goods being the joint property of William Caulfield and Robert Simpson , the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

JAMES LEACH.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-82
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1924. JAMES LEACH was again indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 tea-urn, value 5s. , the goods of Christopher Buckland .

HENRY BUCKLAND . I am the son of Christopher Buckland, a cabinet-maker , of Circus-street, New-road . On the 16th of October this tea-urn was on a box near the door for sale; Mr. Clarkson came and told us it was taken - I looked and missed it; I had seen it safe half an hour before - I ran out, and saw the prisoner walking away with something under his coat; when I came up he held it out to me, and said, "Take it, take it."

CHRISTOPHER CLARKSON . I live opposite the prosecutor - I saw the prisoner looking at the goods exposed for sale; he then looked at the goods inside - in a moment or so he withdrew, and lifted up an apron which he had on, covered something with it, and went into the New-road; I pursued, and saw him stopped, and he gave up the urn.

WILLIAM JONES . I am an officer, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN BEDFORD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-83
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1925. JOHN BEDFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 10 shirts, value 40s.; 19 shirt collars, value 15s.; 1 basket, value 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of Sarah Thornhill , widow , from the person of Joseph Baillie .

SARAH TRORNHILL . I am a sempstress . On the 5th of October I sent the property stated in the indictment by Joseph Baillie , from where I live, in Jubilee-place, Commercial-road, to Cornhill, about ten o'clock in the morning; he returned about eleven, and said they were taken from him - I have never seen it since; there were six day shirts, four night shirts, a collar, and some other things, in a basket.

JOSEPH BAILLIE . I am ten years old. I was sent with these things in a basket; before I got as far as Bedford-square, Commercial-road , I met the prisoner, who was carrying two gallon jars in his hand: he asked me where I was going - I said into the City; I did not know him before - he said, "Wait a moment, and I will go with you; I am going that way:" he asked me to mind one of his jars while he went with the other into the Canning's Head - he came back, and said, "My brother is a long time coming;" in a few minutes the boy he called his brother made his appearance, running towards us - he asked him where he had been so long; he said round the corner - the prisoner then asked me to go and get a halfpenny worth of acidulated drops, and to put down my bundle on a step - I

went to get them, and kept looking back till I got to the shop; the prisoner was then sitting still, but when I came out he was gone, with the bundle; I went to the Canning's Head, and told them; they sent for the officer, and the prisoner was taken on the Thursday following. I am perfectly certain of him.

THOMAS STIMSON . I am an officer. I found this witness at the Canning's Head; he gave the same account he does now, and described the prisoner - I went and took him in Horse Shoe-alley, Moorfields, on the Thursday; I put him with three or four others, and kept Baillie back; when he came in he said directly, "That is the boy;" I asked the prisoner, when I took him, if he had been out with any oil of tartar on Monday - he said No: I said, "Were not you at the Canning's Head?" he said Yes - I said, "Did not you give a boy a halfpenny to go for some drops?" he said, "Yes, but I did not take away the bundle;" he had a fustian jacket and a cap on, just as Baillie described.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not say any such thing.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

MARY ANN MANNING.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-84
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1925. MARY ANN MANNING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 watch, value 3l.; 2 gowns, value 10s.; 1 shawl, value 10s.; 1 petticoat, value 5s., and 1 purse, value 1s. , the goods of Agnes Kerridge .

AGNES KERRIDGE . I am single , and live with my brother, who keeps a public-house, at Holloway . The prisoner was servant there, and I slept with her - this property was mine, and was in a cupboard in the room we slept in; there were two of her gowns there. On the 30th of September she asked if I had disturbed her gowns which were in that cupboard; I said No - I went to look for them, and missed my own things; she came down and asked the ostler if he had seen any one about; he said No- she said there had been a man in the tap-room that morning, who had been trying the gates the night before. On the Saturday after the officer brought in my property.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I am an officer. On the Saturday after the robbery I had a man at the office, and as I was going along I saw the prisoner and a boy with a bundle in his hand; the prisoner said to me, "What has become of the man?" I said, "He is ordered for re-examination:" I then said to the boy, "Where did you get this bundle?" he said first his mother gave it him, and then he said the prisoner gave it him - I took the boy, and went into the office; the prosecutrix there claimed the property: I went out again, and took the prisoner - she had then parted with a child which she had had in her hand, and hid herself in a field.

SAMUEL HARRIS . I live with my father and mother. The prisoner came to our house, and said, "I want your little boy to carry this bundle to the King's Head," and she said she would give me 1s. - I went with her, carried it, and the officer took me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

ELIZABETH ROWEN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-85
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1926. ELIZABETH ROWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 6lbs. weight of pork, value 3s. , the goods of Hannah Elsworth .

ROBERT WHITLOCK . I live with Hannah Elsworth, a cheesemonger , of Drury-lane . On the 17th of October, I saw the prisoner come to the window, and take this piece of pork - she walked two or three yards with it; I pursued, and took her with it - she said her sister bought it, and gave it her to carry.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman was in the shop, buying butter - she gave me this, and said she bought it; I do not know whether she had paid for it.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

HYAM MOSES.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-86
VerdictsGuilty; Guilty
SentencesTransportation

Related Material

1927. HYAM MOSES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 6 veils, value 1l. 3s. , the goods of Jonathan Ward .

AMELIA WARD . I am the wife of Jonathan Ward - he is in the lace and cap line , and lives in Whitechapel-road . On the 17th of September, about a quarter-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and requested to look at some black veils; I reached down the box, and placed half a dozen on the counter, not intending to show them to him; I then took out one veil, and showed it to him - he did not like that, and I threw it into the window -I was about to show him another, when he seized the half dozen on the counter, and rushed out: I jumped over the counter, pursued, and never lost sight of him till he was taken - two of the veils were found.

Prisoner. Q.Are you certain it was me? A. Yes, quite; I said I thought you had a ring on your finger, and I think so still.

WILLIAM ADAMSON . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 17th of September I was on duty, and heard Stop thief! called - I saw the prisoner going from the shop; I chased and took him - he was running fast; as soon as I took him he threw down this veil; I took him to the watch-house, and saw he was doing something to his finger - I said,"What are you doing?" he said, "What is that to you?" and he put his hand behind him.

AMELIA WARD . This is one of my veils, and one he dropped in running. GUILTY . Aged 20.

1928. HYAM MOSES was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 12 handkerchiefs, value 1l. 10s. , the goods of William Dudley .

MARY ANN THOMSON . I am in the service of Mr. William Dudley, a hosier . On the 15th of September, about half-past eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in, and asked for some black silk handkerchiefs; Mrs. Webb shewed him some - he said they were not good enough; she shewed him some others - he then made a sudden dart, with intent to strike us both, took up twelve handkerchiefs, and ran away; I ran out, but he made his escape down King-street - I am sure he is the man: the property has not been found.

CHARLES DAWSON . I was present when the prisoner was taken, on the 17th of September - I found this handkerchief tied round his neck, over a black one - it is quite new.

MARY ANN THOMSON . I believe this handkerchief is one of them - it has been hemmed, but not washed.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought this handkerchief for 4s.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

MARY HOLLOWAY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-87
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

Related Material

1929. MARY HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , 2lbs. weight of starch, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Piper .

THOMAS PIPER . I am a grocer , and live at Hackney . On the 11th of September I was at the counting-house door, and saw the prisoner come to my shop, take up a parcel of 2lbs. of starch, and walk out; I called to her - she made no answer, but went into a baker's shop, about twenty yards off; I went in, and charged her with it - she denied it, and said I might search her; I searched her, but found nothing - I then took her to the constable.

WILLIAM MABBETT . I live with the prosecutor. I had not been home long when I heard of the robbery; I went into the garden, by the side of the road, and found this paper of starch.

THOMAS PIPER . This is the paper - here is my writing on it; it was weighed for an order.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. You found nothing on the prisoner? A. No - I believe she told me who she was, and where she came from; I have not inquired whether her address was correct - I let her go, and then took her again: I said she must have given it to some person, or thrown it over the garden wall; I did not say I let her go because I thought two other women had taken it, nor that I was going after two other persons - the prisoner was ordered to appear at Worship-street, and she was there about five hours before I was; I do not know exactly the time I got there - I let her go at first because I found nothing on her, though I had seen her take it.

MARY TAYLOR . I know the prosecutor's shop; I passed by about one o'clock that day, and saw the prisoner go into the shop - I did not see her bring any parcel out, but I saw her throw one over the garden wall.

Cross-examined. Q. What distance were you from the wall? A.Fifteen or sixteen yards; I did not see any other persons about - I am quite positive she is the person, and it was a parcel of this description.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

The prisoner received a good character, and was strongly recommended to Mercy.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

ELIZABETH MIDDLETON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-88
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1930. ELIZABETH MIDDLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 2 sheets, value 3s., and 1 blanket, value 2s. , the goods of Frederick Swailes .

MARTHA SWAILES . I am the wife of Frederick Swailes - he lives in Easton-square, Clerkenwell . I lost these articles from a lodging which I let to the prisoner in my house - she had been with me about six weeks, and left my room on the Tuesday; I opened the door of her room, and missed these articles; she owed me 18s. for rent.

WILLIAM BRYMER PYATT . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Little Warner-street. I produce the sheets and blanket, which were pawned by a woman, in the name of Elizabeth Hill, at two different times, on the 1st of September; these are the duplicates I gave for them - I cannot say whether the prisoner was the person.

JOSEPH COOMBES . I took up the prisoner from information - she gave up the duplicates, and said she pawned the things.

MARTHA SWAILES . These are my property. The prisoner is a widow, and has five children.

Prisoner's Defence. I said I was not the person who took them - a young woman took them.

GUILTY . Aged 41.

Confined One Month .

ANN McCARTY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-89
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1931. ANN McCARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 sheet, value 2s. , the goods of Robert Hill .

ELIZABETH HILL . I am the wife of Robert Hill - he lives in Princes-street, Soho . I hung up three pairs of sheets in the back yard, on the 21st of October - the street door is on the latch sometimes; my husband was at dinner at twelve o'clock - he saw a person pass along the passage - I ran out, and found the prisoner in Frith-street, with this sheet: it was wet - she said she did not take it.

JAMES OSMOND PHILPOTT . I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Recommended to Mercy, believing her to have been in distress.

Confined One Month .

WILLIAM FREEMAN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-90
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1932. WILLIAM FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 saucepan, value 2s.; 1 knife, value 4s.; 1 fork, value 2s.; 2 toast-racks, value 5s.; 2 cork-screws, value 4s.; 2 pairs of snuffers, value 5s.; 1 snuffer-stand, value 1s.; 1 pair of pliers, value 3s.; 1 cheese-taster, value 1s.; 1 curtain pin, value 1s.; 1 pair of nippers, value 1s.; 2 iron brackets, value 1s.; 1 hammer, value 1s., and 2 screw-drivers, value 1s., the goods of James Veitch and William White , his masters .

JAMES VEITCH . I am in partnership with William White - we are ironmongers , and live in Regent-street . The prisoner was our warehouseman - he had access to these articles - he had been with us four years and a half, and from information we took him into custody; I went with the officer to his lodging, in Wardour-street, and all the articles stated were found there.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found on him a key, which opened the door of his lodging; I found all these articles there, except the snuffers and tray, which I received from Mrs. Lee, the landlady - they all appear to be new.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. What part of the house does he live in? A. In the back attic; there was no one in the room - I took him at his masters'.

JAMES VEITCH . These are our property - two of the articles are marked; I knew the prisoner lodged in Wardour-street, but I did not know the house.

The prisoner put in a petition for clemency, and two witnesses gave him a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, believing it to be his first offence.

Confined Three Months .

GEORGE NORRIS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-91
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1933. GEORGE NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 carpet, value 40s. , the goods of Alexander Brice .

JOHN WAUGH . I was employed by Alexander Brice to beat carpets; I took eleven from his house, on the 24th of September, and beat them in the fields - the prisoner assisted me to beat some, but not this one; I put them into a cart, and the one that was lost was put in the middle, so

that it could not fall out - I went on from the back of the Bedford Arms to Mr. Brice's, and left the carpets; it was rather dark, and I said I would call the next morning to see that they were all right - the officer afterwards came to me; I went to Mr. Brice's, and one of the carpets was missing, which I had put in the middle of the cart.

WILLIAM HOLT . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 24th of September, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner with this carpet, in Albany-street, about two hundred yards from the carpet-ground; I asked where he got it - he said from the carpet-ground, and that he was going to Newport-market; I said, "Where is your stick?" he said, "I belong to the ground, and we leave them there;" I again said, "Where are you going to take it?" he then said to Oxford-market, then to the Plasterers' Arms, and then to the Queen's Arms: I went to the carpet-ground - the master said the prisoner had been forbidden to come to the ground, and if the carpet had been left there it should have been taken to him, as he was answerable for it; the prisoner said he had been working with Waugh, who had left the carpet for him to carry.

WILLIAM BEAN . I am servant to Mr. Alexander Brice , of Euston-square . I gave eleven carpets to Waugh to beat - this is one of them.

Prisoner's Defence. Waugh asked if I would go and help him two hours for a 1s.; when they were done he put them into the cart - I then went and helped another man; I went across the field, saw this carpet, and was going to take it to Oxford-market.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

FRANCES POWELL.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-92
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1934. FRANCES POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 loaf of bread, value 8d.; 2lbs. weight of veal, value 1s.; 1lb. of pork, value 8d.; 2 shirts, value 8s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.; 1 petticoat, value 3s.; 2 sheets, value 4s.; 1 pillow and case, value 3s.; 1 copper pot, value 8s.; 1 flat iron, value 8d.; 2 earthern jars, value 1s.; 1 basket, value 6d., and 1 knife and fork, value 6d. , the goods of Robert Humphreys .

MARY HUMPHREYS. I am the wife of Robert Humphreys , and live in Waterloo-street . The prisoner was my servant - she left me on the 27th of September, without notice - I was very ill at the time; when I went into the kitchen I missed all the articles stated - I never permitted her to take any of them; I have not seen any of them since - when she was taken, she said she sold them; she had been with me five or six weeks.

JOHN PEYTON . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and asked what she had done with the property; she said she sold them to a Jew in the street.

Prisoner's Defence. That is false; my mistress quarrelled with me on the Saturday, and I left on the Tuesday - she was in the habit of sending me out with these things to get liquor; that is why they were sold.

MARY HUMPHREYS . That is not true - I received no money from her at all; I had seen them but a day or two before.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

SAMUEL PETHERS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-93
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1935. SAMUEL PETHERS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 ham, value 15s. , the goods of Richard Gates .

JOHN JAMES CAMPLIN . On the 13th of October, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner unhook a ham from the door-post of Mr. Gates' shop; I was within four or five yards of him - I sprang forward; he threw it down, and ran - I pursued, and took him at the corner of Church-street; there was another man with him, who made his escape.

JOHN ROBINS . I assisted in taking the prisoner - I went to the shop and got the ham.

WILLIAM MORETON . I am a constable. I received this ham, and have had it ever since.

SARAH GATES . I am the wife of Richard Gates. There were three hams hanging on the window-post - this was the middle one; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was working till nine o'clock, when I went to get half a pint of coffee - I came out, went a yard or two, and heard a person call Stop thief! I ran to the corner of Church-street, and some persons caught me; I never saw the ham till I was at the watch-house.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHANNA QUIN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-94
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1936. JOHANNA QUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , 1 half-sovereign, and nine half-crowns , the monies of Bridget Lycett .

BRIDGET LYCETT. I am single , and live at Mr. Stanley's - the prisoner was there, minding a room for some persons who were out; she slept in the same bed with me - I had a box in that room, and 3l. 12s. 6d. in it - it was locked; I missed one half-sovereign, and nine half-crowns from it on the 9th of September - I had the key in my pocket tied to my side; I had left the box locked, but I found it unlocked - I told the prisoner I missed the money, and that she was the thief; she denied it - there was no one else to take it.

CATHERINE STANLEY . I am mistress of the house the prisoner was employed to mind - the room was open in the day; I never gave the prisoner directions to have any key made.

WILLIAM PERRY . I am in the service of a gentleman- my brother keeps a smith's shop in Blandford-mews, On the 9th of September the prisoner came while I was there, and asked for a key for a box; I shewed her a large bundle - she selected one, and went away for three or four minutes; she then came back and said it would go in, but would not turn - I picked her out two or three more; she took them, came back, and said neither of them would do - on the Monday following the officer came to me; I went and saw the keys, which I believe were what I gave her - one of them locked and unlocked the box.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . The prosecutrix applied to me on Saturday, the 12th of September; I took the prisoner at the house, and said it was on suspicion of taking money- she said, "She can't swear to money;" the prosecutrix said she knew she had taken it - the prisoner said any body else might have taken it; I then went and got the keys, and this one opens the box.

Prisoner. I leave it to your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

JAMES ROGERS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-95
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1937. JAMES ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 1 coat, value 24s. , the goods of Benjamin Green .

HENRY HELSDON . I was at the corner of King-street, Covent-garden , on the 24th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; I saw the prisoner getting off a cart, with this coat on his arm; he ran with it to Broad-street, St. Giles' - I followed him to the court he lives in: I have seen him before - I then went back, and told the prosecutor; he got an officer, and went with me to the court - the coat was found there.

BENJAMIN GREEN . I am a labourer . I drove my master's cart to market, and got a load of manure; this coat, which is mine, was on the cart, while I was waiting for my baskets; I went to the prisoner's lodging, and found it.

JOSEPH FAIRWEATHER . I am a Police constable. I was called by the prosecutor, and found this coat in the lower room, where the prisoner was.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

FREDERICK SCOTT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-96
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1938. FREDERICK SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 8lbs. weight of bacon, value 3s. , the goods of James Cant .

JAMES CANT . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Leather-lane . On the 8th of October I was in my parlour, and saw the prisoner come and take a piece of bacon from my window, and walk away - I overtook him about thirty yards off; he threw the bacon down, and I took it up - this is the bacon: the shop window was open.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of employ, and was driven to distress; I had my goods seized, and had a wife and child to support.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined Fourteen Days .

HENRY LEE.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-97
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1939. HENRY LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , 1 pair of breeches, value 10s.; 5 shirts, value 30s., and 3 pairs of stockings, value 3s. , the goods of Benjamin Gane .

BENJAMIN GANE. I am a journeyman baker . This property was in a box in my room, at the Jacob's Wells, in Charles-street , where I lodged; I went to a situation in the country, and came to town on the 15th of August - I then missed three shirts; I told the landlord of it - I was obliged to go into the country again: when I next came to town I missed two more shirts and my breeches, and two pairs of stockings; I never authorized the prisoner to take any of them - he belonged to a baker's club with me.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How many men slept in that room? A. Four besides the prisoner; they were all bakers out of work - the room had never been left open.

JAMES FRANCIS THOMPSON . I live at a pawnbroker's. I have a pair of breeches, pawned in the name of Henry Lee - I do not know by whom.

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Bulstrode-street. I have two pairs of new stockings, pawned on the 25th of September, in the name of Henry Lee, No. 13, Charles-street; I believe the prisoner is the man.

JOHN MURPHY . I am a Police officer. I took the prisoner on this charge - I asked if he would show me his box; he opened it, and I saw in his hand, concealed, some papers: I took them from him, and gave them to the landlord - I went to the box again, and the prisoner snatched the papers from the landlord, and began to chew them; we rushed upon him, and took them from him - they are part of the duplicates of these stockings and breeches.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The room has often been left open.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing him to be in distress.

Confined Six Weeks .

WILLIAM THOMAS, HENRY TUTILL.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-98
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1940. WILLIAM THOMAS & HENRY TUTILL were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 watch, value 4l.; 1 seal, value 7s.; 1 watch-key, value 4s., and 1 ribbon, value 6d. , the goods of Daniel Corner .

DANIEL CORNER , I am mate of the Nancy, collier - she was at Shadwell on the 21st of October, at two o'clock in the day; my watch was in my bed-cabin - at three I was told two strange boys were on board; I went and saw one of the prisoners on the next ship, and the other coming up out of the cabin; I stopped Tutill, and asked what he was doing there - he said he knew nothing of the other boy, but he had been down to look for a water-closet; I took him down to the cabin, and missed the watch; I then brought Thomas in, and found my watch on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOSEPH BADMAN . I am a coal-meter's man. I went down to the cabin, and saw the two prisoners there - Thomas asked me if I could shew him where the water-closet was - I took a certificate up on the deck, and told the mate; while I was telling him the prisoners came up, and were leaving the ship - the mate took them, and found the watch on Thomas; Tutill said he knew nothing of the other boy, but it appeared to me they were together.

Tutill's Defence. I met this lad, and went on board to get employment: Thomas asked me where the water-closet was - I said I did not know: I know nothing of it.

JOSEPH BADMAN . The cabin is about ten feet square; it did not appear to me that the watch could have been taken by one without the other seeing it.

JAMES HUNTER . I am chief mate of the Medina. -Thomas is bound apprentice to my captain, for five years- here are his indentures: we are going to the Swan River, and will take him with us.

THOMAS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

TUTILL - NOT GUILTY .

ELIZABETH TURNER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-99
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1941. ELIZABETH TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 2 dresses, value 1l. 11s. , the goods of Esther Phillips .

ESTHER PHILLIPS . I am a dress-maker , and live in the Strand , with my father. The prisoner lived servant there for ten months; I lost two dresses on the 20th of September, from a drawer in the second floor room, which had been locked - I had the key in my pocket; the lock appeared to have been forced.

JOHN HUGHES . I am an officer. The prisoner was

given into my custody; I asked what she had done with the things - she said she had given them away.

WILLIAM WARD . I am a pawnbroker. I have a dress, pawned on the 21st of September, in the name of Mary Thomas, for 15s. - it was not by the prisoner.

ELIZABETH BAKER . I live with my father, who is a shoemaker. On the 21st of September the prisoner came and brought a gown and two other articles, which I bought for 6d.

ESTHER PHILLIPS . This gown is mine, and the dress brought by the pawnbroker - these other articles are the prisoners.

The prisoner put in a long written Defence, stating that three girls had called in her mistress' absence, and persuaded her to leave her place, promising she should live with them like a lady- that they desired her to wait at the door while they went up stairs and fetched her clothes, which they brought down with the property in question, and left her destitute. She received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutrix, on account of her character, and believing it to be her first offence.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

CHARLES BROWN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-100
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1941. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , 1 half-sovereign, 8 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the property of Ann Freeman , widow , from her person .

ANN FREEMAN. I am a widow, and live in Spitalfields. At ten o'clock at night on the 16th of September, I was in Whitechapel , going home with my son and daughter; my daughter went part of the way with me, and then said she could not go any further, as her husband would be home - she then left me; any person could have heard what she said: the prisoner then came up to me, said he was going my way, and he had got an old mother of his own; we had not walked above twenty yards, when I found his hand in my pocket - I said, "You are robbing me;" he said, "You old b-h, you lie;" I took hold of him - he bit my hand, and beat it very much, to make me let him go; the marks of his teeth are in my hand now: I held him, and called the watchman, who came and took him - I know I had eight shillings, a half-sovereign, a sixpence, a handkerchief, and some halfpence in that pocket when he came up, and I lost all but a few half-pence; the officer searched him, and found a half-soverigns, two sixpences, and some halfpence, on him.

JOHN HOWARD . I was on duty, and the prosecutrix called Watch! I took the prisoner, who had then got away from her; she charged him with stealing eight shillings and a half-sovereign - she was a little in liquor, but told her story sensibly, and she knew the prisoner next morning; when I got up he said she was his grandmother - her hands were black and blue. I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner. She said I robbed her of a shawl. Witness. I found her shawl about ten yards from the place.

JOHN DUNGATE . I am a constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to me; the prosecutrix did not appear quite sober, but was not drunk; she charged him with stealing a half-sovereign and some silver - I asked what money he had; he said two sixpences and some halfpence - I put my hand into his pocket, and found a half-sovereign, a sixpence, and 5d. in copper; the prosecutrix's wrist was very much bruised, and some blood was on her apron and handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. There were three of them fighting together; she was so intoxicated she was forced to be dragged to the watch-house - she first said she lost 8s., and then 14s.; at the watch-house, when she saw the half-sovereign, she said I took that - I knew I had the half-sovereign, but I wanted to keep it back to give my sister in the morning, when I thought I should be let out- I never said she was my grandmother; I was going to Mr. Robinson's, a hair-dresser, at Bow, for whom I had worked; the prosecutrix, a man, and a woman were fighting - she asked me to wipe her face, and I did; she then forced me into a gin-shop, to have something to drink, and when we came out she said I had robbed her.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

JOHN CATERER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-101
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

1942. JOHN CATERER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 watch, value 1l., and 1 seal, value 10s., the goods of William Pond , from his person .

WILLIAM POND . I am in a gentleman's house, where I lived thirty years as servant . On the 21st of September I met the prisoner - we went into a public-house; he was a stranger, but I saw him going up Holborn; he said he was a carpenter out of employ; we had a pint of porter and some gin and water - we drank together, and both nearly alike, for an hour and a half; I was not sober, and when we got out I became more drunk; we went to another house and had some more gin - I cannot say when we came out.

ROBERT LODGE . I am a house painter. I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner in Museum-street between six and seven o'clock in the evening of the 21st of September - they stopped in the street; the prosecutor leaned against some rails, took his own watch out, and replaced it again; the prisoner took hold of his arm, and said, "Come along father, we must get home;" I saw the prisoner take the watch and put it into his own pocket; they then went on to Bedford-square, and the prisoner put him against some rails, and said, "Father, have you any money, I will take care of it for you?" he then led him to Caroline-mews, and I got the patrol; he never quitted the prosecutor.

NOT GUILTY

CHARLES POWELL.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-102
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1943. CHARLES POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Thomas Keogh , from his person .

THOMAS KEOGH . On the 12th of October I was in Coventry-street , about half-past nine o'clock in the evening - a person told me my pocket was picked; I missed my handkerchief, which I had felt safe about a minute before; I saw the prisoner run down Coventry-street and Oxendon-street - he was taken at the King's-mews; the handkerchief has not been found.

JOSEPH MEARS . I was in Coventry-street, and my attention was drawn to the prosecutor; I saw the prisoner and another close behind him - I kept close behind them; the prisoner took the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's right-hand pocket and ran - I pursued; he dropped it - I took it up and still pursued; the person

who was with the prisoner came behind me and took the handkerchief from my hand; he then knocked my hat off, but I still pursued the prisoner, and he was taken near the King's-mews.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Fourteen Years

ELLEN SMITH, MARY ANN READ, CHARLES NEWMAN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-103
VerdictGuilty; Guilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1944. ELLEN SMITH , MARY ANN READ , and CHARLES NEWMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 watch-chain, value 4l.; 2 seals, value 2l., and 1 watch-key, value 10s., the goods of Stephen Noad , from his person .

STEPHEN NOAD . I live in Charles-street, Hatton-garden, and am a working silversmith . On the 25th of September I was coming up Peter-street, Saffron-hill - the three prisoners were walking together; Smith ran up, took me round the neck, and took my watch; I said,"You have got my watch," and caught hold of ber - she threw up her arms - I caught her round the waist and held her; the others tried to get her from me; I do not know what became of the watch - they were all very near together; it was a narrow street - they were walking in the middle of the road when I first saw them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This was in day-light? A. Yes; about half-past five o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Where were the three prisoners walking? A.In the middle of the street - I was on the right-hand side of the way; I do not know what Newman did, he was gone in a minute -I do not know how the watch went; Smith flung her hands round.

JOHN WICKENDEN . I was in Peter-street, and saw the three prisoners and another man with them; Smith went up to the prosecutor - I did not see her take the watch, but I saw it in her possession; the prosecutor laid hold of her - Read then went up and said, "What is the matter?" Read took the watch from Smith and passed it behind her - Newman took it and passed it to the other man, who ran away with it; the case of the watch was picked up, but I do not know by whom; I got rid of my child, who was in my arms, and assisted to keep the two women till the officer came.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How long was it before Newman was taken? A. I believe four days; I had seen him before, but had not spoken to him; I am not mistaken in his person - I did not hear the prosecutor swear he was not the man; there was a witness who said so at first, but he afterwards said he was; I could not take hold of him at the time because I had a child in my hand; the man who received the watch from Newman ran away; Newman stopped perhaps ten minutes, and told the woman to cut away into the passage and not stop there - he then went away; I had never spoken to him; I am a labourer at Mr. Cox's, in Shoe-lane - I had been to my tea and stopped rather over my time; I do not recollect two witnesses saying Newman was not the man.

PETER COUTURE . I am a printer, and live in King's Head-court. I was not in Peter-street when the watch was lost; when I came up I saw Smith and the prosecutor scuffling - in a few minutes Read came up and received the watch from Smith; I did not see it pass into any other person's hands except a young man who ran away, calling out that he was an officer, which prevented the people from taking him; I saw Newman on the spot, but did not see him have any concern with the watch - it was said at the watch-house that he was in the scuffle in the passage, but I did not see that.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How near were you to the woman when you saw the watch go? A. About four yards; I saw it go - Read took it from Smith when she went to rescue her, and passed it to a young man behind; it appeared to me to be a silver watch.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.You saw it pass to some person who ran away? A. Yes; he put it into his right-hand pocket - that was not Newman; I never told the last witness I had changed my mind and that it was; Newman was on the spot - there was a struggle between the prosecutor and the woman, before the man who ran away received the watch; to the best of my knowledge Newman took no part in it.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a grocer. I heard a young woman scream and went to my door; I saw the prosecutor and Smith struggling - he said, "This girl has got my watch and gold chain;" I said, "She shall not go till we get assistance;" we got on to No.13 - he pushed the girls into the passage; Newman and another man came in to try to rescue them - I left them in the passage, and went to Hatton-garden, but before I got back the parish officer had taken these women.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate that Newman endeavoured to rescue the girls? A. Yes; the prosecutor was only struggling with one girl at first; I did not see the watch taken - I only went when I heard a scream.

WILLIAM CLARK . I went and took the two women; I got this watch-case from the prosecutor.

GEORGE WADDINGTON . I am an officer. I took Newman on the 29th in Holborn, in consequence of information; he denied having been in company with the women.

MR. CLARKSON to STEPHEN NOAD . Q. Did not you tell the Magistrate that Smith took the watch and gave it to Read, and she to a man who ran away? A. I said she flung her arms round, and some one took it, but I could not tell who; I saw Newman examined twice - the women were brought up first, and then twice afterwards; I was not told that one of the witnesses said Newman was not the man.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 18.

READ - GUILTY . Aged 19.

NEWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

JOHN STRONG.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-104
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1945. JOHN STRONG was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 5 handkerchiefs, value 10s.; 4 ozs. weight of thread, value 8d.; 12 yards of ribbon, value 2s.; 50 yards of ferret, value 2s.; 9 yards of crape, value 5s.; 11 yards of lace, value 1s. 6d.; 4 yards of linen, value 2s.; 2 yards of woollen cloth, value 3s.; 11 pairs of gloves, value 14s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 1s. 6d., the goods of James Wilson , his master .

JAMES CROPLEY . I am in the service of Mr. James Wilson , linen-draper , of St. John-street - the prisoner had been porter there about eight months. On the 11th of October Mr. Wilson called him into the parlour, and said,

"John, we have a thief in the house, I will find him out -I must search the boxes, and will begin with yours; have you any objection?" he said No; I saw the prisoner's box searched, and the articles stated were found in it; he said he did not know how they came there: I asked him if he had any property in any other part of the house - he said No, that was all - and that no other person was concerned with him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How many persons pass through the prisoner's room to go to bed? A. Three or four; his box was locked - he unlocked it; I made him no promise before he said he had no more.(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HALL . The prisoner was brought to the office; he said he was afraid it would be a bad job for him.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, believing it to be his first offence.

Confined Three Months .

THOMAS APPLETON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-105
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

1946. THOMAS APPLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 5 ozs. weight of silk, value 10s. , the goods of William Middlemore .

WILLIAM MIDDLEMORE . I am a weaver , and live in Wellington-row, Bethnal-green - the prisoner was my journeyman . I counted the bobbins of silk at eight o'clock in the morning of the 14th of October and missed some; the prisoner came to work - I saw him put his hat on a box, and his handkerchief fell out of it; he went to work, and when he went to his handkerchief, I saw the bobbins which I had missed full of silk, fall from his hat, and they were empty; I got out of my loom and took them up; I got an officer, and he was taken to the watch-house at eleven o'clock - at one, he said if I would let him out he would go to work, and never do any thing of the kind again - I had a good character with him.

HANNAH CRANE . I was in the shop; what Mr. Middlemore has stated is correct - the bobbins were found empty as they came from the prisoner's hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no opportunity of winding it off.

NOT GUILTY .

CATHERINE BARRY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-106
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1947. CATHERINE BARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 1 shirt, value 4s.; 1 shift, value 3s.; 1 night-gown, value 1s., and 2 frocks, value 15s., the goods of George Mosley ; and 1 pair of shoes, value 4s. , the goods of Mary Harricot .

MARY MOSLEY . I am the wife of George Mosley - he keeps an eating-house in Berwick-street, Oxford-street ; the prisoner lodged there for three months. I missed these articles, and sent for an officer.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I went to the house on the 19th of October - I found the prisoner on the first floor; she said I might search, I should find nothing but what was hers - I found five duplicates in a drawer in a box, which led to the articles.

PETER DIXON . I live at Mr. Howe's, a pawnbroker, in High-street, Bloomsbury. I have a shift and two frocks, pawned by the prisoner on the 19th of October.

THOMAS LUCAS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham-court-road. I have a table-cloth and a pair of shoes - I do not know by whom they were pawned, but I gave this duplicate.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

ANN CARTER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-107
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1948. ANN CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 3 shifts, value 3s.; 3 petticoats, value 3s.; 2 caps, value 2s.; 5 bed-gowns, value 3s.; 4 frocks, value 4s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 1 shirt, value 6d.; 1 whittle, value 2s. 6d., and 3 keys, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Cobden .

ANN COBDEN . I am the wife of Charles Cobden. a soldier - we live in Rochester-street, Westminster . The prisoner lodged with me, but her husband did not; I missed these articles from a box under the table in my room, and my keys.

SAMUEL HERDSMAN . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tothill-street. I have a shawl and a child's gown pawned on the 15th of October - the gown was pawned by the prisoner - I am not certain about the shawl.

ELIZABETH MORRIS , My husband is a soldier. The prisoner came to my house on the 25th of October, and sold me this shawl for 8d. - she came a second time with a shift and bed-gown, but I would not buy them.

JAMES PHILLIPS . I am a Police constable. I took the prisoner, and found on her four duplicates and these keys, which the prosecutor claims; two of the duplicates relate to this property.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. She lent me the gown, and knew what I was going to do with it; the keys were on the table - I was amusing the child with them, and happened to put them into my pocket.

ANN COBDEN . I never lent her any thing to pawn - she took them without my leave; I did not find it out till Sunday morning.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined Three Months .

CHARLES LANE, GEORGE CLAYTON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-108
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

1949. CHARLES LANE and GEORGE CLAYTON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 live tame fowl, price 3s., the property of Leonard Baldry ; and 1 live tame chicken, price 8d. , the property of John Bailey .

JOHN BAILEY . I am a baker , and live in Osnaburg-street, Regent's-park . I keep fowls - the one I lost was usually kept in a stone-mason's yard; I did not miss it till I was told it was taken.

LEONARD BALDRY . I am a victualler , and live fifty or sixty yards from Mr. Bailey - the stone-mason's yard is between his house and mine; I lost a chicken, but did not miss it till the prisoners were brought in.

THOMAS SPARKS . I live within four doors of Mr. Bailey. I saw the two prisoners last Saturday week; the fowls were fluttering in their arms - I took Clayton, and the servant took Lane.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The fowls were alive? A. Yes - they did not say they were going to fight them.

JAMES WARD . I was going to work, and saw the prisoners with the fowls; I caught Lane.

NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS MILLER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-109
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

1950. THOMAS MILLER was indicted for embezzlement .

CAROLINE PEARCE . I am the wife of James Pearce - we are customers of Mr. Watkins '. In September a sack of split beans were brought to our house; I paid the prisoner's son for them on the Tuesday following - I received this receipt; I do not know whose writing it is.

NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS MILLER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-110
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1951. THOMAS MILLER was again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 36 bushels of coals, value 2l. , the goods of George Watkins , his master.

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

JAMES LASSAM . I am a labourer. I carried four sacks of coals to the prisoner's house, for him, on the 26th of September, for which he gave us 6d. a piece - there were two bushels in each bag; I took them from Mr. Watkins' shed.

WILLIAM JENNINGS . I carried five bags of coals to the prisoner's.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ever carry coals for him before? A. I have carried bushels for him, at 1d. a bushel - I do not work for the prosecutor.

GEORGE WATKINS. I am a coal and corn-dealer , and live at Brentford . The prisoner was in my service, but I never employed him to carry these coals for me, on the 26th of September.

Cross-examined. Q. What wages did you give him? A.Fifteen shillings a week and a bushel of coals; there was no arrear of coals due - he booked the coals himself up to the 5th of September; he has lately opened a shop: he told me of it, and I said he might do what he pleased -I discharged him on the 5th of October; he said there were five bushels of coals due to him, but I did not know of this then; sometimes he booked them, and sometimes I did - I do not believe there were any due to him; the book will prove there were not thirty-six bushels due to him.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How soon was it after the 5th of September that he left you? A. On the 5th of October - there could not have been more than four or five bushels due to him; I never authorised him to take thirty-six bushels to his own shed.

COURT. Q. Was he a labourer? A. He was a sort of foreman , and kept the books ; he had been with me ninety-five weeks - he was allowed a bushel of coals a week, and took them when he pleased; I turned him away on suspicion nine days after these coals went away: he never bought coals of me, to my knowledge - he has bought cinders and wood; these coals were taken out the back way.

Prisoner's Defence. There were forty bushels of coals owing me; I have them in in the winter - I had had half a chaldron of cinders of him, and a load of wood of Mr. Winkworth; when I had a bushel of coals I put it down retail, as I did what I sold.

JURY to JAMES LASSAM . Q. Did you carry these coals the shortest way from the prosecutor's? A. Yes; we came out of the back way of the shed, as most convenient to carry the coals - it is done sometimes.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARY HUNT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-111
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

Third Middlesex Jury. - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1952. MARY HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 3 lbs. of pork, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Brown .

EDMUND EDDS . I know Mr. Thomas Brown , a cheesemonger , of Grafton-street, Soho . I saw the prisoner come and take this piece of pork, put it under her shawl, and walk away; I followed, and took it from her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I have four children, and my husband is a cripple.

GUILTY . Aged 61.

Confined Seven Days .

CHARLES MUNDEN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-112
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1953. CHARLES MUNDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 10lbs. weight of ham, value 6s. , the goods of John Tofts .

JOHN TOFTS. I keep a cheesemonger's-shop , in Charlton-street, Somers'-town . On the 17th of September I went out, and when I came home at a quarter-past twelve o'clock, I heard the prisoner was at the watch-house, and the officer had the ham - I had left it safe when I went out.

Prisoner. Q. Was the ham missing from your house? A. Yes.

SARAH PUGH . I live in Charlton-street. I saw the prisoner take something from his apron, and throw it into Tofts' shop; I heard Mrs. Tofts cry Stop thief! and say the prisoner had stolen the ham - he ran away, and I sent my husband after him; I did not lose sight of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me out of the house with the ham? A. Yes, with something that you threw back.

GEORGE BOWER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner- he had only a halfpenny about him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ask the woman whether I was outside the shop? A. Yes, and she said you were.

Prisoner's Defence. She said I was inside the shop all the time; I went to get a halfpenny worth of cheese, and knocked on the counter - no one came: I saw a carriage stop, and was going out to see if they wanted the horse held; a person came and said the woman wanted me - I went back to the shop, and the woman said I had taken up the ham, and put it down again, but it was upside down.

SARAH PUGH . He had got about a yard from the door when he turned back and threw it in.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARY PLAYSTEAD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-113
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

Related Material

1954. MARY PLAYSTEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 2 pairs of shoes, value 8s. , the goods of Ralph Wilcoxon .

JAMES EADE . I am in the employ of Mr. Ralph Wilcoxon , a boot-maker , of Walker's-court, Berwick-street, Soho . I saw the prisoner take two pairs of shoes, and put them into her pocket; I was in the passage - she stopped about ten minutes - I charged her with taking them, and she said she did it through distress.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Where is this passage? A. It adjoins the shop; I was looking through the partition - she had not minded the shop; she came to bring some work which she had done - she was a trimmer : I do know whether she worked for any one else.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am an officer, and took the pri

soner - she pleaded distress; she had some other shoes on her, which were not finished.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

GEORGE ROY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-114
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

1955. GEORGE ROY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 1 truck, value 2l. , the goods of Charles Cockerton .

CHARLES COCKERTON . I lost a truck from the side of my house on the 12th of September; I saw it safe at eleven o'clock at night, and in about half an hour I heard it going; I went out, and saw the prisoner with it - I asked what he was going to do with it; he made no answer, and I took him.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was he not drunk? A. He was rather the worse for liquor - there were a great many people about.

THOMAS MATTERFACE . I was in conversation with the prosecutor, when we heard the truck move - he ran out; the prisoner had the truck, and was taken.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not appear drunk? A. Yes, quite so.

NOT GUILTY .

MARY SULLIVAN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-115
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1956. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 2 spoons, value 4s. , the goods of James Gibbons .

ELIZABETH GIBBONS. I am the wife of James Gibbons , and live in Seymour-place, Bryanstone-square . The prisoner was in my service till within a month of the 12th of September - I had missed two spoons, and discharged her, in consequence of it; these are them: this one was in a pot of red currant jelly, and the other was taken from between the two drawers in the bed-room - when I missed them I asked if she knew any thing about them, and she denied it: I said, "If you have pawned them tell me, and I will say nothing more about them."

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is Gibbons your name? A. Yes, but in my confusion I put my maiden name, when I went to Mr. Jenkins' to inquire about them - she had taken them from there, and put them into another place; she sent me to a pawnbroker's, in Edgware-road, and they sent me to Lisson-grove - in my fright I signed my name Broadway, and did so before the Magistrate, because I did not wish my name to be brought before a parcel of gentlemen. My husband is a picture-frame maker and cleaner; his name is not on the door - he does not go by the name of Broadway; I will not swear to that, or to any thing more than I have done.

COURT. She calls herself before the Magistrate, the wife of James Broadway, and makes her mark. Witness. There is no James Broadway .

RICHARD WILCOX FAIRHAM . I have two spoons, which the prisoner brought to pawn: I stopped her, and sent for Mrs. Broadway, which was the name the prosecutrix had given me - I saw the person called James Gibbons at the Sessions-house.

Cross-examined. Q.When did she give her name as Broadway? A. A fortnight before, when she came to my house, and I was to send to Seymour-place for her - I have since heard her name is Gibbons.

JOHN CHAMBERLAIN . On the night of the 12th of September, I saw Fairham running after the prisoner, and I stopped her.

COURT to MRS. GIBBONS. Q.Why did you say your name was Broadway? A. I am of a respectable family, and I did not like to go my own name, lest it should be known about the country; I was married twenty-two years ago - my name was Elizabeth Broadway .

Cross-examined. Q.Can you write? A. Yes, but I made my mark, because I have had an accident with my right hand - I was married at St. Martin's, in Birmingham.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this place - it is a house of ill-fame; my mistress used to send me to bed at half-past ten o'clock, and then let in gentlemen; they have two daughters, and two other ladies live there - she wanted me to turn as bad as her daughters; she took half a crown that was left for me by Mr. Lake, and would not give it me.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months .

JAMES SMITH.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-116
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1957. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 1 ball of twist, value 3s. , the goods of George Boulton Poynton .

HENRY CARTER . I am in the service of George Boulton Poynton , a woollen-draper , of Oxford-street . The prisoner came on the 3rd of October, for a ball of twist; one of the young men served him, and he paid 3d. for it - I saw him put this other ball into his pocket, and when he got out of the shop I called him back, and said I wanted the twist he had in his pocket; I put my hand into his pocket, and took it out; I then gave him in charge - he said nothing.

ANGELIOUS BETRAUN . I was sent for, and took the prisoner - he said he did it through distress.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Two Months .

THOMAS JOHNSON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-117
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1958. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 3 live tame fowls, price 4s. 6d., the property of Robert Ames ; 1 bag, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Bradley ; 29 lbs. weight of lead, value 5s., and 2 brass cocks, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Cole Hipkin , and fixed to a building of his ; and that, at the General Session of the Delivery of the Gaol of our Lord the King, held at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, on Thursday, the 31st of May, in the eighth year of the present Reign, he was convicted of felony.

ROBERT AMES I am a schoolmaster , and live in Redman's-row, Stepney . On the 20th of October, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, when I went to the school, I found the back door of the play-ground broken open, and three fowls gone from a shed at the back of the house - I saw the fowls at Worship-street the same day; they were then dead.

THOMAS COLE HIPKIN . I live in Claremont-place, Redman's-row, about a hundred yards from Mr. Ames' school. I heard that the lead pipes had been taken from Nos. 4 and 5, Redman's-row: I went, and missed the pipe and two brass cocks, which had been affixed to a building of mine.

THOMAS BRADLEY . I lost this sack or bag the same

night the fowls were taken; the fowls were found in the sack - it is a particular one of my own making.

JOHN HOLLETT . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner in Mile-end-road on the 20th of October, at a quarter before seven o'clock in the morning; this bag was laying by the side of the road, and when I stopped to look at it he came up; I said, "Is this yours?" he said Yes - I said, "What is in it?" he said he did not know; I said."You have been at your old tricks again;" he said, "What is a man to do? he can't starve;" I took him to the watch-house.

GEORGE KELLY . I went with the prisoner to the watch-house, and found three fowls, this pipe, and two cocks in the bag; the witnesses have seen the articles, and sworn to them.

GUILTY . Aged 71.

Transported for Seven Years .

HENRY SCHOOLING.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-118
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

1959. HENRY SCHOOLING was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 60 knives, value 30s.; 60 forks, value 30s; 2 candlesticks, value 3s.; 1 cream jug, value 1s.; 1 mustard-pot, value 1s.; 1 pepper-castor, value 1s.; 2 salt-holders, value 3s.; 24 spoons, value 4s., and 1 canister, value 1s., the goods of John James Rippon , his master .

JOHN JAMES RIPPON . I am an ironmonger , and live in Well-street . The prisoner was my porter ; during the last five or six weeks that he was with me, I have been missing articles - I believe the articles produced are mine.

WILLIAM CAVANAUGH . I am apprentice to Mr. Thompson, of Berwick-street. I have known the prisoner five years; he called on me one morning, about five weeks ago, and asked me to pawn him a dozen knives, which he had bought of his master at trade price - I pawned them for him for 10s.; he called at one o'clock, and I gave him the money and duplicate - in three weeks he called again, said he had taken them out of pawn, and asked me to pawn them again, which I did, at Mr. Harrison's - I gave him the money and duplicate at dinner time: he came again last Monday fortnight, said he had taken the knives out of pawn, and asked me to pawn them again; I went with them to Mr. Harrison's, who said, "I have several of these knives - I must know where they come from, and detain you;" I was frightened, and ran out of the shop: I was taken three days afterwards - he gave me these salt-cellars five months ago, for my good behaviour to him, and giving him something when he was out of place.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. How long have you lived in your place? A. Five or six years; I pawned these on my way to my master's shop - I do not know the prosecutor, but I know his shop. I kept these salts in my own room, but I did not know they were stolen; I thought he had bought them of his master - I did not suspect the knives were stolen; I had not sold any.

HERBERT JOHN CLARK . I live with Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker, in Wardour-street. On the 5th of October the witness came with some knives - we had taken some of him before; we questioned him, and he ran away - the prisoner had not redeemed any.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask where he brought the first from? A. Yes - he said they were his own.

GEORGE AVIS . I took charge of the prisoner, and told him it was for robbing his master; he denied all knowledge of it: when I took Cavanaugh he said he would tell me all about it, and told me of the prisoner - I got some of these articles from Mr. Rockford's, and some I found in Cavanaugh's box, which he said he received from the prisoner.

JOHN JAMES RIPPON re-examined. After the things were found I asked if he had robbed me, and said if he had, it would be better to tell the truth - he denied it.

PETER THOMPSON . Cavanaugh is in my employ; I have seen the prisoner there, but have not seen him bring any thing; I told Cavanaugh I would not have boys at my house.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN THRELKELD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-119
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1960. JOHN THRELKELD was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES WALL . I am a hair-dresser . The prisoner was employed in my shop, and was to receive money for me, which he was to deliver to my wife. On the morning of the 15th of October I was ill, and had a bill of 10l. coming due - I asked the prisoner to take some articles to pawn for me; he took them, but did not return: he went at nine o'clock in the morning - I received some information, and went the same evening to Ratcliff-highway, and found him- he said he had pawned the things, spent the money, and was very sorry; he was sober then, but had been drunk in the day.

GEORGE SMALLBONE . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a coat, six tea-spoons, and a pair of ear-rings with me, for two guineas, in the name of John Taylor , Princes-street, about nine o'clock in the morning - I gave him this duplicate.

THOMAS AMES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found on him 12s. and this duplicate.

Prisoner's Defence. For the last two years I have been out of my mind; I have cut my throat twice, and hung myself twice - if I take a glass of liquor I do not know what I do; I have worked five years for my master - he told me not to pawn them in his own name.

JAMES WALL . Yes, I did; I had no idea of his being out of his mind at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .

WILLIAM PERKINS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-120
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1961. WILLIAM PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 2 barrels, value 2s., and 6 cwt. of tar, value 26s., the goods of Charles Price and others; and 1 boat, value 5l. , the goods of John Dawson .

JOHN DODD . I am clerk and foreman to Sir Charles Price - he has two partners; one of them is named Charles Price . In October three barrels of tar were landed at their wharf at Mill-wall , on account of Samuel Williams ; it was in their care, and Mr. Williams' name was chalked on the head boards of the barrels. On the 12th of October, or the morning of the 13th, two barrels were taken from the wharf; when I came in the morning a notice was given that the Police had stopped a person with two barrels - I went and saw them; they had the same marks on them, and I believe were the same that were missed from the wharf.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know what they contained? A. No - they were landed as barrels of tar, and had that appearance.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . I am a watchman. I was going round at half-past one o'clock on the morning of the 13th of October; I saw the prisoner on Messrs. Price's wharf - he put a barrel of tar into a boat; I went and told him to bring his boat too, but he pushed off - I sprang my rattle; he hung down his head, and pulled off till he got one-third across the river - he then let the boat that had the tar in it drift against a lighter; the Police-boat came up - I said, "Go, and take that boat;" they went and took the prisoner, and then brought Mr. Dawson's boat, which had the tar in it.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you spoken to the man? A. No - I could not know his voice; I had seen him on my beat - I saw his face when he was putting the barrel into the boat; it was very moonlight - I did not see any other boats moving.

WILLIAM JUDGE . I am a Thames Police-surveyor. I saw Andrews about a quarter before two o'clock - he told me to pull after that boat, which I did; it was then pulling towards the Surrey side - I gave chace, and saw the prisoner in the boat; I called to him to stop, but he would not - I said I would fire into it if he did not; I then came up to him, and asked what he had been up to - he said Nothing; I took him into the Police-boat - he said he had come from the City-canal; I took him to Andrews, and asked if he had not been on Price's wharf - he said not that he knew of, but he might have been looking for his boat; I saw Dawson's boat with two barrels of tar in it - the front of the prisoner's jacket was tarry, and the sculls likewise.

WILLIAM MAURICE . I am an apprentice to Mr. John Dawson . I left my master's boat about two hundred yards from Price's wharf, at half-past twelve o'clock - I went there in three-quarters of an hour, and found it outside a tier of barges, with two barrels of tar in it.

Prisoner's Defence. This is the jacket I had on - it has had tar on it these two years; the work I am engaged in is nothing but tar and dirt - I never had the boat in my charge, and did not put the tar into it, nor tow it at all; was in my own boat.

WILLIAM JUDGE . The weight of one barrel was 350lbs.

WILLIAM ANDREWS . He placed a board to the boat, and rolled it in.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 12 Months .

GEORGE WHITEHEAD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-121
VerdictNot Guilty

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1962. GEORGE WHITEHEAD was indicted for embezzlement .

CHARLES HURST . I am a baker . The prisoner was in my employ for two years and a half; I gave him this bill to take to Mrs. Blackburn on the 31st of August - it is for 1l. 1s. 9d., and here is his receipt on it for 13s.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you make out the bill? A. Yes; he accounted to me for money every day, but did not account for this; he has not paid me several days accounts together - he enters what he receives in his own book, and I enter them in the ledger - my ledger is not here.

COURT. Q. Did you make the bill from your book and send it by the prisoner? A. Yes; I have no recollection of it but from my book - I do remember this was not paid -I will take him into my employ again.

MARY BLACKBURN . I paid the prisoner 13s. on the first Monday in September.

NOT GUILTY .

FRANCIS WELSH.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-122
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1963. FRANCIS WELSH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 pair of trousers, value 10s. , the goods of Ambrose Bradley .

MARTIN SUTTON . I am servant to Ambrose Bradley , of Brown's-lane, Spitalfields . I saw the prisoner take these trousers from his shop - I saw him by a looking-glass; he was behind another man and thought I should not see him; he put them under his jacket - I went and took him with them; he dropped them on the floor.

THOMAS HART . I am an officer, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Fourteen Days .

ANN SMITH, CHARLOTTE CAMPBELL.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-123
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1964. ANN SMITH and CHARLOTTE CAMPBELL were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of September , 1 jacket, value 6d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 3s.; 1 waistcoat, value 3s.; 2 stockings, value 3d.; 2 ozs. weight of tobacco, value 7d.; 1 pair of drawers, value 6d.; 1 shilling, and 10 penny-pieces, the property of George Wilkinson ; and 1 hammock, value 4s. , the goods of Thomas Smith Cockburn .

GEORGE WILKINSON. I am a sailor . I know the two prisoners; I saw them on the 22d of September, at twelve o'clock at night, in New Gravel-lane , together, and one of them asked me to go with her - I went with one and Cockburn went with the other - we went to the same house; I was up stairs with Smith, and he was down stairs - I undressed, and laid my clothes in a chair with some tobacco, a pair of drawers, and 1s. 10d. in money; I did not go to sleep - Smith blew out the light and went down stairs - I got up and called the watchman, he came, and the clothes were gone; I saw her again in about an hour at the watch-house; my clothes are here.

THOMAS SMITH COCKBURN. I was with Wilkinson, and went to the same house with Campbell; I had a hammock with me which I laid on a chair - Smith is the woman that Wilkinson went with.

GEORGE DEVERELL . I am a watch-house-keeper. Smith and Campbell were brought to the watch-house with this bundle - Smith was very much alarmed, and said, "Do forgive me, and I will tell you all about it;" I sent the watchman to find where they took them from, and while he was gone, Smith said she took them from a sailor in Bluegate-fields; the witnesses then came, and I opened the lock-up place for them to see the prisoners - I saw this bundle lay by the side of Smith; I said, "What is that? I thought I searched you;" she said, "Yes; but I had these on;" it was these trousers.

THOMAS BIRD . I am a watchman. I saw the two prisoners soon after two o'clock that morning; Smith had something bulky - I asked what she had got, she made no reply; I took her by the arm and asked her again - she then said she took them from a man who had been ill-using her; I took them to the watch-house, and then went to

No. 2, Bluegate-fields, where I found Wilkinson, with his shirt and a pair of canvas drawers on.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

CAMPBELL - NOT GUILTY .

EMMA HOOPER, MARY SCROOF.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-124
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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OLD COURT.

THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1965. EMMA HOOPER and MARY SCROOF were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , 2 pairs of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Mary Ann Comin .

MARY ANN COMIN . I am a widow , and sell shoes . On the 23rd of September the prisoners came into the shop with another - Scroof asked for a pair of shoes, and tried two pairs - one fitted; they came to 2s. - she said she had not enough by 4d.; the other two had left the shop before I finished trying them on; she said she would go over the way to the young woman who had gone out first and borrow 4d; the one not here had gone before Hopper - Scroof did not return, but in two minutes I missed two pairs of shoes; I shut my door and ran out, but could not see them; I returned and stood at my door - shortly after I saw Hooper going along Shoreditch - I ran and caught her by the arm and brought her back; she denied having been in my shop; I told her she had, and asked who the other two were; she said she did not know them, and had never seen them before, but merely came in with them; I then gave her in charge; I described Scroof to Johnson, who took her in a few minutes and brought her to the shop - one of them must have taken the shoes.

EDMUND DARNLEY . I live with Mr. Miller, pawnbroker, of Kingsland-road. I have a pair of shoes pawned by Hooper on the 23rd.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am an officer. This pair of shoes was given to me this morning by a pawnbroker, who is too ill to attend.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HOOPER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

SCROOF - NOT GUILTY .

JAMES SIMMONS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-125
VerdictNot Guilty

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1966. JAMES SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 carpenter's plough, value 2s. , the goods of Joseph Thimblebly .

HENRY FREAKS . I am in the employ of Joseph Thimbleby , a pawnbroker . On the 21st of September, about twelve o'clock, I was called - I ran out and overtook the prisoner, walking, about fifty yards from the shop, with this plough in his hands, before him - he said it belonged to him; he had taken it from the side of our door, where it hung - I knew him before; it has been in our possession twelve months.

WILLIAM HARRIDGE , On the 21st of September, this plough hung at the prosecutor's door-post; I saw the prisoner looking at it - he turned round, saw nobody looking at him, then reached it down, and walked off with it; I went in and told the witness.

HENRY FREAKS . The prisoner says it is his own; he means that it has been stolen from him - it was pawned with us in January, 1828.

Prisoner's Defence. It was stolen from, me and is the fourth I have lost; I bought it about two years ago, in Brick-lane.

JAMES NEWTON . I am a plane-maker, and I have known the prisoner fifty years; I recollect his purchasing a plane four or five years ago, but I cannot swear to this.

NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS HADNETT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-126
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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Second London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1967. THOMAS HADNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 candlestick, value 2s., and 1 extinguisher, value 6d., the goods of John Humphreys ; also on the 13th of June , 1 candlestick, value 2s., his property .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM LINDSEY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-127
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

1980. WILLIAM LINDSEY was indicted for that he, on the 18th of September , at St. Mary-le-Bow , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain order for payment of money , which is as follows:-

Baker-street. September 17th, 1829.

Masterman and Co. Please to pay Mr. John Smith, or Bearer, 75l. 7s. on demand.

£75. 7s. GEORGE YOUNG .

with intent to defraud William Masterman , and others; against the Statute.

2nd COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a like forged order, with a like intent, knowing it to be forged.

3rd COUNT, for feloniously offering, disposing of, and putting away, a like forged order, he well knowing it to be forged, with a like intent.

4th COUNT, like the third, only calling it a warrant, for payment of money.

MESSRS. BRODRICK and BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BRAND. I am cashier at the banking-house of William Masterman, and Co.; there are five more partners. In September last George Young , proprietor of the bazaar, in Baker-street, Portman-square, kept cash at our house, and was in the habit of drawing cheques. On the afternoon of the 17th of September, the prisoner presented a cheque to me, which I did not pay.

EDWARD GARNETT . I am clerk to Mr. Gates, solicitor for this prosecution. On Wednesday last, I served the prisoner, in Newgate, with a notice, of which this is a copy (Notice to produce the cheque in question, on the present trial) - (read.)

THOMAS BRAND . The cheque purported to be drawn by George Young; I wrote on it, "Not stated from where drawn;" as the reason I refused payment, and returned it to the prisoner - I was in attendance at the banking-house on the following morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, when a cheque, purporting to be drawn by George Young , was presented by a porter named Perkins; this is the cheque(looking at it) I had seen Perkins about the neighbourhood before, as a porter, dressed in a white apron, as porters generally are; I refused payment of the cheque, and made inquiry of Perkins, and from what he stated, I went into

the counting-house, stated the circumstance to Mr. Mildred; he and another gentleman went out; the prisoner was brought into the banking-house about twenty minutes after - Perkins and Aldred came with him; I had detained the cheque, and said to the prisoner, "What did I say to you yesterday afternoon, when you presented the cheque?" he said, I refused it on account of its not being dated from any place, and desired him to get another- I believed him to be the man I had seen the previous afternoon; Mr. Young had kept an account at Masterman's six years - I am acquainted with his hand - writing, and believe the signature to the cheque not to be his handwriting - I had the same doubt about the one presented the night before, but did not state it; I have been a cashier there nine years - his cheques invariably come through my hands; I consider it like his writing, but am satisfied it is not his.

CHRISTOPHER PERKINS. I am a porter, and have stood at the corner of Nicholas-lane, for fifteen years. On the morning of the 18th of September, between nine and ten o'clock, the prisoner came and spoke to me - I am not certain of the time; he asked if I knew Masterman's - I said Yes; he told me to go and get that cheque cashed - to bring two 10l. notes, and the rest in sovereigns, and when I got it to bring it down to him at the public-house; he did not say what house, but I stood against the door of a public-house, and supposed he meant that house - he said if any inquiry was made, I was to say, the person who gave it to me, came from No. 72, Grosvenor - square; I took the cheque to Masterman's, and in consequence of what passed, I went back to the public-house, and asked for the prisoner - he was not there then, but had been there; I looked about for him with Newman, the waiter, and saw him standing against the London Life Insurance - office - he said to me"Have you got the money?" I said No, and told him he was to go himself; I said that from the directions I had received - While we were talking together, Aldred the officer came up, and asked me what it was about; I told him the circumstances, and he took the prisoner in charge - we went to Masterman's together; the prisoner had beckoned me over to him, before I went up to him; as we went along, I heard him say to Aldred, that it was all right, he had been there the night before.

BENJAMIN ALDRED . I am a City-officer. I was in Cannon-street, near the London Life Insurance Office, on the 18th of September - my attention was attracted by Perkins and the prisoner talking; in consequence of what passed I took the prisoner into custody - he said in my hearing that he came into possession of the cheque from a person at No. 78, Grosvenor-street, or Grosvenor-square, I will not be certain which; this was before we got to the banking house, and before we got there he said he was at Masterman's the night before with a cheque, and I should find it all right - on arriving there Brand identified him, and said, "You are the young man who presented a cheque here last night;" the prisoner made no answer -I took him into the office and searched him, and heard him say he was the young man who had been there the night before; as I took him to the Compter, after his examination, he said, "I have one thing I wish to state to you;" he put out his hands - I shook hands with him, and said, "If it is any thing to benefit you, I shall be happy to hear it, if not, say nothing;" he said, "What I want you to do will be the means of clearing me of this altogether - if you will go up to the corner of St. Martin's-lane, near Orange-street, Leicester-fields, you will there see a young man, between the hours of half-past five and six o'clock; his dress will be a blue coat, with yellow buttons, and trousers, or a green coat with yellow buttons"- I said, "Can you give me any further description of the young man;" he said, "He has a roundish face, fresh colour, dark hair, smoothed over his face," and that he was to meet him there, if he got the money, and give it him- I went there with White, my brother officer, at the time he stated, and waited till half-past six o'clock, but saw nobody at all answering his description; I afterwards went to the Feathers, in Orange-street, kept by Page - that is eight hundred or a thousand yards from the place I was desired to go to; I went there because the prisoner had told me he lodged there the night before, and was well known to Mr. Page - a room was pointed out to me there, which I searched, and found these strips of paper(looking at them) - I found all these in the room on the first search; some in the fire-place, some on the floor, and some on the cill just outside the window of the room- I marked them; on the Saturday I searched the dustcellar in that house, and found these papers which I produce - they have never been out of my possession.

MARY HIGGINS . In September I lived servant at the Feathers, in Orange-street, kept by Page. I know the prisoner, and remember hearing of his being taken up- he was at the Feathers the night before he was taken, and slept there; I saw him next morning, before he left the house, upon the first floor - he slept on the second floor; I saw him in the club-room - he asked me for a sheet of writing paper; I went down, got one, and gave it him - there was pen and ink in the back-room, even with the club-room; I told him to walk in there, and he did - he did not shut the door; I put it too - he came out in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and asked me the time; I told him I did not know, but it was between eight and nine o'clock - I went into the room in the course of an hour after; nobody had been in after he came out, to my knowledge, but there might have been; when I went in there were some pieces of paper about the floor, which I swept up, and threw among the dust - that was between that time and twelve o'clock; I remember some officers coming - Aldred went into the room where the prisoner had been with the paper; I was in the club-room, and the officer was in the back-room- I saw him there as I came down stairs.

CHARLES RIDER . In September last I was in the employ of Langford, who has stables in the Green-yard, Orange-street - Mr. Pybell had also stables there at that time, but has not now; the prisoner was in his employ. On the evening before he was taken into custody, I saw him in our stables - I believe it was between seven and eight o'clock; he had a paper in his hand - there was some writing on it, and some across on the front of it; he did not say what it was - he shewed it to me, and was shewing it to another person, who was tipsy in the stable, and could not take notice of it; he said he had been for some money, but could not get it till to-morrow morning -I read the writing across it; it was "Not dated from any place" - he asked if I would go into the City for him on

the next morning; he did not say what for - he said he would give me half a crown if I would go; I said I did not want to have any thing to do with him at all - next morning, about eight o'clock, or a little after, I was at a coffee-shop in Bluecross-street, near our stable, and seven or eight doors from the Feathers, nearly opposite there, and saw the prisoner there, sitting in the same box as me, on the other side of the table - I saw him writing, but could not see what; he was writing on about a quarter of a sheet of paper, of this size(the cheque); he told me the night before that he was going to Hull, in Yorkshire, and had booked his place - this was the night before; he was to have gone that day about twelve o'clock - he did not say why he had not gone.

JAMES CLARKE . I was clerk to the late Mr. George Young , who kept the horse-bazaar, in Baker-street. The prisoner was in his employ for four or five years at least, principally as groom, and we occasionally sent him out with messages; Mr. Young died about a month ago - he was ill at Hastings all the month of September; he had been there three months - he died in Baker-street; he kept cash at Masterman's - I saw him write almost every day in my life for eight or ten years; the prisoner bad an opportunity of seeing him write - (looking at the cheque) I am certain no part of this is Mr. Young's writing; the prisoner left his employ about the end of last April - I am quite certain Mr. Young was not in town in September; he was brought from Hastings in October, on a Thursday.

JOHN BURDEN . I was in the service of Mr. Young, in Baker-street, for about six years, as a clerk in the office- I left about four months ago; he went to Hastings the week after, and was very ill when I left; the prisoner was in his employ nearly all the time I was, as groom and messenger - it was his duty for the last year and a half, before he left, to make up an account of returns every night, except Sunday; it was my duty to make out a return every night and include his return in that - I had to copy his returns, and have seen him write almost every night; (looking at the cheque) I believe this to be his hand-waiting - the whole of it; I am quite certain it is not Mr. Young's, and have no doubt of its being the prisoner's - (looking at the papers found by Aldred, and also those found in the dust-hole) I believe all these to be the prisoner's hand-writing.

Prisoner. Q.Where have you seen me write? A. In the office - I have given you the paper to write, and seen you write several times; I have ordered you out of the office several times to write, and have known Mr. Young to do so, and not allow you to write in the office, but have seen you write in the office several times - it is my belief this is your hand-writing; I am sure it is not Mr. Young's.

Prisoner. I have seen him write several times, and should not know his writing; I am well aware that he is not acquainted with mine. Witness. The papers are not in my writing.

THOMAS BRAND re-examined. What I wrote was on front of the cheque - our house is in the City.

JOHN ABEL SMITH . ESQ. I am the son of John Smith, who is a banker - I have lived in Grosvenor-square; there is no No.72 in the square - I think the last number is 44; my father was out of town at the time this cheque is dated, and I think the whole of September - I was in town the greatest part of the month; I know nothing of the prisoner - I am not aware of having seen him before; my father had so dealings with the prisoner, to my knowledge - he lives at No.22, Grosvenor-square; I am not aware of any other John Smith living in Grosvenor-square.

The cheque was here put in and read; also the papers which had the words "Please to pay Mr. John Smith, 75. A. Geo. Young ," and parts of other words composing the cheque.

Prisoner to CHRISTOPHER PERKINGS. Q. Are you certain whether I told you No.32 or 72? A. I understood you 72, and am sure you said Grosvenor-square.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him Leicester-square. On Thursday, the 17th of September, a gentleman I know very well to have been at the Horse-bazaar, having horses there, met me by accident in Leicester-square. and asked me to go to the Bank for him, to draw the money for a horse and gig he had sold on Saturday; it was customary for them to give a cheque four days after the sale - he said he had received it four days before, and had not time to go- I had frequently seen him in the counting-house and yard: he went by the name of Smith: he desired me to meet him again at nine o'clock that evening - I went to the banker's; the gentleman said he was under a heavy penalty if he paid it, wrote "Not dated, &c.," and returned it to me to get another more correct; I took it to the gentleman at the time appointed - he was in company with another gentleman; I handed him the cheque - he said he would give it to Young and get another; I was to meet him at the top of Martin-street, Leicester-square, at nine o'clock next morning; he gave me the cheque, and desired me on no consideration to go myself, but to employ a Temple porter - he gave me 1s. to pay the porter: I had no money myself, and thought I could not get a porter there for that money - I went on to the lane, gave this man the job, and told him to come to me, not to the public-house in the lane, but to another in Cannon-street; I waited a considerable time for him, and a few minutes after I saw him going up the lane with another person - I called him over, and asked if he had received the money; he said No, I had better go myself; I said I would - this gentleman came and took me to the banking-house, and asked me several question, which I answered as well as I could; Mr. Gates asked if he went with me, whether I could find the gentleman - I said not till the time appointed, half-past five o'clock, but he would not give me an opportunity of going then, or I dare say I could have pointed him out.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

(On the 2nd and 3rd Counts)

RICHARD BISHOP.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-128
VerdictNot Guilty

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First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

1969. RICHARD BISHOP was indicted for knowingly, feloniously, and traitorously having in his custoday and possession, 1 mould, made of plaster of Paris, in and upon which was impressed the figure stamp and resemblance of the obverse side of a lawful half-crown; again the Statute .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and SCARLET conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT BRADBURY . I have known the prisoner above three years. On the 24th of September , about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw him at his lodgings, No,23, St. Ann-

street, Orchard-street, Westminster ; his wife was present - they lodge in the one pair back room; the door was locked when I went: I knocked, and his wife let me in - I saw the prisoner mixing up some plaster of Paris in a cup of water; he poured it into a round band of tin, putting it into a plate, and let it stand a short time to harden - then took a knife, and pared the bottom of it, took some grease from a candlestick, and greased the faces of it, turned it up, and poured in a quantity more of the mixture from the top of the tin band, which was to constitute a pair of moulds; I saw no apperance of good money, and did not know what the moulds were intended for - he said a man had been up there that morning, and wished him to let him have a score of bobs, which means counterfeit shillings - I went from there straight home to my own house, No.17, St. Ann-street; I was standing at the door, and a very short time after, the prisoner's wife came by; I took the prisoner up some gin in a cup, by her request - I found the door locked: there was a great fire in the great, and a pipkin on it, containing a quantity of metal in a fluid state - the prisoner was stirring it about with a long common tobacco pipe: I saw the moulds on the hob of the stove, one on the top of the other - while he was stirring the metal we both heard footsteps on the stairs; he said, "Is that you Polly?" meaning his wife - and receiving no answer, he immediately laid the pipe down on the shelf, seized the moulds, and instantly began rubbing them face against face, where the impression was; the door was forced open, and the officers entered.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. As you had arranged they should, was not it so? A. No - I knew nothing at all of their coming - that I swear; I have been twice in gaol, not more: I have gone by no other name than Bradbury - that is not my real name; my friends being respectable, I did not wish them to know the circumstance I was placed in; my name is Robert Rose - I dropped that name on being apprehended with the prisoner; I never went to the Mint, nor the Mint officers - I have known Tyrrell two years; I do not know Fowler, nor Drew - I had not seen Tyrrell for a month before this, and then had no conversation with him; I was in Newgate by the name of John Howard , charged with highway-robbery in April last, and at another time for stealing a coat, by the name of Pope - that did not occur to my memory. When the officers burst into the room, I had lit my pipe - it was not the one the prisoner stirred the metal with; I have received no money for this, nor do I expect any; I had not seen the officers on the subject before I was apprehended, nor sent my wife to them, and do not know of her going; I never told her any thing about it - she has been in trouble by the name of Sophia Dunn , her maiden name.

Q. On your oath, do not you know she fetched the officers, and were you not the person who told her to do it? A. I swear I never told her, nor am I aware that she did it- I gave nobody any direction about it. The prisoner had the moulds in his hand when the officers entered; I only knew Tyrrell by sight - he has searched me before in the street, and might have suspicion of me, but never had a charge against me; I have been an utterer of counterfeit money, and the Mint suspected me, I believe, as Tyrrell stopped and searched me three or four times - I have been twice in custody about counterfeit coin, and went by the name of Pope; the Mint knew I had been convicted - I told the officers what I had been charged with after I had been admitted an evidence at the office, not before; the prisoner and I were both remanded at first, by request of the Magistrate - I told Mr. Powell all I had seen; I told him I had been in custody for these things, and had gone by different names. I am twenty-six years old.

ROBERT TYRRELL . I am a constable. I went with Drew and Fowler to No.28, St. Ann-street, Westminster, about a quarter-past three o'clock in the afternoon; Drew went into the yard - Fowler and I went up to the back room second floor, looked through the key-hole, saw the door locked, and the key inside; we knocked, received no answer, and instantly broke open the door - the prisoner was in his shirt sleeves; there was a very large fire in the room - as I entered the room I saw the prisoner rubbing these two moulds together, and they dropped into the chamber-pot, which was by him; they appeared to be wet when he was rubbing them - I jumped over the bed, and found them in the pot; they remained there nearly an hour, till Mr. Powell arrived - I asked what he was doing; he said, "I shall make no answer:" his hands were all over whitening and wet - I asked what was on his hands; he said "Pillacotia;" whether that was in derision I do not know; there is a medicine of that sort, but he said it with a smile - a pipkin was on the fire, nearly full of white metal, in a liquid state; Drew took it off - Bradbury was standing by him, with a pipe in his hand, when we entered - we handcuffed them both, and waited the arrival of Mr. Powell; Fowler found a paper on the shelf, with plaster of Paris - there was a pipe on the shelf, with metal in the bowl; the prisoner's breast was open, and the fire was very large - he had his breeches on, and an apron, with part of the white stuff on it, which he had rubbed off his hands.

Cross-examined. Q. You have been acquainted with Bradbury for two years and a half? A. I have known him as the prisoner's companion for two years and more, and his wife about the same time - he gave the name of Bradbury when he was taken; I never heard his name before, though I have stopped him in the street and searched him, considering him a passer of counterfeit coin, but never knew him in custody for it; I heard he was in custody for a highway robbery - I only knew him as an acquaintance of the prisoner's; it was a woman who gave me information of this - she told me to go in the afternoon; I had not seen Bradbury for a month before or more - I cannot say whether I would believe him on his oath or not - a bad character may speak the truth.

JAMES FOWLER . I accompanied Tyrrell; on entering the room Tyrrell jumped over the bed and I after him - when I opened the door the prisoner was rubbing something, and his hands were wet; he immediately put it into the chamber-pot - Bradbury stood against the table with a pipe; the prisoner had neither coat nor waistcoat on - his neck was quite open; I immediately caught them both by the collar, one in each hand - we called Drew up; a pipkin was on the fire, with white metal in a fluid state - Drew took it off, and went for Mr. Powell; I and Tyrrell remained in the room; the mould was not taken out of the pot till Mr. Powell came, which was in about an hour - I found some plaster of Paris in powder on the shelf, and

this collar of tin; the prisoner had a blue apron, with white marks where he had rubbed his hands after putting the mould into the pot; Tyrrell asked what the white on his fingers was - and in rather an ignorant way he said pillacotia.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you knowzBradbury? A. I once searched him - it was nearly two years ago; I do not suppose he knew me; I had not the least reason to believe I should find him in this room, nor the prisoner - I did not know Bradbury's wife till since this; I am sure we knocked before we forced the door open.

THOMAS DREW . I went to the back yard, and afterwards went up stairs; I saw Bradbury and the prisoner both in custody - both seemed much confused; I took the pipkin off the fire with white metal in a fluid state, and have it here - I found this file on the mantel-piece - the teeth are full of white metal on both sides; I saw the moulds taken out of the chamber-pot after Mr. Powell came; I found a pair of scissors with some white metal on the rivet; the bosom of the prisoner's shirt was all over white, or plaster of Paris; I found an old handkerchief with a deal of white on it - and on opening it on a bit of small cloth, a quantity of metal filings came out.

Cross-examined. Q. You searched the prisoner's person I take it for granted? A. I saw him searched; no counterfeit coin, nor any metal, except that in the pipkin, was found.

SARAH BARNES . I am the landlady of the house. I let the prisoner this room, and while he was there the door was always kept locked; once when they went out the key was in the key-hole that nobody should see through.

Cross-examined. Q. You have other lodgers? A. Yes; I never tried their door, but heard it was locked.

JOHN FIELD . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin for the Mint. Here is an impression on this large mould; I find some letters, and a portion of the impression - here is E.O. and the top of R, then a space and an E., a space large enough for three letters - then S., and then distinctly III. D.E., a faint impression of I.G., a space for one letter, the top of A. and the cross top of T. - here is a small portion of the graining sunk on the edge; the mould is the size of a half-crown.

COURT. Q. Do the parts you have pointed out correspond with the parts of the obverse side of a current half-crown of the Realm? A.Precisely so, as far as they go; they appear to be impressed by a genuine half-crown; the metal produced is such as is used to counterfeit coin by this process - and a file is frequently used to file the edges, where the channel of the mould went; the other things produced are such as are used in this process of coining.

FRANCIS KIRBY , ESQ. I am a professor of chemistry and natural philosophy. I have analysed the materials of this mould - it is what is commonly called plaster of Paris; the powder produced is the same.

Cross-examined. Q. What is plaster of Paris? A. It is produced from sulphurate of lime, by draining off the water and crystalization.

RICHARD FRANKLYN , ESQ. I am a moneyer of the Mint. I can clearly discover on this mould and A. and III.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

WILLIAM JENNINGS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-129
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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1970. WILLIAM JENNINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , at St. John, at Hackney , 1 tea-caddy, value 20s.; 6 ladles, value 10s.; 12 spoons, value 10s.; 1 skewer, value 1s.; 1 pair of sugar-tongs, value 2s.; 1 castor-top, value 1s.; 1 candlestick, value 2s.; 1 pair of ear-rings, value 2s.; 5 necklaces, value 1s.; 5 bracelet clasps, value 1s.; 3 bracelets, value 1s.; 1 locket, value 10s.; 4 snaps, value 2s.; 10 yards of linen, value 5s.; 1 box, value 1s.; 2 cruet-stands, value 6s.; 1 bottle-stand, value 1s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 1s.; 2 D'Oyleys, value 2d.; 4 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 5 table-cloths, value 13s.; 4 towels, value 1s.; 5 sheets, value 13s.; 2 tray-cloths, value 1s.; 1 coffee-pot, value 5l.; 2 canisters, value 2l.; 1 watch, value 5s.; 1 coat, value 5s.; 1 knife, value 1s., and 1 snuffer-tray, value 1l., the goods of Eliza Flower , spinster, and Sarah Fuller Flower , spinster; 3 rings, value 6s.; 1 gown, value 6s.; and 1 petticoat, value 1s., the goods of the said Eliza Flower ; 3 rings, value 6s.; 1 snap, value 1s.; 1 shawl, value 15s.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d., and 1 bag, value 6d., the goods of the said Sarah Fuller Flower, in the dwelling-house of the said Eliza Flower and Sarah Fuller Flower .

JOSEPH DORSETT . I am inspector of the Police of Acton. On Sunday night, the 18th of October, about a quarter-past ten o'clock, I was on duty in Pigwell-field, near the park road, in Acton parish, and heard some footsteps; a little farther I saw the prisoner, just by the gate which divides Pigwell-field from Park-road - he was on the footpath - Clark, the officer, who was with me, first got up to him; I laid hold of him by the arm, and asked where he was going - he said home; I asked where that was - here plied to Barton's court, Hoxton; I asked where he had been to - he said to the Bird Cage, at Stamford-hill; there is a public-house of that sign - I asked what brought him that way, as it was not in his road from there to Hoxton - he said surely a gentleman might take a walk, which way he liked; I said it appeared to me rather strange he should take a walk that way at that late hour in the night - I and Clark took him to the watch-house, supposing there was something amiss; I saw Clark search him - the prisoner pulled off his coat, put his arms out, and said, "Now, search me;" nothing was found in his coat, but the skirts of it were wet - after Clark had done searching the coat, he went up to the prisoner, took of his hat, and in it was this silver tea-caddy (produced by Clark) - when his hat was laid down there was likewise some leaves of privet and quickthorn came from his hat; I then assisted in searching him, and found him wet nearly up to his knees - I desired him to pull off his shoes, and they had then got water in them, as though he had recently come out of some water. I know Miss Flower's house; I first saw him about two hundred and fifty yards from their house, going by the road way, but by going over the field at the back of the house, it is about fifty yards nearer - in coming that way a person would have a ditch of running water, about two feet wide, to cross; it is generally about eighteen inches deep - when I met him he was going as if he had come from the field where that ditch was. On the Monday morning I went to the prosecutrixs' house, examined the field and the ditch - I traced footsteps from the house, across the field, to a gap in the hedge, one side of which is privet, and the other quickthorn; after returning through the house, I went the road way into the field, and observed

an appearance of some person having slipped down the bank of the ditch into the water.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did he not say he had found the caddy? A. I asked where he got it- he said he picked it up; I have heard other property was picked up about the fields and road - a woman, who was in charge of the house, was taken up, the ladies being absent in the country: I have heard the son of a woman who was in the house has absconded - the woman was held to bail before the Magistrate; I do not know whether she is in custody now; I have inquired every where for her son, and cannot meet with him - I have searched for him; there were three examinations before the Magistrate - I am not aware of any witness being here who knew he was living in the house; I have searched for him to bring him to trial.

JAMES CLARK . I am a head borough, and was with Dorset when he stopped the prisoner; I searched him, and found the tea-caddy; his feet and coat were wet, as has been described - some privet and quickthorn leaves fell from his hat.

Cross-examined. Q. You are aware that a considerable portion of the property has been picked up in the fields and about the road? A. It was picked up in the night by the patrol; I did not see it found - I have searched for the woman's son.

GEORGE THOMAS. I am a patrol of this road. On the night between Sunday and Monday, I was on duty on the road, going round my beat, about two o'clock in the morning, in Pigwell-field, with William Lee - I had heard of a man being apprehended; I saw a portmanteau close by the side of the footpath, over some pales - it was within the pales; a person passing on the footpath would not naturally have seen it; it stood on its end, as if lifted over - it was unlocked - I took it to the watch-house; I looked into it before I got there - it contained plated or silver goods, several articles; I found a reticule in it, and a jewel case.

WILLIAM PLUMB . I produce the portmanteau, which I have had in my possession ever since it was brought to the watch - house.

GEORGE THOMAS . Here is a list of the contents of the portmanteau - (read; this list consisted of most of the articles stated in the indictment.) Next morning I examined the field adjoining Pigwell-field, and found two cruetstands in that field - I saw Plumb find a pepper-box stopper near where we found the cruet-stands; that field is at the back of Miss Flowers' house.

Cross-examined. Q.Then articles were found loose? A. Yes - I and Plumb carried the portmanteau to the watch-house; there were a good many spoons and things in it, such as a man could easily carry away in his pocket - the portmantean was open when it was found - there is a lock to it; I did not see the prisoner searched - no picklock-key was found on him.

WILLIAM LEE. I have heard Thomas' evidence; I was with him, and agree with his evidence.

WILLIAM PLUMB . I went to Miss Flower's house with a bundle, containing several articles of linen shirts, and table-cloths, napkins, D'Oyleys, pillow-cases, & c. - the inventory read contains the things I took as well as the plate.

Q. Has all the plate been produced from the portmanteau? A. It has - I think one person might carry all the plate in his pockets.

JOHN CHAMBERS . I am constable of the night of Hackney. The goods produced were brought to the watch-house, and in the morning I went and found seven glass cruets in a ditch at the further end of Mr. Hankey's field covered over with grass.

WILLIAM BLAND . I am a shoemaker. I was sent for on the Tuesday night before the robbery to sleep at Miss Flowers', in consequence of an attempt having been made to break into the house, and have slept there till now - I went there, on this Sunday night, a little before ten o'clock- I sat there three-quarters of an hour, then went to bed; the servant was there and her mother Mrs. Fillory - she had been minding the house while her daughter went out to tea I understood - she did not regularly live there; Sarah Fillory , the servant, lived in the house - she had just come home when I got there; her mother was there, but nobody else - the mother went home after I had been there about half an hour - I saw that all the doors were locked, and the windows fastened: then I and the servant went up to bed both at the same time - I slept in the back room first floor, called the verandah room; the girl slept in the front room on the same floor - I did not see her brother in the house; I got up a little after six o'clock, and went home - I went out at the front door, and knew nothing of the robbery; I saw nothing misplaced - I went to town, and when I returned I heard of the robbery.

Cross-examined. Q.Do you know Mrs. Fillory's son? A. I saw him about two months before the robbery - he is about twenty years old; I have not seen him since - I have heard search has been made for him.

SARAH FILLORY . I am the prosecutrixs' servant. I went up to bed at the same time as Bland; I was not up when the watchman came - when I got up the house was apparently in the same security as the night before; no door or window was open - the front door was on the single lock as Bland had gone out; it was bolted and chained at night - no window nor any door was broken; I saw my brother last on the Sunday of the robbery - he came to the house, and was with my mother and me; my mother did not live there - my brother was a seafaring man, and was seeking for a ship; I dined in the kitchen - the plate and articles were kept in the bed-room I slept in, in the portmanteau produced, which is Miss Flowers'; it stood under my bed - I had seen it last on the Friday; it was not locked - my brother came there about three o'clock that day; I went out, leaving him with my mother; I returned at nine, and he was gone then.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you ever see the prisoner before? A. No; I have not seen my brother since the robbery - he lived with my mother, about five minutes' walk from Miss Flowers'; I do not know where my mother is -I cannot tell whether my brother took the portmanteau out and hid it in the ditch.

COURT. Q. How long had your brother been from sea? A. Four or five months; he had been gone four years and a half from the family; he came home about five months ago from the hulks at Sheerness - he had done something; I do not know what - he was at sea before he went to the hulks - he went from the Marine Society.

WILLIAM BLAND re-examined. When I went out in the morning the front door was regularly closed as it was the night before; no part of the house was broken - the chain was up as I had left it; I went to the house about a quarter to ten o'clock - I knew of nobody being in the house, except the servant when I went to bed.

MISS ELIZABETH FLOWER . I and my sister Sarah Fuller Flower both live together in this house: we are spinster s - the silver plate, and most of the jewellery is our joint property; we pay the rent of the house jointly - we had been from home about a fortnight when the robbery was committed, and left the servant in care of the house, and Bland to sleep there; these spoons and the plate are mine and my sister's; they are worth more than 5l., not so much as 50l. - the jewels are not worth above 5l.; this tea-caddy was our joint property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taking a walk, and return-turning home, kicked against the caddy, and picked it up as any other person would; I put it into my hat - two officers accosted me, and asked what I had got.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his previous good character.

Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

PETER BARNEY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-130
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1971. PETER BARNEY alias SAMUEL PICKERING , was indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry James Quin , on the 27th of October , at St. Martin-in-the-Fields , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, 1 shilling, his money .

HENRY JAMES QUIN . I am ten years old (the witness being questioned appeared perfectly aware of the obligation of an oath) - I live with my parents. I was in Oxford-street on Tuesday night last with my little brother; I was playing the flute to get a few pence for my father and brother - my father is a musician; while I was playing the prisoner came and asked me to come down as far as the Haymarket , and said if I would I could get 1s. at a gentleman's house; I went there, and began playing at a gentleman's house - 1s. was thrown out to me, my brother took it up and gave it to me; the prisoner then came up, and said, "Let us look" - I was not inclined to let him look, as he appeared to wish to get it from me; I kept it in my hand, which I put down near my side - he then got hold of my hand, robbed my knuckles, and forced it from me; my little brother cried, followed him, and he gave him what he called a half-crown, but it was a coronation medal, worth nothing, and then ran away - I ran after him, calling Stop thief! he was stopped by one of the new officers; he had ran as far as Charing-cross, by the Horse Guards - I never lost sight of him; I was about a yard behind him, and am sure the man the officer stopped is the man who robbed my knuckles and got the shilling - he wished to give the officer some drink to let him go, which he refused; he is the same man as spoke to me in Oxford-street - I was about twenty minutes with him, and noticed him so as to know him again; I am sure he is the man - it was the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q. Had you received any thing previous to this shilling? A. Yes, people had given me pence in the street; I had received something from the same house before.

Q. Before you went did I not tell you if you would go with me you should have 6d, to remunerate you for playing, and if that would not satisfy you, you should have half of whatever was got? A. No, he made no bargain with me that he was to have any part of what the gentleman might give.

Q. You told the Magistrate I was to have half of what was given at the house you were going to? A. You are a story teller; here is the coin he gave me.

EDWARD RICHARD PENSTONE . I am a Police-constable. I was at the end of New-street, Spring-gardens, behind Messrs. Drummond's banking-house, and perceived the prisoner going up New-street with two children; I suspected something, and walked back wards and forwards - I did not see the children playing; in about five minutes I heard a cry of Stop thief! saw the prisoner running away, and this boy after him; I stopped him at the corner of the mews at the end of New-street - he said, "Officer, don't say any thing, I will give you something to drink to let me go;" I refused, and took him to the watch-house - the cry of stop thief! proceeded from the witness; I knew the children, having watched them - I found a letter on the prisoner, also a shilling, and other things.

Prisoner's Defence. The shilling was given to me in the morning, and was wrapped in a pawnbroker's duplicate enclosed in a letter in my pocket - I had not time to do that if I had taken it from the boy; a sixpence was thrown out, and the boy took it up - another parcel was thrown out to me; the brother went to pick it up, and I prevented him - whatever was thrown out of the window was in a paper; it contained the pocket piece, or whatever it was: but the first that was thrown out was silver - his brother picked that up, and put it into his waistcoat pocket; the next was thrown towards me - his brother cried, and I gave it to him whatever it was; the shilling found on me was given me by my sister-in-law - I had not had a shilling for six weeks before; I have had the run of the whole house I lodge in, and could rob the people in the very house this sixpence was thrown from, for I slept there three nights, and the servant knew me; I lived fourteen years with Lord Northwick; he sent me two sovereigns, and recommended me to Mr. Glover to go to Swan River; and if he had gone I should have gone as his bailiff, but he declined going: I went and got work in Marchmont-street, but was not in employ at this time; I have a wife and four children.

EDWARD RICHARD PENSTONE re-examined. I have been to the house the money was thrown from last night, and ascertained that it is Colonel Rochford 's; the prisoner's sister lives there: it is No.2, Spring-garden-terrace.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 31.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-131
VerdictGuilty > theft under 100s
SentenceTransportation

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Before Mr. Baron Garrow .

1972. WILLIAM DRINKWATER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 1 watch, value 20s.; 1 ring, value 10s.; 1 diamond-pin, value 15s.; 12 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 5 half-crowns, 9 shillings, 2 sixpences, and 1 5l. Bank note, the property of William Partington ; and 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of William Charles

Heydinger , in the dwelling-house of the said William Partington .

WILLIAM PARTINGTON . I am a clock and watchmaker , and live in Paddington-street ; the prisoner was my errand-boy for three years - Mr. Heydinger lodged with me. On the 12th of September, in consequence of suspicion, I called the prisoner into the parlour, and said, "Mr. Heydinger has lost some silk handkerchiefs, do you know any thing about them?" he said, No: that he had nothing but an old handkerchief - I said, "The best way will be to go down into your room, and search all the way upwards;" he slept in the back kitchen - Mr. Heydinger accompanied me down; the prisoner was present, and I believe opened his box himself - the first thing found was a half-handkerchief, with Heydinger's initials - and on searching further we found the other half; they were put together and made one handkerchief; we found a silver watch of mine on him - it had hung in my shop for sale; he never had permission to take any thing for his own use; I lost a 5l. note, which has not been found - we found the ring and diamond-pin in a box in the next kitchen to where he sleeps; he broke the box open himself - the things found are not worth 5l.

WILLIAM CHARLES HEYDINGEE . I lodge at the prosecutor's, and was present when the prisoner was asked about my handkerchief; he said he knew nothing about it; I saw the two halves found in his box - both are mine, and formed one handkerchief when I lost it; I saw the other things found.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGR . I am an officer. I was sent for; five sovereigns, half a sovereign, two shillings, and two-sixpences, which I was informed were found on him, laid on the bed; I found this watch on his person - a diamond-pin and ring were given to me. Partingtington took a box from the chimney-piece - I broke it open, and found four half-crowns, two sovereigns, and half a sovereign - on my getting to the office, by some means, I missed the pin; I went back, and on throwing the clothes off the prisoner's bed, a pair of stockings fell down, in one of which I found five sovereigns.

WILLIAM PARTINGTON . Before I went for the officer, I insisted on knowing every thing he had on his person or in his room; he then took a box, went into the other kitchen, got a hammer, broke it open, and there were five sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and a few sixpences, the diamond pin, and pearl ring - I had not lost any sovereigns or half-sovereigus.

Prisoner's Defence. I saved the money out of my wages.

GUILTY (of stealing to the value of 4l.) Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN BROWN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-132
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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First London Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1973. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 pair of trousers, value 12s. , the goods of Philip Lawton .

PHILIP LAWTON. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Bishopsgate-street . On the 16th of October I received information, ran out, and took the prisoner, who was running, with these trousers concealed under his coat, about fifty yards from the shop; they were taken from close to the door.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man shewed me the trousers and told me to take them.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Weeks .

HENRY WEYER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-133
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1974. HENRY WEYER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 3 1/2 lbs. of cheese, value 2s. , the goods of Charles Vincent .

JAMES TATE . I live with Mr. Turner, in Great Bell-alley. I saw the prisoner take this cheese from Vincent's shop window, put it under his apron, and walk away; I gave information - he threw it down, and was taken; I never lost sight of him.

CHARLES VINCENT. I am a cheesemonger , and live in Bell-alley . This is my cheese.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched it.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Three Months .

BENJAMIN BARTINGTON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-134
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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1975. BENJAMIN BARTINGTON was indicted for that he, on the 7th of October , at St. Peter, Cornhill , being in the dwelling-house of Charles Wilson , did steal therein 1 watch, value 2l., the goods of Sarah Hanley ; 1 snuffbox, value 4s. 6d., and 1 hat, value 8s., the goods of Frederick Wilson ; 1 pair of boots, value 3s., the goods of John Robson ; 2 pocket-books, value 10s.; 18 knives, value 10s.; 18 forks, value 10s.; 1 rule, value 8s.; 1 cribbage-board, value 1s.; 1 pencil-case, value 4s. 6d.; 1 book, value 2s.; 1 coat, value 5s.; 1 stone bottle, value 1s. 4d.; 2 gallons of brandy, value 2l. 12s.; 2 half-crowns, 20 shillings, 9 sixpences, and 2 bills of exchange for payment of and value 50l. each, the property of the said Charles Wilson; and afterwards, about one o'clock in the night of the same day, burglariously did break out of the said dwelling-house; against the Statute .

JOHN GRIMES . I am an officer of Leadenhall-market. I have known the prisoner some time - I apprehended him on the Friday after this robbery, which was on the 9th of October; on searching him, I found a pocketbook, a watch, a rule, a snuff-box, and 15s. 6d. in silver; after searching him, having heard of this robbery, I made a search at Mr. Brown's, his master's, and found a great coat, a pair of boots, a hat in a box, containing several books, which I produce; he was Brown's apprentice.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do these goods refer to this indictment? A. Yes.

CHARLES WILSON. I lived at No. 88, Gracechurch-street , in the parish of St. Peter, Cornhill - it is my dwelling-house. I left home some days previous to the 7th of October - I received a letter on the 9th, informing me I was robbed; I came to town on Monday morning, the 10th or 11th, and missed the property stated in the indictment; I observed that the wood work of one of the locks leading to the shop had been cut away, but not sufficiently to remove the iron work - a window leading to the shop had the wood work removed; I have not a doubt the party had got out of the house by breaking the window open - he had not got in that way; there was no external mark of violence at all: I missed property, including the bills of exchange, to the value of 100l. - I knew the prisoner by sight - he had been on my premises; he was apprenticed to Mr. Brown, a neighbour, who lived about thirty yards

from me, in Half Moon-passage; among other things, I missed this rule - I had left it on the premises, and this pocket-book I can swear to, and this pencil-case - they were in the parlour; I am positive they were safe when I left town - the property was produced by the officer when I came home.

Cross-examined. Q.How soon after the robbery did you see the house? A. On the Monday morning, four or five days after - how it was entered I cannot tell; the bills of exchange were not due at the time - they are worth 100l. - I lost three, but the other was over due, and 12l. had been paid on it - the other two were for 50l. each; the amount of the other property taken out was 15l. or 20l; I believe it is all here - I have no partner.

JOHN ROBSON . I was foreman to Mr. Wilson at the time of the robbery; he keeps a wine-vaults . On the morning of the 8th of October, about half-past five o'clock, I came down stairs to open the bar, and found a great portion of the wood cut from the lock, but it was fast; I opened it, found a drawer open, and a door, leading to Half Moon-alley, was unbolted - a person came in and had a glass of gin, and I found both the tills emptied; I went and told the housekeeper, and alarmed the house - a great coat, watch, and several things were missed; the poker stood under the parlour window; we could trace footmarks under the window on a chair; it appeared somebody had been in the house and broken out; how he got in I could not tell - it is a public-house; I missed a great coat, and a pair of boots of mine from the bar, and found them at the Mausion-house.

Cross-examined. Q.You are the bar-man? A. Yes- people have access to the house in the course of the day; I saw my great coat in the officer's hands on the day of the robbery.

FREDERICK WILSON . I am the prosecutor's nephew. I was alarmed on the 8th by the door bell ringing - I came down at six o'clock in the morning, and found the property gone.

DANIEL BENNETT . I live at this house as waiter. I was alarmed about half-past six o'clock in the morning -I had shut the house up safe at night, and in the morning one of the bolts of the door leading to Half Moon-alley, was unbolted.

Cross-examined. Q. How many servants are there in the house? A. Three - the bar-man, myself, and a maid servant; she is not here - I went to bed about ten minutes past eleven o'clock; the maid servant and housekeeper sat up after me - what they did when I was in bed I cannot tell.

BENJAMIN ALDRED . I am an officer. I was going through Leadenhall-market on Saturday morning, a little after ning o'clock - Mr. Brown called me aside; I went over to a place on the opposite side, and on searching among the baskets I found a two gallon bottle, which appeared to have brandy in it - I took it to the Mansion-house, and locked it up; Wilson arrived on Monday, and on looking over the things with Grimes I found in the pocket-book seven duplicates of articles pawned at Matthews, in the Minories.

CHARLES WILSON. These duplicates are not mine, nor Frederick Wilson's.

SARAH HANLEY . I am housekeeper to Mr. Wilson. I was alarmed on the 8th of October by John Robson - I know nothing of the prisoner - the watch produced is mine, and was left on the parlour mantel-piece that night - this is it; the other things were all in the house on the 8th - the robbery must have been done in the night.

Cross-examined. Q.It was quite day-light when you got up? A. Yes.

JOHN GRIMES . I found that watch on the prisoner's person, in his fob.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you see him? A. In Leadenhall-market, at his master's house; I said before that I found the watch on him on the 9th.

CHARLES WILSON . The pocket-book and other things are my property - the thieves had evidently broken out of the house, from the appearance of the premises.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not see it for five days after? A. No - I speak from the nature of the fastenings.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday morning I was in the coffee-house in Leadenhall-market, taking a cup of coffee- as I came out a person, apparently a poulterer, asked me to let him leave the things at our shop till he called for them in the evening; I said I had no objection, not knowing they were stolen.

RICHARD BROWN . I am a Submonger, and live in Leadenhall-market - the prisoner was my apprentice between four and five years; he bore a good character.

COURT. Q.Did you know any thing of the pocketbook and rule? A. Not till they were found; I know nothing of the great coat or boots - the prisoner must have taken them there; I cannot say how they got on my premises - there is only myself and son occupy the premises besides the prisoner; one of us must have placed them there.

Prisoner to JOHN GRIMES . Q.In what part of Brown's premises did you find the goods? A. Part were in Brown's shop and the counting-house; they were secreted there.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth and good character.

JOHN DAYLEY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-135
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1976. JOHN DAYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 saw, value 2s. , the goods of William Godfrey Harvey .

WILLIAM GODFREY HARVEY . I am a carpenter . On the 18th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, my saw was taken from a private room up stairs in the New Post-office , where I was at work; I found it in Cooper's possession. The prisoner worked on the ground floor as a labourer .

JOHN COOPER . I am a carpenter. I was laying under the bench, to watch, and saw the prisoner come and take the saw; I followed him down, and took it from him at the bottom of the stairs - he wished to make it up.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was taking it back when I met the man on the stairs.

JOHN COOPER . He was going away with it, and ran.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Weeks .

JOHN SHEPPARD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-136
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1977. JOHN SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 pair of reins, value 10s., and

1 breaking-bit, value 14s. , the goods of Thomas Rawlinson .

THOMAS RAWLINSON . I am a stable-keeper , and live in Little Distaff-lane . I know the prisoner, by seeing him at the Repository in Little Britain; he came to my gate on the 14th of October, said he was out of work, and in great distress - I told him to go over to the public-house, and have a pint of beer, and I would come and pay for it, which I did - in the afternoon he came again; I felt ill, and went to get a glass of gin - I gave him a glass, and went to work; a gentleman came in with a chaise - I took out the horse, and washed it; the chaise stood in the street - he said he would finish the horse while I moved the chaise; a person came to a different part of the stable - he came to me, and said he was going home to bed, and in less than five minutes I missed the bit, bridle, and reins; I told an officer, who brought him to me in the morning.

JOSEPH BATES . I am a patrol of Farringdon Ward. I went in the morning, and found the prisoner in bed: he declared he had never seen the things: I took him to Rawlinson - he still denied it: I returned to his lodgings, and found the reins and bit.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

JOSEPH RYAN, WILLIAM CLARK.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-137
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1978. JOSEPH RYAN and WILLIAM CLARK . were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 piece of handkerchiefs, containing 3 handkerchiefs, value 30s. , the goods of Thomas Dossetor .

GEORGE HAWES . I am shopman to Thomas Dossetor , a hosier , of the Poultry . On the 28th of October the prisoners came to the shop, in company; Clark asked for a pair of braces, which he paid for - they were about ten minutes in the shop; the officer brought them back, with this piece of handkerchiefs, which was on the counter before they came in.

CHARLES HERDSFIELD . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners in company, opposite the Mansion-house, looking in at several shops - they went into Dossetor's shop; I saw Clark trying a pair of braces on Ryan's shoulder - I then saw Clark lay hold of a piece of handkerchiefs, and hand it to Ryan; they came out, and ran across the road - I ran, laid hold of them both, and found the handkerchiefs between Ryan's hips, in his small-clothes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

RYAN - GUILTY . Aged 13.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

JANE WATERS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-138
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1979. JANE WATERS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 2lbs. of bread, value 4d. , the goods of Daniel Francis Thurston .

JANE THURSTON . I am the wife of Daniel Francis Thurston - he is a weaver , and does not live with me; I keep a bread-shop in Barbican. The prisoner is a stranger - she came into my shop last Thursday; I sent my little girl to serve her - she asked for a cottage loaf; we had none: the child came and said she had run away with the bread; I ran out, and took it from her - it was a 2lbs. loaf: I wanted to have nothing to say to her, and wished her to go away, but she gave me the most gross and abusive language, and I gave her in charge, as she used the most vulgar and obsence language possible, too shocking to repeat; I still wished her to go, but she followed me home, saying she would break every window in the house, and my head too.

MARGARET THURSTON . I am the prosecutrix's daughter. The prisoner came and asked for a cottage loaf; I said we had none - she said one of the others would do, but it must not be crusty; I gave it to her - she took it out of my hand, and ran out: my mother ran and brought her back - she used very bad language.

JAMES NOYES . I am a constable, and took the prisoner in charge - her conduct in the watch-house was most gross and scandalous, and her language dreadful.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the bread, but did not steal it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

The prisoner was recognized as a most abandoned character, whom much pains had been taken with to reclaim.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM GRAINGER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-139
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1980. WILLIAM GRAINGER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , 11 lbs. of coffee, value 10s., and 1 canvas bag, value 2d. , the goods of Edmund Dowling .

EDMUND DOWLING . I live in King-street, Tower-hill , and am a grocer . On the 14th of September my boy set three or four bags of coffee at the door; I came home at ten o'clock at night - none had then been missed, but next morning, about eight o'clock, Roberts came, and I missed one, which I had seen the morning before.

JAMES ROBERTS . I am an officer. On the 14th of September, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was in Goodman's-yard, Minories, and saw the prisoner coming along with another man - he had this bag of coffee over his shoulder; I said, "What have you got there?" he hesitated, and said coffee; the other man ran away - the prisoner attempted to follow him, but I detained him; he said,"It is my master's coffee," but refused to tell who his master was - he was too strong for me, and got away; I followed and took him, without losing sight of him - he was four or five hundred yards from Mr. Dowling's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a gentleman on the pavement, very much in liquor, with the coffee by his side - he asked me to pick it up; I did so, and told him he was in the Minories - he said he would pay me to see him home, and to carry the coffee; when the officer came I called the gentleman, but he did not come back.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Months .

JOHN LLOYD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-140
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1981. JOHN LLOYD was indicted for a misdemeanor .

GEORGE CHAPPELL . I live in Skinner-street - my brother John keeps a pork-shop there. The prisoner came on the 8th of October - I knew he had lived at the Gray's Inn coffee-house; the porter called me, and told me he had asked for a loin of pork for the Gray's Inn coffee house -I weighed one, and he took it away.

JOHN BRYANT . I am clerk to Mrs. Hilton, who keeps the Gray's Inn coffee-house. I know what provisions are wanted - the prisoner was employed as porter by Mr.

Hilton, when he was alive two years ago, but not since; I did not send him for this pork, nor did any one else.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

RICHARD VAUGHAN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-141
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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NEW COURT, Third Day.

Third Middlesex Jury - before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1982. RICHARD VAUGHAN was indicted for stealing on the 1st of October , 1 box, value 1s.; 1 screw-wrench, value 6s., and 10 bolts and nuts, value 6s., the goods of Charles Frederick Baxter and others, his masters .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined Six Months .

JAMES CHAPMAN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-142
VerdictNot Guilty

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1983. JAMES CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of July , 4 books, value 3l. , the goods of Robert Harding Evans .

ROBERT HARDING EVANS . I am a bookseller , and live in Pall Mall . These books were committed to my care, by the widow of General Miranda, for public sale; I did not see these at my house, but when the porter brought the books, and I went to look over them, these were deficient - they are the Baskerville edition of Addison's works.

WILLIAM GOSLING . I am a bookseller, and live in Bond-street. At the public sale at Machin and Debenham's on the 5th of October, I bought these books: I do not know who gave them to me.

FREDERICK PRIEST . I am a pawnbroker. I sent these books for sale to Machin and Debenham; they were pawned with me on the 3rd of July, 1828, by James Flather , and had not been redeemed.

JAMES FLATHER . I pawned these books with Priest; the prisoner brought them to me on the 3rd of July, 1828, at Lambeth, where I then lived - I have known him for years; he is a gold wire-drawer by trade, and has been in the habit of selling books on commission; I am a cabinet-maker's plumber, and have sold books for some time - the prisoner was indebted to me, having boarded ten months with me; he agreed to let me have 1l. out of the money I pawned them for.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Will you name some person for whom you have worked within the last three months? A.Business has been very bad, but I have worked for Lazenby and Son; I have not had 2s. 6d. a night for debating at a room in Spitalfields - I do not remember ever receiving a farthing in my life, for debating any where; I did belong to a Mechanic's Institution -I did go away to avoid being arrested for 33l., but certainly did not abscond under the imputation of taking a sum of money belonging to that society - I never went by any other name than my own; I pawned the books in my wife's name, as I thought it not very respectable, and my family are respectable - I have been in pawnbrokers' shops a hundred times, but I never pawned a book in my life that did not belong to me, except in this way, and these I thought did belong to me; I had a library of books when I kept a coffee shop on Clerkenwell-green, and with them, and my father's library I set up a book shop, in April, 1827 - I did live in Oakley-street, and removed to the next street; I was offered a sum of money to leave - I remember attending at Guildhall in consequence of a most injurious report in the Morning Herald, respecting my coffee-shop on Clerkenwell-green, but I am not conscious of attending at any other time; a pickpocket of the name of Smith was there; I did not go to give evidence, I went respecting my own business, but I think Sir Peter Laurie did put a question to me -I did not state that it was my constant practice to receive books, handkerchiefs, and other things from the persons who frequented my coffee-shop, not any thing of the kind - I was secretary to the Mechanics' Institution; my bro- did pay 70l. or 80l., because there was a deficiency in the account, but not to prevent my being prosecuted; there had been three secretaries, and when I returned from Paris, there was a regular arrangement of all the monies paid and received; there was a deficiency of 70l. or 80l., but all the monies I had were given up.

JURY. Q.You have stated you are a bookseller? A. Yes, and have been so for two years; I do not now keep a public shop - my business was very bad, and I was anxious to get into any other; I have been in the tin plate-working business, it is connected with my own - I have followed no other business, that I recollect; since I have been in the book business, I have occasionally pawned books, when I have wanted a little money.

GEORGE FEARNECOMB . I am a porter. I received these books at Mr. Miranda's, on the 14th of June, 1828, and brought twenty-four or twenty-five bags of books to Mr. Evans.

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I took the prisoner at Lewisham, on the 19th of October; I told him Mr. Flather was in custody, and he had informed me he was the person he had the books of - he said he knew nothing about them.

NOT GUILTY .

MARY COOK.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-143
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1984. MARY COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , 1 shawl, value 3s., and 1 shift, value 1s., the goods of Mary Ann Hipsley ; 1 cap, value 6d., and 1 ring, value 2s., the goods of Letitia Wicks , and 1 petticoat, value 1s., and 1 collar, value 1s. , the goods of Sarah Ginger .

MARY ANN HIPSLEY . I am a nurse at St. Bartholomew's-hospital - the prisoner was a patient there. She left on the 20th of September, and I missed my shawl and shift.

LETITIA WICKS . I am a nurse at Bartholomew's-hospital. I missed a cap and a ring on the 20th of September.

SARAH GINGER . I am single, and am assistant at the hospital . I missed this petticoat and collar on the 20th of September.

GEORGE UNDERWOOD . I am a pawnbroker. I produce all the articles stated; they were pawned on the 20th, 21st, and 22nd of September by a woman about the prisoner's size - I gave her these duplicates.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 2nd of October, and found these duplicates on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was left with two children, and

had nothing to cover me; I was not in a fit state to go into the street - I had scarcely any thing to support me while I was in the hospital.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months .

JOHN OXER, THOMAS TURNER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-144
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1985. JOHN OXER and THOMAS TURNER were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , 3 trusses of hay, value 6s.; 1 bushel of oats, value 3s., and 1 peck of beans, value 1s. , the goods of Dennis Woodin .

DENNIS WOODIN. I am a veterinary surgeon , and live in Upper Park-place ; Oxer was in my employ for about twelve months. up to the 24th of October, as stable man . About seven o'clock that morning I had information, and went to Marylebone office, where I found him in custody - there was a cart there belonging to Sermon with three trusses of hay in it, some loose hay, some beans and oats, but the beans were out of the cart; there was about a peck of them - I compared the hay with what I had at home; it had every appearance of being the same - I cannot tell whether any was missing from my stock, for though I am there every day, Oxer had the management of the stable; I compared the oats with mine, they appeared the same, and the beans more particularly, because they have a quantity of peas among them - I have seen Turner at my stable for dung.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you miss any thing from your stock? A. I could not at the time, as I was in bed; I could not ascertain that there was a deficiency - I bought the oats and hay of Mr. Curtis, a salesman in Smithfield; he sells a great deal to others - it is not uncommon for beans and peas to be mixed.

ROBERT THOMAS LAMBEN . I am a Police-constable. At five o'clock, last Saturday morning, I was at the corner of Little George-street, Marylebone, I saw a cart fourteen of sixteen yards from Mr. Woodin's stable, with the name of "Sermon, Little Chelsea," on it - the two prisoners were there, and I saw them put two trusses of hay into it; they then put a sack into the cart with something in it; fastened the stable door, and went into Great George-street with the cart - I made way for the cart to pass, and then followed, keeping my eyes on the prisoners - I came up to them, and said to the carter. Turner,"What have you in your cart?" he said dung - I said, "I am an officer, have you nothing else? I must see," and I got into the cart; I found a truss of hay under some dung, and then I saw a bag - I put my hand on it and said, "That is what I have been looking for;" I told Turner to stay in the cart, and I would give him a ride to the watch-house - Oxer ran away; as I was going to the watch-house Turner opened the bag and shot the oats in front of the cart, but they fell inside - he said, "D - n the fellow, I wish I had had nothing to do with him; he has brought me into a pretty mess" - I afterwards found Oxer, and knew him again; I said he must go with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Under what circumstances Turner got these, you do not know? A. No; Oxer ran away while I was contending with Turner - I had followed the cart about forty yards; Mr. Sermon came, owned the cart, and I found Turner belonged to him.

Turner's Defence. I did not know about the hay and corn - I understood it belonged to this man.

OXER - GUILTY . Aged 29.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN ATKINS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-145
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > whipping

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Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

1986. JOHN ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , 1 waistcoat, value 2s. , the goods of Sarah Hawkins .

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a constable. On the 29th of August I saw the prisoner and another boy round the prosecutrix's stall, in Spitalfields-market ; the prisoner took up the waistcoat, turned it round, and looked at it - the other lad, who was prosecuted last Session, held up his apron, and the prisoner threw it in; I took the other with the waistcoat, but the prisoner got away at the time - he was taken, afterwards, and I am confident of his person.

SARAH HAWKINS . This waistcoat was on my stall on the 29th of August; I remember seeing the prisoner and another boy at different times that morning about by stall- I did not observe them take any thing, but I saw the officer come with the other boy in his hand; I am quite sure I had seen the prisoner near my stall.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

JOHN ANTHONY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-146
VerdictGuilty
SentenceCorporal > whipping

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1987. JOHN ANTHONY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 pair of trousers, value 8s. , the goods of Abraham Romanel .

FRANCIS NOTT . I am shopman to Abraham Romanel , a clothes salesman , of Wigmore-street . On the 9th of October I was informed a pair of trousers had been stolen- I went out and saw the prisoner running in the road, about twenty yards from my master's; I pursued, and saw him throw the trousers down - he ran through several street, but was overtaken and brought back; I am sure he is the person - they hung on the door post.

THOMAS GOODLUCK . I saw the prisoner come running from the prosecutor's house, and the leg of the trousers hanging from under his apron; I pursued through several streets - he threw them down, I caught them in my left hand, and followed him down William-street, where he was taken.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I was in a shop, and saw the prisoner running along - I went, and took charge of him.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

WILLIAM ALLEN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-147
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1988. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 wash-hand stand, value 5s. , the goods of Charles Wright .

CHARLES WRIGHT. I am a broker , and live in Upper Rathbone-place . This wash-hand stand was at my door on the 17th of September; I was going in at nine o'clock, and saw my son place it on a table - in ten minutes it was gone - I went into that shop, but could see on one; in the afternoon I saw the prisoner in Great Queen-street, offering it for sale; I asked if it was for sale - he said, Yes; that he wanted 3s. for it, and it was honestly worth 5s. -I let him go on to Great St. Andrews-street, where I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. It was outside the door; I did it through distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined One Month .

SARAH WILLIAMS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-148
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1989. SARAH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 2 shillings, and 1 half-crown, the monies of John Frost , her master .

JOHN FROST. I am a baker - the prisoner was my shopwoman . On the 17th of October I marked two half-crowns and five shillings, and put them into the till at half-past eleven o'clock in the morning - I missed one shilling, and after that a half-crown; I sent for Mr. Valentine - he found on her person two shillings, and in her box a half-crown, which I had marked.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM VALENTINE . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found 6s. 6d. in her pocket - two of the shillings were marked; I found four halt-crowns in her box, and one of them is marked.

JOHN FROST . These are a part of what I marked - she used to serve in the shop, and had access to the till; I was only out for about an hour: when she served any bread she put the money into the till - I saw 1s. 6d. taken while I was there; I then went to the till, and found only 10s. 6d. in it, 1s. deficient.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

WILLIAM GREEN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-149
VerdictNot Guilty

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1990. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 1 half-crown, and 2 shillings, the monies of William Proctor , his master .

WILLIAM PROCTOR . I am a grocer , and live in Whitecross-street ; the prisoner had been my apprentice - his time expired about the 7th of October. On the 23rd of October a friend marked some money, but I did not see it.

JOSEPH HAWES . Mr. Proctor requested me to mark-some money; I marked two half-crowns and one half-sovereign, and put them into a piece of paper - I sent a young woman with them to buy some tea.

ELIZABETH PULMAN . I took the two half-crowns and the half-sovereign, which I received from Hawes, and went to Mr. Proctor's shop on the 23rd of October; I bought 1lb. of 8s. green tea, and 1lb. of 7s. black, of the prisoner - I gave him the same money; I do not know what he did with it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you not afterwards to have returned the tea, and get your money? A. No - I gave the tea to this gentleman.

WILLIAM PROCTOR. I came down about nine o'clock after the tea had been purchased - I saw the prisoner, and we had our breakfast; Mr. Hawes afterwards came in -I cast my eyes in the till, and saw one half-sovereign and one half-crown; I said "The money is right" - he replied, "I sent two half-crowns;" the prisoner was at that time up stairs - when he came down I spoke to him, and he produced a half-crown, which was marked, and some other silver.

NOT GUILTY

FREDERICK JOHN DUFFETT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-150
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1991. FREDERICK JOHN DUFFETT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 4 pairs of shoes, value 1l., the goods of Samuel Rowcliffe , his master .

THOMAS STAFFORD . I am in the service of Mr. Harrison, a pawnbroker. The prisoner, to the best of my belief, sold me a pair of shoes on the 3rd of September, and pawned one pair in the name of John Jones .

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you the person with whom they were pawned? A. Yes - I will not undertake to swear to the prisoner; he certainly looks different to what he did when he pawned them, and I have more doubt in my mind now than I had; whether it is from his dress, or what, I cannot tell - I did not particu-cularly remark his dress; I cannot tell whether he had a black coat or not, or whether he had a great coat on -I should not wish to swear to him.

COURT. Q. Did you go before the Magistrate? A. Yes - I saw a person before the Magistrate, but the prisoner seems different; there is some similarity - he certainly does not appear to me to be the same; the person I saw before the Magistrate was the same person I had seen at the shop, to the best of my belief - I do not think I expressed any doubt at the office; in the dress he had on then he seemed more fresh to my recollection than now - this deposition is signed by me; it is merely the dress, I suppose, that makes the difference in his appearance - I believed he was the man, certainly; I said,"The prisoner came into my shop," that is true; I had not doubt he was the man then.

HENRY WOOD . I am in the employ of Mr. Samuel Rowcliffe , a shoemaker . The prisoner has been in our employ about four months, as an out-door workman - these are my master's shoes.

JURY. Q. What stamp is on the shoes? A. Here are figures on the bottom - they are Northampton shoes, not the prisoenr's making.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know them by any thing but the figure? A. They are master's writing - I have pawned shoes by master's direction, but not these; the prisoner has slept in the shop occasionally - no women ever slept there; I swear that - no prostitutes came to that shop that morning; I went out at half-past twelve o'clock in the day with the prisoner in a cabriolet, to the house of an acquaintance of his - we had half a pint of gin; I sent the prisoner to master's for my coat, but did not tell him not to go in if master was there- I left him, and went home to tea; I called a cab about seven o'clock that evening - I went home and got half a crown to pay for it; the wheel came off, and we went into a wine-vaults; the prisoner then took me to a singing room in Wych-street - the prisoner slept in the shop on the 8th; I did not tell master of that.

JURY. Q.Were you and the prisoner intoxicated? A. I left him intoxicated in the passage - I was not intoxicated.

COURT. Q. You swear these shoes belong to your master? A. Yes, and they have No. 11 on them - here is a book in which they are entered, and not marked off as sold - there had been none pawned by my master's order for some time.

FRANCIS BYAS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Greek-street, Soho. I have two pairs of shoes - I cannot tell of whom I received them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was riding in a cub with the witness at the time the property was pawned.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, believing it to be his first offence.

Confined One Month .

JOHN WALL, JOHN DEVEREUX.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-151
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1992. JOHN WALL and JOHN DEVEREUX were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a person unknown, from his person .

JAMES KIMROTT . I am a Police-constable. I was in Broad-street, St. Giles' . On the 13th of October, about four o'clock, I saw the two prisoner in company, and watched them for two hours; there were some prostitutes with them - I saw a gentleman pass; Wall went and took hold of his right-hand coat flap, and took out his pocket-handkerchief; he gave it behind him to Devereux - I seized them both, and called the gentleman, but he went away: they dropped the handkerchief - Devereux made great resistance, and got from me, but I called Stop thief! and he was taken; I do not know the gentleman's name.

Prisoner Wall. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

WALL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

DEVEREUX - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

ANN WHITE.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-152
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1993. ANN WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 hat, value 1s.; 16 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of Thomas Conolly , from his person .

THOMAS CONOLLY . I am a boot-closer , and live in Green's-court, St. James'. Last Tuesday morning, at half-past one o'clock, I was in Drury-lane ; Monday was St. Crispin's day - I had been at a house of call for shoemakers, and was late going home; I was the worse for liquor, and sat down at a door - I fell asleep, and my hat was taken, my pockets turned inside out, and the money taken.

HENRY GROVER . I was coming along Drury-lane, and saw the prosecutor sitting at the door; the prisoner took his hat off, and ran away - I followed, and stopped her; she had run forty or fifty yards: I gave her to the Police-constable - this is the hat.

JOSEPH PEARCE . I am a Police-constable. I was on duty in Drury-lane; I saw the prisoner with this hat in her hand - she was given to me by Grover, and I took her to the watch-house; I found only 4d. on her - she was not in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not recollect being in his company at all - I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS WILSON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-153
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1994. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Charles McPherson , from his person .

CHARLES McPHERSON. I am a woollen-draper . I was in St. John-street-road on the 9th of October, about nine o'clock in the evening; I had a handkerchief in my right-hand coat pocket, and felt it taken - I turned, and saw the prisoner; I seized him, and accused him of taking it - he denied it, but while he was denying it I saw it on the ground, at his feet; this is it.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and have had the handkerchief ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and this gentleman accused me of taking his handkerchief - while he was talking to me I walked a little way back, and he found it on the ground; I said it was not me, for I had been to Mr. Ryder's livery-stable.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

ANN JONES.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-154
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1995. ANN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , 4 shillings, and 3 sixpences, the monies of Samuel Phillips , from his person .

SAMUEL PHILLIPS. My father keeps a china-shop in Queen-street. On the 25th of October, at twelve o'clock at night, I was in King's Head-yard , returning from my father's stable, where I had been racking up the horse - I met the prisoner, who was a stranger; she spoke to me, and asked where I was going - she put her hand into my pocket; I said, "Let me have none of your nonsense," and was going to pass her - I found her hand in my waistcoat pocket, where I had 5s. 6d.; I said nothing to her, but called for the Police-man - she had taken four shillings and three sixpences out of my pocket; when I called for the Police she gave me back 4s. 6d. - she was searched, and two sixpences found on her; I am confident I had the money in my pocket when she came up to me - it had not been long in my pocket.

JOHN TEDMAN . I am a Police-constable. The prosecutor called me, and I went up - he was very much frightened, and said the woman had robbed him, and given him back 4s. 6d. when she saw me coming; I took her to the watch-house, and found two sixpences on her.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Life .

JAMES HARVEY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-155
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1996. JAMES HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Dennis Philbey , from his person .

THOMAS DENNIS PHILBEY . I am a hatter , and live in Little Chapel-street. On Sunday, the 4th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was at Spring-gardens - I felt a tug at my pocket, and missed a silk handkerchief- I turned, and the prisoner crossed close by me; I followed him into the road, and stopped him - I charged him with the robbery: he forced himself from me, and ran into the King's-mews - he was pursued by same persons, and made several attempts to knock them down; as he was coming back the constable took him, and pulled my handkerchief from his trousers pocket.

CHARLES FREEMAN . I am a Police-constable. I was in Spring-gardens, and saw the prisoner running, trying to knock down every body he met; he came through the coach-stand - I collared him; he made great resistance -I saw his hand in his pocket, and took this handkerchief from his pocket - it is marked with the prosecutor's name.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

JOHN BROWN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-156
VerdictGuilty
SentenceCorporal > whipping

Related Material

1997. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 cap, value 3s., the goods of William Rowe , from the person of Edwin Samuel Rowe .

JANE ROWE . I am seven years old, and live with my

father in Red Lion-street, Kingsland-road. On the 27th of September I went into the fields with my brother Edwin Samuel Rowe , and saw the prisoner - he told me there were some butter-cups in the field; I went to look for them, and left my little brother at the top of the field, with the cap on his head - I could not find any butter-cups, but when I turned my head round I saw the prisoner running with my brother's cap; he turned round the corner: I had seen him once before; I went to my father, and told him what had happened - this is my brother's cap.

Cross-examined by MR. J. ALLEY. Q.Were there many boys in the field? A. There were two more, whom I did not know; the prisoner had no coat on - I did not see him throw any thing away: the other boys stood still - I have a governess - she asked me about the cap; I did say I was not sure the prisoner was the boy who took the cap, but I saw him run away with it; the other boys were not dressed as he was.

WILLIAM ROWE. I am a dyer , and live in Red Lion-street, Kingsland-road. My little son, Edwin Samuel Rowe, was out with this child, and went on Sunday, the 27th of September, about four o'clock, to Black Horse-fields - she came back to me, and stated what she has now- a boy came to my house, and asked if I had not three children; I said Yes - he described a boy to me: I went after him, but could not find him - I applied to an officer who knew him by name - he took him the same evening; the prisoner's mother found the cap next morning - this is it.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you a governess in your house? A. No.

CHARLES WALLER . I am a Bow-street patrol. I took the prisoner in consequence of information - I asked him at the watch-house what he had done with the cap he took from the child; he said he knew nothing about it - I went to his mother the next day, and she gave me this cap.

Witnesses for the Defence.

MARGARET BROWN . I am the prisoner's mother. I went to William Holt , with my son Edward and a boy named Charles Austin ; a cap, which I believe is this, was produced to me by Holt - I have not seen him here to-day- I tried to find him, but he has moved from the house; he promised he would attend here.

COURT. Q. You know nothing of Mr. Rowe? A. I know he lives in that street; they have pitched on a wrong person - the officer said if I could find the cap they would liberate my son; as I was going home I saw some boys in the road, who asked me if my son was gone to the watch-house about a cap - I said, "Yes, and if you can tell me any thing about it I will give you 1s.;" they said a boy who was selling apples had a cap thrown on his basket - I went and got this.

CHARLES AUSTIN . I know William Holt - I went with this witness to him, and got this cap.

COURT. Q. You knew where to go and get it? A. Yes - I was not in the field that day; Holt is taller than the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

WILLIAM SKILTON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-157
VerdictsGuilty; Guilty
SentencesTransportation

Related Material

1998. WILLIAM SKILTON was indicted for bigamy .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am parish-clerk of St. Mary, Newington, in Surrey. I have the register of the marriages in that church (reads), "On the 11th of September 1820, William Skilton, bachelor, and Mary Ann Wyld , spinster, were married by banns by me, J. B. Saunders. Signed W. Skilton and Mary Ann Wyld ."

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You do not recollect either of the parties? A. No.

WILLIAM WYLD . I am the brother of Mary Ann Wyld. She lived as cook in the service of a gentleman to whom the prisoner was gardener; I afterwards saw them living together as husband and wife in Adam-street, Manchester-square; he called my father and mother, father and mother, and me, William - this signature is my sister's writing; I saw her on the 16th of September alive.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there a person of the name of Skilton here? A. I have not seen him; I do not know Catherine Rowe.

SARAH WILKINSON . I married the prisoner at Islington , on the 23rd of April, 1826 ; I know his hand-writing - this signature is his; he lived with me till the 28th of last January - I had two children by him; he left them with me - he paid for one of them for three months after he left me; he ill-used me, and pinched and kicked me.

Cross-examined. Q. You parted by mutual consent? A. Yes; we had quarrels - he did not complain of my making use of twenty-two weeks' rent; I was obliged to pawn some articles from necessity, but not the furniture - we each took one child; the person with whom he placed one child gave it up, because the payment was not kept up after the first four months.

COURT. Q. What were you before you married? A. I was servant to Mrs. Wall, of Hoxton-square - I had been there ten months; the prisoner courted me twelve months and twenty days - he represented himself as a single man; he never told me he had been married - I accused him of it, but he denied it; he was gardener to a gentleman at Upper Clapton; I had no fortune.

Prisoner's Defence. The witness has sworne false.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

1999. WILLIAM SKILTON was again indicted for bigamy .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS. I am parish-clerk of St. Mary, Newington, Here is the register of the marriage of William Skilton, bachelor, and Mary Ann Wyld , spinster, by banns, on the 11th of September, 1820.

WILLIAM WYLD. I am the brother of Mary Ann Wyld . I saw her alive on the 16th of September last; this signature is her writing - and I know the prisoner and she lived together as husband and wife.

JOHN JONES . I am parish-clerk of Lewisham. I have the register of marriages at Lewisham church - I was present, on the 20th of July , 1829, when William Skilton and Esther Pink were married by Evan Morgan, curate, in the presence of Georgiana Jeffries and John Jones - this is my signature; the prisoner is the man - I have a perfect recollection of him.

GEORGE MEADOWS . I apprehended the prisoner at Isleworth, in Middlesex; I went to No.2, Angel-row, but he was not at home - I followed a woman, who went with a dinner to the prisoner; I said, "I want you for having

three wives;" Wilkinson and Pink followed me - Wilkinson said to him, "You are a blackguard, you will serve this poor thing as you have served me and your first wife;" he said, "Hold your noise, or I will make you;" I said,"I will have none of this: if you go about marrying women in this way, you must expect they will say something;" he said, "What if I have had three wives, two of them turned out d - d bad ones, and now I have got a third I suppose you wont let me keep her."

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years for each offence .

THOMAS SHEPPARD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-158
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2000. THOMAS SHEPPARD was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 1 silver tea-pot, value 3l. , the goods of Samuel Hamer ; and that at the delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, on the 6th of December, in the 8th year of His Majesty's Reign, he was convicted of felony by the name of Thomas Millgrave Sheppard.

SANTE CAPITANI . I am an Italian, and am in the service of Mr. Richard Pullen, who lives at Mr. Samuel Hamer's, No. 74, Wimpole-street . On the 23rd of October, between four and five o'clock, I saw the prisoner go up the area steps; I suspected all was not right, and went after him - as he was walking up Wimpole-street I overtook him, and asked what he had got - he said, "Take it;" and gave me this tea-pot, which belongs to Mr. Hamer - he then ran from me, and through several streets to Oxford-street; he went into a house and I lost sight of him - an officer came up and I went home - this was on Friday, and I saw the prisoner again on the Sunday: I am quite sure he is the man; I recollect his face perfectly - I took particular notice of him.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. I believe he was quite a stranger to you? A. Yes; I was in my own room adjoining the pantry, his side was towards me; I went to the top of the area steps and saw him walking - I then got my hat and went after him; he had got as far as the corner of Little Wimpole-street - when I got the tea-pot he ran away; there were people in the street - I went into the house he went into, but could not find him; a good many people went in with me - he was walking when he gave me the tea-pot.

COURT. Q. Are you quite certain he is the man who gave you the tea-pot? A. Yes; I am quite positive of it.

MARY BAKER . I am servant to Mr. Samuel Hamer. This is his tea-pot, and was taken out of the pantry; I do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you out at the time? A. No; I was up stairs; this tea-pot was on the pantry table; the witness' room is on the other side of the passage - I saw the tea-pot safe about four o'clock; it was brought back between five and six o'clock.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I heard of the robbery, and received information that the prisoner was the person who ran away; I went to Paddington and took him - he said he knew nothing of it; the witness identified him.

Cross-examined. Q.Where did the witness see him? A. He was in our office, and when I brought in the prisoner, he said, "That is the man."

Prisoner's Defence. I am placed in awkward circumstances, having had an indictment against me before of which I was found guilty; I was out of work, and went out that day to go to Putney - I met a friend in Cumberland-street and had a pot of ale with him; we went to several public-house - I got tipsy at a public-house in Edgware-road - it was half-past four o'clock, and he advised me to go home; I called on a friend at a cottage, and she advised me to go home, which I did, and stopped all night; the officers knew where I lived, and if guilty I should have absconded; I was not within two miles of the prosecutor's.

JOHN GRIFFITH . I am a hackney-coachman, and live at No. 17, Moor-street, Bryanstone-square. I know the prisoner, and was with him yesterday week, from three o'clock in the afternoon till five - we first went and had a pot of ale at the Pitt's Head, Cumberland-street, Bryanstone-square; we smoked a pipe, and might stop for an hour - we then went to a public-house in the New-road, Edgware-road, took a little drop of gin, and I think we left at half-past four o'clock or nearly five.

COURT. Q. You are a hackney-coachman? A. Yes, and have been so about twelve years - I drive No. 19; I had been that day to Essex-street to get entered, which makes me so positive of the day; I have known the prisoner three or four years, but we were not particularly intimate -I have drank with him - I do not know how he gets his living; I never heard that he was in trouble two years ago; we have not drank very often - I rather think I paid that day for what was drank; I am a night coachman - I believe him to be very honest, and never knew him to be charged with felony - if he had said so himself in Court I would not believe it.

SARAH HANNER . My husband is a tailor, and lives in the cottages at the bottom of the Harrow-road. The prisoner came to our cottage yesterday week, about five minutes before five, or it might be ten minutes - he was rather intoxicated; I sent my daughter for his wife, and she came a few minutes after - the prisoner staid about half an hour, and I went home with him to his own cottage, some little distance below mine - he lodged with me about six months from March last.

COURT. Q. Do you know Wimpole-street? A. No; these cottages are at the bottom of the wharf, near the Grand Junction Canal - the streets are not named; I know a Wimpole-street, Marylebone - I should think it is about two miles off; I do not often see the prisoner - I do not minute the time when he comes to see me, but my children were coming from school, and I told them to come home before five, as I had some things to send home to the Elm Tree-road - the prisoner left me about eight or nine weeks ago - it may be eleven weeks; I know his wife - I understood he was a painter by trade; I never heard any thing against him - if he had asserted in this Court that he had been tried and convicted I would not believe it; I think I saw him on the Thursday - I see him almost every day; I believe I had seen him on the Wednesday - I do not think I saw him on the Monday or the Tuesday.

ANN ROGERS. My husband is a journeyman carpenter - we live at No. 5, Earl-street, Lisson-grove. I was working for Hanner yesterday week at her cottage, as a laundress - I saw the prisoner there that evening; he had a blue coat on and a great coat over it - he was not quite sober - he had been drinking; this was nearer five o'clock than four - I recollect his leaving to go home.

COURT. Q. What made you tell us the coloured coat he had on? A. I had no particular reason - I have seen him a great many times; my husband does not know him - I do not know much of him; I never changed ten words with him - I remember the time because I was ironing a dress that was to go home at five o'clock; I have seen the prisoner with a brown great coat, and I think he had it on then - I never heard any thing against him; Mrs. Hanner told me to come here - I did not go before the Magistrate.

PHILIP WEBSTER. I produce a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner by the name of Thomas Millgrove Sheppard , on the 6th of December, in the 8th year of his present Majesty's reign; I attended his trial by order of the Magistrate, and I know he is the man.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

GEORGE WAYS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-159
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2001. GEORGE WAYS was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , 1 chair, value 30s. , the goods of William Bourne .

JAMES FOWLER . I am a Bow-street patrol. I saw the prisoner running from Mr. Bourne's house with this chair; I pursued him - he threw it down, and a young man caught him.

WILLIAM BOURNE . This is my chair, and was safe inside my shop on the 2nd of October - the prisoner's father worked for me some years back; I am a cabinet-maker .

Prisoner's Defence. I was taking a walk in Whitechapel, and a man asked me to carry this; he put it on my shoulder - I walked in the middle of the road with it, and I saw a coach was coming - the man said, "Put it down," and ran off - I did not know what for.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Month .

WILLIAM WHEATLEY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-160
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2002. WILLIAM WHEATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 1 umbrella, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Francis Tadman .

FRANCIS TADMAN. This umbrella had been left in my care, and was, on the 7th of October, on the one pair landing at my house in Leonard-street ; I know nothing of the prisoner.

SUSAN AFFORD . I lodge with Tadman. The prisoner came to the house to bring me some coals - he was obliged to pass where the umbrella was; I missed it immediately he was gone.

ANN BYRNE . I lived near the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner go into the house with the coals, and come out with a brown cotton umbrella; he took it away with him.

JOHN MARTIN BALL . I was going across Spital-square - I saw two women had hold of the prisoner; he got from them, and I took him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the umbrella, nor saw one there.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Fourteen Days .

SARAH REED.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-161
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2003. SARAH REED was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 shawl, value 4s. , the goods of John Dubourg .

CAROLINE DUBOURG . I am the wife of John Dubourg , we live in Dudley-court, St. Giles' . On the 20th of October I went into the next house; as I returned I saw the prisoner coming down the stairs - I asked what she wanted; she gave me no answer, but when she got to the bottom I saw my shawl hanging from under her clothes- she said it was her daughter's; I had left my door a little open, and the shawl on the dining room table.

CHARLES MAYHO . I am a constable, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to look for a woman my husband kept - she had a shawl just like that; I was told she lived in Dudley-court - I had had a little liquor, and do not know what I did.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Three Months .

JAMES REYNOLDS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-162
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2004. JAMES REYNOLDS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Charles Tooley .

CHARLES TOOLEY . I am a shoemaker , and live in Whitecross-street , at the corner of a court, in which the prisoner lived. I went out, about six o'clock in the evening, last Wednesday fortnight - I left the shoes safe in my shop; I returned at ten and, missed them - I found them on the prisoner's feet on the Saturday following.

EDWARD PAYNE . I am an officer. These are the shoes I took from the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ANN TOOLEY . I am the prosecutor's wife. The prisoner came to our shop, and tried on the shoes - a gentleman came in to try a pair of boots; the prisoner went away, and these shoes were missing when my husband came home.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

WILLIAM PETTIFORD.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-163
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

2005. WILLIAM PETTIFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 4 pieces of oak timber, value 30s. , the goods of William Austin .

WILLIAM AUSTIN . I am a builder . This timber is mine; it was put into a saw-pit and buried with earth, about four months ago in the ground belonging to the Haberdasbers' company, at Hoxton - I buried it because I expected I should want it on the premises again; the prisoner was digging a sewer about a hundred yards from the saw-pit - I never authorized him to remove it.

ROBERT HAYFORD . I am a watchman at Hoxton. On the 8th of October, from a quarter to half-past five o'clock, I was finishing my round, and saw the prisoner and three witnesses removing a piece of timber - they then removed three other pieces; I said nothing to them, but when I went off duty I informed the prosecutor, who identified the wood - we got an officer, and took the prisoner.

JOB REDFORD . I was employed by the prisoner - we had worked all night in the sewer, and left off at half-past five o'clock; he said he had some timber to remove - we went, and removed four pieces; they were all pulled out before I got there - he was with us all the time; we put it at the side of the wall.

JOHN BAYLIS . I was employed by the prisoner at the sewer on the Monday, and on the Thursday he employed

us to move this timber; he did not say who it belonged to.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a bricklayer. The prisoner asked me to lend him a hand with the timber - he gave no reason why; I carried one piece to the end of the sewer - he and the others put it at the end of the Haberdashers' wall; it was not necessary to use it in the sewer.

CHARLES CONSTABLE . I am an inspector of the watch. I went to the sewer and took the three witnesses, and by direction of the Magistrate I took the prisoner at his own house - in going to the office he asked if he could not see the prosecutor, and beg his pardon, or arrange it with him, and said he would take the timber to where he took it from.

Prisoner's Defence. I was working in the same field for four weeks; several things were carried away, and this timber was laid bare - I moved it to give our watchman charge of it.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM WILKINSON, JOHN CONNELL.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-164
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2006. WILLIAM WILKINSON and JOHN CONNELL were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 7lbs. weight of pork, value 3s., and 3lbs. weight of cheese, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Mary Venville .

JOHN MURPHY . I am a Police-constable. On the 18th of October I saw the two prisoner together in Tottenham-court-road - Wilkinson was carrying a leg of pork and a roll of Dutch cheese; I asked, in the other prisoner's hearing, where he got them - he said he had bought the pork in Oxford-market of a butcher named Davies; I took them there, and in going along Connell ran off - I followed, and brought him back; I went up to the butchers and asked if they knew any thing of the prisoners - they said No; I went round the market, and could find no person of that name - I took the prisoners to the watch-house; the prosecutrix swore to the property.

Prisoner Wilkinson. Murphy and his serjeant agreed to discharge us, and keep the property between themselves.

JOHN MURPHY . We did not; they were discharged from the watch-house because they gave an account of the weight of the pork, and they took the articles with them - another officer brought them back with it.

JOSEPH FAIRWEATHER . I am a Police-constable. I was in the watch-house when the prisoners were brought in; they gave the true weight of the pork, and were discharged; but in consequence of further information I went and took them at No. 2, Pearl-court, St. Giles' - my brother officer found the property in the room; I never heard of what the prisoner has now said.

JOHN WILDEMAN PAYNE . I am a serjeant of the Police. I went to the house, and found the pork and the Dutch cheese; I never heard that the prisoners were to go, and we were to keep the articles.

MATILDA JOHNSON . I am cook to Mary Venville , a milliner and dress-maker , in New Cavendish-street . This pork and cheese were in my care; I had put the pork in a dish to salt, and on Sunday morning, the 18th of October, I missed it - it had been safe in the area at eleven o'clock the night before; I am certain this is the pork by a place which I have cut in it, and this cheese has a particular mark on it - about two ounces has been cut off the cheese.

Connell's Defence. I had not been with Wilkinson three minutes when I was taken.

WILKINSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

CONNELL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

DANIEL MARSHEA, JOHN EDWARDS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-165
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

2007. DANIEL MARSHEA and JOHN EDWARDS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 2 gowns, value 6s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 3s. , the goods of Richard Allen .

RICHARD ALLEN. I live in Tysoe-street, Wilmington-square, Spa-fields . On the 15th of September I lost two gowns and a pair of trousers from the landing-place of my second floor room - I had seen them just before; Marshea, his father, and mother, came to lodge with me a short time before - his father is a jeweller.

JOHN HENRY PARKER . I am a pawnbroker. I have two gowns and a pair of trousers pawned by Edwards on the 15th of September; he said it was for his sister.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM JERKINS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-166
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2008. WILLIAM JERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 11 napkins, value 1l. , the goods of Thomas Tod Madden .

JOHN MASON . I am a Police-constable. On the 24th of September, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was standing at the corner of Well-street and Charles-street, Middlesex-hospital; I saw the prisoner and another boy- they saw me, and parted; I followed the prisoner - he dropped this bundle out of his apron, and ran; I pursued - he went in at the back door of the Tiger public-house; I went in at the front door, and we met at the bar - I took him to the office, and he was remanded; I went to different drapers, but could not trace the property - at last I looked at the Court Guide, and found Mr. Madden's name, whose initials corresponded with the mark on the articles which are made.

SYBIL DAVIES . I am a servant to Mr. Thomas Tod Madden; he lives in Wimpole-street . These napkins are his property; I made them, and know my own work- they were lost at the same time from the housekeeper's room; there is an area to the house, and steps to go down - the gate is open sometimes.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into a wine-vaults to see what time it was; a young man asked me to have a drop of beer, and when we came out he asked me to carry these articles to a mangle in Well's-mews - I took them in my apron; when the officer asked what I had, I said I did not know - I ran to the house, where I thought to find the young man, as he said he would wait for me; but he was not there.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

JACOB HALLS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-167
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2009. JACOB HALLS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 70 yards of cotton tick, value 70s. , the goods of Jonathan Nicholson and William Nicholson .

JONATHAN NICHOLSON. I am in partnership with William Nicholson; we keep a carpet warehouse at the corner of Southampton-buildings, High Holborn . Between nine and ten o'clock in the morning of the 1st of

October, the prisoner came into the shop while I was at the desk; he took this tick - I followed, and took him with it, about forty yards from the shop; he was quite a stranger - here are seventy-three yards of it.

CHARLES WATSON . I am a Police-constable, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I recommend myself to your mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS EDWARDS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-168
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

2010. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 4 snuff-boxes, value 4s. , the goods of Charles Allen .

CHARLES ALLEN. I am a tobacconist , and live at Islington . The prisoner used to deal with me, and visited me on the 8th of October - he came to buy some tobacco, and to chat; he went into the back parlour, and staid two hours - the next morning I missed four snuff-boxes, which had been in the shop window; he has frequently taken boxes to look at.

GEORGE ABRAHAM . I am a constable. I found the prisoner at the other end of the town - I told him I wanted him; he said, "I guess the case" - I took him to Worship-street, and found two snuff-boxes on him; he told Mr. Allen one more was at home, and the other he had sold - he said he meant to have returned them if he had not sold them; I found one at his mother's house.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM RICHARD SMITH.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-169
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2011. WILLIAM RICHARD SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of July , nine 5l. Bank notes, the property of Stephen William Young , his master .

STEPHEN WILLIAM YOUNG . I am a solicitor , and live in Poland-street, Oxford-street . The prisoner was my clerk - on the 3rd of July I gave him nine 5l. notes to pay to Messrs. Gosling and Sharp, my bankers, in Fleet-street - he never returned; I saw him again on the 13th of October, in custody: he had been with me four months.

EDWARD JOHN TOMKINS . I am a clerk to Messrs. Gosling and Sharp. The prosecutor keeps cash there - there were no 5l. notes paid in on his account on the 3rd of July - I am cashier, and keep the book; they were not paid to me or any one else.

HENRY GODDARD . The prisoner surrendered himself to me on the 13th of October - he said he had been in Dublin, and spent his master's money, and the only atonement he could make was to surrender himself up.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM DENHAM.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-170
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Fourth Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2012. WILLIAM DENHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 15 window sashes, value 7l., the goods of John Scott , and fixed to a building .

MR. BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JOHN SCOTT . I have six houses building in Oldenham-street , near the old church, St. Pancras; I had these window sashes safe, three days previous to the 28th of September - the whole of one house was then glazed except the kitchen; the family had been there some months.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know a person named Boyd? A. Yes; he receives money from me, for finishing the houses - I bought the property of Mr. Staley, who pays Boyd; Boyd has the power of letting the houses - he is to have them at a certain price; I had paid for these sashes in the purchases - they were there when I purchased the property; the prisoner did not make them - I saw sashes in the house before I knew the prisoner - I cannot swear they were these.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Are you proprietor of the ground? A. I have the lease of eleven houses; I advance money to the builders, and then grant leases; the prisoner applied about a lease of that house - I said when it was complete I should have no objection to grant a lease to him, or any one that Staley had appointed; this was five months ago.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not your agreement with the Brewers' company, that the houses were to be fit for inhabiting at a given time? A. Yes, and they are not - I am not certain that they will not be taken from me.

ROBERT BOVD . I am a carpenter. I assisted in making the sashes for this house; I received money from Mr. Staley - I fixed up these sashes before the prisoner engaged to finish the house; I had made the basement sashes, and some of the attics, before he entered into any agreement with me. On the 28th of September, I saw the prisoner with one sash in his hand; I said, "What are you going to do with that?" he said, "Stop me if you dare" - I said, "I shall stop the sash;" this is the one - it was a quarter-past twelve o'clock in the day; the sashes were then out of the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do not you know that he made a claim of right to them? A. No - there was no agreement between him and me that he was to finish the house in a certain time, or to forfeit the things in it; there was no such agreement made with my son-in-law, to my knowledge; I made an agreement with the prisoner, in the presence of my son-in-law, John Payne ; I know this paper; I admit this - the prisoner never said he had any claim of right - I made part of the sashes, and Mr. Scott's money paid me; the prisoner did not employ me - there was an agreement that the prisoner should have the house at a certain time; these sashes were removed a few hours before the time.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Did the prisoner in any way contribute to put the sashes in the house? A. No. except the glass, he being a painter and glazier .

JOHN LIMBRICK. I took the prisoner, and told him I wanted him about some sashes - he said he knew nothing of any sashes.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM COOK.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-171
VerdictGuilty
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

Related Material

2013. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 4 loaves of bread, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Clark .

WILLIAM BEECH . I am servant to William Clark , green-grocer of Golden-lane . He has bread of Mr. Thurgood, and on Monday morning, Thurgood came to settle for the bread; Mr. Clark was in the country, and I was left there - Thurgood said, "How many loaves had you on Saturday?" I said, Fourteen - he said, "How many on Sunday?" I said, None - he said, I had, and went home to see who served it; the prisoner was in the

next room, cleaning shoes - the people in the adjoining house have a right to the same yard - the prisoner heard the conversation, and went into the yard, through the next house to Mr. Thurgood's, and got four more loaves - when Mr. Thurgood came back to me, he said, "The boy has had four more loaves now;" I said, "He is in the room cleaning shoes;" I went into the room, but he was gone, and I did not find him till he was taken on the Tuesday evening.

HARRIET THURGOOD . I am the wife of Mr. Thurgood. On Monday, the 28th, the prisoner came, and had four loaves for Mr. Clark.

EDWARD HANDS . I am a headborough of St. Luke's. I received information, and took the prisoner at a woodshop; I told him what he had been doing - he said he was hungry, and wanted me to take him to his mother; I refused, and took him to the watch-house; he showed me five different places, at which he had sold the loaves.

GUILTY. Aged 10.

Judgment Respited .

LOUISA DENNIS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-172
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2014. LOUISA DENNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 6 sovereigns, and 1 farthing , the monies of John Werry .

JOHN WERRY . I am cooper on board a ship . I saw the prisoner on the 13th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, in the Commercial-road; she asked me to go home with her - I went to a house, occupied by Mr. Davies, with her, and to one of the chambers up stairs; I said I would go and get something to drink - she said I should send: I said I wanted change for a half-sovereign - she called Davies to get it; she brought me back 9s. 3d. change, and half a pint of gin. When I went to the house I had a 5l. note, ten sovereigns, a half-sovereign and a shilling; I gave Davies 3d., and the prisoner 2s., and then a half-crown; I took off my jacket, and put it under the head of the bed, and laid down on the bed - the prisoner had part of her clothes off; she went out of the room, got a wash-hand basin, turned it down, and sat upon it - I heard some money rattle, got up, and said, "You are robbing me;" she said, "I am not - lie still:" I got my jacket, and missed six sovereigns - she went down, and went out of the house; I followed her, and she called me a scaley fellow - I went back, put on my things, and got an officer; we went to the house which she had gone into, but she had escaped; the officer found her - she ran into a rag-shop.

Cross-examined by MR. BODKIN. Q. How long had you been on shore? A. I came on Saturday week; I had been paid that day, and went straight to the Commercial-road, where I met her; I had not taken any beer or spirits - I did not invite her to go with me; I should have gone on board at one o'clock - the first thing we had at the house was half a pint of gin; we then had the same again, but the woman who brought it drank with us - we afterwards had half a pint of rum; I will not swear we had no more - I might be two hours in the house - I was not tipsy, but a little animated; she had 4s. 6d. of me besides the liquor - I counted my money in the house, while she was gone for Davies to get the liquor; she did not see it - it was all in one pocket - any person might have taken the whole; I am sure I gave her no sovereigns - I did not drink so much as she did: she was rather tipsy - she was taken in about half an hour.

MARY ECCLES . I am married. When this piece of work was I saw the prisoner in the street with the prosecutor - she said to him, "You might have spoken to me in a proper manner, and not have made such a piece of work"- she took him to her own house; he stopped a short time, and then came out to get an officer; the prisoner then fastened the door, and threw some water over some people who were standing outside - the officer came, but she got out the back way; he found her afterwards, and took her- I saw her in charge, and followed her to Lambeth-street office - as she was going along she loosened her pocket and dropped it; I took it up, and gave it to Thompson, who I saw give it to Healey.

Cross-examined. Q. What house did she come out of with the sailor? A. Out of Davies', and went to her own house; she was dragging him by the hand, and said if he would come with her she would make all right - he left her in her own house to get the officer; in going to the office she said her things were loose - the officer said, "Tie them;" she then put her hand into her pocket-hole, broke the string, and let her pocket fall.

JOHN HENRY FRASCH . I am a clerk. I was standing in the Commercial-road, talking to an officer; two or three people came up, and said the woman had run down Cannon-street-road - the officer told me to run after her; I turned down Richard-street, and saw the prisoner and a man; she ran into a rag-shop - I took her, and gave her to Thompson.

DAVID HEALEY . The prisoner was brought to Lambeth-street Office, and given into my charge; Thompson, the officer, had this pocket in his hand - I found in it six sovereigns, two shillings, one half-crown, and one farthing.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the money - he was very much intoxicated.

DAVID HEALEY . He did not appear tipsy; she did not say this at the time.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

ANN BARFOOT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-173
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

2015. ANN BARFOOT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 2 petticoats, value 3s.; 2 pockets, value 1s.; 2 aprons, value 9d.; 1 pair of scissors, value 2d.; 2 towels, value 3d.; 2 combs, value 3d.; 1 shawl, value 1s., and 1 shift, value 1s. , the goods of James Ely .

ANN ELY . I am the wife of James Ely - we live in Whitecross-street. On the 12th of September the prisoner came to meet me at the House of Correction, in Spafields; I had a bundle, containing these things - she asked if I would go to her place, and lodge with her, and said I need not trouble myself to look for any other home; I asked her if she would have any thing to eat and drink - she said she should be much obliged to me; we went to the Apple Tree and had something to drink, and then I gave her something to eat; I had occasion to go backwards, and when I returned she was gone, also my bundle and shawl - this was about one o'clock in the day: I have seen none of the property but two old combs and a little bag - I swear the combs were in the bundle.

Prisoner. What she has said is entirely false - she came that morning out of the House of Correction.

ANN ELY. Yes; I was there for some things being stolen which I had to wash - the petticoats were given me from the House of Correction, and belonged to me.

JANE STOKES . On the 12th of September I went to fetch a pint of beer, and saw the prisoner with a bundle, tied up in a blue spotted apron; this was between two and three o'clock - I afterwards saw the prosecutrix; she asked if I had seen the prisoner, and I said I had.

EDWARD HANDS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner to the watch-house; I found these combs and this bag on her - she said she knew nothing of the bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. There were two women and a man with her all the morning; we went to several public-houses - she gave me these combs after the woman had gone away with her trifling bundle, but there were not so many things as she states; she told me she had lost her bundle, and if I did not pay her she would give me in charge.

ANN ELY . I said if she would give me the duplicates, or tell me where they were, I would not hurt her.

EDWARDS HANDS. In going to the watch-house the prisoner said she had pawned the petticoat, but did not know what she had done with the money.

NOT GUILTY .

MARY BROWN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-174
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2016. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 2 brushes, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Joseph Vauzeller .

GEORGE MARLONI . I am butler to Mr. Joseph Vanzeller , of York-place, Portman-square ; I saw the prisoner come and take these brushes - I stopped her in the area, and she put them down.

Prisoner. I hope you will have mercy on me.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Seven Days .

JOSEPH BUTCHER, JOSEPH PERKINS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-175
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2017. JOSEPH BUTCHER and JOSEPH PERKINS were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 ham, value 12s. , the goods of Thomas Mason .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a green-grocer. Thomas Mason is a cheesemonger , and lives near me; Page gave me information - I looked towards the end of the street, and saw Butcher with something under his apron, walking quick; I ran round the houses, and came nearly to him - he threw down this ham, and ran off; I called Stop thief! and he was stopped within three or four yards of me - I did not see Perkins.

HENRY PAGE . I am an errand-boy. I saw Perkins take the ham from Mason's shop - he gave it to Butcher, who ran off with it; Perkins ran in the same direction, and then turned back - I followed, and he was taken in my sight.

EDMOND LIMAN . I am shopman to Thomas Mason . I know this ham to be my master's; I did not see it taken.

Perkins' Defence. I was running, and the lad called Stop thief!

BUTCHER - GUILTY . Aged 22.

PERKINS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARY JONES.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-176
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2018. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of September , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 rule, value 9d., and 1 handkerchief, value 3d., the goods of George Britt , from his person .

GEORGE BRITT . I am a bricklayer . I met the prisoner near Fleet-market about twelve o'clock at night, on the 22nd of September - we went to a public-house, and then to a house in Field-lane ; we went to bed - I wound up my watch, put it into my trousers, and put them under my pillow: I soon fell asleep, and something awoke me - I saw the prisoner going out of the door, with a light in her hand; I asked where she was going to - she said to get some beer; I said it was too late - she said she knew where to get it: I laid down again, and thought I did not hear my watch - I knocked on the floor for a light; some person brought one up, and said she was gone out to get some beer- I got up, and went out; I saw the watchman, and as I stood talking with him, the prisoner and another female came into the lane - the prisoner went into the same house again; I followed, and asked if she had not some property of mine - she said No; I called the watchman, who took her, and found the watch in her hand.

GEORGE ROGERS . I was called in - the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner; I asked her to give me the watch - she said she had not got it: I saw her take her hand from her pocket - I took hold of her hand, and found the watch in it; the handkerchief and rule were found the next morning.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He wanted the watch, and I said I would give it to the man; it was my intention to bring it back to him, as there were many girls in the house - I pulled it out of my pocket to give it him.

GUILTY (of stealing only) . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

ROBERT PHILPOT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-177
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

2019. ROBERT PHILPOT was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS CROSSLEY . I am a retail coal-dealer , and live in Cow-cross . The prisoner was in my employ for five or six weeks - he left me on the 28th of September; he was to give me the money immediately for the coals that were sold.

ANN ROBERTS . I deal with the prosecutor for coals - I had two bushels on the 17th of September, and paid the prisoner 3s. 6d. for his master.

REBECCA NICKELSON . I paid the prisoner on the 21st of September, 1s. 2d., for a bushel of coals.

MARTHA DAVIS . I paid the prisoner 1s. 2d. on the 24th of September, for a bushel of coals.

THOMAS CROSSLEY . The prisoner gave me 3s., and said Mrs. Roberts would pay me the 6d.; the other two bushels sent to the other witnesses he said were not paid for.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor had agreed to be re-paid by instalments, and not prosecute him.

THOMAS CROSSLEY . I found he had taken 2s. 6d. at one place, and that I said I would make a debt of, if he would never do the like again - I said nothing about the other money.

JOHN ALLEN . I am a coal-dealer, and live in Cow-cross. The prisoner lived nine months with me, and bore a good character; he came to my service again after he left the prosecutor; I took him to Hatton-garden - there was only one charge against him, which the Magistrate would not enter upon; I bailed him: the prosecutor then

brought this charge, and told me he would prosecute him if he came into my service, but if he kept out of the way he would not, I will take him into my service now.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .

JAMES FREDERICK DELDEN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-178
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

2020. JAMES FREDERICK DELDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 chair, value 3s. , the goods of James Thomason ; and that he, at the General Session for the Delivery of the Gaol of Newgate, held at Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, on Thursday, the 15th day of January, in the ninth year of the reign of the present King, was convicted of felony, by the name of James Pearce .

JAMES THOMASON . I am a broker . I came home at half-past eight o'clock in the evening, on the 28th of September - my shop is small, and in making room I put this chair, which had been in the middle of the shop, at my door; in a few minutes it was gone - I went down Old-street, and saw the prisoner offering it at a bookseller's shop for sale; I went up, took the chair, collared him, and gave him to the watchman - he said he had received it from a woman, but I saw no woman.

Prisoner. Q.Where is your shop? A. No 35, Old-street , between Whitecross-street and Bunhill-row, on the same side; I heard a person say you were seen in Featherstone-street with a woman, but I did not see you - I took the chair from your shoulder; you were twenty doors from my house.

JOHN BRANCH . I am a bookseller. The chair was offered to me by the prisoner, and I refused to purchase it - the prisoner took it out of my shop, and I saw the prosecutor take him in front of my house; I did not hear what he asked for the chair - I do not think he asked any price, as I positively refused to buy it; I heard him tell the prosecutor he had it from a woman.

Prisoner. Q.Did you hear the prosecutor say he could bring a person to say he saw me with it in Featherstone-street? A. No.

PETER GANNING . I am an officer, and took the prisoner in charge.

THOMAS EARLE . I received the prisoner and the chair - I found this passport on him.

The prisoner, in a very long address to the Court, narrated the particulars of his travels abroad, stated himself to have been in great poverty, and that he had bought the chair of a woman in Banner-street.

JOHN PARRY . I produce a copy of the former conviction of the prisoner by the name of James Pearce - I was present, and know he is the man; the Jury subscribed 1s. a-piece, and gave him, on account of his pleading distress - he was fined 1s.

GUILTY . Aged. 39.

Transported for Life .

MARY FOX.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-179
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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2021. MARY FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 3 sovereigns, the monies of William Allen , from his person .

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am a housekeeper. On the 14th of October I sent for the prisoner, who was my lodger, but had left me the day before, and owed me 4s.; when she came she asked how I was - I said," Very poorly;" she said, would I have some rum or gin? I gave her a shilling to get some gin - she then said would I have some rum or brandy? I had eight sovereigns in my pocket - I did not miss any till I was told by Spicer; I then missed three - I was in bed at the time.

MARGARET SPICER . I was at the prosecutor's on the 14th of October, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening - he desired me to go and fetch Mary Fox ; I got her - he sent her out for something to drink; she drank a glass, and so did I - I asked the prosecutor to drink, but he would not; I then heard a knock at the door- I went to see who it was, and the candle blew out; I came into the room again, and heard the waistcoat knock against the bedstead, and the chink of money - the prisoner said,"Who is it?" I said it was a stout man, and she said,"Let me go out" - I said, "You shall not go till the light comes."

Prisoner. If ever there was a just God she is an unjust woman - the candle was never removed from the counter, and there was no knock at the door. Witness. Yes, there was, and I took the candle and went to a man of the name of Thomas.

THOMAS JOHNSON . I was at Mr. Allen's when Spicer's husband came and said there was something wrong; the prisoner was not there then - I went to Fox's room, and sent for the officer; she denied having any of the prosecutor's money.

Prisoner, Q. Did not you ask Allen if he would let you have some money, and he gave you 3d.; you said that was not enough, and then he gave you a halfpenny, and under it was a shilling? A. No, I did not.

COURT. Q. Did you see any sovereign? A. Yes - she took two sovereigns, and threw them on the floor; the officer took the other from her - she then threw two sixpences on the floor.

BENJAMIN BATEMAN . I am a Police-constable. Spicer's husband came to me, and said, "I believe Fox has robbed Allen" - I went and found 15s. 5d. in her hand, and these two sovereigns and a sixpence on the floor.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me a sovereign to get half a pint of gin - I got it; I gave him the change, and he put it into his waistcoat-pocket - I went home to tea; before I drank the second cup he sent for me again -I went, and said, "What do you want?" he said, "To speak to you in particular;" there were five or six people in the room drinking gin - all those people went out except one, and then he sent for 3d. of brandy; he took it with some warm water, and had his bed made - Spicer afterwards came to me, and said Allen wanted to speak to me; I went to him - he gave me a shilling to get three quarters of a pint of gin; he then put this money into my hand, and said, "Keep this till to-morrow morning" - I said, "Allen, I don't wish to have any thing to do with it;" he said, "Take it, if it were 20l. I should not be afraid to trust you with it;" he was very much intoxicated- he had been drinking all day; next morning he met my husband, and said, "Fox, your wife can clear herself at Queen-square if she will say but two or three words - tell her to say I gave her that money to sleep with me last night."

WILLIAM ALLEN . I had drank nothing but the brandy and water.

JURY to MARGARET SPICER. Q. How long afterwards

was the prisoner taken? A. In five minutes; the prosecutor was not intoxicated - I did not leave the room, except when the knock was at the door, and the wind blew the candle out.

BENJAMIN BATEMAN . The prosecutor was not intoxicated; he went with me to the watch-house, and signed the charge - he seemed poorly.

GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months .

JAMES WARNER.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-180
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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2022. JAMES WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Robert Vincent .

JAMES VINCENT. I live with my brother Robert, a shoemaker , on Saffron-hill . On the 26th of September, about eleven o'clock, I was standing at his door; the prisoner came opposite his window, took these shoes, put them on his arm, and ran off - I pursued, and took him; I did not see him throw them down, but a person took up one shoe - the other we could not find.

JOHN BARNLEY. I took the prisoner, and received one shoe.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN MARTIN, JOHN BENNETT.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-181
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceCorporal > whipping

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2023. JOHN MARTIN and JOHN BENNETT were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 2lbs. 14oz. weight of pork, value 2s. , the goods of William Johnson .

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am a butcher , and live in Wellington-street, Goswell-street . On the 10th of October I lost this pork from my stall-board; I did not see it taken, but in twenty minutes the officer brought it back with the prisoners - I had not seen them before.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am an officer. I saw Martin take the pork off the stall-board, and give it to Bennett; I followed them into King-street - one of them went round the square, and the other down the street; I took Martin and put him into a shop; I then took Bennett with the pork under his coat.

MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 11.

BENNETT - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

MARY HARRIS.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-182
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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2024. MARY HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , 1 shirt, value 5s.; 1 pewter pot, value 1s.; 1 apron, value 6d.; 2 stockings, value 9d., and 1 table-cloth, value 18d., the goods of Charles Henry Clifford ; and 1 pewter pot, value 8d. , the goods of John Nicholls .

ANN POOL . I am a servant to Charles Henry Clifford- he keeps the Coach and Horses at Shadwell . I took this pewter pot, with some beer in it, to the kitchen for the char-woman, on the 26th of October; the prisoner was gone backwards at the time, but she had been about the house all the morning - in about an hour and a half I went into the kitchen again, and the char-woman asked me if I had seen the pot; I said No - she gave it me afterwards, and I knew it again.

ELIZABETH MELVIN . I was at the house at work. Pool brought the beer for my dinner - I put it on the copper; the prisoner was in the kitchen at the time - I left the kitchen for a short time, and when I returned the pot and the beer were gone; I asked her where it was - she said she knew nothing of it; she soon afterwards went away in my absence - I went after her, and found her in the street; I saw she had something in her pocket - I said, "What have you here?" she said Nothing - I said,"You have;" she then put her hand into her pocket, gave out this pot, and begged I would not tell my master.

GEORGE REYNOLDS . I am a street-keeper. I received this quart pot from the witness - I went and took the prisoner in bed that night, and found these other articles.

Prisoner. I did the deed, and am very sorry for it -I cannot answer for myself; I leave it to you to do what you think proper with me.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN HARRISON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-183
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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2025. JOHN HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 2 sovereigns, and 14 farthings , the monies of Thomas Maynard .

THOMAS MAYNARD. I am a sawyer , and live in the City-road . On one Sunday night in September, (I am not exactly sure as to the day) I put six sovereigns and a half into my box - on the Thursday I took out the half-sovereign, but did not notice whether the others were safe- on the Friday I missed two sovereigns out of the six, and a great many farthings; I took one sovereign and thirteen farthings from the prisoner - my landlady sent for the watchman, and he found one farthing on him.

RICHARD REED . I am a coal porter - the prisoner and prosecutor lodged at my house, and slept in the same bed. On the last Friday in September, I was sitting down stairs, and heard the prosecutor's box unlock - I ran up stairs, and saw the prisoner sitting on it; I went down and told my wife - I then went and accused the prisoner of the robbery - I said, "What money have you of your own?" he said 1 1/2d. - we took thirteen farthings and one sovereign from him.

MARY LASSITER . I looked through the key-hole, and saw the prisoner take a key from his pocket and unlock the box; I did not see him take any thing out.

JAMES TAYLOR . I took the prisoner. I found on him one farthing, a knife, and a tobacco-box.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a watch-house keeper. I received the prisoner, but found nothing on him; he seemed a good deal intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

GEORGE BROWN, THOMAS BROWN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-184
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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2026. GEORGE BROWN and THOMAS BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 fowl, price 2s. the goods of James Somers .

FREDERICK PEMBERTON . I have the care of a shop, belonging to James Somers - he is a poulterer . On the 10th of October I placed a number of fowls in the window, and at noon I missed one; shortly afterwards a fowl was brought back, which I believe was the same; there was one missing which had been in its right place half an hour before.

JAMES KINNERLEY . I am a musician. I was on the opposite side of the way; the two prisoners went past the shop - there was an officer at the corner of Wardour-street- I saw Thomas Brown go and take a fowl, and go to George-street; he then put it into his apron - I followed him, and brought him back with it to the shop; the officer had got the other prisoner there - George was standing looking at Thomas while he took it.

George Brown's Defence. I was not with this boy - I saw him brought in; a gentleman took me by the arm and said it was for stealing a fowl, but I know nothing of it.

Thomas Brown's Defence. He was not with me - I know nothing of him

GEORGE BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

THOMAS BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM BAYLEY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-185
VerdictNot Guilty

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2027. WILLIAM BAYLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 saw, value 2s.; and 2 planes, value 6s., the goods of William Browett ; 1 chisel, value 2s., and 1 punch, value 1s. , the goods of George Cormick .

WILLIAM BROWETT. I am a carpenter , and was working in Nicholas-street, New North-road . On the 10th of October I left a saw and two planes, and in the morning they were removed down below - I know nothing of the prisoner.

GEORGE CORMICK. I worked at the same place - I left a punch there on the night of the 10th of October.

DENNIS WELSH . I was at the premises about six o'clock- I saw the prisoner putting a plane in the back window down stairs - these other tools were laying down in the back parlour; he said he came there to sleep - he wanted to give me a direction to where he lived, but I would not take it.

WILLIAM KEYS . I am an officer. I was going round, and the witness called me - I found these two planes on a board against the window, and this saw against the door - I took the prisoner; this chisel and punch were in his pocket.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that he had gone to the house to sleep, and put the tools found on him into his pocket, but not with a felonious intent.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM THORNTON.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-186
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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OLD COURT.

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2.

First Middlesex Jury - Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2028. WILLIAM THORNTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 1 live pig, price 20s. , the property of Thomas Knight .

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am inspector of the dismounted Police. On the 28th of October, about five o'clock in the morning, I was in the Harrow-road, and met the prisoner carrying a sack; I asked what he had got - he said a pig; I asked where he brought it from - he said from his master, Mr. Carthy, of Kelsal-green, and was going to take it to Franklin, a pork-butcher, in Oxford-market; I took him in charge, went to Carthy, and still detained him: Mr. Knight has a farm in Harrow-road, about two miles from where I stopped him - he saw the pig, and claimed it.

WILLIAM FULLER . I am servant to Thomas Knight , carcase-butcher , Harrow-road . I saw the pig in Taylor's possession - it is master's, and was stolen out of the sty, where it was put to fatten; I saw it safe about five o'clock the evening before - it was fastened in the sty, which is in a yard: the prisoner has been lurking about there for the last two months.

Prisoner's Defence. The pig was given to me by a man who goes about with water-cresses - I know him very well by sight; he told me to go to Kelsal-green, at four o'clock in the morning, and gave it to me to take to Oxford-market.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN TRUEMAN.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-187
VerdictNot Guilty

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

2029. JOHN TRUEMAN was indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away, a certain forged order for the delivery of 6 pipes of wine, with intent to defraud the London-dock company , well knowing it to be forged .

SEVEN OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS. ALLEY and BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS COXHEAD . I am an accountant in the wine and spirit department in the London-docks , and have the book in which entries are made of wines standing in the docks, with the names of the several owners.

JOHN BLACKWOOD . The entry in this book is in my hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are they original entries, or made from a waste-book? A.This is the first entry.

THOMAS COXHEAD . I find that on the 3rd of December, six pipes of wine stood in the name of George and Thomas Cussons , imported by the ship Isabella; they could obtain possession of it by an order signed by them (looking at the document in question) this is the order on which wine is delivered or transferred at the dock - it is the only authority required by the dock company; if genuine it would entitle the party named in it to take the wine away at once, or to transfer it into his own name: if he chose it to remain he would have a warrant enabling him to transfer the wine by endorsement to any party he chose, or to deliver it to any one - he could take it away by giving an order to deliver to bearer; I saw the order in question presented by the prisoner, on the 29th of December, but whether to me or to Blackwood, I cannot say - he stood just by; I know that five pipes of wine have been delivered to that order.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know who lodged these wines in the dock? A. They were regularly entered by Donaldson, and arrived in November, 1827 - were then entered in the name of Donaldson, and on the 18th of December, 1828, were entered by Donaldson to George and Thomas Cussons; three pipes of the wine were delivered on the 18th of March last, one on the 30th, and one on the 12th of May - one still remains in the docks; Cussons lodged a caveat against the delivery after four pipes had been delivered - the fifth was delivered to C. Pamenter, to whom it had been transferred by Field, to whom the sale had been made; they could exchange hands by endorsing the transfer on the warrant - it is a power which transfers property by endorsement, like a bill of exchange.

JOHN BLACKWOOD . I am a clerk in the same office. I am not certain whether this order was presented to me or Coxhead, but I was present; the prisoner was asked if he would have a warrant - he said Yes, and wrote on the back of it, "Please grant me a warrant for the six pipes of wine, as on the other side, John Trueman;" this is the warrant which was given to him, agreeable to that request - it conveys the property to him - it afterwards found its way back to the docks, and the six pipes of wine were made over to C. Dalrymple ; by the party holding this document

they had possession of the wines, and could get them by presenting it.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you from your memory say the prisoner is the person who brought this order? A. He is - I remember him distinctly.

HENRY LINCOLN DALTON . I am a clerk in the wine and spirit department of the London-docks. This warrant was drawn by me - it transfers the wine to Dalrymple; I do not remember to whom I gave it: I am in the same office as Blackwood, and made it out by his direction.

THOMAS CUSSONS . I am an agent, and carry on a cotton spinning and manufacturing business at Manchester, in partnership with my brother George. The prisoner was in our employ up to December last as agent; I was on the continent, and knew nothing of this wine (looking at the order) my name is written here, but it is not my writing - my brother's name is not here; I never authorized the prisoner to sign it, or to use my signature, nor did my brother, to my knowledge: I never gave him authority, directly or indirectly, to take these wines out of the docks.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew nothing of the transfer? A. No - it took place after my departure for the continent;(looking at a paper) this has my signature, and my brother's; the prisoner carried on our town business, and was to be paid 5 per cent. on goods sold, and not to be answerable for bad debts - he had carried on business for us about thirteen months; he has not been obliged to raise money for that purpose, to my knowledge - I do not know one way or the other; my brother sent Jones up in January last to look into our affairs - I was in Flanders at the time: I have not detained the prisoner in custody for the amount of these wines.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you leave for the continent in December? A. Yes - on the 14th; when I left there was a balance in the prisoner's favour, of upwards of 100l. - I left a bill for 135l. in his hands, also a balance of 100l., which I told him he must cash out.

Q. Explain what you mean by a balance - was it due to you or the prisoner? A. Due to us; he was indebted to us 100l. - money collected, and due to us.

COURT. Q.Then why did you leave the bill in his hands? A. In case he should want it, besides the 100l.

GEORGE CUSSONS . I am in partnership with my brother. The signature to this order is not my hand-writing; I never authorized any person to sign it for me.

Cross-examined. Q. You were in England? A. Yes, at Manchester; the prisoner corresponded with us from time to time on business; I do not know of his borrowing money of Picton - I had a note which was given to Picton, but cannot find it; I had a note signed Picton - it was a copy, not the original; I cannot find it - I had it last January, it was signed by Picton as a promissory note to the prisoner for 19l. - I had it from Jones, my brother-in-law; I first spoke to the prisoner respecting this wine about February; I had sent Jones up to watch his conduct - I came to town myself on the 11th of January, and knew nothing about the transfer of the wine till that day.

Q. Were you not then apprised that the warrants for the wine had been deposited with Picton as security for the 19l.? A.Jones told me Trueman had deposited the order with Picton for 19l. - he knew of the prisoner doing it - when I came to town the prisoner was arrested for debt; I lodged a detainer against him the beginning of January for 200l. - this wine was included in that 200l.

COURT. Q. Have you never taken off that detainer? Never; because he owes us the amount in addition to the wines - I did not lodge a detainer for the whole amount he owed us - I included the wine; but have since ascertained that he owed us more money - we took the wine into the account for which we detained him; the value of the wine alone is 270l. - I knew he owed us 200l. independent of the wine, at the time the detainer was lodged; I had no knowledge of the forgery then - I knew he had dealt improperly with the wine on the 11th of January, and lodged the detainer after that.

MR. ALLEY. Q. At the time you lodged the detainer, did you know whether your brother might not have authorised him to make the order? A. I did not know the order had been made.

COURT. Q. You meant in your detainer to include the value of it, or part of it? A. I did; I knew it was in the name of Trueman at that time; I got a detainer for the criminal charge in September - I ascertained the order to be a forgery at the end of February, on my brother's return, and gave the business into my attorney's hand to proceed against the dock company - when I found out the forgery I did not go to the docks, as Trueman had told Jones my brother had transferred them to him before he went on the continent; I did not treat the wine as a civil suit in June -I included the wine in the detainer.*

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had you any transactions with the prisoner for goods sold and delivered except this wine? A. Yes; there was 48l. deficient in stock.

COURT. Q. Had you any demand against him for goods sold and delivered? A. For 48l. deficient in stock, and he had overdrawn his commission; the 48l. was for goods he had from us.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you mean that you had sold them to him? A. He had taken them and sold them of his own accord, and overdrawn us for them.

COURT. Q. When you lodged the detainer, you had no positive certainty of the exact amount of your debt? A. I knew it was 200l. besides the wine - but the wine was included by my solicitor - I did include the wine.

WILLIAM BADLEY TOWNLEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Cussons. About the 20th of December I was at their place of business in town, which is in Basing-lane, and saw the prisoner - there were a number of work people in the place; I asked what they were - he said they were cottonwinders in the prosecutors' employ, and were waiting for their wages; I asked why he did not pay them - he said he could not, Thomas Cussons having gone on the continent on the Sunday previous, and he had only a bill of exchange - he asked me to cash the bill, which I declined, and asked why he did not sell the wines? he said he could not without the signature of the firm.

THOMAS CUSSONS re-examined. The average weekly sums paid to the work people was from 8l. to 10l.; he supplied himself with that money from the general proceeds of goods sold - I knew there was a scarcity of money when I

*It appeared on reference to a writ of Habeas, by which the prisoner was brought to the court, that declaration had been made in June upon the original detainer.

left, and left the bill for that purpose - but still there was 100l. due to us; the bill had a month or two to run.

WILLIAM JONES . I am Messrs. Cussons' brother-in-law. On the 1st of January I was sent up to the town establishment - the prisoner told me Mr. Thomas Cussons had transferred the wine to him - he did not say when.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not tell you that, in order to raise money to pay the work people, he had been obliged to raise 19l. through Picton on these wines? A. He did; and that if I would repay the 19l. the wines would be my brother's again - but he specified no time; he said in a few days the money would be returned - I went with him in the course of the week to Picton; Picton told me he would go with me to the person who he (Picton) had transferred the warrant to, if I would call on him in a few days; he would not tell me who it was.

COURT. Q.As soon as you saw him, you told him you had heard he had transferred the wines? A. I had not heard of it, but I found a paper in the books purporting that he had received 19l. on the wines, and spoke to him about it - he said he had raised 19l. on them to pay wages and expences.

NOT GUILTY .

CHARLES PENNY.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-188
VerdictNot Guilty

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Before Mr. Baron Garrow.

2030. CHARLES PENNY was indicted for stealing on the 10th of September , 1 portrait, value 5l. 5s., the goods of Maria Bloomer , in her dwelling-house .

MR. PHILLIPS (for the prosecution) declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

STEPHEN SANDFORD, WILLIAM LESSLIE.
29th October 1829
Reference Numbert18291029-189
VerdictsGuilty; Guilty
SentencesDeath; Death

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

2031. STEPHEN SANDFORD was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Stulz , about eleven o'clock in the night of the 25th of September , at St. James, Westminster , with intent the goods and chattels of John Stulz , Samuel Housley , and George Brown Stulz , in the said dwelling-house, feloniously and burglariously to steal ; and WILLIAM LESSLIE was indicted, for that he, on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously was present, aiding, abetting, and assisting the said Stephen Sandford the said felony burglariously to do and commit; against the peace, &c .

2nd COUNT, the same, only stating the dwelling-house to be of George Stulz, Samuel Housley , and John Stulz .

3rd COUNT, the same, only stating the dwelling-house to be of John Stulz , Samuel Housley , and George Brown Stulz .

4th COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of George Brown Stulz .

5th COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of George Stulz , John Stulz , Samuel Housley , and George Brown Stulz .

FIVE OTHER COUNTS, charging the prisoner Sandford as in the above Counts; and the prisoner Lesslie with feloniously inciting, moving, procuring, aiding, counselling, hiring, and commanding him to commit the said felony and burglary, instead of being present, aiding, abetting, and assisting.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

JOHN EVANS . I am clerk to John Stulz , Samuel Housley , and George Brown Stulz, who are tailors , and carry on business in Clifford-street, Bond-street , in the parish of St. James, Westminster. The back of the house in workshops - the lower part is used as cutting-rooms; Mr. George Brown Stulz occupies the dwelling part of the house, and pays the rent and taxes - he lives in the house.

JOHN ROSSITER . On the 25th of September I was in the employ of Messrs. Stulz; I shut up the house on the night of the 25th, and secured it both before and behind, the dwelling-house in front and workshops behind, by bolts, bars, and locks, before I went to bed, which was about eleven o'clock - I secured the back workshop.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you the last person up? A. I think I was, but am not certain; the shop is under the same roof as the dwelling-house - they all join in one; we go from one to the other without going into the open air.

JOHN METZGER . On the night of the 25th of September I was in the prosecutors' employ, and slept that night in the cutting-room, which is a front room; I was disturbed between two and three o'clock in the morning by a noise sounding like a hammer, proceeding from the back of the house - it awoke me; I got up, and saw a light in the workshops, one in the upper and one in the lower work-shop, both of which are at the back of the house - the lower workshop leads into the cutting-room, and the light was before the door; I got up directly, and went up stairs to call Mr. George Brown Stulz - as I went up stairs I saw several feet under the door of the workshop behind - I could see their shoes from under the door; I was a good deal alarmed - I alarmed Mr. Stulz - I do not know either of the prisoners.

JOHN ROSSITER re-examined. I was a porter in the prosecutors' employ; I slept in the same room as Metzger in another bed - I was disturbed in the night by a noise resembling a hammer and chisel knocking against the wainscoat and the door - there was valuable property kept in the room I slept in - there was cloth to a very considerable amount; my masters have a very extensive business; I got out of bed, directed my eyes towards the spot where I heard the noise, and saw a man with the whole of his body through the pannel of the door except one arm and one leg; (I awoke rather after Metzger) he had one hand through the pannel, and in that hand was a large tallow candle a light - it was the same kind of candle as our Journeymen use; I said, "Who are you?" using a vulgar expression - he said to me, "Silence! you old***, or we will shoot you;" I swore at him again, and told him I would shoot him with a blunderbuss which I had in the room, and was feeling for it at the time I was speaking - I found it, and presented it at him - he drew back immediately through the hole and ran away; the candle was in his hand all this time - I had an opportunity of seeing his person; the prisoner Sandford bears a strong resemblance to the man in point of stature, clothing, and dress; I only saw the white of his eye - his face was in the shade; I immediately ran out at the front door, and called Watchman! Thieves! and Murder! as loud as I could halloo; I was in my shirt - I saw Bannister the watchman at a distance - he came running towards me; I directed him down the mews; he ran towards the mews which our workshops come into - there is no other entrance to it; the men are never allowed to go through the house - I still kept calling for more assistance, and saw another watchman; I think it was Pethers - he ran towards the spot; I went in again directly at the front premises to dress - I examined the

premises, and the inner door leading to the cutting-room, the pannel was cut through; I heard the piece of wood fall which awoke me - they had entered the premises by breaking away two wooden rails which are over the door in the mews; in the upper workshop I found a piece of was candle burning, and a large candle of the same description as the man had in his hand, burning also in the same candlestick; we never use wax candles - it is the first time I ever saw such a thing in the shop; we use very large tallow candles - the tallow candle was one such as I saw in the man's hand, and one was gone from one of the candlesticks; I saw a crow-bar and a chisel picked up, and the pieces of wood belonging to the door; I saw a phosphorus-box case produced by somebody on the premises - it was only the case; I knew Lesslie by his working at Mr. Stulzs' in the middle of last summer, in May or June - I never saw Sandford before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. This was at two or three o'clock in the morning? A. Yes; I had been in bed; I was rather alarmed at being awoke, and much agitated.

JOSEPH BANNISTER . On the 25th of September I was watchman of Clifford-street, Bond-street - I heard a noise near Clifford-street; it was as near as I can recollect before two o'clock - I thought it was from Stulzs' premises, which come into Coach and Horses-yard, which is no thoroughfare; I listened for two or three minutes, heard no more, and proceeded on my rounds; about half-past two o'clock I went my round - all was quiet till I came into Clifford-street, to the front of Stulzs' premises, and then heard a voice sing out, "Watch! Murder! Thieves are in the house! they have broken into the back premises at the back of the mews:" I returned from there, and when I got to the entrance of the mews, I saw the prisoner Sandford coming up the Coach and Horses-yard mews - he was running, and coming up towards Boyle-street; I laid hold of him, seized him by the collar, and told him he should not go another inch from me - he levelled a pistol at me, and pulled the trigger, it burnt the priming in the pan; I saw that it flashed and missed fire in my face; I had hold of his collar at the time - it produced no effect on me; I did not let him go, and he then knocked me down; I cannot say whether it was with his fist or the butt end of the pistol - he struck me above the left temple, it did not turn out a contused wound; he got from me and went up Boyle-street, and I lost sight of him there because I was on the ground; I saw James Barham , and Clark the Watchman, running after him - McDonough was not running; I did not see him till he had the prisoner in custody; I followed after Barham, and Clark singing Stop thief! and sprung my rattle - followed him up New Burlington-street and Regent-street into Fobears' passage; I did not see Sandford taken - I saw him after he was taken in McDonough's hands - he is a watchman; I lost sight of the man in turning.

Q. Can you say whether the man McDonough secured, was the man who you had collared, and who presented the pistol at you? A. Yes, I am certain of it; I had a very good view of him, by a light at the corner - he was in custody within three or four minutes of his knocking me down; I found a handkerchief in Regent-street, laying on the flag stones, and saw it picked up - it was in the course the prisoner had ran, when I saw it, and on being picked up, the prisoner said it was his; he was searched at the watch-house - a half-sovereign, a half-crown piece, a free-bottle and phosphorus-matches were found on him; there was no case for the bottle - there was part of a case, and a piece of wax candle; Buckland, the beadle of the night, searched him - the fire-bottle, matches, and candle were in his right-hand waistcoat pocket - I gave him in charge, returned with the officers, and examined the prosecutors' premises, with other persons; I found nothing, but saw the implements picked up, and two pieces of wood which came from over the fanlight of the back door, where they had got in, and a crow-bar - that is all I saw picked up; I examined the door, and parts of the back premises - we thought they had got in over the door, where the fan-light bars were taken down; it was large enough to admit a person - I saw, in the workman's room, a piece of wax candle found- it corresponded in size and appearance with that found on the prisoner. I saw Lesslie that evening, first about half-past eleven o'clock coming down Old Burlington-street, into Clifford-street; I know the Burlington Arms- he was not doing any thing there then - he asked me if I had seen a serjeant of the guards standing there with a girl; there had been a sergeant there with a woman - I told him I had seen him there, but they had not been there long; they were gone off my beat, and I had nothing more to do with them - he said, "I think they wanted to make a job of it to go down the mews, but the sergeant had not browns enough;" he went away up Clifford-street, turned round to Savill-row, towards Boyle-street, which is the nearest way to this mews; I saw Lesslie again about half-past twelve o'clock, or a quarter to one, coming round the same quarter as before, out of Old Burlington-street, by my box - he accosted me, and said it was a find night; I said it was - I came out of my box, and heard a noise, which I thought was some window shutters falling down (I did not ask his business at that time) I went to the top of Clifford-street - he followed me, and when I got to Savill-row, I saw Samuel Evans , and told him what I had heard, and where I was going; I heard Evans say to Lesslie, "I think you are a Police-man, and are come to see what you can find out, before you come on duty;" Lesslie said, "I am not - I am a tailor, and working for Mr. Stulz;" Leslie asked if we would have anything to drink, meaning both of us - I told him there was no house open; he said, "If you will get the landlord up, Mr. or Mrs. Barry, I know them perfectly well - we have been spending the evening there - they know me well, and I will treat you with ale, if it is a dozen pots, or any thing you have a mind to drink;" this was at the Burlington Arms - I told him it was no use, for the house was shut up, and the people gone to bed, and would not open for any body; I then left him, went and called my rounds - I saw him again about ten minutes before two o'clock; I was in my box, and he wished me a good morning - I passed the compliment to him again, and saw no more of him; I did not ask what he was doing there - when I parted with him at a quarter before two o'clock, he turned up the top of Clifford-street, down towards Boyle-street, leading to the mews; that was a little before two.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were not you a little frightened during the transaction? A.

No; I was rather burnt at first, by the priming of the pistol - I cannot say whether I was struck with the pistol or hand; I was not alarmed at all - I should not be alarmed in the least if a man fired within half an inch of me; I have fought for my country twenty-two-years - I should not be alarmed at being fired at - if I had a stick I would knock him down; I received a blow, either from the pistol or his fist - I was struck above the temple, and the blow knocked me down; I was not much hurt - I had my hat on, and my night-cap; I should not have gone to the public-house with Lesslie, if it had been open - I could have found plenty of houses open. if I had chosen; I am not on the beat now, the new Police have come there.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Did you know Lesslie before? A. I never saw him before to my knowledge - it was about half-past eleven o'clock; it was not very light then - there are gas lights - I do not know whether he came out of the Burlington Arms, when he first spoke to me; I saw him come to the corner of my box- I did not see many other persons about there then; I saw the soldier and woman, but nobody else - I saw nobody else pass in that direction after this; it is not a great throughfare - I saw other people going a different way, in the course of the night; many persons observe to me about the night, as they pass - it was Evans told him he was a Police-man; he said he was a tailor, and worked for Mr. Stulz.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Did he say, "I am a tailor, and worked for Mr. Stulz," or "I am a tailor, and work for Stulz". A. He said, "I am a tailor, working for Stulz."

MR. LEE. Q. Are you satisfied, whether he said he had worked for Stulz, or that he was then, at that time, working for him? A. He said he was working for him; he led me to suppose he was at that time working for Stulz - that is what he said to me.

COURT. Q.This conversation with Lesslie happened before you were knocked down, by the man you say is Sandford? A. Yes, two hours; my box where he spoke to me is, I suppose, two hundred yards from the mews, leading to Stulz's back premises - I always go into that mews, every half hour; I was then the watchman of that mews - I did not see the pistol picked up; I have seen it since - I could not see it sufficiently when it flashed, to see the size of it; I heard the cry of "Murder! Murder! Thieves are in the house!" as near as I can recollect it was about twenty minutes before three o'clock.

JOHN CLARK . I am a watchman of the same parish. In consequence of hearing a cry I went in pursuit - I went into Clifford-street; I did not go to the premises till after I had pursued the prisoner - I first saw a person running out of the mews, when I was going down the mews with Bannister; I saw the prisoner running out of the mews - Bannister told him to stop, and he immediately presented a pistol to Bannister; it snapped.

COURT. Q.Then, before you saw the man running, you saw him in the custody of Bannister? A. Yes, he had hold of him by the collar, and was scufflling - I first saw him at the end of the mews with Bannister, who was holding him by the collar; I saw the pistol flash, and he afterwards struck Bannister and knocked him down - he ran away; I pursued him, and Barham also - McDonough and a watchman caught him in Little Marlborough-street, he had been out of my sight for a moment when turning Fobears' passage, but not more - I pursued him into Fobears' passage; there was nobody running in the passage except the person who was secured - I swear it was the same person; Sandford is that person - I knew nothing of him before; Barham assisted McDonough in securing him - I afterwards returned to the mews. where Bannister had been knocked down, and found a piece of tallow candle and a pistol; I gave them to Schofield - there was a piece of red rag wrapped round the candle; it was something similar to a tailor's cutting - Regent-street is in the way I pursued him, and between the chapel and Fobears' passage, as I returned with the prisoner, I saw a handkerchief laying; one of the watchmen picked it up, and the prisoner claimed it as his - it was not given to him: he was by when it was picked up by McGill, a watchman - I did not see who he gave it to.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you seen it since? A. No - it was not produced at the office; McGill is not here - I did not take the prisoner into custody myself; the person who took him, met him - he was not between me and the prisoner; the passage is in Regent-street - it is a very short passage, and has three or four houses in it; when I turned I saw the person turn into King-street - I saw him in the passage, and saw him turn out of the passage into King-street.

COURT. Q.How near were you to him all the way you ran? A.Four or five Yards; he was not running when he was stopped - he stopped.

JAMES BARHAM . On the 25th of September I was a waiter in the service of Scott and Freeman, Stevens' hotel, Bond-street, at the corner of Clifford-street; I had permission to go to my club that night - our door, which goes into Clifford-street, is next door to Messrs. Stulzs' house; I was coming home a little after two o'clock and heard an alarm of thieves and murder given from Stulzs' premises - I saw Bannister, the watchman, going down towards the mews, as he was directed, after the prisoner; I saw a person running from the mews towards Boyle-street - it was the prisoner Sandford; I heard Bannister desire him to stop - I saw him seize him, and saw Sandford present and flash a pistol at him; I saw him struck to the ground, and saw Sandford run - I pursued and joined Clark in the pursuit, over-run Clark, pursued him through Burlington-street into Regent-street, and saw a girl near the chapel; Sandford was running near the centre of the road - when he came up to the girl, he called out to her, Poll, and threw, apparently, a pistol towards her; I did not stay to see if she picked it up, but pursued him.

Q. From the time you saw the watchman struck to the ground, till you got to Marlborough-street, did you lose sight of Sandford? A. I did not - I saw him taken by McDonough, and assisted to take him to the watch-house; I never lost sight of him at all till he was taken - on our way to the watch-house with him I saw a pocket-handkerchief found, and he claimed it; on our road to the watch-house he said to me, "D-n and b-r your eyes, if it was not for you I should not have been apprehended" - when I got to the watch-house I saw him, searched by Buckland; a phosphorus-bottle and matches, half a sove

reign, half a crown, and some bread and cheese were found on him, and a piece of candle.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How many examinations were there at the office? A. Five, I believe - I never said I had lost sight of the person - I was examined twice; I believe it was the first and last time, and swear I did not say I lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.About what time did you hear the cry of murder? A.About a quarter after two o'clock - it might be a few minutes later.

ROGER McDONOUGH . I was a watchman at this time - my beat was in Great Marlborough-street; Little Marlborough-street leads into it; I took Sandford into custody - I saw him running, and other people pursued him; I did not hear a cry of Stop thief! but seeing him pursued I stopped him, and took him to the watch-house - I saw Mc Gill pick up the handkerchief; I had Sandford in custody at the time - he said the handkerchief belonged to him.

SAMUEL EVANS . I was on duty as a watchman in Savill-row, and was met by Clark and Bannister - in consequence of what passed I accompanied them to search the prosecutors' premises, and found two doors broken at the back of the house, towards the mews; I picked up a crowbar in the house, on the steps leading to the workshop behind - Schofield has it; I produce a piece of wax candle, which I found near the same spot - it was not burning; I also picked up the case of a fire-box on the premises - Schofield has that; it was in the passage, nearly on the threshold of the door leading to the back workshop; I found also a broken wooden rail.

Q. About half-past twelve o'clock at night, did any thing happen on your beat? A. Yes; I recollect seeing Lesslie - he came up to my box, accompanied by Bannister - Bannister came to see what was the matter, as I had slipped over my half-hatch door by an area; I asked Lesslie who he was, and said, "I suppose you are one of the new Police?" he said, "No, I am not;" I said, "I think you are;" he said, "No, I will bet you a sovereign to a shilling of it;" he wanted me to go to the Burlington Arms, and said, "I will treat you with a dozen pots of ale; I know Mr. and Mrs. Barry very well - I have been spending the evening there;" he said he was a tailor, and worked for Mr. Stulz; he went away - I will not be positive which way he went: the clock struck one about that time. I saw Lesslie again coming from Savill-passage, about half-past one; the passage crosses Boyle-street, which leads down into the mews; he came from the passage to the corner, and surveyed me from head to foot, and said,"Talking of my being a Police-man, I should think you were one;" he again invited me to drink - I told him he knew very well there was no shop open, or he would not be so free to ask me; I left him at the corner of Boyle-street and Savill-row - on my return from the passage I saw no more of him.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I produce the pistol and the charge which I drew from it, also a piece of tallow-candle, with a bit of red cloth round it; Clark, the watchman, gave them to me - a common crow-bar, with a piece of stocking tied round one end of it, to prevent a noise, I suppose; here is a piece of railing and the case of a phosphorus-bottle given me by Evans - a chisel and small saw given me by Rossiter Buckland has the phosphorus-bottle; I went to the prosecutors' premises some time afterwards, but did not examine the manner it had been done. On the Friday after the robbery I detained Lesslie at the office, and told him I had been after him for some days - I held out neither threat nor promise to him; I told him I had been after him respecting the robbery at Mr. Stulzs' - he said he was out of the way that he should not be taken into custody, which he expected; I said I should detain him, and about an hour after that he remained with me in the waiting-room; Bannister and Evans came in - I overheard them say, "That is the man that was where Sandford committed the robbery;" I desired them to point the man out, as several were there - they pointed Lesslie out; I then told Lesslie I must search him - he said I might; he made no reply to what was said - he said afterwards, as I took him backwards and forwards to prison, at different times, that he had known Sandford for upwards of eight years.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q. Had you not previously been to Lesslie's house? A. I had, and left a summons for him to attend at Marlborough-street, Office the day before - I left it with his wife; he came to the office in consequence of the summons - that was seven days after the robbery; I had left the summons on Thursday, and he came on Friday.

JOHN VIRGO BUCKLAND . I was on duty at St. James' watch-house on Friday night, the 25th of September, and remember Sandford being brought in - I searched his person, and found a phosphorus-bottle, without a case; some phosphorus-matches, which I tried with the bottle, and they ignited, and a piece of wax candle; the phosphorus-bottle does not match the case - it is rather too large.

GEORGE SYMONDS . I am in the employ of Mr. Edge, a solicitor, of Essex-street. I know Lesslie; I became acquainted with him when I went to search a house in Grange-court, Carey-street - Sandford was at that time lodging in the same house with him; that was in September: Lesslie admitted to me that he had been intimate with Sandford a long time, but Sandford was at that time in custody.

JOHN ROSSITER . I know Lesslie - he worked for Stulz and Co. for two or three months last summer. On the 16th of October I was at the office when the prisoners were being examined, and in consequence of a proposition made to me, I was locked up in the same cell with Lesslie - Sandford was at that time in an opposite cell, as his voice echoed from there.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see Sandford in the cell? A. No, but Lesslie hallooed out "Sandford!" and Sandford called out "Halloo!"

Re-examined. I heard Lesslie call out Sandford! a voice said Halloo! Lesslie then said, "What a bl-d fool you were to send that letter;" I did not hear any answer to that - Sandford called Lesslie! he hallooed out Halloo! and Sandford said, "I have just seen my wife, and she says we are to be remanded for another week;" Lesslie said, with a bad expression, "Welcome, but how is that?" the voice said, "Because there has been a robbery in Clifford-street;" (I knew myself there had been a report of a robbery in Clifford-street, since ours) - Lesslie then said,"What! another robbery in Clifford-street - welcome; I

wish there had been a dozen, so as they got to the right house;" a voice from the opposite cell said, "I understand old Edge has sworn to the pistol," with a bad expression - Lesslie said, "Has the old b-r? why it was not his, was it? I thought it was Dickey's;" the conversation stopped between each sentence, for a little while, but at this time longer than usual, and then Sandford called Lesslie! and Lesslie said, "Hold your tongue, you b-r; a plant, a plant" - Lesslie knew I was in the place when he first came in, but it was so dark he could not recognize my features; the voice from the cell called out, "Shall you say any thing, Lesslie?" Lesslie then said, "No, not here: what will do you will do me;" Lesslie called Sandford! Sandford called Halloo! Lesslie called out Halloo! and said, "Oh, won't I give those b-g-r-d old watchman a pepper" - Lesslie said, "I have been to the George Colson ;" the voice said,

"Have you? I suppose you had a bit of talk about the concern;" Lesslie said, "We just did," and added, "How your wife cried."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Pray what were you charged with, that you were put into the cell? A. I was put in to hear what Lesslie said; one of the officers asked me if I was afraid to go in, and Mr. Stulzs' solicitor asked me - I was sober; I pretended to be drunk - I was directed to do so.

Q. You were put there to get what evidence you could from the prisoner's lips, against him? A. Yes.

Cross-examined by MR. LEE. Q.What were you to get for it? A. Not any thing; I swear that - nothing of the sort was proposed; there is a wide stone passage between the cells - the officers were two or three long passages off; the prisoners spoke quite loud - they hallooed, or they could not hear each other; every body passing and re-passing must have heard what they said.

Q. Has this conversation ever been read over to you? A. Yes, the solicitor read it over to me once or twice - I think altogether he may have read it to me four or five times since I made the communication.

COURT. Q. Did you first tell him what conversation had passed? A. I wrote it down myself first as soon as I got to the prosecutors', after coming out of the cell.

MR. LEE. Q. Was any amendment made to it afterwards by the solicitor? A. Not that I am aware of - I gave the same evidence to the Magistrate as I did to the solicitor; no alteration was made in my evidence by the solicitor - I was in the same cell with Lesslie; I knew him by his working at the shop - this conversation took place about twelve o'clock in the day, through the bars over the door of the cell; I suppose there is two or three inches between the bars - there is a little light coming from there; he could see there was a man in the cell - I could see him sufficiently to swear to him, because he got up on a bucket in the cell to speak through the bars to the voice, and the light was on his face; there was light enough without that for me to see him walking about, but I do not think I could distinguish his countenance except when he was at the bars - the light came through the bars on his face quite sufficient for me to know him when he was on the bucket.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. You made a memorandum of what passed before you saw the solicitor? A. I just told him I had been in, and said I would write it down - I have the memorandum I wrote at the time, (producing it.)

PATRICK BARRY . I keep the Burlington Arms. I remember the night of Mr. Stulzs' robbery - Lesslie was not at my house that night at all; I know him well - he was not there at all that night, nor had he any thing to eat or drink.

Sandford's Defence (written.) - My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - I am accused of committing a burglary alone, which must appear to your minds almost impossible to be accomplished by one man - and had I gone with the determination of committing such a desperate burglary, I am certain that it must occur to your minds that I should not have retreated armed, as it is stated that I was, because a man happened to raise an alarm: had I been sufficiently desperate to have attempted such a dangerous enterprise alone, it must strike your minds that that desperation would not soon have forsaken me; besides, had I been so well acquainted with the premises, as the witness, Evans, states that the person must have been, who broke into the premises, is it likely that I should have broken into a room in which a person slept? you will please to recollect that one of the witnesses states that he saw the legs of three or four persons - had this been the case, more than one person must have been seen; as the watchman, Bannister, states that he came up the instant the alarm was given, and that he only saw one person, and when he came up to that person, he made, as the watchman states, a desperate resistance - whereas it is not attempted to be proved that I made any resistance.

Lesslie's Defence (written.) - My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, - I beg to declare most solemnly that I am wholly innocent of any connection with any person or persons who were concerned in committing the burglary on the premises of Messrs. Stulz, and the fact of my coming forward in a voluntary manner to give such evidence as might be required of me by the Magistrates of Marlborough-street, will, I trust, carry conviction to your mind of that fact; for had I been the guilty man it is attempted to make me appear, I could not have had the audacity to have acted in this manner; on the contrary, is it not more probable that I should have attempted to secrete myself, or to leave the country, which I might have done, as more than a week had elapsed from the commission of the crime and the apprehension of Sandford, to the time I surrendered myself, which I did on a summons being left at my house? There is one point in this case to which I think it necessary to call your attention; the public press gave out that I had absconded on the apprehension of Sandford - I therefore beg but a moment's time to explain this, in order to remove any prejudice that that aspersion may have made on some of your minds; the facts are these: - the first examination of Sandford took place on Saturday, the 26th day of September - his wife was apprehended on the Tuesday following, and on which day, for the first time, I left my house, and went to work for a Mr. Tyndale, of Market-street, Westminster, and returned and slept at home on that night; the following day I again went to Mr. Tyndale's and resumed my work, and slept at his house on that and the following nights, namely, Wednesday and Thursday nights, in consequence of our continuing work until very late hours, and considerably after midnight, so that no time might be lost in getting the work in hand finished, as it was to be done by a certain time. On the Wednesday night (the first night that I slept at Mr. Tyndale's) the officers from Marlborough-street went and searched my house: on the following day, Thursday, the officers came again, and left the summons which I have before alluded to, which my wife brought to me at Mr. Tyndale's - in pursuance of which I went to Marlborough-street, where I was taken into custody, and kept under examination for twenty-one days, deprived of my liberty, and also of any legal advice; an order having been made that I should not have communication direct or indirect with any person, and it was

with difficulty that my solicitor obtained permission to see me, and that in the presence of an officer, who was placed there to hear every word that passed. Although I was thus kept so long under examination, yet no other evidence than that adduced on my first examination was brought forward, except that of the witness, John Rossiter - every word of which is a tissue of the most glaring falsehoods; and I am certain that you will attach but little credit to the testimony of such a man. I need not say more on this subject, as I am certain your verdict will not be governed by such evidence; therefore, under the full confidence of an innocent man, and one who has made it his study to go through life in an irreproachable manner, and act with the strictest integrity, as the witnesses who do me the favour to come forward and speak to my character, will testify. Gentlemen of the Jury, - I cheerfully entrust my fate in your hands, under the firm conviction that your verdict will restore me to liberty, and to the bosom of my family, and enable me to resume that respectable occupation in life, which I have hither to enjoyed.

Three witnesses gave Sandford a good character.

JOHN TYNDALE . I live in Market-street - the prisoner Lesslie was in my employ; I was ill, and could not do my business; he was in my employ on Tuesday, the 30th of September, and went to the Police-office on the Friday following - he went there from my employ, and was in my employ for three days preceeding that time; I have known him six or seven years, up to the present time - I never knew any thing of him but as an honest man, as far as I know; all I know of him is, that I am a tailor and he worked for me.

THOMAS ELDRIDGE