Old Bailey Proceedings.
12th January 1826
Reference Number: 18260112

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Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
12th January 1826
Reference Numberf18260112-1

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SESSIONS PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE WILLIAM VENABLES, MAYOR.

SECOND SESSION, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, On THURSDAY, the 12th of JANUARY, 1826, and following Days.

Taken in Short-Hand (by Authority of the Corporation of the City of London) by H. BUCKLER, Basinghall-Street.

London: PRINTED BY J. BOOTH, No. 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET.

1826.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM VENABLES , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir William Alexander , Knt.; Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; James Allan Park , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; John Ansley , Esq.; George Scholey , Esq.; John Atkins , Esq.; Christopher Magnay , Esq.; and William Heygate , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Recorder of the said City,; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; and William St. Julien Arabin , Sergeant at Law; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Henry Searl ,

John Parry ,

Wm. Ironside ,

Wm. Inglis ,

Wm. Anderson ,

W. H. Palmer ,

John Vine ,

Samuel Shipley ,

James Neatt ,

Jas. Richardson ,

Wm. Bond ,

James Carter

Second

Joseph Y. Hatton ,

Wm. Smither ,

Richard Harris ,

Henry Court ,

Daniel Cole ,

John Plumber ,

George Ellis ,

C.W. Titterson ,

John Hume ,

James Ratcliff ,

John Musgrave ,

Wm. Sturkey .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Daniel Capps ,

John Francis ,

Wm. Freath ,

S.C. Fuller ,

Griffiths Gittins ,

James Goodwin ,

Alexander Gordon ,

George Gasden ,

Edward Haggar ,

Joseph Hall ,

John O. Hamley ,

Thomas Andisyde .

Second

Wm. Aldous ,

John Allwinkle ,

John Abbott ,

Wm. Bailey ,

Joseph Bentley ,

Job Bant ,

Thomas Crowden ,

Robert Clapperton ,

Alexander Geddis ,

James Cotterell ,

J.B. Eland ,

Robert Emerson .

Third

Thomas Ashby ,

Thomas Allman ,

Benjamin Allen ,

Alexander Aberdure ,

James Alders ,

Wm. Bradford ,

Wm. Blankley ,

Wm. Bond ,

Charles Cole ,

John Crossfield ,

John Clothier ,

Thomas Chapman .

Fourth

Alexander Haye ,

Wm. Hayward ,

Henry Arthur ,

James Cronin ,

Thomas Collingwood ,

James Christie ,

John Cruddis ,

Thomas Churm ,

Wm. Caslake ,

Roger Chidley ,

John Clarke ,

Joseph S. Cooper .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, JANUARY 12, 1826.

VENABLES, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

JOHN JONES.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-1
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

OLD COURT.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

182. JOHN JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alfred Richard Cocker , about three o'clock in the night of the 11th of December , at St. Anne, Westminster , with intent, the goods and chattels therein being, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

ALFRED RICHARD COCKER. I live at No. 11, Nassau-street, St. Anne's, Soho , and rent the house. On the 11th of December, before eleven o'clock at night, I examined the street door - it was bolted; my servants and family had retired to bed before that. I was alarmed between three and four o'clock in the morning, by a ringing and knocking at the street door; I got up, opened my bed-room window, and saw several persons round the door, and heard persons coming up stairs. I went down to the kitchen, and found the kitchen area door open, and two large holes in it, which were apparently made with a centre-bit; they were large enough for a person's arm to be put through: the pieces of wood which were cut out of the holes were within the kitchen.

JAMES STEVENS . I am a patrol of St. Anne's, Soho. On the morning of the 12th of December, about a quarter past three o'clock, I was going down Nassau-street, on the opposite side, and saw a man at this door - I asked what he wanted there; he made no reply, but ran off; directly after that the prisoner ran out of the door, which was open, and down the steps; I am sure he is the man; I did not know him before: I had a good view of his features by the gas-light, and am certain he is the man; I directly called Stop thief! Leach, the watchman, sprang his rattle, and went after him. I went to the house, got a light, and went in at the street door with three or four more men - we went up, and alarmed the family; Mr. Cocker and I went into the kitchen, and found two holes in the area door; there is an arch over the door, which prevents a person being seen from the street. I heard a man was taken, and found the prisoner in the watch-house; I am certain he is the man; he had light thin shoes on; the gas-light was not far from the door, and on the same side. I had a good view of him.

SILAS LEACH . I am a watchman of King-street, and part of Nassau-street. I was at the top of Nassau-street; Stevens came by me, and walked down Nassau-street - I followed, and heard him say to a man at the prosecutor's door, "What do you do there?" he ran off; I followed, and then saw two men run down Nassau-street; I was nearly opposite Stevens; he told me to spring the rattle; I pursued - they turned into Gerrard-street, and round the corner into Grafton-street, but before that Cummins, a watchman, got between me and them; they ran faster than me, and thinking they might turn a corner I ran up Hayes-court, into Greek-street, and saw the prisoner come running up to the corner of Greek-street; he was one of the two I had pursued; he ran as fast as he could; I said, "If you don't stop I will knock you down;" he made no reply, but kept running on as fast as he could, and when I got nearer to him he made a kind of dart to avoid me, but I hit him on the head with my stick, and knocked him down; he was secured; I am sure he is the man who ran from Nassau-street.

Q. How did he get round to Greek-street? A. He ran up Litchfield-street a little way - there is then a turning. I found a crow-bar and lantern on the left hand side of Grafton-street; I saw nobody else passing all the way I pursued. The prisoner had very thin shoes on.

COURT. Q. Does Litchfield-street cross Grafton-street? A. Yes - he got from there into Greek-street; I stopped him at the corner of Church-street and Greek-street.

HENRY COOK . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 12th of December I was in Gerrard-street, coming towards Nassau-street, and heard Stevens saying, "What are you doing there?" I went on, and saw two men run from Nassau-street, and cross towards Gerrard-street - they turned towards me; I crossed to meet them: they ran back as hard as they could; I called Stop them! the rattles sprang; Cummins met them right under the gas-lamp; Leach and Cummins were full thirty yards before me. I lost sight of them, and went to No. 11, Nassau-street, with Stevens, to examine the house; we entered the street door, which was open; two holes were cut in the kitchen door, both the bolts undone, and the bar laid on the floor. I picked up two pieces of wood which had been cut out of the door - I produce them. A centre-bit has been applied in seven places in one hole, and six in the other.

WILLIAM CUMMINS . I am a watchman. I was at my stand, and heard Stevens say, "What do you do there?" I looked over to Nassau-street, and saw a man coming down that street - he turned round to go towards Gerrard-street, and crossed over to the corner of Nassau-street;

Cook said, "Stop these men," and I saw there were two men. I crossed over and met them - I made a blow at the other man, and hit him on the breast, at the corner of Gerrard-street; they both got away; I pursued them along Grafton-street, and by Grafton House I heard something thrown down; I still followed - the other man turned down Litchfield-street, to the right - the prisoner ran on about four doors beyond Litchfield-street, and stopped up against some shutter, to hide himself, as a watchman was coming by. I saw nobody else passing at all. I saw the prisoner's face in Gerrard-street, and am certain he is the man.

COURT. Q. Where did you first see him to swear to him? A. When I crossed over in Gerrard-street they both passed close against me - it was the other man who I struck. I had a good opportunity of seeing the prisoner - there is a gas-light at the door where they passed me - it shone in their faces.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and in Compton-street I heard a cry of Stop thief! I went through Church-street, and a watchman laid hold of me, but I know nothing about it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

MARY PRIOR, WILLIAM WOOD, Thomas Dingley.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-2
VerdictGuilty > theft under 40s; Guilty > theft under 40s
SentenceTransportation

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Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

183. MARY PRIOR and WILLIAM WOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 40 yards of Norwich Crape, value 3l., the goods of William May Lander and Thomas Dingley , in their dwelling-house .

WILLIAM MAY LANDER. I am in partnership with Thomas Dingley - we are linen-drapers , and live in Strutton-ground, Westminster . On the 12th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I missed a piece of Norwich crape from the window; I put another piece in the window, in the same place, tied a string to it, and carried the string to the further end of the shop. About six o'clock, seeing the string move, I jumped over the counter, went into the street, and saw the prisoner Prior and and another female - I caught the prisoner by the shoulder, and said she had been taking a piece of Norwich crape from the window - the other woman immediately ran off; Prior turned round, and dropped the piece of Norwich crape; I took her into the shop, and observed that her hand was bleeding; I sent for an officer, and gave her in charge. The crape is worth 3l.; it measures forty yards, and cost me 1s. 9d. a yard.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You missed a piece before that? A. Yes, about four o'clock; a small piece was broken out of the window on Saturday morning - I could not get it mended. I am sure Prior dropped the crape; I caught hold of her shoulder, and it dropped from her.

ANN JENKINS . I belong to the Westminster blue coat school. The prisoners live together, in the first floor back room of the same house as me - I live in the kitchen. On the 12th of December, about six o'clock in the evening, I was coming up stairs, and met them coming down, with another woman, whom I know by sight - they got out of the street door before me, and got down the steps; I opened the door, went down the steps, and saw them all three in Orchard-street; the two women were on the left-hand side of the way, and Wood on the right; I saw Wood cross over to them, and say, "Don't both of you go;" the other woman said, "I will go;" Prior immediately said,"I will go - my hand is smaller, look;" this created my suspicion - they went on. Wood went on before Prior, and turned down Strutton-ground - he took a steel thing out of his pocket, and was going to thrust it into the window - Prior said, "Don't do that, I can do it in half the time" - Wood crossed over to the other side. I saw Prior put her hand into the broken piece of glass, and pull out a piece of silk, as I thought; I went in to tell Mr. Lander- he asked what I wanted, but before I could answer he jumped over the counter, went out to Prior, and I saw no more,

Cross-examined. Q. What is your father? A. A milkman. I was never in the prisoners' room. I know of no quarrel between my father and them.

Q. What made you follow them? A. I was going to Mr. Lander's, for half a yard of calico. Prior rather unrolled the stuff in pulling it out. I told Mr. Lander all I had seen, and was told to attend the office next day.

- SIMPSON. I am an officer. I was sent for about a quarter past six o'clock, and took Prior into custody with the crape. On our way to the office, having known her six or eight years, I asked how she came to do it - she said, "I am in liquor, or I would not have done such a thing."

DAVID PHILLIPS . I am a watchman, and assisted in taking Wood.

PRIOR'S Defence. My prosecutor swears false. I was standing at the window with several people, seeing the things marked so cheap; another woman stood there. I saw a piece of stuff drop - it laid by me, when he came out and said he was certain I took it.

PRIOR - GUILTY . Aged 21.

WOOD - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM BURKE.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-3
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

184. WILLIAM BURKE was indicted for feloniously assaulting George James Lewis , on the King's highway, on the 25th of December , at St. Clement Danes , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 hat, value 10s., his property .

GEORGE JAMES LEWIS. I live in Stanhope-street, Clare-market. On Sunday morning, the 25th of December, about one o'clock, I was returning from a party, walking arm-in-arm with a friend - I was quite sober, and in Drury-lane a gang of about thirty boys came up, and surrounded us immediately - one of them made a snatch at my friend's watch; my friend immediately knocked him down with his fist; some of them had sticks; they all began immediately to knock us about with sticks and their fists - I am sure the prisoner was one; we were parted in the scuffle; my friend tried to escape up Harford-place, and as I attempted to take his part they attacked me; I followed my friend, and they struck me with sticks, and some with their fists; I have marks about me now. I was not knocked down. I placed my back up against a wall to defend myself; the prisoner struck me in the face with his fist, and instantly seized my hat; I saw him deliver it to some of his companions; he immediately

made his way towards Russell-court; I followed as well as I could, and collared him at the top of Russell-court; he was never out of my sight. I called the watchman, who came up instantly, and took him; the rest ran off in different directions. I did not think of looking for my hat. I am quite positive he is the boy who struck me and took my hat - there was a gas-light exactly opposite to where I stood. I am sure he struck me before he pulled my hat off. The boys all appeared to be of one party.

WILLIAM ASHTON . I am a watchman of St. Clement Danes. On Christmas morning I heard a call of Watch! ran into Drury-lane, nearly opposite Russell-court, and saw the prosecutor running after the prisoner; there were twenty or thirty boys and young men in Drury-lane. I and the prosecutor both seized the prisoner about the same time - Lewis said he had stolen his hat; I believe the prisoner said nothing; I took him to the watch-house. I am certain he is the boy whom Lewis seized; the others dispersed in different directions.

JOHN SCOTT . I received the prisoner in charge at the watch-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was following the waits down Drury-lane, and saw a parcel of boys going along; this gentleman and another were arm-in-arm - I crossed to see what was the matter with the boys, and saw them knock the gentleman about - I was knocked down, and ran into the watchman's arms.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his youth and good character.

WILLIAM GROVES.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-4
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

185. WILLIAM GROVES, alias CAFFTREE BROOKER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , at St. Mary, Stratford, Bow , 1 gelding, price 4l. , the property of Augustus Elliott Fuller .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE SHEPHERD . I am coachman to the Honourable Mrs. Fuller, of Ashdown House, East Grinstead - Augustus Elliott Fuller is her son. On the 28th of November I missed his grey pony from the field, and found it in the possession of Butcher, at the King's Arms, public-house, at Bow, on the Wednesday week following.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What age is Mr. Fuller? A. About thirty years.

WILLIAM BOWRAH . I am under keeper to Mr. Augustus Elliott Fuller - he had a grey poney at Ashdown House; he was in Wales at the time; I saw it in the field on the 28th of November, and found it at Butcher's afterwards - it is worth 4l.

ISAAC MATTHEWS . I am a labourer. I went to Romford-market on Wednesday, the 30th of November, to buy a pony, but did not buy one. I live in Dighy-street, Globe-row. I was returning home, and overtook the prisoner; I did not know him before: I told him I had been to Romford, to buy a pony; he said he had one, which he would sell me; we walked on to the King's Arms, at Bow - he there shewed me a grey pony; I agreed to meet him next day, at ten o'clock, which I did, and agreed to give him four guineas for it; I paid him 2l., and was to pay him the rest in a few days. Next day I thought it was too cheap; I consulted a friend, and then took it to the King's Arms, till I could find Groves again; I saw him in the street on the day I took it back, and told him I did not like the pony - he asked for what reason - I told him I suspected it might be stolen, for I had had it valued; he assured me it was all right, but wished me to wait till Monday or Tuesday, when he would either give me back the 2l., or satisfy me that it was all right, as he had other business to attend to then; but I gave him in charge of an officer. He asked 6l. for it at first.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you a judge of the age of horses? A. No; my friend considered it worth 9l. or 10l. The King's Arms is a public yard.

MR. LAW. Q. Was it a pony of good appearance? - A. Yes.

CHARLES BEARD . I live at Brixton-hill, and know the prisoner. On the 29th of November, or the 1st of December, I saw the prisoner on the Norwood-road, about two o'clock in the afternoon; he was four or five miles from town, with two horses - one was a sorrel, and the other a grey pony; I know it was on one of those days, because on both days I was on that road.

SAMUEL BUTCHER . I am ostler at the King's Arms, Bow. On Tuesday, the 29th of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I think, the prisoner brought a grey pony and a chesnut mare to the King's Arms - he asked if he could stop there that night; I said he could: he said hay would do for the horses; he did not want corn; they were wet and dirty, as it had rained. About seven o'clock next morning I saw him - he said he should take the mare out and shew her to a man, which he did - he took her away; she was very lame in her fore feet - he left the gelding pony with me, and said he should return in a few hours. I saw him again between seven and eight o'clock that evening (the 30th) - Matthews was with him; they looked at the pony; the prisoner said they would meet next morning about it; I went out next day, and when I came home the pony was gone. On the Saturday morning Matthews brought it in, and left it; I could not tell him where Groves lived. In a few hours I saw Matthews and the prisoner at the King's Arms; I asked the prisoner where he bought it; he said, in Kent: I asked if he had no receipt for his money - he said No, but that he had known the person of whom he bought them three or four years - he gave me a name, which I do not recollect. I understood him he was something of a gardener - we took him to the office.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On Tuesday, the 29th of November, in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner passing Whitechapel-church, on the road to Bow, leading a chesnut horse and grey pony - they seemed much fatigned. On the Saturday evening Butcher and Matthews brought the prisoner to me - Matthews said he thought he had bought the pony too cheap, and wanted his money back; I detained the prisoner. I have seen the pony - it appeared to me to be the same as I saw him with. On the Saturday evening, when I was at the King's Arms, I asked the prisoner where he got them - he said he bought them of one John Bailey, a gardener, of Westerham, in Kent - that he was servant to General Dorin, at Hill Park; I asked what he gave for them - he said he gave 6l. for the chesnut, and 3l. for the pony - that

he had known the man a good while, and had bought them in the market on the Saturday previous, which would be the 26th of November. I asked what took him to that part of the country - he said he had been to see his brother - that he had another brother living at East Grinstead; he said he had seen his brother at East Grinstead, and went to take him some money, and made this purchase on his way back on the Saturday; I asked what detained him from not coming to town before Tuesday - he said he slept with John Bailey two nights, and the other night at Hayes, on the road. I told him I had seen him leading two horses, and he said it was so. I afterwards went to his house, and saw his son - I returned, and told him I had asked his son if he had any horses to sell last week, and the son had said he had none to sell - that I then asked him where he (the prisoner) had slept for four nights, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, and he had said he slept at home every night - the prisoner said, "It is very odd he should say so - he must have made a mistake - I don't know who could have told him so." I then said I should take him to the watch-house, and next morning took him his breakfast, and told him I was going down to Westerham to see this John Bailey , and that I had heard of two horses being lost at East Grinstead - he said if they were the two horses it would be of no use for me to go, for John Bailey would hear of it, and be out of the way - he then said it was a bad job for him - it was a done job, and he must suffer for it. I went to Westerham, but could find no John Bailey, and was informed that General Dorin had been dead six months, and could get no information of any John Bailey having lived with General Dorin - none of the inhabitants knew of such a person.

Cross-examined. Q. There has been a General Dorin? A. Yes. I believe the prisoner is a married man - I only saw one child.

Prisoner. I am not guilty of stealing it out of the lady's ground.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 51.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor, on account of his character.

CHARLES COLLISON, EDWARD MARTIN.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-5
VerdictNot Guilty

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Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

186. CHARLES COLLISON and EDWARD MARTIN were indicted for stealing on the 16th of November , 18 sheep , the property of William Welch .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM WELCH. I live at Southall . On the 16th of November I had eighteen sheep in my field - they were marked with a W on the side. I afterwards saw the same sheep at the City Green-yard.

SAMUEL WYATT . I am the prosecutor's shepherd. I saw these sheep in the field on Wednesday afternoon, the 16th, and missed them about nine or ten o'clock next morning - sixteen of them were brought home that day week; the other two have been killed - their skins are here. I had marked them with a brand mark, and have no doubt of them.

DANIEL WOOD . I live in City-gardens, City-road, and know Collison. On the 17th of November, about a quarter past six o'clock in the morning, I was going from my house into a shop which I have in my yard - Loadsman opened the door, and I found eighteen sheep in a stable adjoining my shop; they appeared very much fatigued; about a quarter to eight o'clock I saw a man in the yard, dressed in a brown frock coat, a leather gaiter on his left leg, and high ankle shoes; he had no gaiter on his right leg, but a handkerchief tied round the small of it. I believe Collison to be the man. Nunn was there at the time.

Cross-examined. Q. Collison is a neighbour of yours, I believe? A. I did not know him before. When I saw him at Worship-street I knew his features; I saw him through the window; they told me that was the man who claimed the sheep. When I saw him at Worship-street he had part of his whiskers taken off, and wore a flannel jacket. I verily believe him to be the man - I saw his side face.

MR. LAW. Q. You believe him to be the man? A. Yes, but he is altered as much as he could be, in dress and figure.

JOSEPH NUNN . I am apprentice to Mr. Wood. On the 17th of November, at a quarter past six o'clock, I saw eighteen sheep in my master's yard, and about six o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner Collison take them away - two other men assisted him; I followed, and saw Collison and two other men put them into a shed in Howard's-green. I went in the morning, and spoke to Loadsman about it, and shewed him where they were put. Collison had a brown frock coat, ankle shoes, a galter on the left leg, and a handkerchief on the right. Howard's-green is about one hundred yards from master's. I knew Collisou before, by seeing him in a shop in Howard's-green, next door but one to the shed. I saw a stout tall man there when I went with Loadsman - it was not either of the prisoners.

Cross-examined. Q. Nobody was with the sheep when you first saw them? A. No. Collison is a butcher, and sells meat in this shed; he uses it as a shop; he drove the sheep into that shop.

JOHN LOADSMAN . I live in Castle-street, Clerkenwell. On the 17th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went with Nunn to No. 24, City-gardens, and saw eighteen sheep there - they appeared particularly tired; I went to Howard's-green afterwards, and saw a shed with meat hanging in front of it; I saw Collison in that shed about a quarter past nine o'clock that morning; he was dressed in a dark mixture coat, corduroy breeches, ankle shoes, and a handkerchief round his right leg. I got information and watched the premises, and saw Martin there from time to time, but never saw Collison there after the 17th; I never saw the sheep there myself - I saw Martin there on Saturday, the 18th, serving two customers with meat, and on Sunday and Monday, but never saw him there after Monday. I found Collison at Worship-street on Saturday; I had been to the shop early and late but could not find him.

Cross-examined. Q. Martin is a journeyman butcher? A. I considered him the servant there, or I should have taken him.

RICHARD PEDRIC . I am a wheelwright, and live next door to the shed where Collison's shop is. I kept a horse and cart at this time. On Sunday Martin asked me to let him have the horse and cart at five o'clock in the morn

ing, as he wanted to take some skins into the country to bury - I did not lend it. I used to see both the prisoners in the shed - Collison's wife was often there - the shop is about ten yards from the shed where the sheep were put- I did not see Collison after I was asked for the cart, till he came into a public-house and struck me - he then wore a fustian coat and leather gaiters - I gave him in charge.

Cross-examined. Q. Might not the skins he corrupted and had? A. I asked him no questions - I thought it improper to lend him the cart at so early an hour - I saw a number of sheep in the shed - whether it was when he asked me for the cart, or a few days before, I cannot say.

CHARLES NEWMAN . I live on Howard's-green - adjoining this shed. I looked through the boards, and saw the sheep there - I used to see Collison serving in the shop about that time - I was ill for a few days and do not know when I last saw him there. Martin was apprehended on the Sunday - they have both served me with meat.

JOHN BEDFORD . I am a Smithfield drover, and live in Bunhill-row. On Monday, the 21st of November, about five o'clock. I was at Howard's-green, and met Martin - he said "Will you do a good turn for me, and take these sheep to a green-yard, or otherwise loose them?" I said"Don't you know a green-yard after being all this time in London?" he said No; he went with me to the stable - some of the sheep were outside the door and some in - he said they had come astray of him four or five days ago- he went to the end of the street with me, and I took them to the green-yard in Whitecross-street - there were eighteen, and were marked W in the side, and some in the hips.

Cross-examined. Q. Green-yards are places of deposit for whatever is lost? A. Yes - I went and told Mr. Slocome.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am a constable. On the 23d of November I saw eighteen sheep in the green-yard; I had two of them slaughtered, and have the skins here. I apprehended Collison for an assault on the 18th of December - Vann asked him how his leg was - he said "A good deal better" - we took Martin in Collison's house, on the 27th of November, at City-gardens, Howard's-green, and asked him where Collison was - he said he should be a pretty fellow to answer that question. Vann asked Collison if he had eighteen sheep - he said he had no business to answer that question.

THOMAS VANN . I am a constable. On the 27th of November we apprehended Martin at Collison's house - he said he should be a pretty fellow to tell me where Collison was, I must find him. On the 18th of December I found him in the watch-house, and asked how his leg was - he said much better - I said "Have you had any sheep in your possession?" he said No; I said "Did any sheep belonging to Mr. Welch, of Southall, follow you?" he said he was not bound to answer that question. We left orders at the watch-house that he should not change his dress, but when he was brought to the office he had put a flannel jacket on.(Skins produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

GEORGE COXHEAD.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-6
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceDeath

Related Material

Before Mr. Justice Park.

187. GEORGE COXHEAD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Taylor and John Woodcock Smith , about six o'clock in the night of the 28th of December , at the liberty of the Rolls , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, 1 petticoat, value 5s.; 1 gown, value 3l.; 1 shawl, value 3l.; 3 brooches, value 1l.; 1 ring, value 10s.; 2 pairs of ear-rings, value 10s.; 1 watch, value 10l.; 1 watch key, value 5s.; 1 head pin, value 3s.; 1 thimble, value 2s.; 1 pair of buckles, value 1s.; 1 tooth-pick and case, value 1s.; 1 pen-knife, value 1s.; 1 necklace, value 10s., and 1 work-box, value 10s., the goods of the said John Woodcock Smith .

JOHN NICHOLLS . I live at No. 10, Marchmont-street, Russell-square. On the 28th of December, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, I was returning to my office in Symond's-inn - it was quite dark - there is a coffee-house at the corner of Symond's-inn gateway - the front door opens into Chancery-lane, and the back into the inn - and there is a window looking into the inn; I observed two men, whom I suspected, looking about the inn; I was proceeding to my office at the back of the coffee-house and observed one of the ground-floor windows of the coffee-house open - it was not the coffee-room; the room was not lighted, but I could see, by the light of a gas lamp, a man in the room, with something white in his hand - I waited in the yard three or four minutes, then knocked at another window and called Watch! - the two men ran off - the man put his hand on the window ledge and jumped out, with a bundle under his arm - I ran towards him and attempted to seize him - he slipped by me, dropped the property, and ran about forty yards before I overtook him towards the courts which lead into Fetter-lane; I dragged him back to the place where he dropped the property; my cries brought assistance round - I desired the persons to surround the property - it was delivered to the beadle of the liberty in my presence; I am certain it is the same as he dropped - I took an inventory of it at the watch-house - I am certain he is the man - I never lost sight of him.

HENRY TAYLOR. I am in partnership with John Woodcook Smith - we are proprietors of Symond's-inn coffee-house , which is in the liberty of the Rolls, and both live there; I had been into this room between five and six o'clock - it was then dark - there is only one window to that room - I went to see if it was ready for the reception of company, and believe the window was down, but cannot say whether it was fastened. When the alarm was given I found that the brass curtain rod was bent.

THOMAS KEARNEY . I am a constable. On the evening of the 28th of December I was called - Mr. Nicholls shewed me the property strewed on the ground, at the back of the coffee-house - he held the prisoner while I gathered it up. I have had it ever since; he took an inventory of it at the watch-house.

MARY SMITH . I am the wife of John Woodcock Smith, and know this property. Here is a cambric petticoat, a shawl, two gold brooches, (one of which cost a guinea), and a mourning brooch; a pair of ear-rings, worth 30s.; a gold watch, worth 10l., that belongs to a gentleman, and was left in Mr. Taylor's possession - we had lent money on it; here is a shawl, which cost me 3l. 8s. - I had only worn it three times; the property is all mine except the

watch - I had placed it all in a drawer in this back room- it was not locked - I had been to the drawer at four o'clock that afternoon, and saw my work-box, which contained the trinkets, there.

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20. Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglary .

WILLIAM FERRAR.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-7
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

London Cases - First Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

188. WILLIAM FERRAR was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 56.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

RICHARD JAMES HARRIS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-8
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

189. RICHARD JAMES HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of December , 10lbs. of lead, value 2s., the goods of Jeremiah Evans , his master .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

MR. JEREMIAH EVANS. I am a stove-grate manufacturer . I have a quantity of lead on my premises. The prisoner was in my service on the 28th of December - about a quarter to three o'clock, I was at my desk, and observed him leaving off work - eight o'clock is the proper time; I called out, "Where are you going?" he said "I am going to leave off" - adding that the other man had left and he could not work alone. I called him back, and observing that he looked bulky, said "What have you got?" he said Nothing; I said "Step back;" he did so - my clerk said"You have something, let us see;" the clerk then put his hand under his waistcoat, and drew out a quantity of lead- he then broke from me, and went down into the manufactory - the clerk followed him.

EDWARD ROBINSON . I am clerk to Mr. Evans. I followed him down to the manufactory, and saw him putting a pint pot into the fire - I had taken the lead from under his waistcoat.

WILLIAM APPLETON . I am an officer. The lead weighs 13lbs. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Confined One Year .

STEPHEN CLOTHIER.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-9
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

190. STEPHEN CLOTHIER was indicted for embezzlement .

MR. ROBERT SPILLER WADESON . I am a solicitor , and live in Austin-friars . The prisoner was in my service as clerk for two or three years, and entrusted to receive money for me; a client of Mr. Turner's owed me 45l. - the prisoner never accounted to me for it.

EDWARD DUKE . I am managing clerk to Mr. Wadeson. Shortly before the 30th of May, I gave the prisoner a receipt for 45l., without date, to give to Mr. Turner, or he was to leave the receipt if it was not paid. He left on the 1st of October; I had asked him many times after the 30th of May to call for this money - he made various excuses, saying, he had not received it; he has never accounted to me for it.

MR. HENRY HOLDEN TURNER . I am a solicitor, and live in Percy-street, Bedford-square. Some person, who I really believe to be the prisoner, called for this money - I paid him 45l. - he gave me this receipt on the 30th of May - I think he inserted "30th of May" in the receipt. I paid him a check on Messrs. Hoare and Co., St. James's-street: here is the cheque.

JAMES MILLER . I am clerk to Messrs. Hoare and Co. I produce the cheque; I paid it on the 30th of May, with a 40l. Bank note, and five sovereigns.

MR. DUKE. The date in the receipt is in the prisoner's hand-writing.

GUILTY - Aged 47.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

WILLIAM KING, JAMES KING, HENRY WILLIAMS, MARGARET HEWITT.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-10
VerdictsGuilty; Guilty; Not Guilty; Not Guilty
SentencesTransportation

Related Material

191. WILLIAM KING , JAMES KING , and HENRY WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of December , 24 yards of stair carpet, value 2l. 15s., the goods of William Hare , in his dwelling-house ; and MARGARET HEWITT was indicted for feloniously receiving, harbouring, and maintaining the said prisoners, well-knowing them to have committed the said felony .

WILLIAM HARE. I live in Bishopsgate-street-without . This carpet was about eighteen feet inside my warehouse; between twelve and one o'clock in the day time, I saw it safe and went out; I returned in a few minutes, and missed it - I have not found it - there were twenty-four yards - it cost me 2l. 15s. I went almost immediately with an officer to Barnett's, in Catherine-wheel-alley, and then went into the next house, followed the officer up stairs, and saw the three male prisoners in the same room with the woman, who was washing; I accused them of stealing the carpet; no charge was made against the woman. I believe the house is let out in lodgings.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. I take it for granted your stock is frequently sold? A. Yes; this only came from the country a few days before, and I cut off forty-eight yards, leaving twenty-four; none had been sold while I was out; the men were all out - I only left a woman there. One of the prisoners was smoking a pipe, another on the bed, pretending to be ill, and the other sitting in a corner.

ROBERT BUTLER . I am in the employ of the Imperial Gas-light Company. On Monday, the 19th of December, about half-past twelve o'clock, I saw James King come out of Hare's shop, with a roll of carpet in his hand, and when he got six or seven yards from the shop, a person held his hand out, and received it from him; I did not see that person's face; he was dressed in a long dark coat and trousers; I saw nobody else - I did not see Williams - I directed a person who was with me to follow them, and I went to Mr. Hare's, and told a woman in the warehouse; I went to this room in less than ten minutes, and saw James King by the fire side, without his cap; I recognised him, and found a hairy cap in the room which he wore when he took the carpet. I believe William King, from his dress and appearance, to be the man who received the carpet - he was dressed exactly the same. Williams was on the bed pretending to be asleep - after rousing himself, he took hold of a pair of stockings, and said"Mother, wash these stockings, will you?" They were examined before the Lord Mayor the next day - the woman came as a witness and was ordered into custody.

Cross-examined. Q. What was William King's dress?

A. A long dark frock coat, which he put round the carpet to hide it - he wore dark trousers.

HENRY SMITH . I was with Butler; he said "That carpet is stolen;" I then saw two persons running away with it; I saw the features of one, which was James King; the other had a long dark coat and dark trousers; they turned into Catherine-wheel-alley; Williams was waiting at the corner of the alley for them - that is about fifty yards from Hare's, but within sight of the house; when they got to the alley they all three ran together; I followed them to the top of the alley; they turned to the left hand, directly I turned they got into a house which I understood to be Barnett's; I waited opposite the door for ten minutes; I did not see them come out, but in a quarter of an hour they were found in a house at the back of Barnett's yard; I found the four prisoners there; I had seen the features of all three as they ran up the court, and am certain of all three.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not a long alley? A. Yes; it leads by some turnings into Petticoat-lane. Mr. Hare's house is on the same side of the way as the alley. Williams could see the house from where he stood, for I stood there myself on purpose to try. There is a communication from Barnett's yard to the house where they were found - there is only a low slight fence between them.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable. I went with Mr. Hare to Barnett's house, in Catherine-wheel-alley, but could not find the carpet; I went into the yard, and found it easy to get over the paling to the house, where I found the four prisoners - the witnesses recognised them - nobody else was in the room - Smith spoke to all the three male prisoners.

JAMES KING'S Defence. My coat is now in prison, and it is a black one - the man swore it was a brown one.

WILLIAMS' Defence. I went into Mrs. Hewitt's room, and asked her to wash my shirt - I had been there ten minutes when this young man came up - I was just going to take my shirt off for her to wash - one of the men asked her to wash his stockings - he laid on the bed being tired.

W. KING - GUILTY .

J. KING - GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAMS - NOT GUILTY .

HEWITT - NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM ALDIS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-11
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

192. WILLIAM ALDIS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 ream of writing paper, called demy, value 18s. , the goods of Christopher Magnay and others, his partners.

JOHN ELL . I am in the employ of Messrs. Christopher Magnay and Sons, of College-hill, Thames-street . I saw the prisoner come out of the warehouse with this ream of paper - he was a stranger - I said I thought he was not right; he said he was perfectly right - that he came from Mr. Hartnell, of Wine-office-court.

EVAN WILLIAMS . On the 4th of January I was on Garlick-hill, I heard the cry of Stop thief! and saw the prisoner running without his hat; I stopped him - the paper laid in Maiden-lane.

WILLIAM JOYCE . I took charge of him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOSEPH LEE, DAVID MORGAN.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-12
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

193. JOSEPH LEE and DAVID MORGAN were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 80lbs. of beef, value 3l., and 14lbs. of mutton, value 10s. , the goods of Thomas Woodman and Robert Woodman .

THOMAS WOODMAN. I am a farmer . My son Robert and I bought two beasts between us, at Smithfield, on the Monday before Christmas day; I brought part of the meat to Newgate-market in a cart, about eleven o'clock on Friday morning, the 23d; I employed a person, who very much resembles Lee, to take ten or eleven stone of beef, and a neck of mutton, to Messrs. Hales and Brooks, in the market, to be sold for me; he never took it there; he was to return for more, but did not. What I delivered to him was worth 3l. 10s.; he was alone, I believe, when I gave it to him; but there was a crowd about.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. You are not partners generally? A. No, only for that week. I went to Hales', and found the meat had not been brought.

EDWARD PAINTER . I am a porter at Newgate-market. I saw this cart in Newgate-street, and saw the prosecutor deliver the meat to Lee, whom I knew - Morgan was with him. Woodman told him to take it to Hales and Brooks - he went through the market, and turned down Ivy-lane- Morgan followed, and said, "Go a little further, and I will take it of you;" and in Ivy-lane he took the mutton from him; I do not think he heard Woodman say where it was to go, but he must have seen it delivered to Lee - he took the mutton in Ivy-lane; they parted. I ran, and sent an officer after them; Morgan was taken on Tuesday morning, and Lee afterwards. I have seen them walking in Newgate-street together before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Have you been into a public-house with Morgan since this? A. No; I went to one with his wife. I was never accused of any offence; I was once charged with buying the ticket of a watch; I was stopped when I went to take it out of pawn. I was taken up on suspicion of robbery only.

Q. Did you not tell his wife that her husband would be safe with her in the morning, for you could not swear any thing against him? A. No. I had tea and some beefsteaks with her; I went with a view to find out where the meat was; there were more thieves in the room - she asked me to take the steaks, but I paid for them; I bought them of Mr. Walker, my master - she complained of being in distress for meat, and I got the steaks - it was the day he was committed. I always buy my meat of my master; I have a wife and two children. It was five or six years ago that I was charged with robbery; I was never charged with any other - I was remanded for three days, and then discharged. We only had a pound of steaks between four of us; there was another man, named Baker, and a woman there, and I thought the other man knew where the beef was. I do not think I ever spoke to her before. I am in Mr. Walker's employ now, and have been from my childhood nearly. I went to school with Morgan - I was with his wife ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; I did not say any thing about her husband - she asked me to tea. I talked to Baker about the meat.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Have you been making yourself busy with Lee's friends? A. No; I do not know where he lived. I am a meat porter, and work for Mr. Walker when he has work for me. I took Lee in

Ivy-lane on Friday; Bill Knap was with me, and helped to take him.

Q. Have you not said you were not so sure of Lee's person? A. I did say so, because his face was covered with a handkerchief, up to his nose, and as soon as he took the handkerchief down, I said, "Joe Lee I want you."

THOMAS BROOKS . I am a meat salesman. Lee was a porter at the market. On the Friday before Christmas day he did not bring me any meat; Mr. Woodman came to ask me if I had received it.

JAMES KEMP . I am street-keeper, and took charge of Lee.

THOMAS JENKINSON . I look after the slaughter-houses in Warwick-lane. I was at the end of Ivy-lane - Painter came and said something to me, in consequence of which I went into Cheapside, and saw a person with the beef, very much resembling Lee, but he had no mutton, and I said nothing to him. I saw Morgan turn down Foster-lane, with something in his handkerchief - they were following one another.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the mutton? A. No, it was in a handkerchief, but it looked like a leg of mutton; it was the shape of one - it might be pork for what I know. I had heard that mutton was missing.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM HUNT.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-13
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

SECOND DAY. FRIDAY, JANUARY 13.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

194. WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Cox , about nine o'clock in the night of the 4th of January , at St. Leonard, Shoreditch , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein 1 pair of shoes, value 6s., his property .

WILLIAM COX. I am a boot and shoe-maker , and live in Swan-yard , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and rent the house. On the 4th of January, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in the room behind my shop, and heard a rattle against the window, and in about two minutes I saw a shoe moving from a shew-board - I immediately ran out, and caught the prisoner with this shoe in his hand - one half out of the broken window, and the other half in; I had seen it a quarter of an hour before - he had entirely removed it from where it laid before; quite so - he had lifted it up, and got it half out of the window - he was pulling it out when I seized him; he said, "I have done nothing - I have just come from work - you are mistaken." I immediately took him to the watch-house, and found a knife on him, which he must have used to break the window; the glass was not broken at all before- his hand must have been inside the window to get the shoe. I sent for his father, and from what he said I was induced to bring him here. There was another boy with him, who ran out of the yard, with the fellow shoe. I found a rule on him, which he said he had found. I produce the shoe which he had in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by, and saw two boys whom I knew - they told me they had broken a window; I said, "I will get away, or I shall be taken with you." The gentleman came and caught hold of me, and said, "I have caught you with a shoe in your hand;" I had not touched the window. I picked that rule up in Old-street. Several people said I was not the boy who had been seen about there. I never touched the shoe - I could find the boy who broke the window.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 14.

SUSAN BARNETT.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-14
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

195. SUSAN BARNETT was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Bartley , on the King's highway, on the 28th of December , at St. Giles in the Fields , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 1 watch, value 15s.; 1 chain, value 2d.; 2 seals, value 2s., and 1 key, value 1d., his property .

JAMES BARTLEY. I am a carpenter , and work in Little Moorfields. On the 28th of December I lived at Somer's-town. I was in Drury-lane between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; I went to a gentleman who I had worked for, and waited to see him, being out of work. I was returning about six o'clock, and saw the prisoner before me, walking arm-in-arm with a man. I overtook them, and as I passed them the prisoner laid hold of my arm; I looked up in her face, and said, "What do you want of me; I don't know you;" she said, "Come home with me;" I said, "No, I have got no money - I want to go home." - The man immediately struck me in my face, and knocked me down, and I saw the prisoner take my watch out of my pocket; I only received one blow - it was a violent one; they went off in a moment. I went to the watchmaker, got the number of the watch, and found it in pawn. She was taken up last Monday - I knew her the moment I saw her.

JOHN ANDREW SIMPSON . I am shopman to Mrs. Morrit, pawnbroker, of Long-acre. On the 28th of December, about a quarter to seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pawned this watch.

JAMES BARTLEY . It is mine. I know the chain and seals also.

Prisoner's Defence. I met this man in Drury-lane - he was tipsy, and said he would go home with me; he went home with me to King-street - he said he had no money, and left his watch till he brought me some money - he was two hours in my room, which my landlady well knows; he got up and smashed the window, and was taken to the watch-house for it. My landlady has left the house since.

PROSECUTOR. I went to no house with her, and never gave her the watch - it is all false.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

GEORGE WILLIAMS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-15
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

196. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of James Bouchett , on the night of the 24th of December , and stealing 2 sheets, value 2s., and 1 loaf of bread, value 8d., the goods of George Prosser .

GEORGE PROSSER. I am a dyer , and lodge in Fashion-street, Bethnal-green , on the ground floor. On the 24th of December, between one and two o'clock, I went out, locked my room door, and took the key. I returned between five and six o'clock, found the door burst open, and the prisoner in the room, close to a chair, in which were two sheets and a loaf of bread - they had been moved from where I had left them; I got the poker, and swore I

would knock his brains out if he moved; he begged for mercy, saying he had a wife and two children.

JOHN SIMPSON . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found four keys upon him.

ELIZA BOUCHETT . The prosecutor lodges with me. - I saw the prisoner found in the room.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had no idea of robbing the place, though I was found close to the door; he offered to make it up if I had money to give him - my wife offered him 1l.; he said that was not sufficient to pay the expenses.

PROSECUTOR. I made no offer to make it up.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

MARY CAIN.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-16
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

197. MARY CAIN was indicted for the wilful murder of Maurice Fitzgerald .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MARY CASEY . I am the wife of Matthew Casey - we live in Horn's-alley, Liquorpond-street , opposite to the prisoner. On the 26th of December I was going into my own house, and saw her and her husband going into their door; they had a row - I saw them beating one another; I went into my house, and went to bed; Lucknell, who lodges with me, was at my room window, which looks over to the prisoner's house. After I got into bed I heard the prisoner say, "Maurice Fitzgerald, what brought you into my place - I will let you know you have got no business in my place;" Lucknell said something to me; I got out of bed; my husband would not let me leave the room; I looked out of window, and saw the body of a man in the street, being taken away on a shutter, by the prisoner's husband and three more men; I went down, and followed them to Liquorpond-street with the body, then turned back, and went into Cain's yard, and saw the prisoner - I said to her, "What a pity to murder the poor man;" she said, "If there was a row between me and my husband what is it to you - what brought you here." I went away directly. Her daughter was present at this conversation.

JOHANNAH LUCKNELL . I lodge with Casey. I was in her room about eight o'clock in the evening, and heard the prisoner and her husband quarrelling; I looked out of window, and saw them out in the yard; Mrs. Casey was in bed - I could see from the window into their yard; it is on the first floor; there is a gas-light close to the window: the yard is shut in with a gate, but I could see over the gate. I saw Maurice Fitzgerald in the yard, with the prisoner, her husband, and daughter. The prisoner said,"Maurice Fitzgerald, you have no business in my place - you vagabond - I will let you know you have no business in my place;" she then got hold of him; I saw him between her and her daughter - they had no sooner taken hold of him then he fell, and somebody screamed murder - whether it was her daughter or anybody who came down stairs I do not know; I saw no more. I afterwards saw the body taken away - I was at the window - Cain and two or three more took it away, on a shutter or door. I afterwards saw the prisoner come out and shut the yard door. I saw her daughter washing the yard next morning.

COURT. Q. When the two women were holding Fitzgerald where was Cain's husband? A. He was standing at the yard door - they were all in the yard - I do not know how near he was to Fitzgerald; Fitzgerald was not trying to get to the husband, but was standing still in the yard when they laid hold of him.

BRIDGET RILEY . I lodge on the first floor of the same house as the prisoner. On the evening of the 26th of December, Maurice Fitzgerald was sitting by the fire side with me, for three quarters of an hour, till between seven and eight o'clock; the prisoner and her husband lodged on the ground floor. I heard a noise below - the prisoner and her husband were quarrelling; I was going down - Fitgerald prevented me, and went down himself to pacify them. I remained in my room, and in about five minutes Margaret Cain called me down, saying the man was killed; I went down, and the prisoner's daughter was holding Fitzgerald's head up, in the threshold of the door - he was sitting down; the daughter was holding her hand to a wound in his left breast, to stop the blood - there was a great deal of blood; he was speechless; this was at the street door, not the gate; I clasped my hands together, and asked who killed the man; I told her to keep holding the wound, and I would fetch the doctor; I ran to Hatton-garden, and as I returned I met them carrying Fitzgerald on a shutter - he was dead. The doctor, who was with me, said it was of no use, the man was dead. I went home, but do not recollect whether I saw the prisoner - I think I heard her voice. Fitzgerald was perfectly sober when he left my room. I afterwards saw his body, before the Coroner.

SAMUEL CAIGER . I am a patrol. On the 26th of December I was on duty, and heard people quarrelling in Horn's-alley; I went to the outer part of Cain's-yard, and saw the prisoner, her daughter, husband and the deceased - I believe there was another man but am not positive - the prisoner appeared to be trying to get to her husband, who was near the yard gate - she was nearer to the house door - the daughter and Fitzgerald appeared to me to be endeavouring to push the prisoner into the house - she had a slender table knife in her hand, with the blade upwards - she forced herself against Fitzgerald and her daughter, as if she wished to get to her husband, who was about five yards off, standing near the yard door, not doing any thing; there was a cry of "There is the watchman!" and the yard door was directly shut; I think the husband shut it, but am not positive; this prevented my seeing into the yard - the gate is seven or eight feet high - a person at Casey's window can see almost all over the yard, except near the gate - I have ascertained that. After the gate was shut I heard a female voice in the yard exclaim "D-n you, I will stab you;" I cannot swear to the voice, but from hearing the prisoner speak afterwards. I believe it was her voice. I went away thinking it an Irish quarrel, which is very common there, and it did not belong to my beat. In a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, a man was brought by on a shutter, and in a quarter of an hour I went to where the prisoner lived, having got assistance - I found her in bed on the ground floor, with all her clothes on except her shoes; her daughter was in the room, and her husband came in before I left - she was not very tipsy, but certainly had been drinking -

I took her to the watch-house - the flag-stones in the yard appeared as if fresh water had been thrown on them - blood and water together remained between the crevices of the stones, near the door of the house; I accompanied Wainwright to the house next day - two or three knives were found - this table knife was on the dresser (producing it); it is similar to the one I saw in her hand, and appeared to have been recently wiped with a wet cloth - it was turning a little rusty - I saw the body before the Coroner - it was the body of the same man as I had seen in the yard.

MARY CASHMAN . I live in White Horse-court, Turnmill-street. I was in Horn's-alley, next door to the prisoner's house, and heard a quarreling in their yard; I came out directly afterwards, and was passing close to the gate, which was then half open, and saw Fitzgerald standing with his face towards Cain's house door; he was not two minutes there before he turned round, and hallooed out that he was murdered - he spoke twice, but the last expression I could not hear; he turned from the door, took a step or two towards the gate and then fell down. I saw blood coming from him, which made me faint. I waited there till after the body was taken away on a shutter; after that the prisoner and her daughter came out - a woman on the first floor was crying; the prisoner said to her, "D-n your soul, do you think we killed the man?" she made some answer, and the prisoner said, "Well then, what brought him there - that is coming to the point." I then went home.

JOHN CARTWRIGHT . I am twelve years old, and live next door but one to where the prisoner did. On the 26th of December, between eight and nine o'clock, I came out, and heard a noise; I looked in at the gate, and saw the prisoner's husband by the gate; Fitzgerald was with his back against the pig-sty, two or three yards from the house. The prisoner's daughter was holding her hand on his breast, to stop the blood - he said, "Oh! I am dead." She endeavoured to take him into the house; her mother came from the end of the shed, and told her not to take him there; he was standing up, walking slowly, and the daughter behind, holding him. As he was going in he tumbled on the threshold, and fell on his knees - the daughter held him up, with her hand to his breast. the prisoner went in, and fetched out a light; the daughter called Mrs. Riley, who came down, and hallooed Murder! the prisoner said he had a knife in his hand, and tumbled down; I staid till the body was taken away on a shutter - the prisoner was then at her own door, holding a light.

COURT. Q. Was the daughter there when the prisoner said he had a knife in his hand and tumbled? A. Yes, and when Riley hallooed Murder! the daughter told the people that he had a knife in his hand and tumbled down.

PATRICK RILEY . I am fifteen years old. My mother called for me after she fetched the doctor; I went home with her, and saw the prisoner outside the gate, with a child in her arms, talking to some people - my mother said to her, "You villain, you have been and murdered the man" - the prisoner said, "What business had he here - why did not he stay in your place." My mother and I went to the deceased's lodging, in Glo'ster-court, and saw his body there.

STEPHEN SKINNER . I am assistant to Mr. Dynam, a surgeon. On the 26th of December I was called to see the deceased's body, in Glo'ster-court - there was a large wound on the left breast, about the region of the heart; I examined the body particularly before the Inquest, and opened it - the wound had taken a direction downward, towards the heart; an artery was divided. I have no doubt of the wound being the cause of his death. The knife produced would inflict such a wound.

MARGARET CAIN. I am the prisoner's daughter. I was in my place - a little boy came down for me, and said there was a row in the yard; I came up, and observed the deceased in the yard, with his back leaning against the pig-sty - that is the first thing I saw. My mother was in the passage. I laid hold of the man, seeing him bleeding, and called out Murder! to Mrs. Riley, who came down, and told me to hold him till she went for a doctor; I said, "Do go, don't be long," and held my hand to his breast. I saw my mother in the passage, with a child in her arms. I do not know whether she had any thing in her hand - her hand was down by her side; several people came into the yard with my hallooing out. I tried to hold the man up - she said, "Don't bring him here," or something of that sort. I held him till he was put on a shutter, and then went back to my place.

Prisoner's Defence (written). On the night in question I got a cow-heel for supper - I took my child and went out for some onions, and it being boxing-day was made to drink two glasses of gin - when I drink I always loose my reason. I declare I do not know how the man came by his death. I fetched my husband from the public-house - he wanted to go back; a dispute arose, but whether this man was there or not I do not know.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 44.

JOSEPH DOLPHIN, EDMUND WALLER, ESTHER MARR.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-17
VerdictsGuilty; Guilty; Not Guilty
SentencesDeath; Death

Related Material

Before Mr. Justice Park.

198. JOSEPH DOLPHIN and EDMUND WALLER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Thurston , about two o'clock in the night of the 11th of December , at St. Pancras , with intent to steal, and stealing therein 5 sets of harness, value 16l.; 1 saddle, value 10s., and 4 bridles, value 30s., his property ; and ESTHER MARR was indicted for feloniously inciting, procuring, and commanding the said prisoners the said burglary to do and commit , against the statute.

JAMES THURSTON. I live in Southampton-mews, Euston-square , in the parish of St. Pancras. I have a stable there, which joins my house - there is no internal communication from the house to the stable; it is built to the wall of my house, and opens into the yard of the house, which yard is enclosed by a wall, and a large pair of folding gates, and a private gate - the folding gates have a bar across, and the small gate is locked at night; nobody can get into the yard without getting over the gates; I go from my house to the stable without going into the street. On Monday morning, the 13th of December, about six o'clock, I heard an alarm - it was dark; I got up, and went to my harness room, which is part of the stable, and found the door open; my servant lets the coaches in at night; I cannot say when it was fastened up. I missed five sets of single horse harness, four bridles, and

a saddle - they were left in my care, and belonged to different gentlemen - they were worth from 20l. to 25l.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Have you any partner? A. No. I have coaches coming in all night - my ostler sets up for them.

JOHN COTTERELL . I am ostler to Mr. Thurston. On the night of the 11th of December, and the morning of the 12th, I set up till between one and two o'clock; I fastened the gate, and barred the folding gates safe. I had all the harness secure by nine o'clock, and latched the stable door - I did not lock it; I never lock it. I saw all the harness safe at nine o'clock, and saw it at the watch-house in the morning - I am sure it is the same. I got up soon after six o'clock in the morning - it was dark.

Cross-examined. Q. Had all the coaches come in when you went to bed? A. Yes. I locked the small door.

CHARLES ALDERTON . I live in Whitecross-street, at Mr. Graves', but have now come from the House of Correction. I had known Waller for about a fortnight or three weeks before this; I saw the female prisoner on Sunday night, the 11th of December, but never before - I never saw Dolphin before Sunday night, the 12th; I was in company with Waller and a person, named James Smith, on Saturday, the 10th, at the Black Horse, public-house, Barbican: I was at breakfast with Waller that morning, in Gray's Inn-road - he told me he was to go to the Black Horse, to meet Smith; I went with him at twelve o'clock; Smith came in - Waller and Smith went out and talked together, but I could not understand what it was about - I did not hear what passed. Waller had asked me some days before if I knew any body who kept any stables; I said I knew a person who kept livery-stables, Mr. Thurston, in Southampton-mews, Somer's-town; he asked me where they kept the harness; I said they kept it in the second door on the left hand side of the yard - he asked if the door was kept locked - I said it was either buttoned or latched.

Q. When you met Smith at the public-house, what did you do? A. We had a pot of beer. Smith and Waller went out, and when they came back Smith appointed for me and Waller to meet him at six o'clock, at that house - they did not say for what purpose then; I got there at six - neither of them were there; Smith came in a few minutes, and Waller about seven o'clock, Smith said he could not procure a horse and cart that night, but he had agreed for one on Sunday night, and it was put off till then. Smith told us to meet him there at nine o'clock on Sunday night, at the Black Horse - we all met there, and at half-past nine a man came, named Shays; he said he had got the horse and cart, and had left it at the stables; the Black Horse is between three and four miles from Mr. Thurston's. Smith told me to go to the Benbow public-house, in Golden-lane, and ask for Long Harry - I went, and saw Dolphin at the Benbow; I did not know him before; I inquired for Long Harry - Dolphin asked me who wanted him - I said Jem Smith; he said he was not there, and he dare say he could do as well. He went with me - Marr was outside the door, and went with me and Dolphin to the Black Horse; I found Smith and Waller there. Smith, Waller, and Dolphin went aside, and talked together - I did not hear what they said. There was an Irishman in the room, dressed in a blue jacket - he was not one of the party. Smith asked Dolphin if he could get him some large screws, a dark lantern, and a phosphorus-box; Dolphin told Marr to get him some of the largest screws and a phosphorus box - he did not say where from. Waller was present when he sent her for them - she said she could do nothing of the kind, for if Harry found it out he would kill her; Dolphin said they belonged to him, and he had given them to Harry to mind for him; she said she would do nothing of the kind without Harry's orders. We had three or four pots of beer, and staid there till about eleven o'clock, and went from there up Goswell-street, all five of us. Marr and Shays were with us - Dolphin at last, with a good deal of persuasion, got the woman to fetch the dark-lantern and screws - she went for them; we turned down an alley, about thirty yards beyond Sadler's repository, in Goswell-street, and waited down there; the woman went into a house on the left-hand side, and brought out some screws in her apron, and gave them to Dolphin, with a dark lantern and phosphorus box; Dolphin picked out two of the largest screws, and put them into his pocket - we went to the Britannia public-house, in Golden-lane - Marr was with us; we had three or four glasses of porter; Dolphin, Smith, Waller, Marr, Shays, and I were all there; we then went to the stables where the horse and cart were, at the back of St. Luke's church, and waited in the stables till a few minutes after one o'clock; Smith ordered me, Waller, and Dolphin to meet him at the corner of Tottenham-court-road, by the New-road - we were to go there as quick as possible; Smith and Shays overtook us in the cart at Euston-square; they stopped, and Waller got into the cart (Marr had left us in Golden-lane.) I and Dolphin went round the square, down Southampton-mews, and stopped at Thurston's gate; Dolphin went to the small gate, and tried to unlock it with the two screws - he came to me and said he could not open it - they were too small; Smith and Waller came down the mews, Smith said, "Never mind." I and Smith went round a street, and turned down a turning, which brought us by the side of Thurston's house, where there is a wall, and railing at the top, and by getting over there we could get into the yard; Smith got over first, and I after him - Smith opened the gate; Dolphin came in; Waller staid outside - Smith opened the door where the harness was - it was put to, but neither latched nor buttoned. He handed down the harness to me and Dolphin, and told us to put it down by the side of the gate; Smith, Waller, and Dolphin put it into the cart; Waller and Shays rode in the cart: Dolphin, Smith, and I went to the stable in St. Luke's, and found the horse, cart, and harness there - Waller and Shays were there - we got the harness out of the cart, and put it on a bench in the stable; it was then about three o'clock in the morning. Smith began to sort the harness out; Shays went away with the horse and cart, and brought the horse back without the cart, and took the harness off. Several watchmen came to the gate, and sprung their rattles; Smith got over some palings by the side of the stable; I got over after him, and do not know what became of the others. A watchman stopped me, and took me to St. Luke's watch-house - the harness was brought there. After I had been there some time I told the watch-house-keeper where the harness came from,

and where Waller lived as well as I could - he lived in a small square on the left-hand side of Gray's Inn-road. I was eighteen years old last October.

Q. Had any of the prisoners asked you about what was on the premises? A. Waller asked me where the harness was - nothing else. I had known Thurston's three or four months - I used to help the ostler there; he was my brother-in-law's nephew. Waller asked me if there was a dog there; I said he had a large dog, but it was uncommonly harmless, and would not hurt anybody - I saw no dog there that night. When we left the Black Horse the Irishman was still there, drinking rum and water with the servant.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. How long have you been in this reputable business? A. I was never in such a case before. I was never in custody before in my life. I was never taken up on any charge. I was examined before the Magistrate - I did not tell him exactly all of it the first time - I was flurried. There were five or six examinations; there might have been more; there might be nine. I was present at all of them. I told the Magistrate all I knew at the second examination.

Q. You met some of these persons at the Black Horse? A. Yes, in the tap-room; there was not more than one or two persons there - they spoke low about the harness. - We were on the opposite side of the room to the other persons; it is a largish sized room, bigger than that table. Waller asked me about the stables when I was out with him. Nobody was present at the Black Horse but the Irishman and servant - they did not hear our conversation about the screws; they were talking and larking by themselves.

JOSEPH CLARK . I keep the Black Horse, Barbican. - On Saturday evening, the 10th of December, about half-past ten o'clock, I recollect seeing Alderton there - Waller was sitting with him; I was not serving in the tap-room on Sunday evening, as my wife was confined to her bed - I served in the bar. I cannot say who was there that evening, be forehalf-past ten o'clock, when I went into the tap-room - none of the prisoners were there then; there was an Irishman there in a blue jacket, sitting with my servant girl, talking and drinking, and two of my lodgers. I have seen Dolphin and Marr at the house, and had seen Waller there once before.

Cross-examined. Q. You found four persons there? - A. Yes; my room has no boxes - one table goes lengthways, and the other across; there are benches all round the room - it is large enough for persons to talk and not be heard on the other side of the room, if they speak low.

Q. If five persons at one table spoke loud enough to be heard by each other, must they not be heard across the room? A. I think they must.

COURT. Q. If they stood in a cluster together, could they speak without others hearing them? A. I think not; the room is about four yards by five; they could certainly talk so as not to be heard, and strangers might not notice their conversation.

GEORGE WATERS . I am headborough of St. Luke's. - On Sunday night, the 11th of December, I was constable of the night, and about four o'clock on Monday morning I heard rattles sprung; I went out of the watch-house, and met the watchmen; I went into a stable, and found several watchmen there, and five sets of harness, a saddle, and five bridles, a dark lantern and a phosphorus box - we took them to the watch-house. I found Alderton at the watch-house, in Benson's custody; he at first said he knew nothing about it - that he was drawn into it, and if he got out of it he would never get into such a thing again. I apprehended one Crook afterwards, on suspicion - he was discharged; I looked him up in a cell adjoining to Alderton. Alderton told me where the harness came from, and directed me where to find Waller, who I apprehended at one o'clock in the day, on Monday, the 12th - I found him in bed, undressed - his boots, which were in the room, were very wet, as if they had been very muddy. I do not think there had been much rain.

Cross-examined. Q. You found none of the prisoners in the stable? A. No.

EDWARD COTTINGTON . I keep the Britannia public-house, Golden-lane. On Sunday night, the 11th of December, I was in my bar, and did not particularly notice who was at my house - nobody was there after eleven o'clock; I believe the house was open till a quarter to twelve - there had been an Irish wake there - I had the gout and could not turn them out - I know nothing of the prisoners or Alderton.

WILLIAM CLEAVER . I am a watchman - my beat is in John's-row, St. Luke's. On Sunday night, the 11th of December, at nine o'clock, I saw a cart on Europia-place - it attracted my notice - I never have seen a cart in that place before - I missed it soon after one o'clock in the morning, and between three and four I saw it pass my box again - I do not know who drove it - it turned up there again - there was only one person in it, and one came on behind; one of the men asked me for a light, which I gave him - that was Dolphin - I noticed him - he crossed towards the mud-bank; I afterwards gave a light to a man who had the pony belonging to the cart - the pony was all in a sweat; I did not know that man - he had something up to his face - the harness was found in a place near the mud-bank; I have seen Dolphin about that spot before, in the day time; I assisted in taking the harness to the watch-house - I saw Eliza Cale about the place where the harness was.

ELIZA CALE . The harness was found in my stable - I had let this stable to Shays and one Crook - Crook rents it still - I live close to it. The night before this happened, just as I was going to bed, Shays and Crook came and asked me for the key; I handed it out to one of them, as they said they wanted to go to market. About three o'clock in the morning I could not rest, hearing a noise, as if they were moving - I heard a horse and cart come quickly to the stable; I got up, struck a light and went down, but my gate was fast - I could not get to the stable; I saw Waller come out of the gate - he said to the watchman "What noise is this? what is this about? they are my premises?" I had never let them to him, and told the watchman I never saw his face before - the watchman opened the stable, went in and saw the harness.

Cross-examined. Q. What time was this? A. About three o'clock - they made a considerable noise in getting away - I never saw Waller before: he said, "These premises are mine" - it was a dark morning.

JOHN INWOOD . I am a watchman, of Brick-lane - my

beat is near this mud-bank; I saw the harness found in the stable. The first man who came out of the gateway of the premises was Dolphin - he ran from me and escaped - when he came out I asked if he was the owner of the premises - he said he was - I asked if he had driven a horse in there - he said he had - I asked if it belonged to him - he said he was in partnership with a man in it - I asked him to come back and let us have a sight of the horse - he immediately flew off - I sprung my rattle - he was taken two or three days after - I had a lantern, and right facing him was a gas light: he is the man I am certain.

JOHN YOXALL . I am a watchman. I saw three men escape over the fence - Alderton was one of them - I cannot speak to the others.

THOMAS BENSON . I secured Alderton; I saw two more come over the paling, but cannot speak to them; a watchman gave one of them into my care: I left him with another watchman (being a private watchman myself) and he escaped.

JOHN STRACHAN . I am labourer in a timber-yard, and lodge at the Black-horse, Barbican. I was there on Sunday, the 11th of December: the servant girl and an Irish-man, in a blue jacket, were drinking together - Ryder, a carpenter, was there - there was nobody else in the house from half-past eight, when I came in till half-past ten, when I went to bed. I saw none of the prisoners there, nor Alderton either.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a headborough. I examined the premises on the 12th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning - the paling was broken down, and appeared as if somebody had climbed over: I found two hats just by there, and took them to the watch-house: Alderton claimed one of them.

THOMAS BENSON . When I took Alderton he had no hat.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. I apprehended Dolphin at a public-house in Fleet-market, and Marr afterwards.

JOHN CALE . I am Eliza Cale's son. I was getting up to go to work, heard an alarm, went down and saw three men escaping: I cannot speak to them.

MR. THURSTON. I know all this property: I had a dog which was taken away the day before the robbery - I do not know by whom.

DOLPHIN'S Defence. I never saw the witness except at the office.

WALLER'S Defence. I know nothing about it.

DOLPHIN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 39.

WALLER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 59.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of burglariously breaking and entering.

MARR - NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-18
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

199. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for that he, at the General Session of Gaol Delivery, holden for the City of London, at Justice Hall, Old Bailey, on the 27th of October, in the 6th year of the reign of George IV., was in due form of law tried and convicted on a certain indictment against him, for stealing, on the 20th of October, in the year aforesaid, at St. Michael, Wood-street, 1 muff, value 2l.; 1 pelisse, value 2l.; 1 gown, value 10s.; 4 pairs of shoes, value 4s.; 1 box, value 4s.; and 1 canvass wrapper, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Pickford and others, his partners; and also for stealing the same goods, stating them to be the goods of Elizabeth Ann Roberds , instead of Thomas Pickford and others, his partners, and was thereupon ordered to be transported beyond the seas, for the term of seven years, pursuant to the statute; and that afterwards, to wit, on the 17th of December , in the 6th year aforesaid, he was at large, without any lawful cause, within that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland called Great Britain, to wit, at the parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate , in London, before the expiration of the said term for which he was so ordered to be transported , against the statute.

SECOND COUNT stating that he was ordered to be transported beyond the seas for the term of seven years, &c., and that, on the 17th of December, he feloniously was at large, &c.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 39.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-19
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty

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200. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was again indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , at St. Giles Without, Cripplegate , 25 yards of Kerseymere, value 6l., the goods of William Brown and William Brown Sams , in their dwelling-house .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 39.

MICHAEL SIMMONS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-20
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

201. MICHAEL SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of December , 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; 1 pencil, value 1d.; 1 sovereign, 2 half-crowns, 3 shillings, and five sixpences, the property of Phoebe Stulpner , from her person .

PHOEBE STULPNER. I live in Haberdasher-place, Hoxton. On the 27th of December, at half-past eleven o'clock in the morning, I was crossing Bishopsgate-street - there was an ass in the way - there was a rush of persons - I had my pocket-book in my basket; the persons pushed against me, and in about two minutes I missed my pocket-book: on being asked if I had lost any thing, the officer produced it. The prisoner was in custody - it still contained the money I had put into it - I had had the book many years.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. On the 27th of December, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Bishopsgate-street, running; an ass was across the foot-path, which made a stoppage: the prisoner, with another, ran down Artillery-lane; I took him about twenty-five yards down the lane, and, on opening his jacket I found this pocket-book at his left side. I saw Mrs. Stulpner in about two minutes - she was pointed out to me, and claimed it, and stated the contents accurately - I opened it at the Mansion House - he said a person gave it him to carry, but did not say to whom, or where he was to take it; the other got away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other boy came up and said if I would carry it he would give me 3d.: that he had just picked it up, and did not like to carry it: he ran away when this gentleman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

CHARLES SKINNER.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-21
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

202. CHARLES SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 4 shillings, the monies of George Dyer , from his person .

GEORGE DYER. I live in Air-street-hill. I am a printer to Mr. Valpy. On Sunday, the 25th of December, I was on London-bridge , about four o'clock in the morning; I had 4s. loose in my pocket; I was returning from a visit in the country, and was quite sober - I found myself fatigued, and sat down in one of the alcoves; I fell asleep - I was awoke by Gooding, who asked if I had lost any thing; I felt in my waistcoat pocket, and missed 4s., which I had safe when I sat down; Gooding had the prisoner in charge, and found 4s. in his left-hand waistcoat pocket; before he was searched he said he had not a farthing about him.

WILLIAM GOODING . I am an engineer. I was on London-bridge, and saw Dyer sitting on a stone by the engine-house door, where I work - I saw the prisoner on the other stone - he put his fingers into Dyer's waistcoat pocket, and he dropped two shillings on the ground - he then put his foot on them, and afterwards took some more; I opened my door and awoke Dyer, who said he had lost 4s.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

THOMAS FLINN, JOHN FLINN.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-22
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > whipping; Imprisonment

Related Material

203. THOMAS FLINN and JOHN FLINN were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 coat, value 3l. , the goods of Benjamin Johnson .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON. I live in Wellington-street, Goswell-street, and am a journeyman carpenter . I was at work in some premises on Old Fish-street-hill ; Thomas Flinn was servant at the house. On the 3d of January, at eight o'clock in the morning, I laid my coat in the colour room, or warehouse, and went to breakfast; I returned at half-past eight, and it was gone; I had not seen either of the prisoners that morning: in about half an hour I saw the coat in the cellar below, under some paper shavings; I did not see it again till I got to Guildhall - it cost me 3l. 10s.

ROBERT DOVER . I am clerk to Messrs. Gillet and Co. who are owners of the premises. Thomas Flinn was employed there - John was a stranger: I heard this coat was lost. On the night of the 4th I was in the counting house - Thomas Flinn was cleaning away after the men - I secreted myself in the court, where I had a view of the premises: I waited from a quarter past eight to nine o'clock- it was known that a coat was lost: I saw John Flinn come from Old Fish-street, and look up at the factory window - the coat was thrown out - John picked it up - I got a watchman to assist, and secured him with it, and, in our way back, we met Thomas, going home; I told him to come into the counting-house; he did so; I said to Thomas, "I believe you know this is the carpenter's coat;" he said "Yes;" I gave them both in charge: there was no one in the factory but Thomas when the coat was thrown out. John said his brother told him he had bought the coat - Thomas said nothing; it had not been moved till the night of the 4th.

JOHN AUSTIN . I am porter to Messrs. Gillet. I heard, on the 3d, of the coat being lost - it was well known - we found it concealed in the cellar - it was not moved on the 3d; on the 4th, in the evening, after the men left work, Thomas Flinn remained behind; I was not in the factory, but in the warehouse - I saw the coat in the shavings at half-past eight o'clock, and about nine I saw Thomas go into the street - he went up towards John, who had been secured with the coat.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I took them in charge with the coat.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN FLINN'S Defence. When the parcel came from the premises I did not know what it contained; I was looking at it and a young gentleman collared me.

T. FLINN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Three Months , and Whipped .

J. FLINN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

THOMAS MAHONEY.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-23
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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204. THOMAS MAHONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of December , 3lbs. of pork, value 2s. 3d. , the goods of Charles Benwell .

CHARLES BENWELL. I am a butcher , and live in Long-lane . On Saturday, the 24th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, this pork was taken from the shop - I went out, and found the prisoner one hundred yards off, with it in his hand; he said he bought it in the street - I had seen him in my shop - it weighed 3lbs.

SARAH WILSHIN . I am servant to Mr. Benwell. I saw the prisoner take the pork; I was in the room behind the shop.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months .

ANN M'CORMACK.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-24
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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205. ANN M'CORMACK was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 1 watch, value 10l.; 1 watch-chain, value 4l.; 3 seals, value 3l., and 1 key, value 10s. 6d., the goods of Augustus Henry Graveley , from his person .

AUGUSTUS HENRY GRAVELEY. I am a coal-merchant , and live in Upper Ogle-street. On the 20th of December I had a silver watch, gold chain, and seals, worth 17l.; about two o'clock in the morning I was coming up Holborn , from the Commercial-road; I had been drinking with a gentleman who had sailed with me from the East Indies - I was quite sober; at the corner of Gray's-inn-lane the prisoner came out, and caught me round the body, asked me to walk with her; I pushed her away, and as she ran away I felt in my fob, and my watch was gone. I had not crossed Gray's-inn-lane - it was by a baker's shop, close at the corner; I pursued, calling Watch! and the watchman came and took her, going into Walton's-court, which is ten or twelve yards within the City bars. I saw my watch found in her left hand. I had not been with her at all.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know the City boundaries? A. I had been to Captain Sansom's - we dined at five o'clock, then drank, and smoked. I dare say I drank a bottle of wine, and had some rum and water after supper. I suppose a bottle of rum was drank - nobody was there but Mr. and Mrs. Sansom. I drank no wine.

Q. Did you not tell me you drank wine? A. I drank some, but I did not say the quantity - I saw but one bottle of wine produced; gentlemen generally take rum, and

leave the wine to the ladies. Mr. Sansom lives near Stepney-causeway, which, I suppose, is six miles and a half from my house. I am a married man. I was accosted by nobody but the prisoner.

Q. Did you ever tell any body to say it was your own fault entirely, and not the prisoner's? A. I did not - I said nothing of the kind. I had 23s. about me. She had not followed me - she ran out and met me.

JAMES TARN . I am a watchman. I was in Holborn, and heard a cry of Watch! I was in the court, and went up the passage; Mr. Graveley said he had been robbed - I took hold of the prisoner, who he was holding; he charged her with robbing him - I found the watch, chain, and seals in her left-hand; she at first denied having it, holding out her right hand. I took her in the City - the baker's shop is out of the City. Mr. Graveley certainly was sober. He told me the maker's name and number.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he appear as if he had been drinking? A. He certainly had, but was not drunk - he walked as strait as I could. I considered him very sober. The prisoner said at the watch-house that he met her and gave her the watch - he denied it - she had been drinking - I thought she smelt of rum.

JOHN SMITH . I am constable of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - the prosecutor did not appear drunk; he gave the maker's name and number of the watch directly; she said it was given to her for going with him; he said he had not spoken to her.

Cross-examined. Q. Will you swear he was sober? A. I believe him to have been quite sober. She said he had no money, and gave her the watch; he put his hand to his pocket, and I heard money rattle. I think she was not quite sober.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman has false sworn himself.

GUILTY. Aged 22. Of stealing, but not from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

DANIEL DEAN.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-25
VerdictGuilty

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206. DANIEL DEAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , 80lbs. of printing types, called long primer, value 8l., and 100lbs. of other types, value 15l., the goods of Walter M'Dowall, the elder , and Walter M'Dowall, the younger , to whom he was servant .

MR. WALTER M'DOWALL, JUN. I am in partnership with my father, Walter M'Dowall - we are printers . The prisoner was in our employ from the beginning of September to the 19th of November, as a compositor - our type is kept up stairs in our premises, Pemberton-row, Gough-square ; he was composing "Eagle and Young's Tythe Cases," and the notes to "Freeman's King's Bench Reports," and "Archibald's King's Bench Practice" - when the type was used it was his duty to distribute it and replace it in its order in the cases, which have a division for each letter. We used four sorts of letter on Eagle and Young's book; Freeman's Reports had small pica and brevier. While he was in my service I missed the type of three pages of Archibald's work, which had been set up - and I observed that long primer got scarcer than usual.

Prisoner. Q. Have you the bill-book in which the compositor's work is entered? A. I have - (producing it) - he came into my employ in the beginning of September; I charge you with stealing long primer and brevier not in the cases; a person named Pittock was also employed on this work: Bird, Smith, and Hamilton were compositors, working at the same time as the prisoner. Hamilton was overseer, and generally worked in another room. I have the upper part of two houses; there is a staircase to each house. I have five apprentices - four of whom were employed on Freeman's Reports, at different times - I have taken two of them before the Chamberlain, for misconduct, but never charged them with robbery. The brevier type was cast by Austin - he supplies other printers. A man could take out 20lbs. of type at a time without being seen.

MR. CARRINGTON. Q. Austin makes for other printers, but he makes the letters singly, not in words? A. No; no other printers were engaged on this work. The prisoner charges in this book for composing signature 4 L., and correcting it; he would have all the type of that sheet before him - it was his duty to distribute it after printing, and put it into the proper cases.

WILLIAM JEFFERY . I am a printer. The prisoner called on me - I bought of him the type produced - this is exactly in the same state as when I bought it - it is set up - here are 4000 letters in this part; I am certain of two parcels, which contain about 8000 letters; I bought them on the 17th of December - I have his receipt for it - here are other parcels; the two parcels are brevier - here is another piece, of about 1000 brevier letters - it is all in the same state as when I received it; I bought all the brevier on the 17th; in all here are 5000 brevier and 4000 long primer letters; the weight is about 16lbs. I live at No. 45, Hackney-road. I bought the long primer on the 20th.

Prisoner. Q. Did I ever shew you specimens of any type? A. Yes, on one occasion; I did not buy it; I think it was small pica. I once bought some pica of him and some leads.

COURT. Q. Did you ever ask him where he brought this type from? A. He came to me about the middle of the month, stating that one Taver, whom I knew, had informed him I was buying type for a printing-office - that he had bought a quantity under an execution, to go into business as a master printer; but having changed his views he was determined to sell it; I knew him four years ago as a journeyman printer, and did not hesitate about it, having heard that he had been in business; I gave him 1s. per lb. for the brevier, and 7d. for the long primer.

GEORGE HAZLEWOOD WORRELL . I am an officer. I received the type from Mr. Jeffrey, in the same state as it is now in. I apprehended the prisoner at the office of Mr. Taylor, a printer, in the Old Bailey.

MR. M'DOWALL here handed to the Jury the works in question - he himself reading from the type, which exactly corresponded with the impression - among which was signature 4 L, which the prisoner had composed.

The prisoner, in a long Defence, complained of the prosecutors having influenced his friends against him, and persuaded them not to come forward on his behalf, and con

tended that there was no proof of the property being Mr. M'Dowall's - that he had purchased it fairly.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

See New Court proceedings, 3d day.

JAMES HAWKINS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-26
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceDeath

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THIRD DAY. SATURDAY, JANUARY 14.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury,

Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.

207. JAMES HAWKINS was indicted for that he, at the delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 5th of December, in the 2d year of the reign of George IV., was in due form of law tried and convicted on a certain indictment against him, for stealing on the 12th of November, at St. Martin in the Fields, in the 2d year aforesaid, 1 pocket-book, value 1s.; 1 silver rule, value 1s.; 1 pair of diamond tongues, value 1s., and 1 almanack, value 1d., the goods of Richard Thomas , the younger, from his person, and was thereupon ordered to be transported beyond the seas, for the term of his natural life, to such place, &c., pursuant to the statute; and that afterwards, to wit, on the 15th of December , in the 6th year of the reign of George IV., feloniously was at large, without any lawful cause, within that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland called Great Britian, to wit, at St. Martin in the Fields , Middlesex, before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported, as aforesaid , against the statute&c.

SECOND COUNT. that he, at the said Session, held on the said 5th of December, was ordered to be transported beyond the seas for his natural life to such place, &c., pursuant to the said statute; and that afterwards, to wit, on the 15th of December, in the 6th year of George IV., feloniously was at large, &c., as in the first count stated.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 24.

WILLIAM NICHOLSON.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-27
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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208. WILLIAM NICHOLSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Meagle , about one o'clock in the night of the 12th of December , at St. James, Clerkenwell , with intent, the goods and chattels therein being, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

SECOND COUNT. stating it to be the dwelling-house of John Reid and John Stewart Priestley .

ROBERT MEAGLE. I am in possession of the Red Lion public-house, at the corner of Dorrington-street, Clerkenwell - I had possession from John Reid and John Stewart Priestley, the assignees of William Tillyer ; I have been there five months, and live there with my family. On the night of the 12th of December I went to bed about half-past eleven o'clock, and saw every thing fast and secure; the pannel of the back door, leading into the yard, was secure and unbroken when I went to bed; I was alarmed by the watchman springing his rattle about one o'clock, and got up - I found the prisoner in his custody, in the passage. I found the yard door open, and a considerable portion of the brick-work of the wall, by the side of the door, pulled down - there was a small hole there before, to let the fowls through; it had been broken more, to enable him to unfasten the bottom bolt, but the pannel was broken to get to the upper bolt. I found a dark lantern in a shed on the premises; I never saw it there before.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had not searched the shed to know whether it was there before? A. No. The wall was in a decayed state before; nothing but a fork was found upon the prisoner; he at first pretended to be drunk, but when he got to the watch-house he was quite sober.

ANN HURRELL . I lodge in this house. On the 12th of December, at one o'clock, I was sitting up at work, and heard a noise below, in the house; I thought somebody was up - I opened the front window, and called the watchman; he went to the back of the premises - I know no more.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you observed this brick wall? A. It was in a very decayed state; there was a hole for the fowls to go through; I saw that hole the day before - I suppose a boy could get through it.

COURT. Q. Could a man get through? A. No, my Lord. I had not been out of the room all night.

JOHN PILGRIM . I am a watchman - my beat is in Dorrington-street and Great Warner-street. On the 12th of December, about ten minutes past one o'clock, Hurrell called me, and said she heard an unusual noise in the house; I went and tried the shutters, which were fast - I went into the back yard; there are two doors to the yard, one of which is never fastened; as soon as I got in there I saw the prisoner come out of the passage of the dwelling-house; I made a spring to lay hold of him - he threw himself into the covered skittle-ground, and got under some forms; I secured him there, sprung my rattle, and took him into the house. I found the pannel of the door broken, and the brick-work pulled down - he could not get through the hole; the pannel had been broken to get at the top bolt. I found a dark lantern in the place where he threw himself down to hide; the pannel was in three pieces and had only been tacked in. I dare say forty bricks were pulled out of the wall.

Cross-examined. Q. And yet a man could not get through? A. It was a large hole, but extended upwards, to find the bolt - I think a middling sized boy could not get through. Nothing but a fork was found upon him. - The pannel had been sawed; he said he was drunk, but did not appear so in the least.

JOHN BOWYER . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I searched, and found a fork upon him.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you speak to him? A. Yes - he said he was tipsy, but did not appear so. I found nothing that would saw the pannel - I searched for it minutely.

THOMAS MARKHAM . I am headborough of Clerkenwell. I went to the house and found the pannel broken. I dare say the hole in the wall was three feet by two, sufficient for a man to get through; it was not the pannel of the door that was sawed, but the lining - it had been done to get at the top bolt.

Cross-examined. Q. The aperture in the wall was three feet by two? A. I did not measure it, but suppose it was nearly three feet high, and eighteen inches or two feet broad.

ROBERT MEAGLE re-examined. I had seen the aper

ture in the wall the day before, but not in the evening - it was not large enough then to admit a man through; I saw this door secure, with both bolts, when I went to bed, and left nobody up but Hurrell.

Prisoner's Defence. As they brought me along I was used cruelly, and cut over the head and arms. They said as we went to the office, "You are not gone yet - this will do to go to the Old Bailey with."

ROBERT MEAGLE. I have seen the prisoner at my house once or twice - he was there on the evening in question, and went backward three or four times with his companions.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He had been drinking? A. Not to make himself drunk - he and three others had four pots of beer; I saw him leave the house. There is a thoroughfare through the house in the day time, but not all night; it is not a public thoroughfare. I give the persons in Red Lion-yard leave to go through - they come through the bar, and through my yard - the doors are locked at night.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, on account of his youth.

EDWARD COCKERELL.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-28
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

209. EDWARD COCKERELL was indicted for that he, on the 3d of December , at St. Martin in the Fields , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain promissory note, for payment of money, which said false, forged, and counterfeited promissory note, for payment of money, is as follows, that is to say

No. 1110. Bath and Bristol Bank. No. 1110.

I promise to pay the bearer, on demand, the sum of Five Pounds, here, and at Messrs. Bernard, Savery, and Co.'s, bankers, London, for value received, this 13th day of October. 1825. For Hobhouse, Wright, and Hunter.

FIVE. Entered S. Kemp. Signed MARTIN HOBHOUSE . with intent to defraud William Foster , against the statute.

2d COUNT, for uttering and publishing, as true, on the same day, at the same parish, a like false, forged, and counterfeited promissory note, for payment of money, he well knowing it to be false, forged, and counterfeited, with a like intent, as in the first count.

3d COUNT, for offering, on the same day, at the same parish, to one William Foster, a like false, forged, and counterfeit promissory note, for payment of money, he well knowing it to be false, forged, and counterfeit, with a like intent, as in the two former counts.

THREE OTHER COUNTS, the same as the three former, only stating the intention to be to defraud William Haskins instead of William Foster.

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM FOSTER. I am shopman to William Haskins, a jeweller , of Regent-street - he has also a shop in St. Martin's-court, which I attend to, and am accountable for every thing I sell - he attends there occasionally. On Saturday, the 3d of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop in St. Martin's-court , and asked me to take some rings out of the window for his inspection; I did so - he chose a ring and brooch, and was to pay 1l. for them; he tendered me a five guinea Pontefract note - I looked at it, and told him it was not payable in London, and objected to it on that account; he then said he could give me one which was payable in London, and gave me a 5l. Bath and Bristol note, and at the same time requested me to shew him some seals for his son, who was at school; he chose two seals, which came to 2l. 4s. - which made 3l. 4s. I wrapped up the goods which he selected, and told him I had not sufficient change, and should be under the necessity of getting it - I asked him to be kind enough to put his name and address upon it, which he did, in my presence - this is the note (looking at it;) he has written "Mr. Martin, No. 1l, Dean-street, Soho." My suspicions were excited, and I went to Groom, the constable, and gave him the note, having first marked it. Groom came with me - we called on Mr. Harrison, who accompanied us to the shop; Groom had returned me the note before I went to Harrison. - When we got to the shop Harrison assumed Mr. Haskins; I put the note across the counter into his hand, and asked him if he could give change - he looked at it, and turning to the prisoner, said, he really thought it was a bad note, and was very sorry for him, if he had taken it in the way of business; the prisoner said he believed it to be a good one, and if we went to his lodging, where he referred, to Dean-street, we should find it all right; Groom, who stood behind him, said he must search his person before he left, which he objected to - he was brought into the parlour, and searched; the Pontefract note, which he had tendered to me, was found on him: I marked that also; this is it (examining it;) he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. If you took a bad half-crown Mr. Haskins would not make you answerable for that? A. He might not. I have never taken bad money; I have been six years in his service; he has no partner, nor any other Christian name; the goods were never delivered to the prisoner.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Had you packed them up for him? A. Yes.

JOHN NEWMAN HARRISON . I am a tobacconist, and live at the corner of St. Martin's-court, Leicester-square. On the 3d of December Mr. Foster came to me and brought me a 5l. Bath and Bristol note: I looked at it, gave it to him back, and went with him to St. Martin's-court; I assumed to be master of the shop; the prisoner was outside the door, but was called in by the boy; he walked into the shop; Foster asked me for change; I said "I do not know - will you let me look at it?" he gave it me; I said I had no doubt it was a bad note, and was sorry if the prisoner had taken it in trade, for he certainly had got a bad note, he said he was sorry for it too, but he came by it in a regular way, and could give a proper account of it. I said I was sure it was bad, and he must give an account of it; he said he could. I said he must go before a Magistrate to give an account of it; he said, very well; he would very willingly; I said "You must stop to do so before you can leave us;" he said he could give a proper account of it, and it was unpleasant for a respectable man to be shut up. I handed the note to Groom, who was at the door, and said "Stay with this gentleman while I call somebody, who will give us some further account of the note." I called on a Mr. Cools, who said, in the prisoner's presence, that a friend of his had taken one of the same kind. I do not remember that the prisoner answered; Cools said to Groom, "Are you a constable?

you must take this man into custody;" which he did, and searched him in my presence, and found a five guinea Pontefract note in his pocket. He was taken to St. Martin's watch-house. I marked the 5l. Bath and Bristol note(looking at it); this is the note I marked.

Cross-examined. Q. When you returned with Foster the prisoner was walking before the door? A. He was outside the door. I understood, but I did not see him - he was not in the shop when I went in - he was called and came in; he said he was perfectly ready to go before the Magistrate and give every information.

JOHN GROOM . I am a constable, of St. Martin's-court; I took the prisoner into custody at Mr. Haskins's shop, and found a five guinea Pontefract note on him; I asked who he was - he said he had put his address at the back of the note; I looked at the back, and he pointed to it; I saw"Mr. Martin, 11, Dean-street, Soho," on it - this is it. I asked him if that was correct; he said Yes; I said I must go with him to see whether it was correct. I just took him out to the door, and he said it was no go; I said "Then I must take you to the watch-house;" he said "Very well;" he said "If you go up to Dean-street, it is of no use, for I don't live there." I took him to the watch-house; he asked me if I would go to a public-house, and let him write a note and send a person with it; and said I should have five sovereigns to let him go. Foster marked the Bath and Bristol note which I kept - I marked it also.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not he say he had lived in Dean-street, but not now? A. He did not. When I asked his address, he said that was his address on the note, and that it was correct.

COURT. Q. Did you go to No. 11, Dean-street? A. Yes; they did not know such a person.

ANN BORLEY . I am the wife of John Frederick Borley , a jeweller, of Sidney's-alley, Leicester-fields. On Saturday, the 19th of November, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked me for a small hunting watch and seal, which came to 3l. 5s.; I delivered them to him and he gave me a 5l. Bath and Bristol note; I said it was a country note; he said it was payable in London. I took it and gave it to the servant, Ann Jones, to get change; she returned with the change, and I gave the prisoner 1l. 15s.; he left the shop with the goods - the note was returned to me on the Monday: I did not mark it, and do not know who brought it back.

Cross-examined. Q. This was in November? A. On the 19th. I saw the prisoner in custody on the 11th of December - three weeks after he bought the goods. I am sure he is the man - he was nearly half an hour in the shop - I am positive he is the man - my lamps were lighted at the time.

ANN JONES . I am servant to Mrs. Borley. In November last, I remember her giving me a note to get changed - it was on a Saturday, between seven and eight o'clock at night; I took it to Mr. Prothero, our butcher, and saw him and his wife; I gave the note to Mrs. Prothero; she shewed it to her husband, and then he told her to write my master's name on it, and she put "2, Sidney's-alley," on it; I saw her do that (looking at a note); this is it; she gave me the change, which I took to mistress; she gave the remainder of the change to the prisoner, in my presence: I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you write yourself? A. Yes; I did not write on the note; I told Mrs. Prothero to put mistress's name on the note; she did not know it, and put No. 2, Sidney's-alley. I consider that to be written on this note - I read it so - it is what I saw her write.

OWEN O'HARA . I am journeyman to Mr. Prothero. I stood outside the door when the girl brought master the note to change, on a Saturday evening in November - I cannot say the date; she came for change for a 5l. note, and gave the note into my hands at the door; I took it to Mrs. Prothero, and said it was a country note, would she change it; she said if master did not object she would; he said "Certainly." I gave the note into mistress's hands, and she wrote on it (looking at it); here is "Mr. - Sidney's-alley," on it, which I saw her write; she did not know the gentleman's name, and I did not recollect it at the time; but I knew Jones perfectly well, and where she lived - the change was given to her and I left the desk.

SARAH PROTHERO . I am the wife of Thomas Prothero - we live in Lisle-street. On a Saturday night Ann Jones brought me a note to change; O'Hara took it of her and gave it to me; I saw her give it to him; I asked Mr. Prothero if I should give change; he said yes, as I knew where it came from; I gave her change, and wrote on it"Mr. - Sidney's-alley;" this is the note (looking at it); I did not know her master's name, but knew where she lived.

MARIA HIPPOLITE CHALON . (Through B. BARNETT, an interpreter.) I live at No. 42, Berner's-street, Oxford-street, and let ledgings. On a Saturday morning, nearly two months ago, the prisoner came to my house, and asked to see the lodgings; I conducted him to the second floor; he was pleased with them, but as I do not speak much English, very little conversation passed; he said he took them for a gentleman from Bristol - that they were to be got ready by Monday evening, at nine o'clock, and ordered two very large fires in both rooms. I asked him to go down into the parlour to ask for a deposit - we went down - he gave me a 5l. note to get change - I read "Bath and Bristol" on the note, and gave it to Mary Barry, the servant - she went and brought the change back; I gave it all to the prisoner, and he returned me a sovereign; nobody came to the lodging on Monday - I have not seen the prisoner since, till to-day.

Cross-examined. Q. How long was he with you? A. Ten or fifteen minutes; I did not know him before - I recollect him agian, and cannot be mistaken in him.

MARY BARRY . I am servant to Madame Chelon. I understand French very well. I remember the prisoner coming on a Saturday, between twelve and one o'clock - I do not know the month - it was about two months ago - mistress let him in - I saw him on the stairs - they went into the second floor room; I did not attend to their conversation; mistress called me down, and spoke to me at the bottom of the stairs - I then went into the parlour - the prisoner was there - he handed a note to mistress - she read it, and handed it to me to get change;

I took it to Mr. Wilcox, who keeps a pork-shop at the corner of Charlotte-court, Goodge-street; I saw the servant and Mr. Wilcox - I handed the note to him- he gave me five sovereigns, and asked mistress's name; he only wrote the direction, "No. 42, Berners-street," on it; I brought the five sovereigns, and gave them to the prisoner - he gave mistress a sovereign, and said the gentleman was to come on Monday evening, at nine o'clock, and ordered two fires and candles to be ready - he said he was to meet the gentleman and dine with him on Monday - he went away.

THOMAS WILCOX . I am a pork putcher, and live in Goodge-street. Barry brought me a Bath and Bristol 5l. note to change, on a Saturday in November; I gave her change, and wrote "42, Berners-street," on the face of it; this is it (looking at it); I paid it away on the Tuesday - it was returned to me next morning.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure of the note? A. I am.

BENJAMIN BARNETT . I am a friend of Madame Chalon, and was at her house when Mr. Wilcox brought the note back; he gave it into her hands - she gave it to me - I put it into my pocket, and went to Marlborough-street, to give information; the office was closed; I kept it till the morning and then gave it to Read, the officer.

MARIA HYPOLITE CHALON re-examined. Wilcox's shopman brought me the note - I sent it back - Mr. Wilcox brought it himself afterwards and I gave it to Mr. Barnett, who was present.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I received the note from Mr. Barnett - this is it (looking at it); I wrote my name on it.

GEORGE SAMS. I am a stationer, and live in Little Queen-street, Holborn; I also get notes engraved. On Tuesday, the 8th of November, the prisoner came to my house, and ordered me to engrave a promissory note of the Bath and Bristol bank; he gave me directions what it was to contain, and ordered five hundred impressions; I saw him again on the following Saturday, the 12th - they were not ready - he called again in the evening - they were not quite finished - he took four or five, to shew some friends - he came again on Monday, the 14th - they were all ready then, and I delivered him the 500; I kept the plate, - this is it (looking at it); it was engraved according to his directions; the notes produced (examining them) are impressed from this plate, and are those I delivered to him, except the filling up.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you acquainted with his person before? A. No; he asked me if I could engrave a note for a new firm; I had not the least suspicion of him, and did it without further inquiry. I communicated with Sir Benjamin Hobhouse's bank on the day I delivered him the notes.

FREDERICK STOCKMAN . I am clerk to Sir Benjamin Hobhouse , Charles Fillot , Johnson Fillot , and Charles Lowther , of the Bath bank. I have been there more than seven years, and am acquainted with the banking houses in Bath and Bristol; there are now two other banks at Bath - Clement. Tugwell, and Co. and Tuffnell and Co. - in November last there were two others, Cavenor and Co., and Morgan and Co.; I know some of the Bristol bankers - I never heard of the firm of Hobhouse, Wright, and Hunter, as a Bath and Bristol bank; Sir B. Hobhouse draws on Jones, Lloyd and Co. I do not know of any bank using such notes as these - they are not Sir B. Hobhouse's notes - they are drawn on Barnard, Savery and Co. I know of no Martin Hobhouse and Co. I have made inquiry of the bankers at Bath.

Cross-examined. Q. What names did you put on your notes? A. Hobhouse, Fillott, Fillott, and Lowther.

Q. No person, in looking at this note, could take it for one of yours? A. I should think persons might be deceived in it - our notes have no Christian names on them, nor Sir Benjamin's title - they are never signed Hobhouse - I have made no particular inquiry at Bristol. I believe any body may set up a bank if they have a license.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Do not Bristol notes commonly pass through your hands? A. They are as common to us as Bath notes.

JOSEPH MAY . I am clerk to Messrs. Haythorn and Wright, bankers, Bristol, and have been so upwards of fifteen years. I am perfectly acquainted with the banking-houses of Bristol - I never heard of such a firm as Hobhouse, Wright and Hunter - there is no bank called the Bath and Bristol bank. I am not aware that any Bristol notes are made payable in London at present - Rickett and Co. formerly did so, but they have left it off some years - I know of no Martin Hobhouse and Co.

THOMAS FRYER . I am clerk to Messrs. Barnard, Dunsdale, and Co., Cornhill. I have been there twenty-five years. I know all the banking-houses in town - there is no Bernard, Savery, and Co. Clement and Co. of Bath, and Worrell and Co. of Bristol, draw on our house; these notes would not be paid at our house; I know of no such bank or firm - notes like these have been presented at our house, and refused.

TEASDALE COCKILL . I am principal clerk in the licensing office, Somerset-house. All bankers issuing notes payable to bearer on demand, are required to take out a license - no firm of Hobhouse, Wright, and Hunter, or Bernard, Savery and Co. are licensed.

Cross-examined. Q. You say that from your books? A. Yes; I have not got them here. I have looked into them to search, and can speak from my recollection also; there were no such firms licensed in November - I do not make all the entries myself, but they all go through my hands.

The note was here read for which see indictment.

The prisoner made no defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

EDWARD COCKERELL.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-29
VerdictGuilty

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

210. EDWARD COCKERELL was again indicted for that he, on the 23d of November , at St. Luke, Chelsea , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain promissory note, for payment of money, which said false, forged, and counterfeited promissory note, for payment of money , is as follows, that is to say

No. 195. Bath and Bristol Bank. No. 195.

I promise to pay the bearer, on demand, the sum of Five Pounds, here, and at Messrs. Bernard, Savery, and Co.'s, bankers, London, for value received, this 11th day of August, 1825. For Hobhouse, Wright, and Hunter.

FIVE. Entered S. Kemp. Signed MARTIN HOBHOUSE . with intention to defraud James Goer , against the statute.

2d COUNT, for uttering and publishing, as true, on the

same day, at the same parish, a like false, forged, and counterfeited promissory note, for payment of money, he well knowing it to be false, forged, and counterfeited, with a like intent, as in the first count.

3d COUNT, for offering, on the same day, at the same parish, to the said James Goer, a like false, forged, and counterfeited promissory note, for payment of money, he well knowing it to be false, forged, and counterfeited, with a like intent, as in the two former counts.

JAMES GOER. I am a tailor , and live in Smith-street, Chelsea . On Wednesday, the 23d of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop - he saw a coat in my window, and said he should like one like it; I told him I could not let him have that - he said he should like to try it on, and did so; he wanted that one; I said he could not have it; he asked when I could get him one done; I told him by Friday morning. I measured him - he said he would call for it; I asked his address; he said he lived in Caroline-place, which is half a mile from my house; he gave me the name of Martin, and was going out - I said it was usual to have a deposit from strangers; he asked what deposit I required; I said 10s. would be sufficient as I knew Caroline-place to be respectable; he put his hand into his pocket, and drew out 2s., saying he had no more change, but would leave a deposit if I could give him change for a 5l. note; I said I would but I could not give him 4l. 10s.; he said never mind, that will do - he would leave 1l. - he gave me a 5l. Bath and Bristol note. I observed to him that it was a country note; he said Yes, but it was payable in London, and I gave him four sovereigns in change; he went away, and in the afternoon, about five o'clock, I went out, and was passing Mr. Wood's, a neighbour; I went in and asked him to change the note, which he did; I gave him the same note as I received from the prisoner. Mr. Wood wrote on it, in my presence, "Goer, King's road;" this is the note (looking at it); he did not come for the coat; I did not see him again till he was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESSWELL. Q. Had you ever seen him before? A. Not to my knowledge; he was in my shop ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, being measured; I swear he is the man; I had no other note in my possession, nor any money transactions with any body that day.

NICHOLAS WOODS . I am an oilman, and live in King's-road. On the 23d of November, Mr. Goer brought me a Bath and Bristol note - this is it (looking at it); I have written on it "Goer, King's-road, 23 - 11 - 25."

GEORGE SAMS . I am a stationer, and live in Queen-street. On the 8th of November the prisoner came and ordered me to engrave a promissory note for the Bath and Bristol bank: he gave me the instructions for the plate, and said it was a new firm just commencing, and the 5l. notes would be wanted to be used immediately. This was on Tuesday, the 8th. He came again on the Saturday, between nine and eleven o'clock in the morning - they were not ready - he came again at night, and took four or five; I completed the order on Monday, the 14th of November, and delivered him 500. The note produced was impressed from the plate, except the filling up. No impression from that plate was in existence before that Saturday - it is dated the 11th of August.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you engrave it yourself? A. No; I employed a person to do it, and saw him do part of it.

Mrs. Borley, Ann Jones , Owen O'Hara , Susan Prothero , Frederick Stockman , and Joseph May , gave precisely the same evidence as in the former case.

Prisoner. I hope for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 29.

JOHN TOMKINS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-30
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

211. JOHN TOMKINS was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Kepple , in the night of the 5th of January , and stealing 1 gown, value 7s., the goods of Hannah Ferris , spinster .

HANNAH FERRIS. I am servant to Mr. John Kepple, who keeps a public-house , in Mary-le-bone-street . The prisoner was a servant in the house for two months, and had been discharged about a month - on Thursday, the 5th of January - on which day, about six o'clock in the evening, I went up to my room, and saw the prisoner come out of the next room to my own; I ran down - he ran down after me; I called master when I got to the bottom of the stairs; the prisoner ran out at the street door: master followed him; the officer brought him back. I went up to the room which he had come out of, and found my gown there; my own door was open, and a strange key in it; I had locked it at four o'clock, and had the key in my pocket; I had left the gown in my own room; it was dark.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN KEPPLE. I keep the Wheatsheaf public-house. On the 5th of January, about six o'clock, or rather later, I saw the prisoner pass the bar door, and go out; I followed him forty or fifty yards, and collared him in Cleaveland-street; he had his shoes in his hand.

CORNELIUS HURLEY . I am an officer. On the 5th of January I saw the prisoner running in Cleaveland-street, as fast as possible; I stood till he came up to me, and then stopped him; Kepple gave him in charge. I took him back, but found nothing on him. The servant came down, and said her gown was gone, and she had found it in the next room - she shewed it to me. He had no shoes on.

GUILTY. Aged 17. Of stealing only . - Transported for Seven Years .

ABRAHAM DAVIS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-31
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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212. ABRAHAM DAVIS was indicted for that he, at the delivery of the King's Gaol of Newgate, holden for the County of Middlesex, on the 15th of Sepember, in the 59th year of the reign of George III., was in due form of law tried and convicted, on a certain indictment against him, for stealing, on the 13th of September, at St. James, Clerkenwell, in the 59th year aforesaid, 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 seal, value 6d., and 1 key, value 6d., the goods of William Turner Parry , from his person, and was thereupon ordered to be transported beyond the seas, for the term of his natural life, to such place, &c., pursuant to the statute; and that he afterwards, to wit, on the 14th of December , in the 6th year of the reign of George IV., feloniously was at large, without any lawful cause, within that part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ire-

and called Great Britain, to wit, at Christ-church, Middlesex , before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported, as aforesaid , against the statute,&c.

SECOND COUNT, that he, at the said Session, held on the said 15th of September, in the 59th year of the reign of George III., was ordered to be transported beyond the seas for his natural life, to such place, &c., pursuant to the said statute; and that afterwards, to wit, on the 14th of December, in the 6th year of the reign of George IV., feloniously was at large, &c., as in the first count stated.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HALL . I am one of the day patrol of Bow-street. I produce a certificate of the record of the prisoner's conviction - I saw Mr. Shelton, the clerk of the Sessions and Gaol Delivery, sign it. (Read - see indictment.)

SAMUEL DAVIS . I was formerly a turnkey of Newgate. I was here in September Sessions, 1819, and saw the prisoner tried - he is the man who was tried by the name of Abraham Davis, on this charge - he was in my custody three weeks or a month; I saw him go away in the van, to go to the hulks, on the 12th of October.

CHARLES READ . I am an officer of Bow-street, and know the prisoner. I remember his being brought to Hatton-garden on the day Hunt came to town, charged with stealing some watches; he was afterwards committed to Newgate. I was not here when he was tried, but know him to be the man who was examined at Hatton-garden, on this charge, and he gave his name as Abraham Davis.

WILLIAM HALL re-examined. I took the prisoner into custody at his sister's lodgings, French-alley, in the parish of Christ-church, Spitalfields, Middlesex - he was up stairs, looking out of the window, not in confinement.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish a man, named Cole, to be called - he is a turnkey, and took Davis from Newgate to Portsmouth; Bishop has been here fourteen or fifteen years - why should not he have as good a knowledge of Abraham Davis as Davis.

JOHN BISHOP . I have been at Newgate thirteen years, and am now principal turnkey. I cannot say that I recollect the prisoner - he was not under my charge, but under the charge of Davis more immediately.

HENRY BARRETT . I am a turnkey of Newgate. and have been so seven years. I was here in September 1819. I do not know the prisoner - we have different departments, and at that time I belonged to the cells, and had nothing to do with the prisoners who were not tried. I did not know Abraham Davis at all. Cole is not here to-day. The prisoner here handed in a written paper, as follows:

The prisoner most humbly represents, that he was taken into custody by a Mr. Hall, and other officers, and conveyed to Bow-street, at which place he first became acquainted with the nature of the charge against him; and it is to be understood that no fresh charge was advanced against him. The prisoner most humbly submits that the former alleged prosecutor was applied to, who denied any knowledge of his person, and after being closely examined by several other persons, turnkeys of Newgate, Clerkenwell,&c. and other officers of the police, they all declared they had no knowledge of your prisoner. - Davis, however, a discarded turnkey of Newgate, well known as being instrumental in obtaining convictions, basely attempted to swear against him; and whose deposition caused him to be committed, after undergoing no less than seven examinations. No witnesses appeared against your prisoner until the last examination, when they were brought forward at the instigation of Davis, having been promised reward, to be paid out of the 20l. he expects to receive from the county.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

The prisoner had pleaded that his name was Henry Williams and not Abraham Davis, which issue being tried, the Jury found that he was as well known by one name as the other.

JOHN WILLIAMS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-32
VerdictNot Guilty

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213. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Williams , in the forenoon of the 23d of December (no person being therein), and stealing 1 pair of sheets, value 2s. 6d.; 1 counterpane, value 2s.; 1 shift, value 2s. 6d.; 1 gown, value 1s. 6d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 1 cap, value 2s., his property .

ANN WILLIAMS . I am the wife of Richard Williams - we live in Oak-street, Spitalfields ; the house is let out in tenements - the landlord does not live there - we have the ground floor front room. On the 23d of December I went out between twelve and one o'clock - I locked the door. and had the key in my pocket. I left both the back and front window fastened down. I returned at half-past one o'clock, found the door locked as I had left it, and on entering saw the back window was thrown on the bed; a pane of glass was cut out of the window. I missed the articles stated in the indictment. The back window opens into the yard. The street door is kept shut, but can be opened outside; there is a dog in the yard, and his chain reaches to the window. I found the dog ill. I had folded some pieces of cotton in the window, and have seen some of those pieces since.

SARAH CONNELL . I live nearly opposite to the prosecutrix. I was at my own door between twelve and one o'clock on this day, and saw the prisoner come out of Williams' door, with a bundle under his arm, wrapped in a patch-work counterpane. He went towards the Golden Harp, Phoenix-street.

ANN WILLIAMS. The counterpane was patch-work.

PEGGY MURRAY . I was servant at the Golden Harp public-house, Phoenix-street. On the 23d of December, after one o'clock, I remember two persons coming to the house - one had a bundle and the other a basket; the bundle seemed to be patch-work - the one who had the bundle called for a pint of beer, and as I took the beer in they covered the bundle up; the man who carried it went away without his change - he gave me 1s. for the beer. After they were both gone I found some pieces of cotton under the seat. The prisoner is not one of those men.

NOT GUILTY .

GEORGE ANGELL LOWE.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-33
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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London Cases - First Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

214. GEORGE ANGELL LOWE was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

JAMES HOWARD.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-34
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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215. JAMES HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of December , 13lbs. of solder, value 6s., the goods of Hannah Winter , his mistress .

CHARLES WARD . I am in the employ of Hannah Winter, a widow , who is a coppersmith , and lives in Houndsditch . The prisoner was in her employ. On the 14th of December, between four and five o'clock, I received information from a lad, and found 13lbs. or 14lbs. of solder concealed in a copper, in front of the shop. I marked it, and watched to see who would come for it; the prisoner left off work at six o'clock; I wanted him to stop till ten, which he objected to; I went to the copper at six, and the solder was gone. I followed the prisoner, and took him eight or nine doors off, and found it concealed in the waist-hand of his trousers - he said he was not the only one.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He was extremely sorry? A. Yes; he has lived nearly twenty years with my mistress.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY - Aged 47.

Confined One Month .

GEORGE JONES.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-35
VerdictGuilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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216. GEORGE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , 1 ream of paper, value 20s. , the goods of Joseph Douglas .

WILLIAM SMITH . On the 30th of January, about twenty minutes past one o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing in Mr. Douglas's shop, in Distaff-lane - I waited till he came out with a ream of paper in his hand; I left my house, which is opposite, and took him about twenty yards off, and brought him back with it. I had called Stop thief! and he was stopped.

JOSEPH DOUGLAS. I am a stationer , and live in Distaff-lane - Smith lives opposite. The prisoner is a stranger. - I was up stairs, heard an alarm, and the prisoner was brought in with this paper. He said he had a large family in distress.

JOHN JACKSON . I am a constable, and took him in charge.

The prisoner pleaded distress, and received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

THOMAS TAPP.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-36
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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217. THOMAS TAPP was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , 1 purse, value 1d.; 4 sovereigns, 2 half-soverigns, 2 crowns, and 2 half-crowns, the property of Charles Dale , from his person .

CHARLES DALE. I live in Maidenhead-court, Aldersgate-street, and am a green-grocer . I employed the prisoner on Saturday, the 24th of December, to work for me, and discharged him at night - I was awoke by my wife soon after three o'clock in the morning, of the 25th; she asked if I had fastened the room door; the prisoner did not lodge there - I had fastened it. My purse was in my trousers pocket, on a chair in the room, by the fire place; a person could not get at it without forcing the room door. I got up, and found the door had been forced open - a little force would do it - my purse was taken out of my pocket; I am sure there were some sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and two crowns. I know I had 4l. 10s. in all. I had ordered the prisoner to go at eleven o'clock, and he said he was not particular, and I said he might stop till twelve. I closed the door at half-past one - whether he concealed himself in the house I do not know. He was found in the house, and my purse taken from him at the watch-house, with four sovereigns, two half-sovereigns, and two half-crowns in it.

JAMES KNIGHT . I am a watchman. I was called to the house, and found the prisoner in the green-shed, concealed behind the door, and saw the purse found upon him.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . I am a watchman, and saw the money found upon the prisoner.

- EDWARDS . I was constable of the night. I found the purse in the prisoner's coat sleeve.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

CORNELIUS GUILDAY.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-37
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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218. CORNELIUS GUILDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of December , 70lbs. weight of iron, value 5s., the goods of Thomas Allen , his master .

THOMAS ALLEN. I am a smith , and live in Little Trinity-lane, Queenhithe ; the prisoner was six years in my employ. I saw this iron at the Mansion House, and know it to be mine - he left work at eight o'clock on the 23d of December.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How can you swear to it? A. It is of a particular shape - it supported a story post at Vintner's Hall - another piece came from Damer and Co's cellar. I have had two of the prisoner's children in my employ - I believe he has four or five. I missed the iron from the cellar.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer of Dowgate-ward. On the 23d of December, about nine o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner with a bag on his shoulder, in Upper Thames-street, about two hundred yards from Mr. Allen's; I asked what he had got, he said he believed old iron, that he was in a public-house, and a man in a white coat desired him to take it to London-bridge, and was to meet him there. I asked where he worked, he said, any where, and would not tell his name - the bag contained 70lbs. of old iron, which Mr. Allen claimed.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

JAMES ADAMS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-38
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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219. JAMES ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 2 cast-iron shots, weighing 18lbs. each, value 3s. , the goods of William Crawshay and others, his partners.

JOSEPH PETERS . I am servant to William Crawshay and Co. of Paul's-wharf . On the 15th of December, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I caught the prisoner on the wharf on a pile of shot, with one in his hand; I collared him, he begged my pardon, and hoped I would not take him - when I got him into the street, I found two more concealed about his person.

THOMAS NEGUS . I am a constable, and took him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

LEWIS DAVIS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-39
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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220. LEWIS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of December , a coat, value 10s. , the goods of John Ragan .

JOHN RAGAN. I am a pig-dealer , and live in Essex. On the 17th of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at Smithfield ; my boy put my great coat into the cart in the market - he called out that a boy had run away with it. I found the prisoner at the Compter with it in half an hour after - my glove was in the pocket.

DANIEL DRISCOLL . I am fifteen years old, and am servant to John Ragan. I put the coat into the body of the cart near Long-lane, and in about ten minutes I saw the prisoner take it - I am certain of him. I hallooed out to master, and he turned down a court in Long-lane - I lost him for about twenty minutes, but am sure of him.

ROBERT LOCK . I am a constable of St. Luke's. Driscoll made an alarm, and in five minutes I saw the prisoner in Well-street, Cripplegate, running with the coat on his arm - I gained on him, and he dropped it; I put it into a baker's shop and took him. Driscoll was certain of him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN CLARK.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-40
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > whipping

Related Material

221. JOHN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , a hamper, value 1s. 6d.; 42 bottles, value 2s., and 31 quarts of porter, value 10s. , the goods of Richard Bailey .

SECOND COURT. Stating it to belong to Thomas Clark .

HENRY MARK . I am a book-keeper to Mr. Wheeler, wine merchant, of Crutched Friar's. I was returning at a quarter-past seven o'clock in the evening of the 2d of January, and saw two men on a cart, which was loading in Cross-lane , from Mr. Cotton's cellar door. I watched them about three minutes, thinking they belonged to the cart - the prisoner was one of them; the carman came out and gave an alarm - one of them jumped out close before me, that was the prisoner, the other ran off - the carman stopped the prisoner; they were turning the hamper over in the cart, and putting it down; when he made the alarm, they had moved it about two yards towards the front of the cart; the prisoner was taken to the watch-house. I was within half a yard of them and cannot be mistaken.

JAMES KEPPLEWELL . I am clerk to Mr. R. Cotton, of St. Mary's-hill, a cider and porter merchant. I hired a town cart to take some porter from my employer's - it was Thomas Clark's cart - Bailey drove it - the carman gave an alarm - I came up and found the prisoner in the carman's custody - he scuffled on the road to the watch-house; every thing in the cart was my master's; the prisoner was a stranger.

JOHN CHARLTON . I am a patrol, and received the prisoner in charge; he was scuffling with Kepplewell - Richard Bailey was the driver of the cart ; some persons that followed said, "Jack, if I was you, I would not go with him."

Prisoner's Defence. I had drank some liquor - the carman caught hold of me, and said I was one of the boys who had been in the cart.

JOHN CHARLTON . I think he had been drinking.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

JOSEPH ADAMS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-41
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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222. JOSEPH ADAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of January , a handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of Joseph Glenny , from his person .

JOSEPH GLENNY. I live in Wynatt-street, Goswell-road, and am a watch-case maker . On the 11th of January, I went out, and about twelve o'clock I was in Fleet-market - I felt a pull at my coat-pocket, turned round and saw the prisoner with a taller boy - my handkerchief was in his hand - he was handing it to his companion who was behind him; the other seeing me, let it drop. I seized the prisoner and took it up - he begged me not to take him, as he would be sure to be transported.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE GODFREY . I am a constable, and received him in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

JAMES SMITH.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-42
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceDeath

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FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, JANUARY 16.

London Cases,

Before Mr. Justice Park.

223. JAMES SMITH was indicted for that he, contriving and intending our Lord the King and his people craftily, deceitfully, and traitorously to deceive and defraud, on the 10th of December , at St. Stephen, Coleman-street , in London, one piece of false, feigned and counterfeit money and coin, to the likeness and similitude of the good legal and current money and silver coin of the realm, called a sixpence, falsely, deceitfully, feloniously and traitorously, did forge, counterfeit and coin, against the duty of his allegiance, against the peace , &c., and against the statute.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

JAMES SMITH.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-43
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty

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224. JAMES SMITH was again indicted for that he, not being a person employed in or for the Mint or Mints of our Lord the King, and for the use and service of the said Mints only, nor being a person lawfully authorized by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury of our Lord the King, or Lord High Treasurer of England, for the time being, on the 10th of December , at St. Stephen, Coleman-street , in London, one mould made of plaster of Paris, in and upon which was made and impressed the figure, resemblance and similitude of one of the sides, to wit, the head side of the lawful silver coin, current within this kingdom, called a sixpence, without any lawful authority, or sufficient excuse for that purpose, knowingly, feloniously, and traitorously had in his custody and possession, against the duty of his allegiance, against the peace ,&c., and against the statute.

SECOND COUNT. The same, only omitting the words in italics, and substituting the words, "the reverse side.'

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . - DEATH. Aged 27.

JAMES HAWKINS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-44
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceDeath

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225. JAMES HAWKINS was indicted for that he, contriving and intending our Lord the King and his people, craftily, deceitfully, feloniously, and traitorously, to deceive and defraud, on the 23d of December , at St. Pancras , one piece of base coin, resembling the current silver coin of the Kingdom, called a shilling, falsely, deceitfully, feloniously, and traitorously, did colour with materials

producing the colour of silver against the duty of his allegiance, against the peace and against the statute.

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 43.

ANN CONROY.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-45
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Justice Park.

226. ANN CONROY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , at St. Mary-le-bone , 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 shawl, value 3s.; 1 pelisse, value 10s.; 1 pair of boots, value 2s.; 1 bonnet, value 2s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 1s., the goods of Mary Bowstead , spinster ; 2 dresses, value 30s.; 2 pelisses, value 30s.; 3 petticoats, value 3s.; 2 night gowns, value 2s.; 4 shifts, value 4s.; a pair of stockings, value 2s.; 2 petticoats, value 2s.; 1 towel, value 1d.; 15 spoons, value 30s., and 45 yards of silk, value 8l., the goods of Sarah Hunter , widow ; and 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s., the goods of William Crowder , in the dwelling-house of the said William Crowder .

SARAH HUNTER. I live in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital ; the prisoner came into my service in September; on the morning of the 12th or 13th of December, I gave her a month's warning - she left that evening. I had gone out about six o'clock, and returned between nine and ten, and was told she was gone. I then missed two dresses, worth 30s., thirteen silver spoons, worth 2l., three petticoats, worth 5s., and several other articles which I do not recollect. The house belongs to Mr. Crowder.

MARY BOWSTEAD. I live with Mrs. Hunter - the prisoner was her servant . On the 13th of December, between seven and eight o'clock at night she left the house. I heard her in the house after seven, and did not see her go away - within a quarter of an hour after she left I missed a pelisse, a dress, a shawl, a bonnet, a pair of boots and shoes - they were worth more than 40s. I saw them at the office on the 14th in possession of Buckeridge.

HENRY RICHARD BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer of Mary-le-bone. On the 14th of December, about half-past four o'clock, I went to No. 1, Little Welbeck-street, next door to the Edinburgh Castle, public-house - when I arrived I saw a hackney-coach at the door - I went into the house, and saw the prisoner, a woman named Hickey, Mrs. Harrington, and the coachman - the prisoner and Hickey seemed to be intoxicated; I asked the prisoner if her name was not Conroy, which she denied; I said"Why, you were servant to Mrs. Hunter" - she also denied that, and denied having lived at Mr. Crowder's - Hickey also denied it. A trunk stood by the side of them - I asked whose it was - Conroy and Hickey said it was not theirs - I said I should detain them all - Hickey threw down a pocket-book which had a duplicate in it, which does not apply to this property. I took from Conroy's hand some keys, and the duplicate of a piece of silk, pawned for 30s. on the 14th of December. Mr. Crowder and Allison came in and identified Conroy: I immediately took them all to the office, and opened the box in the presence of them all. The first thing I saw was various lengths of silk, containing, in all, twenty-five yards - there was a silk dress, and pelisse, three petticoats, two night gowns, four shifts, four silver tea-spoons, two silver table-spoons, a stuff dress, a cloth pelisse, and a pair of silk stockings, all of which I gave to Mrs. Hunter, at the second examination, about the 18th - they were in my custody till then; from the prisoner's person I took a bombazeen gown, a shawl, a cloth pelisse, and bonnet - she had them on; I delivered them with a pair of boots and shoes, from the trunk, to Miss Bowstead, at the second examination, by order of the Magistrate. I produce six more tea-spoons, a dessert spoon, and a salt-spoon - every thing was in the trunk except what was found on her person.

THOMAS KERRY . I am apprentice to Mr. Neat, a pawnbroker. On the 14th of December, ten yards of silk were pawned for 30s., in the name of Ann Smith, by some person whom I do not know - I gave the person the duplicate which was found on the prisoner.

JOSEPH ALLISON . I am a silk mercer. This silk was sent to Mrs. Hunter's, by one of my young men; I cannot swear to it, having no mark on it; it was such silk as this - I have compared the silk in the trunk with what was pawned - they belong to the same piece - I have no doubt of it being what I sent Mrs. Hunter. I went with Buckeridge, and found the trunk, and saw it opened at the office - his evidence is correct.

HENRY ROE . I am apprentice to Mr. Morrit, a pawnbroker, of High-street, Mary-le-bone. On the 14th of December the prisoner pawned a shift for 3s.; I had not seen her before, but am certain of her person; I saw her again at the office, three or four days after.

ROBERT SEWERS . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker, of Oxford-street. On the 12th of December a handkerchief was pawned for 2s. 9d., in the name of Carroll - I cannot recollect who by.

MARY ANN CARROLL . I am nearly twelve years old. I have known the prisoner some time; I met her at the corner of Wild-street (I think it was this day five weeks); she asked me to go to Mr. Dobree's, and pawn a silk handkerchief for her for 4s. - it was before dinner time - she offered me a penny, and I did it, but got only 2s. 9d. - I gave the name of Carroll - I gave her the money and duplicate, and she gave me a penny.

WILLIAM HARRINGTON . I live at No. 1, Little Welbeck-street, Mary-le-bone. On the 13th of December, about ten o'clock at night, the prisoner called at the door of my lodging, which is on the ground floor, and asked if I would give her room for her box till the morning; I said I did not know that I had any room, as my place was small; I consented afterwards, and she asked me to help her in with the box; I went to the Edinburgh Castle, next door, and found a box standing at the coach-door - I carried it in in her presence; she and Mrs. Hickey followed me in - Hickey wanted to go away - the prisoner said she must stop there for the night; I looked at her and she said "Oh, we will sit up here." I did not like it, but my wife threw a mattress on the floor for them. We had some supper - I lent the prisoner 8d., to fetch some gin, which we drank, and they went to bed; next morning we went to breakfast - she said she would have something to drink first - she went to the box, took out something like a shift or shirt, went out, returned without it, and threw down a shilling to pay me the 8d. I was then going out, and called on Plank, to inform him, but he was out, and I could not find an officer.

FRANCES HARRINGTON . I am the last witness's wife

On the 13th of December the prisoner asked to leave her box till the morning. My husband fetched the box in, and a woman, named Hickey, came in with her; they were both rather intoxicated - Hickey wanted to go home - they said they could stop there; I said I had no where for them to sleep - she said they would sit up in a chair; I put a mattress on the floor, and they staid all night, and next morning I asked them to have breakfast; the prisoner said they would have some spirits; she opened her box and took out something, and asked me to let my little girl pawn it; I refused, and she went herself, returned, and paid my husband 8d.; she took her box away about twelve o'clock, and came back again with it between four and five o'clock; Hickey was with her; the officers came in a few minutes and took her away - he asked if she lived with Mrs. Hunter - she said No, and said the box was not hers. They took her to the office with the box. She had told me the night before, that she had a parcel of silk in the box, and after my husband went out in the morning she took out a piece of silk, and shewed me - it was exactly of this colour - she asked me to cut enough for an umbrella off it - (my husband is an umbrella maker) - I said I should like to measure it first, which I did, and it measured forty yards; after I cut it I said "In the name of God, Ann, how did you come by all this?" she said "I nabbed it - I have plenty more, and silver spoons too;" I said "How could you do so, you will be hung;" she said "Oh, never fear, she is an old widow, and she won't know where to find me;" I asked where she lived; she said "In Charles-street;" I asked if she kept a silk mercer's shop - she said she was a dress-maker; I asked her name; she said "No matter;" I told her she must leave my place instantly, and then I got so flurried that I do not know what more passed - only I remember her going away from my place.

THOMAS SPENCER . I am a hackney coachman. I was in the Mary-le-bone ranks with my coach, on the 13th or 14th of December, and was called and took the prisoner up at No. 1, Welbeck-street; she told me to fetch a box, and put it into the coach, which I did; I drove her about, and drove her back with the box, without her getting out of the coach; the box was not taken out till I took it to the same house again.

WILLIAM CROWDER. I live in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone, and rent the house. Mrs. Hunter lodges there. Here are two handkerchiefs which I believe to be mine, but there is no mark on them.

CHRISTOPHER GREAVES . I am a pawnbroker, and have ten yards of silk pawned in the name of Jane Smith - I do not know who by.

MRS. HUNTER. These eight spoons are mine, and six more were given up to me - they are worth 2l. I received from the officer several things, which are worth above 3l. I am a widow.

MARY BOWSTEAD. The officer gave me a dress and pelisse, which are worth 1l.

Prisoner. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Recommended to Mercy.

WILLIAM KAY.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-46
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

227. WILLIAM KAY was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of December , at St. John, Clerkenwell , 10 watches, value 33l., and 5 watch cases, value 7l., the goods of Edward Keat , his master, in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD KEAT. I am a watch manufacturer , and live in St. John-street , in the parish of St. John, Clerkenwell, and rent the house. The prisoner was six years in my service. On the 29th of December I missed several watches and cases - I desired him to go up stairs with me, and look over the goods, and on looking them over I missed several watches and cases. I desired him to put down on a paper the number of the watches and cases that were missing - he did so, and I then told him that I felt rather distrustful at losing my property, and requested him to find where they were, or make them good; he said it was possible they might be in the hands of some of the work people - he then left the premises to look for them - he returned in the afternoon, and said he still suspected they must be in the hands of the work people; I said I should not be satisfied till the property was found, nor would I suffer him to sit down till it was found; he left my employ for that day, and returned about the middle of the next day; I went up stairs with him, and told him he must know where the property lay - he said he did not, and went down stairs towards the work-shop - I followed him down, and told him unless the property was found he should not work for me, and he left me. I went to Hatton-garden, and took out a search-warrant, next morning(Saturday) - I proceeded, with Read and Lloyd, to his apartments, in Charlotte-terrace, New-cut, Lambeth, and saw him there; I questioned him, in the presence of the officers, respecting the property - he then admitted that he had pawned it; Read requested him not to say any thing, except it was voluntary. A piece of paper was then handed to him, and he wrote down the names of different pawnbrokers where the property was, but said he had destroyed the duplicates - we searched him, and found upon him the list which he had written for me the day before.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q. Has he not since shewn great contrition, and been the means of your discovering more property than you missed? A. I have not seen him since to say whether he is contrite. I had seen all this property at different times - it may have been taken peace-meal.

WILLIAM CLUNES . I am shopman to Mr. Ramsay, a pawnbroker, of Liquorpond-street. I have known the prisoner some time. On the 11th of October he pawned a silver watch, for 30s - I suppose it is worth 2l. in the trade. On the 10th of November he pawned another, for 30s. - that is worth 2l.

Cross-examined. Q. In your judgment neither of them would fetch more than 40s.? A. They would not fetch me more - we sell them by auction. I would sell such a one for 39s.

COURT. Q. One is an engine-turned watch? A. I question whether that would fetch more.

MR. KEAT. This engine-turned watch is mine - it is a double bottomed hunting watch, capped - it cost me 3l. to manufacture; the other is a jewelled double bottomed hunter, and cost me about 3l. 10s.

JAMES PALMER . I am apprentice to Mr. Armstrong, a pawnbroker, of Baldwin's-gardens. The prisoner has dealt at our shop for four years. On the 2d of September he pawned two silver watch cases, for one guinea - they are worth 35s. On the 15th of October a metal watch for 5s.

On the 18th of November a silver watch, for 35s., that is worth 2l. 10s. On the 9th of December, a watch-case, for 10s. On the 17th two cases, for 24s. On the 22d a a silver watch, for 30s., and on the 24th another, for 30s. - they are all new - he always represented himself to me as a watch-maker, living in Elm-street.

WILLIAM SHARP . I am apprentice to Messrs. Reeve, pawnbrokers, of Redcross-street. I have a silver watch, pawned for 30s., in the name of John Thompson. I believe the prisoner to be the person who pawned it, but am not positive.

MR. KEAT. This is my watch, and is worth 3l. 10s. - it is mentioned in the list which he wrote.

WILLIAM READ . I have the paper which the prisoner wrote - this watch is No. 4129; that number is not in the list, but he has written "One in Redcross-street."

THOMAS SHEPHERD . I am a pawnbroker, and live at the corner of Exmouth-street, Clerkenwell. On the 15th of October a silver hunting watch was pawned with me, for 31s. 6d. - it is worth 2l. 12s. 6d. On the 28th of October another, which is worth 5l., was pawned, for 2l. 1s. - I have a recollection of the prisoner's face, but not sufficient to swear to him.

WILLIAM READ . He has entered in this list "2 watches corner of Exmouth-street - D. B. H."

MR. KEAT. These watches are all my manufacture - I believe I never sold any of them. One of those pawned at Armstrong's is worth three guineas.

WILLIAM KEAT . This metal watch I know to be my father's - I have often worn it.

JOHN HIGHO . I finished three of these watches for Mr. Keat.

Nine witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 31.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

JAMES GADSDEN, WILLIAM SIMPSON.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-47
VerdictNot Guilty

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Before Mr. Justice Park.

228. JAMES GADSDEN and WILLIAM SIMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of December , 3 beds, value 4l. 6s.; 1 blunderbuss, value 10s.; 3 bolsters, value 6s.; 4 sheets, value 8s.; 2 pillows, value 2s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 3 blankets, value 6s., and a mattress, value 5s., the goods of William Pearson , in the dwelling-house of Edward Morton .

HARRIET PEARSON . I am the wife of William Pearson, who keeps the Lamb public-house, Orton-street . On the 12th of December I employed Simpson (who had lodged six months with us) to move some goods from the Lamb to Middlesex-street, Somer's-town - he took a lodging there for me; I sent the goods in a caravan, and found some in pawn, and others at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Is your husband here? A. No; he is rather embarrassed; we expected an execution in the house, and employed Simpson to move the goods, and bring me back the key - my husband only took a few necessary things for his own use. There was plenty left to satisfy the creditors.

Q. Whether your husband afterwards assisted in pawning the goods you do not know? A. He was not out of the house before two persons came and told us of it. He was arrested that night - he never told me he had desired the prisoner to pawn them, if he could not find a lodging.

Q. Was not the house stripped of every individual article before the execution came? A. That I deny. After we took a few, the King's tax-gatherer moved a few, but there was a good deal left.

COURT. Q. Were any goods except these, moved before the examination? A. There were about ten chairs and four or five tables.

WILLIAM TOMLINSON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Wilmot-street, Brunswick-square. I have known Gadsden twenty years. On the 12th of December, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners, each, brought a bed into the shop - Gadsden said he brought them from his brother-in-law, whom I knew - he said his brother-in-law wanted to make up a payment, and asked for 7l. - I lent him 4l. on them - he said he would bring me two more to make up the amount.

WILLIAM MATTHEW SMELLIE . I live in Clarendon-square, Somer's-town. On the 12th of December, about eleven o'clock in the morning, Gadsden pawned a blunderbuss with me, for 10s.

ROBERT TEASDALE . I am a watch-house-keeper. On the 12th of December, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners come out of No. 38, Middlesex-street, Somer's-town - Gadsden had a large bundle, and I asked him what it was; he said a bed - that it belonged to that man, who was behind, he believed; I asked what he had done with the other bed which he had carried; he said he nver had any other bed, Simpson came up with a mattress, and said it was his own. I took them to the watch-house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. PHILLIPS to HARRIET PEARSON. Q. At what church were you married? A. I do not know the name of the parish - it is a church at the top of Oxford-street, on the left-hand. I was married seven years ago.

SIMPSON'S Defence. I was four hours before I could get a place to put them in; I at last took them to Middlesex-street; the carman said they should not be taken out till I paid him 12s. - a quarrel ensued; he said he would give information where the things were, and thinking them not altogether safe there, I said I would pawn them - the constable who searched me left 2l. in my fob; he said he had 2l. 13s.; I said, "You should have 4l. 13s., and if you have no more you have robbed me."

ROBERT TEASDALE. He said if I had not got 4l. 13s. I must have robbed him - I put my hand into his pocket, and found 2l. more.

ISAAC NEWTON . I saw this house before the execution was put in - it was stripped of every thing but the fixtures.

NOT GUILTY .

JOSEPH JONES.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-48
VerdictNot Guilty

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229. JOSEPH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , 1 till, value 10d.; 4 crowns, 24 half-crowns, 80 shillings, and 9 sixpences, the property of Thomas Saunders Tapping , in his dwelling-house .

MATILDA TAPPING . I am the daughter of Thomas Saunders Tapping, who lives in Grafton-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 4th of January, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was in the parlour, behind the shop, and saw two men at the door; I looked again, and saw one of them just taking hold of the nob of the till, be

hind the counter; I ran into the shop - he pulled the till out, and ran out with it. I followed, and kept him in sight for fifty yards, when he put it down. I called Stop thief! took it up, and pursued no further; it contained 8l. 4s. 6d. in silver. The shop was lighted with gas, and I was not above three feet from him; he wore a black shiney cap, with fur upon it. I swear the prisoner is the man - I saw him through the glass door.

Q. You could only have seen him for a minute? A. I saw his face in the shop; a gentleman brought him back, and I was sure of him.

JAMES MALPAS . I am a butcher, and live in Fitzroy-market. I heard a cry of Stop thief! ran towards the place it proceeded from, and stopped the prisoner running through an archway of the market; he said, "Is it me? is it me?" and seemed flurried.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard an alarm, and ran up to see what was the matter; a butcher said, "You are the person" - I said, "Is it me?" The girl said the man was dressed in blue, but my dress was brown.

MATILDA TAPPING. I said it looked like blue, but it was dark.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM SMITH, THOMAS DIMSDALE.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-49
VerdictNot Guilty

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Before Lord Chief Baron Alexander.

230. WILLIAM SMITH and THOMAS DIMSDALE were indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of John Green , on the 16th of December , and stealing 3 live tame rabbits, price 9s., his property .

JOHN GREEN. I live in Mount Pleasant, near the City-road . On Friday, the 16th of December, about eight o'clock in the morning, I found the iron-grating of the front kitchen window broken, the sash forced open, and three rabbits were gone from the hutches, which were in the kitchen; I had seen it all safe between ten and eleven o'clock the night before; the railing and sash were secure. On the 21st I found my rabbits at St. Luke's watch-house, and am sure they were mine.

Cross-examined by MR. CARRINGTON. Q. At what time your house was broken open you do not know? A. No - it was light at eight o'clock.

JOHN TWEEDY . I am an officer. On the 21st of December, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was directed to No. 3, Edmond's-place, St. Luke's; I knocked - nobody opened the door. I opened the shutters, got in, and found the two prisoners up stairs, and four rabbits running about the room - they both said they did not know where they came from.

Cross-examined. Q. Did they not say they had purchased them? A. No.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. I bought six in all at Newgate-market.

DIMSDALE'S Defence. We gave 2s. 6d. each for them.

NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAM SMITH, THOMAS DIMSDALE.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-50
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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231. WILLIAM SMITH and THOMAS DIMSDALE were again indicted for stealing, on the 21st of December , 3 live pigs, price 8l., and 1 saddle, value 10s. , the goods of Jeremiah Compton .

JOHN TWEEDY . On the 21st of December Mr. Compton called upon me - I went with him to No. 3, Edmond's-place; we found the prisoners up stairs: I found a dead pig in a tub of water, being scalded; I found two more laying in the corner - one alive, and the other dead. The prisoners both said they did not know how they came there; I said it was very strange pigs should come there and they not know how - they then said a man had driven them in, and was to call for them at twelve o'clock. On handcuffing them I found their hands were quite damp - there was a pot of water by them, with blood and water in it, as if they had been washing their hands in it - we found a picklock-key and a hammer, which the pigs had been knocked at the head with - the hammer matched the bruises, and was all over blood, and so was a case-knife; the pigs appeared to have been first stunned, and then had their throats cut.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What sort of a house is this? A. It has only two rooms. Two girls lived there besides the prisoners. I found the pigs in the lower room; the tub of water was up stairs. I saw nobody escape out of the roof.

JOHN PATTEN . I went with Tweedy - his account is correct. I found a picklock and a door key concealed under the floor - one of them opens the shed door where the pigs were stolen from, better than Mr. Compton's own. I found another picklock-key laying by the pig's nose. The hammer and knife were bloody.

ELIZA SLATER . I live in Turk's Head-court. On the 21st of November, about a quarter to seven o'clock in the morning, I was at the window, and saw Smith in the court, driving three pigs - I am certain of him.

Cross-examined. Q. How far do you live from where the pigs were found? A. About two minutes walk.

MARGARET CONNER . I live at No. 10, Edmond's-place. On the 21st of December, about five minutes to seven o'clock in the morning, I was in my room, and heard a person going up the court - I opened the window, looked out, and saw that person return down the court, and stand by the side of his own door - it was Dimsdale. I saw Smith drive three pigs into the house, where they both live. I went into the house afterwards, and found a saddle, which I gave to Moore.

Cross-examined. Q. He was going from his own place then returned, and a man drove the pigs in? A. Yes - he had been up the court to shut the gate at the end.

ALEXANDER MOORE . I produce the saddle.

Cross-examined. Q. How far is Mr. Compton's house from where the pigs were found? A. About half a mile. Slater lives about two minutes walk from Mr. Compton's.

JEREMIAH COMPTON. I went with Tweedy to the house. The saddle and pigs were mine.

EDWARD SKATE . I am servant to Mr. Compton. I saw the pigs and saddle safe at eleven o'clock at night on the 20th of December, and double locked the door.

SMITH'S Defence. The people who live down stairs asked me to help them to get the pigs in.

DIMSDALE'S Defence. That young girl's brother was taken, and she said she would swear any thing to get him off.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 17.

DIMSDALE - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS NAVIN.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-51
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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London Cases, Second Jury.

Before Mr. Recorder.

232. THOMAS NAVIN was indicted for stealing, 1 gown, value 3s., the goods of Ann Prater ; and a gown, value 20s. , the goods of Dinah Benjamin .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAM HARTELL, JOHN MILLS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-52
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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233. WILLIAM HARTELL and JOHN MILLS were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of December , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of George Taylor , from his person .

GEORGE TAYLOR. I live in Change-alley, and am clerk to Messrs. Bond and Co. On the 15th of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was going up Holborn ; an officer spoke to me, and I missed my handkerchief. The officer took me towards Furnival's Inn, where he took the prisoners, and produced my handkerchief. I had not got out of the City.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you see Hartell that night? A. Yes; he did not appear intoxicated.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable of Clerkenwell. I was on Holborn with Jordan, and saw Mr. Taylor - the prisoners were following him from Holborn-hill; I watched them; I was on the opposite side. I saw Mills take something from Mr. Taylor's pocket, by Castle-street - I crossed, and told Mr. Taylor - the prisoners were then crossing - we followed them. I took Hartell, and Jordan took Mills - I found the handkerchief in Hartell's hat.

Cross-examined. Q. Did Hartell appear intoxicated? A. When he had been some time at the watch-house I thought he had been drinking, but he knew what he was about.(Property produced and sworn to.)

HARTELL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

MILLS - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Life .

JAMES WEBSTER.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-53
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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234. JAMES WEBSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 12 of January , 3lbs. of candles, value 1s. 6d., the goods of Ford Hale , his master .

FORD HALE. I am a tallow chandler , and live in Cannon-street . The prisoner worked for me in his over-time, which he had from the London Docks. On the evening of the 12th of January, about twenty minutes past nine o'clock, when the other men were gone to supper, he remained behind in the cotton room - my young man gave me information - I followed him when he left the premises and overtook him about two doors off, and found 3lbs. of candles in his inside pocket; he had been three months with me; he said "Pray let me go."

THOMAS COLLINS . I am ward beadle, and received him in charge - he begged to be let go.

JOHN ALLEY . I am an apprentice to Mr. Hale. I was watching, and saw the prisoner go to a box in the cotton room, were potatoes are kept, and take something out. I told my master; I afterwards saw him go to the warehouse but did not see him take any thing. He had no business there.

EDWARD COX . I am shopman to Mr. Hale. I was stationed to watch, opposite the house, and saw the prisoner come out - I saw the candles found upon him.

Prisoner. I hope you will be as lenient as possible.

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined Three Months .

JOHN WINN.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-54
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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235. JOHN WINN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of December , a pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of George Joseph Ford .

GEORGE JOSEPH FORD. I am a shoemaker , and live in Field-lane, Holborn . On Sunday, the 25th of December, at nine o'clock, my door was open; I was busy in the shop - the prisoner came in and took a pair of shoes off the rail, as if to look at them, and in a minute he put them inside his coat, buttoned it up, and was going out - I asked what he wanted - he said a pair of boots; I opened his coat, and took these shoes out of his pocket - he said he had bought them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by - they called me in to buy a pair of shoes; I took a pair in my hand, turned round to try them on, and he asked what I was about.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Seven Days .

JOHN GOLDING.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-55
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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236. JOHN GOLDING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of January , 130 yards of chintz bed lace, value 2s. , the goods of James Chadwick , Robert Chadwick , and David Scott .

ROBERT CHADWICK. I live in Little Love-lane , and am in partnership with James Chadwick, and David Scott. On the 2d of January, about half-past twelve o'clock at noon, I stood in an inner room on the first floor, and the witness brought the prisoner in with a gross of bed lace - he denied all knowledge of it.

WILLIAM MAPPERLEY . I am servant to the prosecutors. On the 2d of January I was coming out of the room and saw the prisoner - I caught him on the landing place, and heard this parcel of lace drop from him; he said he came to inquire for Mr. Johnson, and that he knew nothing of the parcel; he was going down stairs.

Prisoner's Defence. A man said he would give me a penny to go and ask if Mr. Johnson lived there.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH BUCHANAN.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-56
VerdictGuilty > theft under 40s
SentenceImprisonment

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237. SARAH BUCHANAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of December , 4 table spoons, value 2l.; 2 dessert spoons, value 20s.; 2 table cloths, value 3l., and 2 sheets, value 12s., the goods of Frederick Wiltshire , her master, in his dwelling house .

MESSRS. ALLEY and PAYNE conducted the prosecution.

MR. FREDERICK WILTSHIRE. I live at No. 34, Poultry . The prisoner was my cook and housekeeper . I missed this property on Saturday week; she has been five years and a half with me; I called on her at Giltspur-street, prison, where she was confined, to knew if she wanted any of her clothes; I asked her what had become of six spoons - she said they should be returned to me; I asked if there was any thing more; she said there were two sheets, and all should be returned; I missed a pair of sheets upon examining; I found the property at Guildhall; these things were my own property.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did she send

any communication to you about the property before you went to her? A. Certainly not; I went to make inquiry of her as well as to offer her linen; I said nothing to induce her to say any thing. I have heard she was connected with a fortune-teller; my spoons and table cloths were returned, with some sheets, which were not mine, but were as good. I am single, and she acted as my housekeeper - she is a widow, and, I believe, has three children.

MR. THOMAS MASSEY. I am in partnership with Mr. Wiltshire, but not in this property. I accompanied him to the Compter; he asked her about some spoons, and two table cloths, which she said should be returned. Mr. Teague cautioned him not to have them returned except through the officer.

WILLIAM SCOURFIELD . I am turnkey of the Compter. On Monday, between six and seven o'clock, a person knocked at the door, and gave me a parcel to give to the prisoner - I gave it to Copeland.

THOMAS COPELAND . I am an officer of Giltspur-street. Scourfield gave me a parcel which I gave to Harrison - it was opened in the prisoner's presence - she said it was Mr. Wiltshire's property - that she had lent it, and sent for it to return - this was on Tuesday.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a marshalman. On Tuesday, the 10th of January, I received the property from Copeland.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I took the liberty of lending them.

GUILTY. Aged 50. Of stealing to the value of 39s. only .

Confined Two Years .

ELIZA MATILDA MORRIS.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-57
VerdictNot Guilty

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238. ELIZA MATILDA MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th July , a piece of printed cotton, containing 20 yards, value 20s. the goods of Frederick Wiltshire and Thomas Massey .

MR. FREDERICK WILTSHIRE. I am in partnership with Thomas Massey, we are Manchester warehouseman , and live in the Poultry . In July we missed twenty-one pieces of printed cotton - we counted them again next morning, and four more pieces containing twenty-eight yards each were gone; we applied to Harrison, the marshalman. I had officers on the watch, and at the end of August we missed eighteen more pieces.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. It must have been stolen by some person on your premises? A. I presume so - they must have entered the warehouse to get it. I often slept out - nobody could enter without being let in by some person within; I never saw the prisoner there.

COURT. Q. The last prisoner was in your service at this time? A. She was my Lord.

BENJAMIN HELMSLEY . I am warehouseman to the prosecutor. In July last I missed property; we sell a single piece.

Cross-examined. Q. How many men servants are there? A. About five - they all have access to the goods; I and the clerk sleep in the house.

PHILLIS JOHNSON . I first knew the prisoner in November - she came to lodge with me at No. 32, Great Sutton-street - we became intimate; she informed me that Mrs. Buchanan had been a particular friend of her's, and the sole support of herself and former husband, for when she could not give her money, she gave her her master's prints and cottons, which she tore into lengths, and pawned at different pawnbrokers, and burnt the tickets to avoid detection; that Buchanan lived with a Mr. W. in the City, but she did not say where. I had often heard her talk of going to Mrs. B. in Newgate-street, by which I knew she meant Buchanan, and one night she sent her daughter to Mrs. Buchanan in the City for a bundle - her daughter returned, and could not find it; she and her mother had words, and she told me what a stupid girl she must be, as there was a board up close by to say where Mr. W. had removed to; next night she went herself, as she told me, and saw Mrs. Buchanan, but she had company, and she was to go the next night. I then went myself to find out Mr. W., to inform him she was coming for a parcel - I at last found Mr. W., who had removed to the Poultry, and Buchanan lived there; I told the clerk the prisoner was to call, and told him what she had told me - that when the officers were walking on the opposite side of the way, she went to Mr. W's., and brought the prints away, wrapped round her body, after eight o'clock at night. I once wanted some shirt frills for my son - she said she had plenty in pawn; about three weeks ago she went to Hatton-garden to swear to the loss of some duplicates, and when she returned, she said she had settled it all comfortably.

Q. Did she ever say she had been at the prosecutor's house? A. She said she had been in the warehouse several times - that their stock was immense, and a little could not be missed.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not understand from her that the bundles were ready for her when she called? A. No. I never asked her a question, it was all said voluntarily - she told me she knew where to find the things, that they were between the bed and mattress. I gave information as soon as I knew where to find the prosecutors.

Q. How do you get your living? A. I have two houses in St. James's walk left me by my father. I kept a butcher's shop till within the last six weeks, and have books with 4 or 500l. of debts on them; I am a widow, and have six children; when I want money I collect a few debts - no single women lodges in the house, except the prisoner's daughter. I occasionally lent the prisoner 1l., and she got communicatlve with me; she represented herself as my sister, but she is not. I had no quarrel with her - I should be afraid to have words with her. I wished her to leave my house - she has abused me, and used very improper language, but if she was abusive at night she was civil next morning - she was not quite sober, and I excused it. I gave her notice to quit several times, she said I must give her regular notice, and I must wait till quarter day to do so.

COURT. Q. How long before you gave information had you learnt who Mr. W. meant? A. I did not know till I went on a Thursday night in November, and read it on the board in Newgate-street.

WILLIAM SLANNARD . I am servant to Mr. Wiltshire; I have seen a person resembling the prisoner at the house three or four times - she came to see Buchanan, and went into the kitchen to her. I believe it to be her.

WILLIAM BURRIDGE . I was in the prosecutor's employ, and have seen the prisoner visiting Buchanan two or three times.

Q. How do you know her? A. From her manner of speech. I do not speak to her features.

MR. MASSEY. When the prisoner was apprehended I saw her searched, fifty-six duplicates were found on her; she said, "If any of those duplicates belong to Mr. W's. property, I will eat my head." I asked who she meant by W., she said, "I mean Buchanan's master, Mr. Wiltshire." Mr. Wiltshire's name had not been mentioned at that time.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you see her? A. At Great Sutton-street - Buchanan had then been about an hour in custody; she did not know who I was.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a marshalman. I went to the prisoner's house, and directly the door was open I ran to the bureau and pulled out some duplicates. I said,"Here are plenty of duplicates;" she said there was no property there belonging to Mr. W. Mr. Massey asked her some questions, but I was busy searching, and did not attend to them. I did not tell her Buchanan was in custody till afterward.

Prisoner's Defence. When he came in he asked if I knew Buchanan; and when the duplicates were found, I said, "If there is any of Mr. W's. property there, I will eat my head." What Johnson has said is false. I knew her five years ago, but have not seen her for three years till lately, when an intimacy commenced, and she proposed our taking a house together; quarrels ensued in consequence of men going in and out at all hours - I was informed the house would be indicted. I certainly told her I was going to see Buchanan, and if she had no money she would let me have other things, as she often lent me clothes to pawn.

NOT GUILTY .

JOHN BROWN.
12th January 1826
Reference Numbert18260112-58
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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