Old Bailey Proceedings.
11th September 1822
Reference Number: 18220911

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Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
11th September 1822
Reference Numberf18220911-1

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THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 11th of SEPTEMBER, 1822, and following Days;

Being the Seventh Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1822.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir Robert Graham , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir William Draper Best Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Richardson , Knt., one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Richard Carr Glynn, Bart.; Sir James Shaw , Bart; John Ansley , Esq.; Joshua Jonathan Smith , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; Christopher Smith , Esq.; and John Thomas Thorp , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; Robert Albion Cox , Esq.; and William Thompson , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; and Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Gatward ,

Thomas Cooke ,

Robert Hulm ,

John Howard ,

David Witham ,

John Mosley ,

John Page ,

William Wilder ,

James Bowen ,

Siras Symes ,

Thomas Wilson ,

John Ravenscroft.

1st Middlesex Jury.

William Burd ,

Anthony Brooks ,

George Bird ,

William Charlton ,

Thomas Cockett ,

John Gregory ,

Thomas Robert Smart ,

John Salter ,

Thomas Kennard ,

William Pater ,

Edward Roberts ,

James Gomm .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

William Hamblin ,

Robert Simpson ,

William Smith ,

Thomas Sawyer ,

Adam Payne ,

Benjamin Bartlett ,

Charles Letchford ,

William Hartley .

Edward Gardener ,

John Middleton ,

William Clements ,

John Benjamin Cole .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1822.

MAGNAY, MAYOR. SEVENTH SESSION.

THOMAS LEATHWICK ROBINSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-1
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1146. THOMAS LEATHWICK ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously selling four silver bottle labels and chains having forged and counterfeit marks, stamps, and impressions in imitation of and resembling certain marks and stamps used by the Company of Goldsmiths in London , he well knowing them to be forged, with intent to defraud the said Company .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS LEATHWICK ROBINSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-2
VerdictNot Guilty

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1147. THOMAS LEATHWICK ROBINSON was again indicted for a like offence, with intent to defraud our Lord the King .

MR. BOLLAND declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

MARY WATTS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-3
VerdictNot Guilty

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1148. MARY WATTS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Finton , on the King's highway, on the 10th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, thirty sovereigns, eight half-crowns, thirty shillings, and twenty sixpences , his monies.

ROBERT FINTON . I am a jobber . On the 10th of August, I received twenty-four sovereigns and twenty-seven shillings of Mr. Dowling, a salesman; I also received five sovereigns at Mr. Butler's in London-wall, and one I had in my pocket. I called at many more places, which detained me till between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, and then I had to return to Mr. Dowling's - as I crossed Wentworth-street, Brick-lane , I was hustled by two girls; they caught hold of me - I struggled, and tried to shove one of them away. I was pulled down by one of the women, and held down till my money was taken - I felt it go out of my pocket; I was kept down till the person who took it got out of my sight. When the money was gone a man caught hold of me, and pretended to assist me - this was nearly nine o'clock at night; it was dark, and the lamps were lit. The prisoner is the woman who was present a minute or two before the money was taken, but I did not see her at the time it was taken - I could not turn round I was so penned down by another girl who was with the prisoner when I first saw her. There were two women present when my money was taken. As soon as I could turn round the prisoner was gone, and the other one got away - I saw the other run away alone; I did not see the prisoner while they were taking the money or afterwards. I did not see who took it, but I saw the prisoner with the woman who held me before; they were talking together. I did not see her again till above a week afterwards. I had been drinking, and was not sober - I might have drank three or four pints of beer, and a glass or two of gin or so - I walked without assistance, and was particular in fastening my pocket. The man got away. I was pulled down by the two women - I had seen the prisoner not two minutes before. I saw no other women but the prisoner and another. I lost all my money.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You saw nobody take hold of you - A. One of the women and somebody took hold of me behind, but I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not. I did not see the man till the instant the money was gone. I believe the neigbourhood is the resort of women of the town. I am satisfied that the prisoner was in company with the woman a few minutes before. I saw her again a fortnight or three weeks after.

Q. Was she not brought up four times before you ventured to swear to her - A. Three times I believe.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

SAMUEL WILSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-4
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1149. SAMUEL WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , at St. Mary, Islington, one gelding, price 40 l. , the property of John Gibbard .

Mr. PLATT conducted the prosecution.

JOHN GIBBARD . I am a farmer at Southam, in Warwickshire , above eighty miles from town. On Saturday night, the 17th of August, I lost a gelding; I had seen it in my stable that night; I saw it again on the Monday week following in London, in the possession of Limbrick, the officer. I am sure it was the same that I lost; I had had it a year and a half, and can swear it is mine - I used

it frequently. The prisoner worked for me eight or ten days in March last, and lived about two miles from Southam - I did not see him after March.

WILLIAM WINKLEY . I am a farrier and grazier. I know the prisoner. I saw him several times at Southam - the last time I saw him there was on the 17th of August; the afternoon on which the horse was stolen at night - he passed my house twice.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody at Islington, with a horse in his possession, on Monday, the 19th of August, about six o'clock in the evening; the horse appeared tired. I asked him if it was for sale? he said Yes, and asked forty-eight guineas for it. I left it in the stable, and went with him to the Blue Coat-boy, public-house. I then asked if he would not take something less? he said No. I said,

"You have come a long way with it?" he said, I came from Stoney Stratford. I asked if it was his? he said, Yes. I said it was stolen, and I should take him into custody and the horse too, which I did; I took him to Hatton-garden, and left him with Mills a short time, while I went for the horse, and in a few minutes I heard the cry of Stop thief! and found he had ran off; we followed and took him in Leather-lane. He was examined before Mr. Lamb. and remanded till Monday week. He wanted some refreshment - I took him over to a public-house, and said I did not consider it was his horse now by his running away. He said it was not his horse. I neither threatened nor promised him - he said it was a very bad job; that he was at work down at Southam, and he took it out of Southam fields; that it belonged to John Gibbard . I went for Mr. Gibbard, who came up on Monday the 26th, and saw the horse. I had left it in a livery stable in Bleeding Heart-yard. I marked it when I first took it from him, and knew it. When I first saw the prisoner, he was on it; he had a halter, but no bridle or saddle. I heard him enquiring for a stable, and followed him down Mr. Brown's yard.

JOHN GIBBARD . I saw the horse on Saturday the 17th; it was turned out into our field.

Prisoner. I hope the Jury will be as merciful as possible.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

ISAAC KNIGHT.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-5
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1150. ISAAC KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , at St. Mary, Whitechapel, one gelding, price 20 l. , the property of Thomas Lewis and Harriot Croft .

THOMAS LEWIS . I am a stable-keeper in Whitechapel . On the 22d of August, the prisoner came to my stables with one of my breaksmen on the box; he told me he was in want of two or three horses for one Mr. Fagg, of Holborn, and stated that his master, Mr. Abel, of the Borough, had no horses, and that he came from Mr. Fagg, wishing to see two or three of mine. I said I had only one which he might take and shew Mr. Fagg, to see if it would suit him, and to come to let me know what offer was made - he took the horse and never returned, nor brought it back. I value it at 20 l. - I did not know Mr. Fagg. On the 5th of September I received information that he was at the Bazaar stables, at the west end of the town, and found him there, and asked him where it was, he said he had sold it to Messrs. Dean and Dance of Hampstead, I went with him to them, and saw it there; it remains with them. I am sure it is the same horse the prisoner got from me.

Prisoner. Q. You asked me how trade was, and I asked you the same - A. Yes.

Q. You then said you had a brown horse which was lame, and you could sell it for a little money - A. I did not - he said he was collecting for Mr. Abel of the Borough, and asked if I was inclined to sell the horse; I said Yes. He said Fagg was in want of horses.

Q. Did you not agree that if you got the horse or money, you would settle it - A. Never.

ROBERT FAGG . My father is a coach master. I know the prisoner - he had brought horses to our yard before, and my father has bought them of him. I never commissioned him to apply to Lewis or any one else for horses. I did not see him bring a horse from Lewis's to our yard, but understood one was brought.

JOHN DANCE. I am in partnership with Thomas Dean ; we live at Hampstead. The prisoner came on the morning of the 22d of August, but I was not at home - I saw him in the evening; he was in the stable with this horse. Mr. Dean had seen the horse before I came home, and told me Isaac Knight had brought a horse for sale, and asked me to look at him, and try him - I said it was too late to try him that night. The prisoner said it was of no consequence, the horse could be left, and I could try him in the morning, and he would come - he came next morning; I tried the horse and bought it. I cannot exactly say what we gave him for it; he asked 15 l. - I agreed with my partner to give him 12 l., and no more. My partner and he went away together to make the agreement, and I do not know exactly what was paid, as we have not settled our accounts. The prisoner left it in our stables, and I used it as ours until Lewis claimed it. I refused to give it up till I knew the law. We are coachmasters.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge from Mr. Lewis, on the 5th of September. I neither threatened or promised him - I said I thought he had been acting very foolish; he said he had done wrong, and was in hopes he had some friends.

Prisoner's Defence. If I had Lewis's servants here, I could prove I had a horse shewn me besides this - the price was twelve guineas; and if Mr. Dean was here and another gentleman, that Lewis wanted to settle it.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

THOMAS HAYES.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-6
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1151. THOMAS HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , at St. Pancras, seventeen bed-curtains, value 2 l. 10 s., the goods of John Mortimer , in his dwelling-house .

MRS. MARY ANN MORTIMER . I am the wife of John Mortimer ; we live in Camden-terrace, Camden-town, in the parish of St. Pancras . On the 15th of August, there were some bed-curtains in a basket in the front parlour. I lost seventeen in all. About twelve o'clock in the morning, I had just left the room, and the window open - an iron railing covered the area, which enabled a person to get in. I saw the prisoner in the room tying the curtains up - he had moved them out of the basket on the floor, and was tying them up in a silk pocket handkerchief

of his own. I asked what he wanted? I did not wait for a reply, but ran out of the room, being frightened. I ran down the garden to call the gardener, and saw the prisoner running across the fields, near the house. I called Stop thief! but I did not see him taken. In five minutes Stone, the officer, brought him back - I am sure he is the man. He left the curtains in the room; he had only tied two corners of the handkerchief. They are worth 50 s. The window had been left open.

EDWARD PRICE . I am a painter and glazier. I was at work at Mr. Mortimer's, in the back parlour, and heard Mrs. Mortimer cry out a man was robbing the house; I immediately ran into the front parlour, and saw the prisoner run from the fire-place, and get out of the window - he got over the rails before I could take him; I cried Stop thief! and saw him turn across the fields - I ran down the garden, and pursued him; he was stopped, and brought back in about five minutes. I am certain he is the same man - I knew him instantly.

MRS. MORTIMER. The curtains are the four post bed furniture - I found them still in the handkerchief. They were made by an upholsterer, and cost seven guineas nine months ago.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN HODSELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-7
VerdictNot Guilty

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1152. JOHN HODSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of John Miles , from his person .

JOHN MILES . I am a collecter of tradesmens' accounts . On the 13th of March, I was in company with the prisoner - he was destitute of breakfast and dinner, which I gave him, and between three and four o'clock I was parting with him - he asked me to lend him 1 s. or two to get a bed; I refused, and he thrust his hand into my pocket, and took out a silk handkerchief, and ran away; I immediately hollowed out, Stop thief! he escaped. I saw no more of him. I indicted him at the Session in April; he was not then in custody. I have known him twelve months. He had slept at my house that night, as I wanted him next day, but never before - he said he had no lodging. I had got him to deliver a summons for me, and he slept in the same bed as myself. I did not pay him for delivering the summons; he owed me a few shillings. I have seen him at Hicks's Hall. I attend that Court for plaintiffs. We were parting in London-fields, Hackney , when he robbed me.

Prisoner. Q. How long was I in your company - A. From the morning till between three and four o'clock.

Q. Do you recollect meeting two girls, and snatching water cresses from them - A. There were two girls, but they had no cresses. I did not lend him the handkerchief. I applied for a warrant to take him on the 3d of April, on seeing him in the Office, but the Magistrate would not grant it - I think I went to the Office to bail one Sutton, and saw the prisoner there.

Q. Did you not indict four people last Session - A. I believe I did for an assault. They never gave me a farthing to settle it.

THOMAS ROGERS . I know Miles very well. In March last, I saw him running along London-fields after a man, calling Stop thief! I cannot say the prisoner was the man. I do not know whether the man had anything in his hand.

The prisoner in a long Defence stated that the prosecutor was indebted to him for serving two summonses, that the prosecutor lent him the handkerchief to wipe his face, and he told him he would keep it till he paid him, and that the prosecutor had offered to settle the business for 1 l.

JOHN MILES . I made no offer to settle it. His father applied to me to settle it; I said it would be compounding felony. I saw the prisoner standing by the Five Pound Court, the day after the robbery. I did not speak to him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

THOMAS BEST.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-8
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1153. THOMAS BEST was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , five brass weights, value 5 s. , the goods of John Gibbs .

ANN GIBBS . I am the wife of John Gibbs ; we keep a shop in St. Lukes . On the 12th of August, the prisoner and four more boys came to the shop - the prisoner and three of them were inside; one of them asked for a penny loaf and paid me for it; they all went out except the boy who had the loaf - I missed five weights from the end of the counter immediately they went out; the boy asked me for the bottom loaf - I said they were all alike, and gave him the top one. I went round the counter; the boy who bought the bread had just got out - I saw the other boys running off. I called to him to stop his companions, for they had got my weights; he said he knew nothing of it, and went after them - I did not follow. The prisoner and another, who was discharged, were brought back. I asked the prisoner if he knew anything about the weights; he said he did not take them, but he knew where they were, and if the witness would go back with him, he would shew him where they were. Part of the loaf was found in his pocket.

JAMES DOUGHTY . I live in Smith's-lane, City-road. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I came out, and pursued. I took the prisoner and another boy in a privy; I had seen them running. I took them back to Mrs. Gibbs's shop; she asked the prisoner where the weights were; he said, he did not know, he did not steal them, that the other stole them, and if I would go back with him he would shew me where they were thrown; but the constable came and took him - he found some bread on him, which appeared to be part of a penny loaf.

Prisoner's Defence. I and another went out to gather blackberries, and met the other two, who went in for a penny loaf; one of them came out, beckoned to me, and I ran; one of them gave me a bit of the loaf, and told me to run.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

JOHN CORKER.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-9
VerdictGuilty
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

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1154. JOHN CORKER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , one watch, value 25 s.; one key, value 2 d., and one ribbon, 1 d. , the goods of Thomas Arnold .

THOMAS ARNOLD . I live at Kentish Town . On Friday the 26th of July, the prisoner came to my house to clean knives and shoes - I saw him there about eleven o'clock,

and about two my watch was missed. Woodward shewed it me on Sunday, the 28th.

RICHARD WOODWARD . I am clerk to the commissioners for watching and lighting. On the 28th, I took the watch from the prisoner. He said it belonged to his brother. Mr. Arnold claimed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN CROMBIE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-10
VerdictNot Guilty

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1155. JOHN CROMBIE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , one bushel of apples, value 1 s. 6 d., and one basket, value 6 d. , the goods of William Collins .

WILLIAM COLLINS . I am a green-grocer . On the 3d of August, I was attending Spitalfields-market with a basket of apples, which I put on the ground in a street, leading out of the market, where I had just bought them; and was helping a woman to take some beans out of a cart, not two yards from my basket - upon turning round I saw it was gone. Upon turning to the left I saw the prisoner walking off with it on his knot, about forty yards off. I pursued and asked what he was going to do with it? he said, what was that to me, and that they were not mine. I took him to the watch-house. He said, a man gave him 1 d., lifted them on his head, and told him to take them to a cart by the watch-house - he insisted that they were not mine after I gave charge of him; I am sure they were mine. I have seen him frequently in the market with a knot. He did not say he was employed to carry them till he got to the watch-house. It is usual to employ porters to carry to the carts - he did not offer to shew me the cart; but struck me and tried to escape.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am the street-keeper. He was given in my charge, and said he was going to carry them to a cart. I said,

"Why did you not shew the people the cart?" he said it was of no use.

(Basket produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to take them to his cart, and I was stopped with them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

ELIZA DAVIS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-11
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1156. ELIZA DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , one blanket, value 3 s., and one sheet, value 3 s., the goods of William Pears , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM PEARS . I keep a house in St. Mary-le-bone . The prisoner took a lodging in my house on the 17th of July; she had the first-floor back room, furnished, at 4 s. a week. She left on the 31st of July. She owed me a fortnight's rent, and left the door padlocked. I got in at the window two days after, and found these things gone, and a duplicate of a sheet and blanket on the shelf. I met her on the Tuesday following in North Audley-street, and said,

"Aynt you a pretty creature to pawn my things; I have a great mind to charge the watch with you;" she said,

"No, pray, don't be so cruel as that; I will call on Friday or Saturday and pay you." I let her go. She did not come, and on Saturday night we found her in Duke-street, and gave her in charge.

PHOEBE PEARS . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 17th of July the prisoner took the back room furnished, and left on the 31st. She took a basket out with her. My husband got into the room two days afterwards, and found the duplicates in a milk-jug on the shelf. The sheet was pawned on the 17th of July, and the blanket on the 27th.

WILLIAM SKINNER . I am a pawnbroker's servant. The prisoner pawned the blanket with us for 2 s. 6 d.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did their washing, which they never paid me for, and having nothing of my own to pawn, I took these things, intending to redeem them when they paid me. They owed me 18 s.

MRS. PEARS. I could never get her to say what I owed her - but she brought in a bill of 18 s. when we had a quarrel.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

WILLIAM GERRARD.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-12
VerdictGuilty > theft under 40s
SentenceTransportation

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1157. WILLIAM GERRARD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , two silver pepper castors, value 2 l. 10 s., the goods of William Guest Read and George Bugh Topping , in their dwelling-house .

WILLIAM GUEST READ. I keep the Old Slaughter Coffee-house, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields . I am in partnership with George Bugh Topping; we both live in the house. We lost two pepper castors on the evening of the 12th of July - they were on the table at dinner time. I was not at home at the time of the robbery. I do not know their value, as I did not buy them.

THOMAS WOOLEY . I am a waiter at the Coffee-house. On the 12th of July, about eleven o'clock at night, I saw the castors on the side-board. I found the prisoner in the parlour about half-past eleven o'clock, and asked what he wanted; he made some confused answer, which I could not understand. Mr. Osborne came over and secured him - he searched him in my presence; but found nothing on him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was he not going into the house, and not coming out - A. He was coming out of the parlour door. After he was searched, he said, he came to tell us the house was being robbed.

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I keep a public-house opposite Slaughter's Coffee-house. On the 12th of July, I followed Austin, who had informed me that a man had gone in at the prosecutor's window - I saw the prisoner looking out from the parlour door down the passage. I went in and secured him - I searched, but found nothing particular on him. I asked how he came there; he said he understood there was a robbery going on, and came to inform them - this was after I had secured him. I asked why he came in at the window if he came to give information; he made no reply.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I live near the Coffee-house. I was informed somebody had entered the window - I went to the door, and saw a man's arm out at the window, with a pair of candlesticks. I saw two men outside; thinking them concerned, I looked about for assistance. I did not see the men take anything; but they ran off on my calling Osborne. I saw the prisoner secured inside. If any one

had come out of the parlour window I must have seen them.

THOMAS WOOLEY re-examined. I saw the castors on the side-board at eleven o'clock, and missed them immediately he was secured. He gave me no alarm of a robbery - there was no light in the room. Some candlesticks were moved from one table in the room, and placed on another table near the window. Nobody but the prisoner was in the room.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were the castors separate or on a stand - A. Separate - he could have put them in his pocket.

Prisoner. I leave it to my Counsel.

GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

GEORGE JENKINS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-13
VerdictNot Guilty > no prosecutor

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1158. GEORGE JENKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of James Delancey , from his person .

The prosecutor did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN CHARD.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-14
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1159. JOHN CHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , seventeen ounces of tea, value 7 s. 6 d., and twelve ounces of other tea, value 4 s. , the goods of John Crossley , and Thomas Crossley .

MR. JOHN CROSSLEY . I am a tea-dealer , in partnership with my brother Thomas; we live in Nicholas-lane - the prisoner was our porter above two years. On the 13th of August, I found a deficiency in my stock, and in the morning of the 14th, I came down stairs about half-past seven o'clock, which was half an hour earlier than usual. He was in the cellar cleaning boots. He came up stairs in a few minutes with his coat off. While he went up stairs, I went down into the cellar. Nobody but him was employed there. I found his coat hanging up, and his pockets full of loose tea; there were twelve or fourteen ounces, which corresponded with the tea in my canister, which stood in the warehouse - we never sell less than 1 lb., and never sold him any. I let him go that morning without saying anything; but I told my brother; and next morning my brother concealed himself in the warehouse, and he was apprehended. I told him of the tea I had found in his pocket the morning before; he said he had nothing of the kind. On the 15th we found three quarters of pound in papers in the corner of his hat. We send it into the country to be sold in small quantities. He pleaded distress. He had one guinea a week when he was regularly employed - but he was only employed occasionally for the last six months.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. He bore a good character - A. Yes.

MR. THOMAS CROSSLEY . I am in partnership with my brother. On the 15th I was concealed under the stairs. About seven o'clock the prisoner came to work, and about eight he was going to breakfast - he went round the counter, and took off the lid of the canister; out of which he took a quantity of tea, and put it in his pocket - he then came round to the other end of the counter, where the teas which are packed up are kept - he took off his hat, and put three packages into the hat; put the handkerchief over them, and put it on his head; he was going out of the door - my brother said he wanted to speak to him. I then came forward, and said,

"You are taken at last," and fetched Drinkwater, who found the tea in his hat, and some loose in his pocket.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I was sent for. He pulled off his hat, in which I found the tea, and about six ounces in his pocket. He said he had done wrong, but it was through distress. I found more tea at his lodging. I found 2 l. 3 s. in his pocket, and ten sovereigns in his room.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

CATHERINE ROOKE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-15
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1160. CATHERINE ROOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , 13 lbs. of cheese, value 8 s. , the goods of John Spooner .

JOHN SPOONER , JUN. I am the son of John Spooner , a cheesemonger of Houndsditch . The prisoner came in on Thursday the 22d of August, and asked for two ounces of shilling butter; I served her. There was some cheese about a yard and a half from her. She paid for the butter, and sat down in the shop, and dropped a ready reckoner out of her hand - instead of taking that up, she took up half a cheese, weighing 13 lbs.; she went to the door, and I stopped her just outside, and took it from under her shawl. She said she knew nothing about it, threatened to strike me, and I let her go.

DAVID M'COMBIE. I am a constable. I was sent for to follow her. I took her four doors from the shop. She said she knew nothing about it. I found a knife and an old ready reckoner on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never took it, if I was to die this moment.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN HALES.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-16
VerdictGuilty
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

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1161. JOHN HALES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , one silver skewer, value 1 l. , the goods of William Smith .

JAMES GRIFFIN . I live with William Smith , who keeps the Three Cups, Aldersgate-street . On the 8th of August, about eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into the passage - I saw him come from the larder, where the silver skewer was, in a fillet of veal. He is a sweep. I enquired at the bar, then ran after him, and overtook him and another sweep. I asked what business he had in the house? he said he called to see if any chimneys wanted sweeping. I asked what he had under his arm, and saw the skewer drop from him.

MARY ALLEN . I am servant to William Smith . I know the skewer was in the veal. I missed it while Griffin was pursuing the prisoner.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable. I took charge of him - he appeared quite hardened.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 10.

Judgment Respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

MATTHEW GARRARD.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-17
VerdictGuilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1162. MATTHEW GARRARD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , one coat, value 15 s.; one waistcoat, value 3 s.; one shirt, value 1 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; one pair of gloves, value 1 s., and 15 s. 6 d. in money , the property of Joseph Maylin .

JOSEPH MAYLIN . I am a fellowship porter , and live in Pudding-lane . On the 12th of August, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I missed this property. I sleep in the garret with the prisoner. I left at a quarter past four o'clock in the morning; I called him at that time, but left him in the room - he had lodged there four nights. I left the coat, waistcoat, shirt, and two handkerchiefs in my box, and 10 s. 6 d. in silver, and the rest in copper - it was all safe on Sunday night. I returned between twelve and one o'clock in the day, and found them all gone. He never said he meant to leave the lodging. He was taken the same evening, and my coat, waistcoat, and shirt, were found on him, and 9 3/4 d.

THOMAS DEACON . I am a constable. He was brought in by Young, on this charge. I found the clothes on him. He said he was extremely sorry for it, and could not tell what induced him to do it.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I am an officer, and live at Aldgate. I found the prisoner at the Bull's Head, public-house, charged with this. He said he had stolen them, and was sorry for it - that he had left his own clothes at a public-house.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS TRINDER.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-18
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1163. THOMAS TRINDER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Samuel Richardson , from his person .

MR. SAMUEL RICHARDSON . I am a merchant , and live in Mark-lane. On the 19th of July, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I was returning home, and in Holborn, close to Fetter-lane , I felt something at my pocket - upon turning round I saw the prisoner close to me; I collared him, and said,

"You rascal, what do you mean by picking my pocket?" I saw my handkerchief fall on the edge of the pavement; it could have fallen from nobody but him. I dragged him to the spot, picked it up, and called Watch! but none came. I took him to St. Andrew's watch-house, and no watchman was to be found in all that way. I gave him in charge to Harrison, the Marshalsman, at the watch-house, as nobody but him was there. He begged forgiveness, and tried to escape.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not two others near me - A. Nobody was near enough to drop it but him.

JOHN BAPTIST MITCHELL . I am a teacher of languages, and live in Rupert-street. I was passing by, and saw a great many people of bad description round the prosecutor. I called the watch for two or three minutes together - none came, and when I returned to the prisoner, he fell on his knees, and begged to be forgiven; said it was the first time, and that he would do so no more. I saw the handkerchief picked up.

ANTHONY HARRISON . He was given in my charge at the watch-house with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. When I begged to be let go, I said he should not take an innocent person.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN JEFFKINS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-19
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > public whipping

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1164. JOHN JEFFKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , four bound books, value 8 s. , the goods of John Bumpus .

JOHN BUMPUS . I am a bookseller , and live at Holborn-bars . Between the 17th and 22d of August, I lost four books from a glass case, in front of my window. The case was not locked. I did not miss them. On the 22d of August the officer brought them to me. The prisoner was in custody. I then went to the case, and missed them. I was from home at the time.

JOHN GARDNER . I am a constable. On the 22d of August, between one and two o'clock in the day, I went into the Rose, public-house, in Cursitor-street, and saw the prisoner offering these books for sale - suspecting he had not come honestly by them, I questioned him; he said Mr. Gibbs the deputy keeper of Bridewell, gave them to him. I took him to Mr. Gibbs's, who denied it. He then said I should not take him.

THOMAS WILDEN . I am a constable. Gardner fetched me. I assisted in taking him to Mr. Gibbs's, who denied giving them to him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was on board the Bombay, East Indiaman, and the third mate gave me the books.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

ROBERT GREW.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-20
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12.

1165. ROBERT GREW was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , one watch, value 2 l.; one key, value 1 d., and one ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of Thomas Richardson , from his person .

THOMAS RICHARDSON . I am a sail-maker , and live in Warner-street. On the 20th of August, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening, I was on Tower-wharf - there was a boat race. I felt my watch drawn from my fob, and found three of my waistcoat buttons unbuttoned. I looked round immediately, and saw it in the prisoner's hand - he put it in the flap of his trowsers. I took hold of his arm, and asked for it - he said he would not deliver it. He ran against another man, took it out, and it fell on the ground. I picked it up, and called Stop thief! he then hit me in the eye, and made off, but was stopped going over the wharf. He was never out of my sight.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You say he said he would not deliver it - A. Yes. He did not say he had not got it; but that he would not deliver it. I did not strike him. I cannot be mistaken in him.

JOSEPH STONE . I am an officer. I heard the cry - several were running. I joined in the pursuit, and saw

the prisoner in custody of two soldiers - he denied the charge. I took him.

JAMES PRICE . I keep a chandler's-shop in Richard-street. I was on Tower-wharf near Mr. Richardson. I heard a scuffle, turned round, and saw the prisoner strike the prosecutor, who called Stop thief! he ran a little distance, and was taken by two soldiers.

KIDMAN POOL . I am a carpenter, and live in Richard-street, Commercial Road. I was on the wharf, and saw the watch fall from the prisoner, who ran away. The prosecutor called out Stop thief! and he was stopped about eight yards off. I saw the prosecutor pick up the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. When the prosecutor struck me, I was on the wharf. I was not stopped till I got over the draw-bridge, in the middle of the Tower.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

STEPHEN TOOLE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-21
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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1166. STEPHEN TOOLE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Scott , about eleven o'clock in the night of the 29th of July , at St. Margaret, Westminster , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing eighteen handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 10 s. , his property.

JOHN SCOTT . I am a linen-draper , and rent a house in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster. On the 29th of July, about ten o'clock at night, I was in my shop, and heard a crack at the window; it was quite dark. My shop lamps are gas, they were lit, and the two shopman were in the shop. I put on my hat, went out at the private door, into the street, and saw the prisoner at the window - I am sure he is the man. I walked past him, and perceived him fumbling at the corner of the window. Two men were at the corner of the street all the time, about three or four yards from the window. I passed the prisoner; crossed to the other side of the way; he left the window and looked in at the shop-door. I continued on the opposite side, and saw him walk round the window, return again, then walk up Parliament-street, and return to the window several times for the space of three quarters of an hour. I kept walking about, frequently passing him. I was on the opposite side of the way, and perceived him put his hand in, and take something out of the window, which I thought were handkerchiefs. I knocked him down with my fist, and these handkerchiefs fell on my neighbour's steps, out of his hand. I took him and the handkerchiefs into the shop, sent for a constable, and gave him in charge. A pane of glass was broken, and the glass out, near where the handkerchiefs had lain. I know the glass was entire an hour before. I missed eleven black handkerchiefs, all in a piece from near the broken glass, and seven coloured ladies' handkerchiefs. I understand from several people that he has born a good character till within three months.

Prisoner. Q. Were there not other people standing at the window for full half an hour - A. Nobody but yourself, and the two by the post. I saw no others in the street. It was near eleven o'clock. They are worth 50 s.

WILLIAM DAVENPORT . I am a constable. I was called on by Mr. Scott, and took the prisoner in charge. I found a knife on him, and a pocket handkerchief. Mr. Scott gave me the handkerchiefs.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner made no Defence; but received a good character from one Witness.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of good Character.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

ROBERT RAMSAY, SAMUEL GREENWOOD.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-22
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty
SentenceDeath

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1167. ROBERT RAMSAY and SAMUEL GREENWOOD were indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Ives , on the King's highway, on the 11th of August , at St. Matthew's, Bethnal-green, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, five seals, value 5 l.; one key, value 17 s., and one ring, value 6 s. , his property.

MR. PLATT conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD IVES . I live at Bethnal-green. On Sunday, the 11th of August, about a quarter before 10 o'clock at night, I was in Church-street, Bethnal-green , passing a court by the Flower Pot, public-house, Ramsay was before me, meeting me, and Greenwood was behind, following me. Greenwood coughed, and Ramsay immediately made a rush, and snatched at my seal, ring, and key, which were attached to my watch and chain; he separated them from the chain, and in trying to get them away, he struck me a blow on the side; this was before he got them; he pulled twice to get them. Ramsay ran down the court. I hollowed, Stop thief! and Greenwood came up and said,

"D - n his eyes, I'll have him;" and ran down the court. The officers then came up and asked if I was robbed. We went to the Flower Pot , and went in search of them at several houses - among others, to the George in George-yard, where we found the prisoners. I will swear they are the same persons - I could see them plainly by a strong light, and am positive of them. When I went into the George, I looked round, and saw the prisoners and another man sitting on a settle in the bar. The officer told me to go into the tap-room, to see if they were there, but I still kept my eye on the prisoners in the bar. I found the bar door bolted, and told the landlord to open it. Ramsay threw down his pipe, and was going out - he was stopped by the officers. I told him to put his hat on, and said I was certain of him - he said I accused him wrongfully. Greenwood did not attempt to escape. I am quite certain of them, on my oath - they were taken about an hour or an hour and a quarter after the robbery. We found nobody at the other public-houses.

Cross-examined by Mr. PLATT. Q. Do not they call the court Brick-lane - A. I do not know; it is the court next the Flower Pot . There was a gas light on the other side of the way, which enabled me to see. The transaction did not last long, but Ramsay overshot the court in running, which gave me an opportunity of seeing him - the light reflected in their faces, and I saw Ramsay as he came towards me; and he could not get my seals at the first pull - I looked him in the face while he was taking them. I described them correctly before I saw them in the public-house.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate you thought you knew Ramsay's back, but would not swear to him - A. I said I would swear to his person altogether. When I went into the bar a second time, Ramsay was putting down

his pipe and walking out - I said,

"Stop that man." I said nothing else till he said,

"You accuse me wrongfully." I then desired him to put on his hat.

MR. LAW. Q. Was the light so situated as to throw a strong light on the passage - A. It was.

COURT. Q. Had you looked behind you before the robbery - A. No; I observed Greenwood's red hair; the light was very strong. I looked at him as he passed me, thinking he might have come to assist me. I know it was him who coughed. One of my seals was found in the court they ran down.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I am a constable. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and went over to Ives, and accompanied him to the George. We found the prisoners there, with another person. As soon as we got in, Ramsay went out at the bar door - there are two or three doors in the bar. Ives told me to bring him back. My brother officer stopped him at the tap-room door. He told Ives he charged him wrongfully; he had said nothing but

"Stop that man" - or I must have heard it. Greenwood kept his seat.

Cross-examined. Q. Who went into the room first - A. A patrol and I, then Ives, Goddard, and Wood. I had my staff - Ramsay knew me perfectly well. We took all the three men, as we always do on finding them at such a house as this where thieves resort - Ives only gave the two prisoners in charge. Ramsay got up to go away before a word was said by any body.

ROBERT WOOD . I am a constable. I accompanied Ives to the George - we went into the tap-room, and were turning round to go into the bar, when Ives and Gibbs saw the prisoners and another man seated in the bar. Ramsay got up to go out. Ives said,

"Go and stop that man." I being near the door, went out and stopped him; he was brought in. He said to the prosecutor,

"You accuse me wrongfully; I know nothing about it." Ives said,

"Put his hat on," which we did. He then said,

"He is the man who robbed me." Nobody had said a word before but

"Stop that man."

Cross-examined. Q. More might have been said without your hearing it - A. I am positive nothing more was said - I was close at Ives's elbow.

COURT. Q. He only said,

"You accuse me wrongfully" - A. That is all, my Lord; he was going out of the door when I stopped him - he had not began to run - he said,

"What do you want? you accuse me wrongfully." We dragged him in, and he said a second time to the prosecutor,

"You accuse me wrongfully, Sir."

RAMSAY'S Defence. I know nothing of it; nor did I ever say,

"You accuse me wrongfully." The officer said,

"Here they are all three of them; we must take them all." Ives said I was something like the back of the man, but he had a light waistcoat on.

RICHARD IVES . I said no such thing.

RAMSAY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

GREENWOOD - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

WILLIAM LESTER.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-23
VerdictNot Guilty

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1168. WILLIAM LESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , twelve sovereigns and nine guineas, the monies of Dedrick Seedenberg in his dwelling house .

DEDRICK SEEDENBERG. I am a sugar baker . In July last, I lodged at my brother George's, who keeps the Red Lion, public-house, by Nightingale-lane ; the prisoner lodged there; he slept one night on my chest, where my money was; two other men slept in the same room. This was about three nights before I missed my money. I had twelve sovereigns and nine guineas in the chest, which was locked; the key was in my breeches pocket, and my breeches under my pillow. I saw it safe on the 26th of July - three days after that he slept on my chest; I told him to get off and get into bed; he said he lay very well. There were two beds in the room, one mine, and one two sailors had. He only slept in my room that night. I missed my money on the 31st of July. I found the chest locked as I left it. I left the room first in the morning he was on the chest then alone - the sailors were gone. I saw the money safe after he slept on the chest, and never saw him in the room after the 26th.

GEORGE SEEDENBERG . I keep the Red Lion. The prisoner lodged in the house - he had come off a voyage about a week before, with Captain Weddle . About a day after the 31st of July I saw the prisoner with two sovereigns in his pocket, and a handful of silver; and two or three days after, I changed him a sovereign at the bar. I asked how he came by so much money; he said he got it from the Captain whom he came with. I had had every body in the house searched before that morning - he said he supposed if he had been at home he should have been overhauled as well as the rest; and though he was a dark man, he committed no robberies. I know that a week before he had no money at all.

RICHARD FORTY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 31st of July, at ten in the morning. I found 5 s. 11 1/2 d. on him - Jacobs gave me six guineas. As his Captain came out of the office, he said to him,

"I paid you no money." The prisoner then burst out a-crying.

EMILY JACOBS . I am the wife of John Jacobs , and live in Swan-alley, Aldgate. The prisoner came to me one Tuesday afternoon, the day before he was taken, and asked if he could have a lodging; I said, Yes; he said he had been paid by his Captain for his voyage, and left six guineas with me to take care of. He had more gold in his pocket - I don't know whether they were sovereigns or guineas. I gave them to Forty next morning. He did not come to sleep there.

Prisoner. Q. Did not I sleep at your house six nights before - A. No.

Q. Did not a man at your house offer me 20 s. 6 d. for them, and I said they were not mine - A. One Barnett was talking to him; I don't know what he said.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my Captain, but met him - I got a sovereign from him. I met Webb an old shipmate, who sailed with me in 1818; he said he had received some prize-money at Greenwich, and gave me six guineas and three sovereigns, to take care of for him - I said I would get somebody to take care of them. He said he did not like Seedenberg to know he had them. I took them to Jacobs.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

HANNAH STANTON, ESTHER CUMMINS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-24
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence; Not Guilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1169. HANNAH STANTON and ESTHER CUMMINS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Woodcock , on the King's highway, on the 15th of August ,

putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one great coat, value 4 s.; one purse, value 2 d., and thirty-five sovereigns , his property.

HENRY WOODCOCK . I am a superannuated Excise-officer , and live at Colchester. On the 15th of August, I was in Whitechapel , between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; it was quite light. I was walking along the path with my great coat under my arm, and my canvas purse in my breeches pocket - it had thirty-five sovereigns and four half-crowns in it. I had been drinking, but knew what I was about very well - I was a little in liquor. Two women came up to me - one laid hold of my arms, and pushed me into Nelson's-court. I resisted, and desired them to let me go; they said I should not. There were people passing. I was frightened, for I could not get out of their arms. They swore I should go to their lodging; I refused - one of them seized my great coat, and took it from me, and the other put her hand into my pocket, and took out my purse, and ran away - both ran up the court. I thought I saw them go into a house in the court; but a man said they were gone one way, and another said they were gone another way. They were making a fool of me, and I gave no heed to them. One of the women was tall, and the other short, and had a full black eye. I can swear positively that the two prisoners are the two women. I did not see them again till next morning, and was then confident of them.

Q. Did you not express a doubt about it at Worship-street - A. I said I firmly believed they were the women.

Q. You were examined before the Justice, and said,

"I think they were the persons; I was rather in liquor, and therefore cannot swear to them" - A. I do not recollect saying any such a word. I gave information at the watch-house between eight and nine o'clock, and described them.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You were middling drunk - A. I was partly drunk - I had only drank beer. I did not express a doubt about them.

Q. Did you not say you could not positively speak to them, because you were intoxicated - A. I said something about that. I swear to them, to the best of my knowledge, and belief. They were off in a twinkling. I was afraid of being murdered. I showed the constable the spot where it happened.

Q. Did you not take the officer to several places before you fixed on the spot - A. When I got to the places, I said that was not the place till I came to Nelson-court; I then said that was it; there are several courts about. I was not drunk; there were many people passing; I could not call them, because I was dragged up the court; I do not think I ever said I could not swear to them.

JOHN CLARK . I am an officer of Whitechapel. On the 15th of August the prosecutor came to me to the watch-house, and said he had been robbed by two women; that one was tall and the other short; that he could not swear to them - he did not describe them further. I went down the road with him, to see if he could point out the place where he was robbed; he looked up two courts, and at last pointed out Nelson's-court, and said that was the place, not the others. I advised him to go home to bed; he was a great deal in liquor. About an hour after he went home, I had information, and went to Cummins' house, and searched it - she lives in Nelson's-court, and I believe, alone. I searched the back yard; and found this great coat, half in and half out of the privy, as it was partly broken down; it was not concealed. I have had it ever since. She said she did not know how it came there; she supposed it was thrown over the wall, which might have happened. I took her to the watch-house. About nine o'clock the next morning, I questioned her again about the coat; she said Hannah had thrown it on her arm. She described Hannah as a Jewess, and pock-marked. I went to Plunkett - he said he knew Hannah - we went to Luke-street, and took Stanton. They would not open the door, and I got in at the window; it is a corner house. I saw the window of the other room open, and called to Plunkett; he followed and took Stanton; her husband was shutting the window down.

Cross-examined. Q. You think he was very much in liquor - A. Yes; he said he could only swear to his coat, and not to the prisoners. When he saw Nelson's-court, he knew it by the post in the middle, which he had clung to. I think the coat might have been thrown over, but it could not then have hung as it did, which was quite smooth. Cummins said in Stanton's presence that she had thrown it in.

RICHARD PLUNKETT . I went with the last witness, in the morning of the 16th, and searched Stanton's house; I knew her before. Nobody would let us in. My partner got in, and desired me to give a look out; when I turned the corner, I could see no one but a man coming towards me. I returned to a chandler's shop, and enquired if she was there; they said No, but I found her up stairs on the first floor. I said,

"I want you, Stanton." She said,

"Oh, Mr. Plunkett, have you a warrant against me?" She said she had a row with a girl, and she thought I had a warrant about it. I said I wanted her for a robbery in Whitechapel-road. She said she knew nothing of any robbery. I found 12 s. 6 d. in her bosom - I found a steel purse in a turn-up bedstead, containing 16 s. 6 d. which she said was private money of her own.

CUMMIN'S Defence. I am innocent.

STANTON'S Defence. I never saw the gentleman; the money I received for a coat of my husband's, which was to be raffled for.

CUMMINS - GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing from the person only .

STANTON - NOT GUILTY .

After the Jury had returned their verdict, the prisoner Cummins stated that she was lame, and it was therefore impossible she could have been the woman who ran away. Partridge the officer stated that in taking her from the watch-house to the office, she appeared weak in the joints, and walked very slow indeed, and begged her husband to assist her; and he thought it impossible she could have escaped

"in a twinkling," as the prosecutor stated.

Mr. JOHN HOLMES , a surgeon, examined the prisoner by desire of the Court, and found her limbs much swollen, arising from a cold after delivery, which must have been much worse a month ago than now; he thought she could not run fast now.

Fined Sixpence and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

JOSEPH BARTIER.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-25
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1170. JOSEPH BARTIER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Langford , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green, about nine o'clock in the night of the 29th of August , with intent to steal and stealing therein, eight knots of silk, value 35 s. his property.

ELIZABETH DAWSON . I live in Shacklewell-street, Bethnal-green , two doors from the prosecutor's. About half-past eight on the evening of the 29th of August, I saw the prisoner come down Shacklewell-street; it was dark, and we could not see whether he had a bundle or not. I had seen him come down the street about five o'clock that evening, with Mrs. Langford; he tried Langford's door, and could not get it open; he then came from the door to the window shutters, and forced them open, threw up the window, jumped in, and was in the house about three minutes; he then came out, leaving the shutters and windows open, and ran up the street as fast as he could. I was about three yards from him, and am positive of him.

Prisoner. Q. How many times did you see me come home with Langford - A. Only once; I cannot say whether Mrs. Langford was sober or drunk.

BARBARA LANGFORD . I am the wife of Thomas Langford ; we live in Shacklewell-street, in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. On the 29th of August, about five o'clock, the prisoner came home with me. I had some silk up stairs, tied in a handkerchief, and put in an old bag. While he was there I said,

"I will go up stairs and look after my property." I had known him a long time. He did not go up with me, nor did I bring the silk down, or say any thing about it; but he knew we had silk, as we get our living by it. About half-past eight I said I would go to my husband's club, to see if he was coming home. The prisoner said,

"You go outside, mistress, and put the shutters too, and I will fasten them." I left him inside the house, to fasten the shutters; he came out, and I locked the door, and went to my husband's club - he went away. I was fetched home by my neighbours about a quarter before nine, and found the window shutter was broken open, and the window shoved up, which was shut when I went out. I missed the silk, which was left with me to wind. I have to pay for it all; there were eight knots, weighing nine ounces and a half, and are charged to me by my employer 28 s. 6 d. I have never seen it since.

Prisoner. Q. Who took you off the tap-room table drunk, at half-past nine o'clock, and led you home drunk - A. I was not in liquor; he did not lead me home, but ran down the street as fast as he could. I was at the Green Gate, public-house, for five minutes, and went from thence to the Black Dog, for my husband; but I had been home with the prisoner before that.

SARAH BROWN . I live next door to Mr. Langford; I saw the prisoner come home with Mr. Langford between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and Mrs. Langford came home in about ten minutes; they afterwards all went out together, and about eight o'clock in the evening the prisoner came home with Mrs. Langford. He came to me for a light - I gave him a candle and candlestick. He said,

"Mrs. Langford, go out and shut the shutters, and I'll fasten them;" which she did, and he fastened them, to the best of my knowledge. She then went in, and they both came out together. I cannot say she was properly sober; she had drank a little. I saw them fasten the door and go up the street together; and in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after, he came down the street alone; he tried the door and found it fast; he then opened the window shutters, threw up the sash, and got into the room; he remained there three or five minutes. I and Dawson watched him, and saw him get out, leaving the shutters and windows open, and run away. After that he returned again with Mrs. Langford, and she said,

"My God, the shutters and windows are open;" he said,

"Yes, I know they are; for I came back to the place, thinking it was not safe, and I thought I heard somebody on the premises, and could not get in at the door; so I got in at the window, and finding nobody there, I came away again." He went away - I saw no more of him till the Monday, when the officer brought him to Langford's. I am sure he is the man - I had seen him three times in the course of the day. I asked why he did not fasten the shutters and window? he said, because he was frightened, and thought they might think he had robbed them.

Prisoner. Q. Where did I go to after getting out of the window - A. To the Black Dog. He leant over the bar door and said to the landlady,

"Mrs. Stokes, I wish you would go up to Langford, and tell him to come down, for his house is open; and if anything is a miss, I am afraid he may think it is me." This was after Mrs. Langford had come home.

THOMAS LANGFORD . I met the prisoner on the 29th of August, and had something to drink with him. I have never found the silk, and know nothing of the robbery.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not very drunk - A. I had been drinking, but was able to go to the club. He bore a good character while he worked for me, which was some time ago.

WILLIAM GIBBS . I apprehended the prisoner on Monday, the 2d of September, with another man, at the corner of Flower Pot-alley, Bethnal-green. I found nothing on him. He said,

"I understand you have information against me." I said, Yes. He said he knew nothing of the charge.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I was informed that night that Langford said I had robbed him, and I was willing to go with you - A. Yes; he well knew I should not let him go; for I had been after him ever since the robbery.

Prisoner's Defence (Written). My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I declare before the face of Almighty God, that I am innocent of the charge. I was at the Green Gate, public house, on the 30th of August; the prosecutor and his wife came and sat in the same box, and observed that they had known me from a child, and I had worked for them when young; I drank with them, and went with them to the Black Dog, and sat drinking till Langford said he was tired and sleepy; they asked me to see them home, which I did. Mrs. Langford said she was going out, and told me to call Langford about eight o'clock, to go to his club; I went away and returned at that time, when I found the shutters open; and went to the Black Dog and told him his place was not safe. He seemed to take no notice. I went down, and found Mrs. Langford asleep on the taproom table. I took her home, got a light, and asked her if all was safe. I heard no more till Monday night, when I saw Gibbs, and was agreeable to go any where. I went to the watch-house without being collared.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

EDMUND MUSTOE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-26
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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1171. EDMUND MUSTOE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , at St. Marylebone, one brooch, value 3 l.; one musical box, value 10 l.; one watch, value 20 l.; one watch chain, value 2 l.; one key, value 7 s., and three seals, value 3 l., the goods of Frederick Boyce , in his dwelling-house .

MESSRS. PLATT and LAW conducted the prosecution.

LIEUTENANT FREDERICK BOYCE . I have a house in Hay's-place; there is a stable to it, which is in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . I have a room over the stable, which has occasionally been occupied by myself and my servant. I keep my horse in the stable. I had let part of the house; but kept the stable in my own possession, and the room over it, and had a bed there, and slept there at times. I left town some time in June, intending to return, and use the room as usual. I returned the latter end of June or July - I had left Powell, my house-keeper, in care of the room, to sleep there or in the house, which she liked. I had a bureau in the room, in which I left my gold watch and chain, and another gold chain separated from the watch, a gold and pearl brooch, a musical snuff-box, a silver snuff-box, a silver tea-pot, and considerable other property. When I came to town, I missed the articles stated in the indictment - I had seen them safe five or six days before I left town. I was absent a fortnight. The bureau was locked. In consequence of information, I apprehended the prisoner in Broad-street, on the 7th or 8th of July. I saw him searched. The constable shewed me two duplicates, which I returned him.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are the stables immediately behind the house - A. Yes, and connected with it, and in the same parish. The gold watch cost twenty-eight guineas.

ANN POWELL . I was housekeeper to Mr. Boyce in June and July. He left town in June, and returned in July. The prisoner is a nephew of mine. While my master was absent, he came to the place, and slept in the room where the bureau was for above a week at different times. I do not recollect the last time he was there.

GEORGE GILLESPIE . I am a watchman. The prosecutor brought the prisoner to me in Broad-street, Golden-square, about a quarter past eleven o'clock, on the 7th of July. As we went to the watch-house, he said,

"My G - d, Sir, don't send me to the watch-house - I shall return you all your property to-morrow." Mr. Boyce said,

"Say nothing to convict yourself; I don't want to convict you."

ROBERT CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am constable of the night. I searched the prisoner, and found three duplicates on him, and a key. In the course of the night, he said, he had stolen the watch, and pledged it, and sold the duplicate to a Mr. Turner. I found Turner in the morning by the prisoner's description, and I saw him deliver a gold watch, seal, and key to Suttie.

CHARLES VAUGHAN . I am servant to Mr. Dry, a pawnbroker, in St. Martin's-lane. On the 21st of June, the prisoner pawned a musical snuff-box, for 1 l. - I am certain of him. Next day he pawned a gold watch, with chain, seal, and key, for 14 l.; he said he brought them from Captain Boyce, 12, Edgware-road. Turner came to redeem the gold watch about a week after. On the 3d of July, a brooch was pawned for 12 s., by a young man, who said he came from Turner. (A duplicate found on the prisoner for a brooch, was here produced). This was what I gave the person - it is in my hand writing.

GEORGE TURNER . I gave Suttie a watch, chain, and seals. I had the duplicate from the prisoner at the Horse and Groom, public-house, Castle-street. He had asked me to lend him 3 l. on a duplicate of a watch, and I said I had no objection, and that I should redeem the watch, as the interest would be considerable, and hoped he would take it from me as soon as possible. I redeemed it at Dry's.

THOMAS SUTTIE . I produce the watch I received from Turner. I am assistant to Chapman.

GEORGE TURNER . This is the watch.

CHARLES VAUGHAN . They are the watch and seals which were pawned with me.

EDWARD CORBAN . I pawned this broach at Dry's. The prisoner sent me with it. I gave him the duplicate.

MR. BOYCE. The property is all mine. The watch cost twenty-eight guineas, and is worth forty guineas with appendages.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you leave the key of the bureau - A. In a little box in the bureau drawer, which was locked, but it could be opened by taking off the bureau. The stable is connected with the premises by walls.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy, by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

WILLIAM MAYNE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-27
VerdictGuilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1172. WILLIAM MAYNE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , one cast iron pipe, value 5 s. , the property of the City of London Gas Light and Coke Company .

Mr. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

JOHN GROMUS . I am superintendant of the London Gas Light and Coke Company. In consequence of information, I went to the pig market in Smithfield , where the Company had several hundred yards of pipe; I charged the prisoner there with taking the pipe, and gave him in custody. I told him there were witnesses to prove he had taken it from the spot; he then said he had taken it, and would shew us the place it was in; he took us to a house in Field-lane, which he said belonged to one Sheppard. The officer found the pipe there, broken in three pieces. Sheppard said he believed the prisoner to be the person he bought it of, and that he gave him 6 1/2 d. for it; it cost the Company 5 s.; I do not know the value of it when broken up.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. It lay in the open street - A. Yes; it was six feet long. The officer told him he had been seen breaking it with a stone, and taking it away.

JOSEPH CLARK . I am agent to Ward and Co. iron merchants, Black friars-road; we furnished several hundred yards of iron pipe to the Gas Company; the pipe in question is the same sort; the price was 5 s.; it is worth 2 s. 3 d. or 2 s. 6 d. in the state it is now in.

DANIEL GOLDING . I live at the corner of the pig market. The prisoner was one of the paviours there; I saw him take the pipe from the corner to the end of the market, and break it with a large stone. I followed him to Sheppard's shop in Field-lane with the largest piece, and saw it laid in the scale. It is an old iron shop.

JEREMIAH GOLDING . I saw the prisoner take the two

small pieces of the pipe, and followed him to Sheppard's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw these three pieces lying on the carriage way for six days, and thought them good for nothing, as nobody looked after them.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

MARK PEMBER.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-28
VerdictGuilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1173. MARK PEMBER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , one iron spade, value 2 s. , the goods of the City of London Gas Light and Coke Company .

ANTHONY ROBINS . I am a watchman in the employ of the City Gas Light and Coke Company, at the works in Dorset-street ; the prisoner is lamplighter . On the 19th of August it was his duty to be there till eleven o'clock; I was waiting in my box at a quarter before eleven; he asked if his time was out; I said no, but he went out. I cried the hour of eleven, and on coming up the yard, I slipped a little blind back, and saw a man on his hands and knees, with his arms under the gate, and saw him draw a spade out; I opened my gate, and cried, Stop thief! he ran off as hard as he could; I followed, and at the end of Crown-court he threw the spade down. Whitaker took him. The spade had no business near the gate; he had moved it from the shed; it was the Company's spade.

GEORGE WHITAKER . I am watchman of Bridewell. I heard the cry, and stopped the prisoner, who was running. Robins gave me the spade.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had taken the spade to use in his garden, intending to return it.

ANTHONY ROBINS . He did not say he intended to borrow it.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

CHARLES ROBINSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-29
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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1174. CHARLES ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th August , at St. Dunstan in the West, one bag, value 2 d.; one snuff-box, value 5 s.; forty-eight sovereigns; two 10 l. and one 5 l. bank note, the property of Richard Holmes Laurie , in his dwelling-house .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. RICHARD HOLMES LAURIE. I am a map and print-seller , and live at No. 53, Fleet-street, in the parish of St. Dunstan in the West . In August last the prisoner was in my employ, as errand boy , and slept in the house. Between two and three o'clock in the morning of the 27th of July, I was called up and informed that the house was broken open. On examining the counting-house, I found the desk broken open, and also the iron closet opened, and a drawer within the iron closet, which contained the notes and sovereigns stated in the indictment, in a bag, and bills and papers. I cannot exactly say how many sovereigns there were, but I presume about forty or fifty; there were two 10 l. bank-notes, and one 5 l.; they were gone also; a snuffbox, which had a portrait of the Duke of Wellington, was taken out of the chest. The prisoner had repeatedly seen me put money in the iron chest. No other place was forced open. I searched the house all over, with the watchman, but found nobody; I called the prisoner up, and he assisted in the search; in the course of which he went into the kitchen, where there is a copper on the left hand side, and on the right there is a flue, to convey steam into the chimney; the prisoner got up on the copper, to search this flue; I said,

"What is the use of your getting up there? nobody can be hid there;" he got down, and made no farther observation. Between ten and eleven o'clock next morning, Harrison the officer examined the premises; he told the prisoner he should search him, and said it must be some person in the house who had done it. The maid servant and the shopman slept in the house, besides the prisoner; they were all searched, but nothing found. Four days after, from other causes, the prisoner was taken to Guildhall, and discharged; he was still in my service, and after he was examined, I gave orders that he should not be admitted into any part of the house but the shop; he did not know of these orders. The maid servant was discharged after the prisoner's examination, not about this robbery, but about something the prisoner said of her conduct; the prisoner went before the girl; I discharged him after his examination on the 3d of August; she stopped in my service till the prisoner was taken a second time. About two days after his discharge he called for his clothes, which were kept in a garret where he slept; I ordered them to be brought down to him, which was done; he endeavoured to go down the kitchen stairs, but the servant hindered him; he did go down the back cellar stairs for some brushes. I saw some chimney sweepers ring at the bell about seven o'clock on Tuesday morning, the 13th of August; in consequence of this I directed that none should sweep the chimneys but Mr. Brown or a person in his employ. On the Thursday Mr. Brown's boy came, and the servant knocked at my bed-room door, and gave Mrs. Laurie, in my presence, a bag containing forty-seven sovereigns, and one was found afterwards; I am sure the bag is the same which was in my chest, and the amount is the same, as near as I can guess. I expected the two boys to call again on Friday, to sweep the chimney, and got Harrison to be ready in case they came, which they did about seven o'clock, and were let in. Harrison came across, and apprehended them, and in about a quarter of an hour after they came I saw the prisoner in Harrison's custody; he had gone out in consequence of what the sweeps said, and brought the prisoner in in about two minutes; he was taken before Mr. Alderman Brown, and committed.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. How many days after the alarm did the prisoner leave your service - A. It happened on the 27th of July, and he left on the 3d of August; he had full access to the house for the first four days.

Q. And had ample time and opportunity to remove any thing during the seven days - A. Certainly; the counting house is in the back part of the premises; he must come down from the garret into the shop to go there. When the alarm was given, I found the street door open, and the counting-house door also; the side of the desk was wrenched off, as well as the lock being picked or forced; it must have taken some time to do it; the chest was open, and the lock of the drawer in it picked. I called the prisoner down from his bed-room. He made some charges against the

servant girl, and that girl brought the sovereigns up. The bank-notes and snuff-box are not found.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where did the servant sleep - A. On the 3d floor; the shopman slept in the next room to the prisoner; they were all alarmed at the same time, dressed, and came down. I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock that night; I could easily hear a person come down stairs if he had his shoes on.

WILLIAM GILLESPIE . I am a watchman; my box is several doors from the prosecutor's, on the same side of the way; I passed his house every half hour, and looked at all the doors; if his had been opened, I must have seen it. I did not notice it open at half-past three; but a little before four, two men came by, and said Mr. Laurie's door was open; I found it so, and alarmed the family; I assisted Mr. Laurie and two of his servants in searching the house, but found nothing.

Cross-examined. Q. You only go round every half-hour - A. No. I had not passed the door five minutes before I received the information. I did not stop the two men; they went away.

ARCHIBALD LUNAIN . I am a watchman. My box is nearly opposite Mr. Laurie's door - I can see the door from it. I saw nobody about it on the night in question to cause my suspicion - I was called by Gillespie, and went over with him. I go my rounds every half-hour, and am seldom in my box.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a marshalman. I went to Mr. Laurie's house first about a quarter or half-past nine o'clock, and was shewn the state of things; there was no force on the door from without; it must have been opened from within. I have no doubt about it. There was a chain and bar to the door, neither of which were forced. I searched the premises; no place had been opened or attempted to be opened, except where the property was. We called the prisoner up stairs, and questioned him. I told him I thought somebody had broken out, and not in; I searched him, and all the servants, but found nothing. On Friday, the 16th of August, I went to the prosecutor's house about five o'clock in the morning; I was walking up and down opposite the house, watching for two sweeps; and just before seven o'clock two chimney sweeps came. I followed them into the house. The servant let them in. I questioned them for full ten minutes; the servant girl was there all the time, and in consequence of an observation she made, I ran out instantly up to the left, and saw the prisoner standing at the corner of Crane-court under the arch of the court, against the wall, singing - I took him, and said,

"This is found out, Mr. Charles;" he said nothing. I took him over to Mr. Laurie's, into the presence of the two sweeps, and the servant. The biggest sweep said,

"That is the man who hired me to sweep the chimnies, and to take the bag of gold out, and I was to have two sovereigns" - the prisoner said nothing; the sweep said to Mr. Laurie,

"I did not mean to take the gold out of the house, Sir, but to give it you." He then said to the prisoner,

"What a pretty mess you have got me into?" the prisoner said nothing - the other sweep was frightened. I took them all three to the Compter. The prisoner was committed, and the sweeps discharged.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was present while you were questioning the sweeps - A. Mr. Laver, the shopman, the girl, and Mills, who was with me, and I think Mr. Laurie was coming down stairs. The door must have been opened inside.

Q. Anybody connected with persons outside could let them in - A. Certainly. The sweep said he was to go down to the chimney below, and in a certain flue he would find a bag of money.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You went out in consequence of what the maid-servant said - A. Yes. I had seen her looking out of the window for an hour before.

STANDLEY HOGDEN . I am a chimney-sweeper to Mr. Brown, who sweeps the prosecutor's chimney. On Thursday, the 15th of August, about seven o'clock in the morning, I went to sweep the chimney, and in the steam flue of the kitchen, I found a bag containing something; I gave it to the servant girl. I looked into the flue with a light, and found a sovereign, which I gave to the servant. I thought there was money in the bag, because I heard it jingle. She took the bag up stairs, and told me to go up the chimney.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the girl tell you to look in that flue - A. Nobody told me - I was feeling for the copper flue, which goes into the chimney, for if we do not attend to that the soot goes into it. When I gave her the bag, she told me to go on; and when I came down, Mr. Laurie told me to look further, and I found the sovereign.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You went to the flue quite by accident - A. Quite.

SARAH HEAVEN . I was Mr. Laurie's servant in July and August. After the robbery, I remember two chimney sweeps coming to the door - I did not open it; the errand boy told them when to come again. I did not hear him - they were not let in. Two days after the last witness came, and swept the chimney. I was in the kitchen when he found the bag in the flue - he went there of his own accord. He delivered me a bag from the flue - I opened it, and saw it contained sovereigns, and immediately took it up stairs, and gave it to my mistress in the presence of my master. After the chimney was swept, I saw the boy take a single sovereign from the flue. On the following morning Harrison was set to watch the house. I was up at six o'clock, an hour before the two sweeps came. I placed myself at the front room, second floor window, with the sash up. The two sweeps came. I saw the prisoner a quarter of an hour before that time, at the back of a mail coach, standing up holding the straps, going towards St. Pauls's; I saw him no where else. When Harrison spoke to the sweeps I told him what I had seen; (They were the two boys who had been there three days before). He went out to look for the prisoner, and returned with him in two or three minutes. The biggest sweep said,

"You are a pretty fellow for bringing me into this scrape," and that the prisoner was the lad who sent him to sweep the chimneys, and to tell the lie, by saying that he came from Mr. Brown's when he did not. The prisoner made no answer. I do not remember anything more being said. The money was produced.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you servant of all-work - A. Yes. I had twelve guineas a year.

Q. Were you very angry with the boy for the accusations he made against you - A. No, because some of it was true, and I forgive him the rest. I saw the sweeps come twice,

their faces were black. I do not know that I had seen them at other times. I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock on the night of the robbery.

Q. I suppose you were accused of having sweet-hearts - A. Yes. I saw nobody on the night of the robbery, I am positive. I slept in the back room, second floor. I am not in service now.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was any body in the house with you on that night, or did you see any body there - A. No. I was not dismissed in consequence of the robbery.

THOMAS SEEKINS . I am a chimney-sweeper, and live in One Tun-court, Strand. I am climbing journeyman to Mrs. Watson. I was never in Mr. Brown's employ. I know the prisoner; he first spoke to me one Monday, in the Strand; he met me there, and said he had left his place in Fleet-street, and told me to go and see about the kitchen chimnies; I was to ring the bell or knock, and I should see the servant or the young lad. He told me to tell the lad if I saw him, that the chimney had not been done for three months. He said there was a bag of money in the copper flue, and I was to bring it away, and he would give me two sovereigns - that it would not chink; it was tied up safe. I had never swept Mr. Laurie's chimnies. I was to say I came from Brown's of Water-lane. I went to Mr. Laurie's on Monday morning, and the lad told me to come next morning, which I did, and was let in, and told to come on Friday morning at six o'clock. I saw the prisoner on the Monday evening in the Strand, about half-past six o'clock, and on Tuesday morning I saw him about seven o'clock, and told him what I was to do, and he said then it would be all right. I went on Friday morning, and Harrison came and took me into custody. I had Woolley, a boy, with me - I do not think he knew what it was about; he was present on Monday when the prisoner spoke, but did not know what passed between us. Harrison spoke to me in the shop, then went out, and brought in the prisoner - I said,

"You have brought me in a nice scrape." I had told him in the Strand that if I got the bag I would give it to the gentleman or lady - he said I ought to be ashamed of myself, and I mentioned it in the shop that morning. I was taken before the Alderman.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you still work for Mrs. Watson - A. Yes. I saw the lad on Monday and Tuesday mornings. I am quite sure I saw nobody but him. I saw the shopman and servant girl on Friday, and not before.

Q. Why did you not go, and tell Mr. Laurie of this - A. I know I am guilty of that; I kept it to myself till Friday; I told the prisoner on Monday, that I should give it to the lady or gentleman. When he first spoke to me, he said he was very wild that he could not go into the kitchen to get the money out of the flue. I told nobody of it. I have served ten years with Watson, and am thirty years old. I told the constable what the prisoner told me; I had nothing to do with him before, but have often seen him go through Hungerford market. I knew nothing of it till he told me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You never spoke to him till Monday - A. No; I never saw the servant before Friday, whether she saw me by looking through the window, I cannot say: I did not see her at the window (looking at her).

Q. Did you expect any thing for returning the money to the gentleman - A. Unless he chose to give me any thing. I told Harrison, who sent me about the chimney before he brought the prisoner in.

SARAH HEAVEN . I saw him on Tuesday out of the window; I cannot say whether he saw me.

JAMES BROWN . I am a chimney-sweeper, and have worked for Mr. Laurie twenty years; I sent my man there on Thursday, by order, but never sent Seekins there.

MR. LAURIE. I produce the bag; it is the same which contained the sovereigns stolen on the night in question; here is a mark on it; I had only one; it contained many more than two sovereigns.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, my Lord; I leave it all to my Counsel.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth and previous good character.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

DAVID WALLACE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-30
VerdictNot Guilty

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THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13.

1175. DAVID WALLACE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , four pieces of trimming, value 20 s.; one piece of satin, value 2 l.; three handkerchiefs, value 10 s.; four feathers, value 10 s., and twenty-one yards lace, value 4 l. , the goods of Richard Davis .

SECOND COUNT. Stating them to belong to Thomas Hosier .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS HOSIER . I am proprietor of Miller's Wharf, Lower East Smithfield . I had a box in my warehouse, directed to Thomas Davis ; it contained the articles stated in the indictment among others; the prisoner was employed on board the Comet , which lay near our wharf. On Saturday, the 31st of August, I found the box had been broken open; I had not seen it for twelve months before; it had been in our warehouse all that time.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am landing clerk at Miller's Wharf. I have the box; I saw it safe twelve months before the robbery. On the 31st of August, about eight o'clock at night, I found it broken open, and the warehouse in which it was broken open also; I did not know the contents; something had been taken out of it; I had seen the prisoner on the wharf that day.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was not a porter's apron found in the warehouse next day - No; it was found in another warehouse. He was on the wharf the same as any other seaman.

STEPHEN KELLY . I am a labourer on the wharf. I went to the warehouse, and found the box broken open; I found a parcel lying on the floor, under the warehouse; it was tied round with tarred twine; I gave it to Roberts. An apron was found in another warehouse on the same floor; the box was among other packages.

THOMAS HOSIER . I know the contents of the box, as we had a dispute about it; I know these to be part of the things; it lay in our lumber-room, and could be easily got at. The prisoner was searched the same night; he

denied ever having seen the parcel, and also the twine, by which it was tied. I gave him in charge, and next morning I went on board the Comet; his bag was produced, and under some dirty clothes in it were four parcels of trimmings, which were taken from the box. The trimmings in the box were similar to this.

JOHN MURRANT . On the 31st, about eight o'clock at night, I took him in charge - he denied all knowledge of the parcel. Next morning Mr. Hosier gave me the bag from the Comet. The prisoner said it was his, and that he found the trimmings in a privy on the wharf, and took them on board. I asked why he did not tell Mr. Hosier he had them - he said he was only asked about feathers and flowers.

MR. HOSIER. There was a considerable quantity of trimming in the box, like this, of the same pattern and fabric. Much more has been stolen than what is found.

JOHN TAPSAN . I am a sail-maker, and have a loft at Miller's-wharf. On the 31st of August, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came up to my loft, and asked if I would give him a piece of tar twine to mend his waistcoat, which I did; it was twine like that the parcel is tied with. My loft is on the same floor as the warehouse. I saw him again about one o'clock on the floor under the warehouse asleep, in the very warehouse the parcel was found - he had no business there; but the boys are frequently there.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS PRIOR.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-31
VerdictMiscellaneous > unfit to plead

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1176. THOMAS PRIOR was indicted for the wilful murder of Eliza Martin .

But it appearing from evidence produced that the prisoner was insane, the Jury found him not of sound mind; and therefore incapable of pleading to the indictment .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

THOMAS CLINES, MICHAEL COIN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-32
VerdictNot Guilty

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1177. THOMAS CLINES and MICHAEL COIN were indicted for the wilful murder of James Murty .

MESSRS. ANDREWS and LAW conducted the prosecution.

MICHAEL HEENEY . On Saturday the 30th of July, I was at the Coopers' Arms, public-house. I saw Murty and Gantly there. Murty and I were taking a pot of beer - he observed that Gantly was there. Gantly came in, and Clines came in three or four minutes after. They both sat in a seat opposite to where Murty and I were. Murty continued sitting there for near five minutes, and when the pot of porter was nearly finished, he said something to me - we finished the beer, and he got up, and was going from the house - Gantly was still sitting, but as soon as Murty rose, and walked towards the passage, as if to go out (I was with him) he (Gantly) followed, and went into the bar, which is the way out. Murty stopped to take part of some beer in the tap-room - Gantly was then standing with his back to the bar; Murty would have to pass him to go out. As he passed him, Gantly immediately put up his right fist, and inflicted a wound on the left side of Murty's head; he struck him with the soft part of his hand. I saw Clines a moment after this, but not at the time the blow was struck. Murty stumbled over against the thing the gin cask stood against. Gantly laid hold of him by the right arm - Clines immediately came out of the taproom into the passage, and dragged me by the back of my neck from parting them - I was endeavouring to part them when he seized me. The blood came from the deceased's head in consequence of the first blow, and therefore I endeavoured to part them. The stillion supported him from falling. I saw several other blows inflicted. Murty kept on his legs, for he was held up by Gantly, and by the assistance of Clines. Gantly held him by the right shoulder, and Clines was behind the deceased with his two hands against his back, driving him up against Gantly, to prevent him from falling, while Gantly inflicted the wounds. Murty was struggling to disengage himself as well as he could, with his left hand; his other hand was held by Gantly - he had him by the right arm. Gantly's fist was not closed in the proper form; he had some instrument concealed in his hand - I could see about three quarters of an inch of it; it appeared to me a blunt instrument, about half an inch thick, and strait; either iron or steel - it was of a hard substance. I did not observe it after the second blow; each blow produced blood, as it was inflicted. Not a word had passed between them before the first blow. I am quite sure the deceased did not strike Gantly first. About five blows were inflicted before I went to the door and called Watch. I did not leave till it was all over, nor was I out of sight except in calling the watchman, which was only a moment - the watchman nor I could render any assistance, being unequal to them. When I returned from calling the watch, both Clines and Coin were about the deceased. I did not see Coin lay hands on him at all. I saw him drive the people back saying,

"Let them, have fair play." There was a crowd about, saying it was a shame to see the man murdered. Murty was all this time bleeding from all parts of his head - his hands were then loosened; he was in a weak state, from loss of blood, and unable to offer any resistance. He was leaning against the end of the bar. When the watchman found he could do nothing he sprang his rattle, and other watchmen came from all quarters - it was just finished when they came in; it had continued from the time the watchman went for assistance until the others came - it lasted six or seven minutes altogether I think, but cannot say particularly. I saw four or five blows then. I came in with Mahoney the first watchman, and stood at the entrance of the door, intending to secure Gantly if he came out. My mind was more upon getting assistance than noticing them. After the first four or five blows, I did not see Clines do anything; he only kept close to Murty. I could not secure Gantly, but I told the watch to keep a look out outside. I am positive Gantly did not go out at the door I stood at. One door leads into West-street, and the other leads into Sharp's-alley. When it was over there was a search for Gantly - Clines and Coin were still in the tap-room, and were taken. Before that, I went into the tap-room, and said to Clines that it was a shame to see a man murdered like the deceased was; Coin was within hearing. Clines and a strange man told me to mind my own business, and sit down. Nobody gave charge of them, for we were in search of Gantly - the deceased and I came in and gave charge of them eight or nine minutes after. I had seen Gantly and the deceased together about a fortnight before, one Sunday night; I

was in the same public-house, and saw Gantly challenge Murty to fight him; they tossed for the ground, and Gantly won the toss.

Q. What were they going to fight about - A. The deceased had been beat by Gantly on the Saturday night, and in about twenty minutes after I saw them in the passage scuffling, and the watchman parted them.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. You were a friend of the deceased's - A. I had known him for several years. I went into the house after nine o'clock - the deceased afterwards came in and joined me. Gantly and Clines were opposite on the other side of the room; they could not hear what passed between us. Murty was leaving the house, and met a relation who handed him some beer - I was right behind walking after him. Gantly was in front of him with his back to the bar. Clines had not left his seat, and did not come up till Gantly struck Murty - he came behind Murty after the first or second blow. Gantly kept striking. I only saw something in his hand once, which was the second blow.

Q. Did not Clines come up and say,

"Let all be fair, man to man" - A. No; he said fair play, and dragged me back as I was going to part them, seeing the blood.

Q. Did not Coin come in with Rowland, the watchman - A. I saw him in the passage nearly at the finish of the fight - he was not in the tap-room. The prisoners had an opportunity to leave the house, but did not attempt.

MR. LAW. Q. When Clines was behind Murty, was it visible what the effects of the blows were - A. It was - he was covered with blood, and not resisting; he tried to strike, but the blow did not fall. Mahoney was the first watchman who came in.

MARY CORKER . I am between fourteen and fifteen years old. Murty was my uncle; he sometimes went to the Coopers' Arms, and I sometimes go there. When you go in at the street door, there is a long passage which leads into the tap-room; the bar is on the left hand, before you get to the tap-room. On Saturday night, the 20th of July, a little before ten o'clock, my father sent me there for my uncle; it was all quiet when I went; I found him in the tap-room, in company with the last witness - they were sitting drinking. It is an open room, not parted with boxes. I saw both the prisoners and Gantly in the room when I went in; they seemed all three of one party, not in company with my uncle. I did not know of Gantly and my uncle having any words. I told him to go home, for my father wanted him; I spoke privately to him; he answered me; I waited for him in the tap-room, and in about a quarter of an hour he got up to go. I did not hear the prisoners or Gantly interfere with him. When he got up to come away, Heeney went with him; my uncle went first, and I was with him. Gantly followed my uncle out, and some person stopped to let him have some drink, when Gantly got before him and waited. The prisoners remained in the tap-room; Gantly stood by the bar, in the passage; my uncle bid the man who gave him the beer good night, and when he got up to Gantly, Gantly said,

"You did not bid me good night, you b - r," and then struck him a blow over the forehead; the blood came from his forehead directly. Betty Dogherty , who had been in company with Clines, and who had followed my uncle out, hollowed out that Gantly was fighting; this brought the two prisoners from the tap-room to the place; several blows had been struck before this. I could see that Gantly had something in his hand like iron; his hand was shut, so that it must have been a small thing. All the blows were struck in the same manner, and on the head; each blow appeared to produce more blood. My uncle did not fall; I screamed out Murder, and called to Mr. Lake, who was inside the bar; he did not come, but said, he did not care for my uncle, what he got, or if he got as much more. My uncle tried to get away, but Clines came and held him, and Coin came and prevented his falling. I think he received three or four blows before the prisoners came up. Clines and Gantly were both beating my uncle - Clines gave him a thump on the mouth, and as he went away kicked him, and said,

"Let the b - r go, he has had enough." My uncle was knocked down at that time. While this was going on, Heeney called for assistance, and Bridget Cahill went for the watchman; the prisoners went into the tap-room again; Gantly went backwards into the yard; there was a door there by which he could get out. My uncle was taken to the hospital about eleven o'clock. He gave no offence to Gantly or the prisoners, that I saw; he was much hurt by the blows; I cannot say whether the prisoners saw what Gantly had in his hand.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Were you ever examined about this since your uncle's death - A. Not by any person but the Coroner; I have not spoken to any body about it since. I am sure both the prisoners were in the tap-room when I first went in; I have often seen them having a pot of beer together. I saw the way every blow was struck; I could see the iron at the bottom part of his hand; four or five blows were struck before the prisoners came up, and his blood was flowing before they came. Heeney stood at the tap-room door all the time; my uncle and Gantly were between the tap-room and street doors; I think Heeney might have heard what Lake said; he was near enough to see Clines strike my uncle in the mouth and kick him. The prisoners were sitting quietly till Dogherty went in and said they were fighting; Heeney must have seen the prisoners sitting at the table. There were many other persons in the room.

MR. ANDREWS. Q. Were you a good deal alarmed - A. Yes; my attention was principally directed to my uncle; I did not observe Heeney go to the door; a watchman came in while they were beating him.

BRIDGET CAHILL . I live in West-street, West Smithfield. I was at the Coopers' Arms about ten o'clock, and saw the deceased there; Gantly and both the prisoners were also there; I stood at the bar, and saw Murty come out of the tap-room; he went towards the bar; Gantly came by him from the tap-room, and somebody offered Murty a pot to drink out of; he returned the pot, and bid the man good night; Gantly turned on his foot, and said,

"You b - r, you have not bid me good night," and struck him over the forehead, not with his knuckles, but with the soft part of his hand; the first blow fetched blood; he struck him several times. A woman named Eliza Dogherty , who cohabits with Clines, cried out that Gantly was quarreling; Clines then came out of the tap-room; Gantly continued to strike, and Clines held Murty's hands, as far as I could see. I did not see Murty strike; Clines stood by his side, quite close to him; Murty tried to stumble

several times; but he was kept up by Clines; Gantly continued to beat him, and Dogherty said,

"Give it him - go it." I saw Coin in the middle of the row, at the entrance of the bar; I did not observe him do any thing; there were many people there; I saw Corker there; she was near Murty; she screamed out to the landlord to put her uncle inside the bar; he said he would not - that it served him right - that he wished he had more of it, for he had not had as much as he deserved; Coin was in the room when Corker called out.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. Have you no other name than Cahill - A. No; the man I live with is named Gavin; some people call me by that name. One Collins of Blackwall had taken me there to treat me with a pint of beer; I only went to the entrance of the bar; I was there before Gantly came out of the tap-room. Heeney came out of the tap-room, as far as the bar; I cannot say whether he came out with Murty. The tap-room door was open. Two blows were given before Dogherty sung out; then Clines came out first. I saw Coin in the midst of the row; there were so many in the room, I could not rightly tell who was there; but on looking about I saw Coin there, standing behind his back as it were; Clines struck him the last blow in the mouth with his fist. I have been at this bar seven years ago, for pawning from a ready-furnished lodging, and was confined twelve months. Murphy's head was all in a gore of blood.

THOMAS SUTCH . I am a shopkeeper, and live opposite the Coopers' Arms, in West-street. On Saturday night, the 20th of July, a little past ten o'clock, I heard a noise there, and went into the bar, which is near the street door; a great number of people were there; I saw Murty with his head bleeding, among a number of people, and one in particular, beating him; he held him, I believe, with the left hand, and struck him with the other. All the blows were with the flat part of his hand. I did not see the deceased return the blows; he was standing when I saw him; he was held by the men who were striking, and apparently by the mob behind him; he bled very much in the head and face, so much so that I could not discern his features. The prisoners were there among the crowd; I think there were twenty or thirty people there; a watchman came in; I did not notice one man more active than the rest; they appeared to hold the man up; the prisoners were in the mob, apparently assisting the rest; I was not there above five minutes. I cannot say that the man who struck had any thing in his hand, but I thought he had, by the manner of his striking. I have no doubt of the two prisoners being there when the first watchman came in. I did not see any body try to prevent what was going on; I was greatly alarmed; I saw Lake in the bar; he must have seen what was going on better than I; he was near to them. After the man was rescued from the men who were beating him, I thought all was safe, and went home; he did not appear to be particularly weak; he walked very fast to the watch-house, but the blood ran from him almost like rain. I recollect Gantly's person; he was the man who struck the blows. A shutter fell in among the crowd by the scuffle; that was two minutes after I went in.

DANIEL MAHONEY . I am a watchman. On the night of the 20th of July Mrs. Welch came out, calling Watch and Murder; my box is near the door. I went into the Coopers' Arms alone; I endeavoured to get to the man who was receiving the blows, but I was pushed back by many of them and overpowered. I stopped till I saw the man knocked down and then ran out and sprung my rattle; I went as far as Smithfield; I came back with assistance, and saw the man standing by himself by the bar; his head was covered with blood; he was the same man whom I had seen struck; I cannot say whether either of the prisoners were there or not. The deceased gave charge of the prisoners half an hour or twenty minutes afterwards; they were sitting in the tap-room.

RICHARD ROWLAND . I am watchman of St. Sepulchre's. I heard a rattle spring, and went to the Coopers' Arms, about half-past ten o'clock; the door of the house was shut; I saw Coin standing at the door; about two minutes after the door was opened, in consequence of my orders, Coin and I went in together; there was a crowd of people in the passage; we went a little further; Coin's heels struck against a shutter, and it fell by accident. Some of them used very had language, and Coin said,

"Don't ill treat the watchman; let him go on, as he is on his duty." They made way for me; I joined the other watchmen, and we searched the house. Murty was leaning against the bar counter; we could not find the man we wanted. I saw the back door was fast and the clothes horse put against it; there is a back window through which a man might escape, and that window was open. Murty was bleeding very much; he appeared very faint when he got to the watch-house, and was sent to the hospital.

ARCHIBALD DOUGLAS . I live in West-street, about three doors from the Coopers' Arms. On the 20th of July my attention was called there by the cries of Murder. I ran in, and in my hurry got between two men who seemed to be fighting; but on looking further, I found one was holding up the other with his right hand, and his left was uplifted, and now and then he hit him on the top of the head in this manner, with the fleshy part of his fist, and there was a gush of blood every time he struck. I saw this for about five minutes; I did not see the person return any blows; he could not; he attempted to fall to the ground, to avoid the blows, but the superior strength of the man who struck him prevented him. There were a good many people about; it was a confused concern altogether; I cannot speak to the prisoners.

EDWARD EDWARDS . I lodged at the Coopers' Arms at this time. The noise brought me from the tap-room to the front of the bar; I had been in the tap-room for an hour or an hour and a half. I had not observed Gantly; I saw him go out, and saw Clines pass me going down the room. When I got to the bar, I saw Murty and Gantly fighting. There might be a dozen persons about them. Blood was flowing from Murty's head and Gantly's nose. I saw Coin come in just before the row ended; he put his hands out in the room and said,

"Make room," or

"Fair play," or something.

Q. Then the first thing he did was to say,

"Make room," or

"Give fair play" - A.

"Make room," or

"Give fair play," which I cannot be certain. I saw nothing more; that was the end of the row. I might be there for three or four minutes. I have told all I saw; I saw both men fighting; the deceased man fought as hard as he could with his fist.

Q. In what manner did Gantly strike Murty - A. One man had hold of the collar by the right hand and the other by the left. The major part of Gantly's blows were directed to the head; I suppose I might see twenty or more blows; I did not count them.

Q. Did you count the blows Murty gave to Gantly - A. No; he gave them so fast, I could not count them; both gave blows so fast I could not count them.

Q. Did either of the blows given by Gantly produce blood from Murty - A. Of course they must. I could not see any thing in his hand; it struck me that he must have something in his hand; I am a carpenter, and out of work at present.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Coin came in at the end of the row, and said,

"Make room, or give fair play;" was that at the time the shutter fell - A. It was not many seconds before it fell; a watchman came in at that time, and the man fell directly. I had not seen Clines drinking with Gantly; I did not see Coin till he came from the street door; and said

"Make way;" that was the first time I saw him.

ELEANOR BYRNE . I was the deceased's niece. I was returning from Kingsland Road on the 20th of July, and passed the Coopers' Arms after ten o'clock; I was standing at Mr. Sutch's door, and heard a very great alarm and a noise; and when I came near, I heard Mary Ann Corker screaming out to Lake for God's sake to interfere to save her uncle's life; I know Lake's voice, and heard him say to her that he did not begrudge the deceased what he had got; he took her by the arm and shoved her away. Murty was all in a gore of blood; he was so disfigured, I did not know whether it was my uncle or brother. I attended the deceased until his death; he found himself so bad, he wished to see my mother; I said,

"You don't seem so bad;" he said,

"Yes, I am bad; tell your mother I want to see her." He said he thought he should die; that he knew he should never recover. This was two days before he died. I did not think him so much in danger.

JOHN SCALEY . I live in Cloth Fair, and am a labouring man. I was at the Coopers' Arms when this happened; I got there about ten o'clock - I had just got in at the door when the affray began. I knew Gantly and the prisoners before by sight; as I entered the door, I saw Gantly coming out; I turned to the bar to call for a pot of beer; I saw them both at one another, beating and striking one another with their hands - I saw blood on both of them; I did not stop to see it over.

JOHN LAKE . I am the master of the Coopers' Arms.

MR. LAW. My Lord, we produce this Witness in order that the Counsel on the other side may examine him if they think proper.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you recollect the night that this unfortunate occurrence took place - A. Yes. I was in the bar, and saw Gantly standing with his back towards the bar - I saw Murty come out of the tap-room, and in four or five minutes I saw Gantly; Murty was going out into the street, but while I was drawing a pot of beer, the affray commenced. I then saw them both striking each other. I cannot say whether either of the prisoners were present when the affray began - I saw Coin a minute or two after it began. I did not see Clines at all to my recollection. I did not see Coin in any way attempt to injure the deceased to the best of my recollection. I saw Gantly strike first. I am sure that a minute elapsed before Coin came up. I did not observe Mary Corker till the affray was over, nor ever told her I did not begrudge Murty getting twice as much, or anything like it, nor seize her arm, and shove her out of the door.

JOHN HARKER . I am street-keeper of Smithfield. I knew Murty; he worked for Mr. Cressey, and was a very healthy active man. I have seen both the prisoners before - I do not know whether they knew Gantly. Two nights previous to this murder, I conducted the deceased home from his master's house in Smithfield, by desire of Mr. Cressey, to his lodging - he had to pass the Coopers' Arms in his way. I saw twenty or thirty people about the door. I do not know whether the prisoners were among them.

MR. LOWE WHEELER . I am house surgeon of Bartholemew hospital. On the 20th of July, I examined the deceased when he was brought in. I found the upper part of his body covered with blood, and several wounds on the upper part of his head - there were ten in number, and most of them an inch in length, and two about an inch and a half, and some about one sixth of an inch deep, and about half of an inch deep going down to the bone. I found a wound near the forehead, about an inch and a half in length, on the leftside, and going to the bone; there was hair from the head within the wound, driven into the bone of the scull; these wounds could not be inflicted by the fist, but by a blunt instrument - there were distinct incisions, and not contusions. I attended him for some days. It was about twelve days before symptoms of injury within the head appeared, which were the natural causes of the blows. There was an interval in which I did not attend him. I believe the chief, though not the sole cause of his death, was the violence he received; that his death was accelerated by the wounds - it was not the proximate cause certainly; I should more properly call it the occasional cause. I believe death might probably be produced by the injury, but as I did not open the body, I am unable to say, but it decidedly must have accelerated his death.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How many days before he died did you cease to see him - A. There was an interval of twelve days between his convalescence and relapse, when I did not see him. His liver was injured, which frequently happens by a blow on the head; and that is my opinion.

MR. HENRY EARL . I am assistant surgeon at St. Bartholemew Hospital. I saw the deceased on Sunday the 21st, the day following his admission. I did not particularly examine the wounds in his head, as they were bound up, and it would injure them. He did not appear labouring under any severe symptoms arising from the injury in the head at that time. I mean that he was quite sensible; about a fortnight after he altered - he always had an unhealthy appearance; no alarming symptoms appeared till the Saturday preceding his death - he had then a bilious attack, which was the consequence of the blow on the head when the patient was in a particular state. He complained of considerable pain in his head, and particularly of one wound on the left side of his head, all the rest were healed. He died on the 9th, having been trepanned on the 8th. I was present during part of the time the body was opened, and attribute his death directly to the injury he received,

being previously in a bad state of health. The fracture did not extend through the scull, only the outer plate of the bone was fractured, and matter formed between the two plates, which accounted for the pain in his head. The death was produced by the injury no doubt, but in my judgment the wounds would not have ended in death if given to a perfectly healthy subject.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Did you see the subject opened - A. My attention was turned to the liver, which appeared to be diseased, and that of long standing.

COURT. Q. Was the injury of the liver likely to cause sudden death, or protracted - A. Protracted; he might have lived twelve months or more, but I think it was incurable.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

THOMAS WILLIAMS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-33
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1178. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , four silver table spoons, value 35 s. the goods of Margaret Fergusson , widow .

FRANCIS BUTCHER . I am servant to Mrs. Margaret Fergusson , who lived in Harley-street, Cavendish-square . I had the care of the plate. On the 6th of August, at a quarter past three o'clock, I saw the prisoner go out of the area gate from the house; I looked and missed the spoons, which were safe two minutes before; I pursued him; he walked a few paces from the gate, and then began to run; I took him in Prince's-street. I found a table spoon in his right hand; a person lifted up a sack which he had over his left shoulder, and in his left hand were the other three. He said nothing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS BAILEY . I am servant to Mr. Pierce. I was coming along Oxford-road, and saw the prisoner being held by Butcher, who charged him with stealing four silver spoons. I found three under the seat.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them on the step.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

ANDREW PETERSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-34
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1179. ANDREW PETERSON was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , one sovereign, the property of William Cooper , from his person .

WILLIAM COOPER , (a blind man ). I lodge with Joseph Corderoy , in New Gravel-lane . On the 12th of August, between twelve and one o'clock in the day, I told the landlord I would lie down a little while. The prisoner lodged in the same room. The sovereign was in my purse, with a sixpence; the purse was in my pocket when I lay down; the prisoner called me, saying it was a quarter past two; I put my waistcoat on, and found my purse gone. There are several lodgers in the house. I found the purse in the room, but not the sovereign. He had left the house, and did not return; he was taken a week afterwards; he had not said he was going to leave. I told him nobody else could have done it; he said he would give me two for it when he got a ship.

SUSAN CORDEROY . The prosecutor and the prisoner lived at my house; I sent him up to call Cooper; he had given me no notice. Cooper came down and said his sovereign was gone. The prisoner was gone out then, and did not return; he had lodged with me from June, and owes me money.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating the landlady to be a great drunkard, and that bad characters had access to the house; and that the reason of his absence was that he had got a ship.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

WILLIAM SMITH, THOMAS MANSFIELD.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-35
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > public whipping

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1180. WILLIAM SMITH and THOMAS MANSFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , four live pigs, price 4 l. and one live sow, price 1 l. the property of William Rhodes .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM SAWYER . I am foreman to Mr. William Rhodes , of Hoxton . On the 7th of August I missed four store pigs and one sow, about half past eight o'clock in the morning. I knew them well by their marks. I had seen them at seven o'clock that morning; I saw them again in two or three days, in care of Jeffries; they had been turned out into the field. Mr. Norris's premises join Mr. Rhodes's. The prisoners are strangers.

FRANCIS MASON . I am servant to Mr. Norris. The day the pigs were stolen, I drove them out of the yard which joins Mr. Rhodes's, about half-past eight o'clock in the morning, and at that time I saw Smith sitting on a fence, and Mansfield by the stile; they could see me drive the pigs out; the pigs went towards home. Next morning I heard they were lost.

JOHN WHEELER , I am a pig jobber, and live at Shadwell. On Tuesday or Wednesday I was sent for to look at some pigs - I found Mansfield with them. There was a sow and four pigs. They were by the wall in New Gravel Lane. Smith came over, asked if I would buy them, and asked 30 s. each. Mansfield stood by. I said I thought it was too much; he then said 25 s.; I offered them 15 s.; they said I should have them, if I gave them the money; I said I thought they were stolen; he said he did not steal them, but found them on the side of the road straying, and drove them on. I informed the constable, and they were taken.

JAMES JEFFERY . I am an officer. In consequence of information, on the 27th of August, I went to the Dock-hills, and found the four pigs and one sow; Mansfield was with them; they did not know me. I asked him if they were his; he said No, he was minding them for a man, and said,

"Here he comes". Smith was coming up, and asked me 30 s. each; I said I should like to know where he lived, if I bought one of him; he said at Ratcliffe Cross, and was well known there. I called the constable, and said,

"Do you think the pigs worth 30 s.?" He said it was a fair price. I turned away to consult about taking them; upon looking round again, I found the men and pigs were gone. We found them six hours after in Stepney Fields, and took them to the office, with the pigs; Sawyer claimed them.

SMITH'S Defence. I never took them.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 30.

MANSFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Years and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

GEORGE BALL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-36
VerdictGuilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1181. GEORGE BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , fourteen pounds of pork, value 6 s. the goods of John King .

JOHN KING . I am a pork butcher , and live in Lamb-street, Spitalfields . On the 24th of July, about six o'clock, I went into my cellar, and found a belly of pork rolled up in an apron; I had hung it in the cellar that morning. The prisoner was at work there as bricklayer's labourer ; I saw him go into the cellar, and come out in about ten minutes; I followed and asked what he had got; I found he had the apron and pork rolled round his body, and another belly in his hat.

JOSEPH ADAMS . I am a constable; I took him in charge. He unbuttoned his breeches and gave me the pork.

Prisoner's Defence. We were at work in the cellar. There was a dispute with the servant about a candle; and she said she would hang me or any one belonging to me, I went to breakfast, leaving my hat and apron there, and in the afternoon I found my apron with the pork in it; I thought master might have bought it; and as I crossed the shop, the prosecutor called me - I went to him, and told him what I had.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

ELEANOR JACKSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-37
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1182. ELEANOR JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , one watch, value 1 l.; one ribbon, value 1 d., and one seal, value 1 s., the goods of Joseph Watkins , from his person .

JOSEPH WATKINS . I am a watchmaker , and live in London Wall. On the 29th of July, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I was in Wych-street , rather intoxicated. I don't exactly know where I had been walking. I know my watch was in my fob when I was in Wych-street. I recollect seeing two females there, and believe the prisoner to be one of them, but cannot swear it. I don't recollect what passed. I found my watch at Bow-street on the Thursday following, when the prisoner was in custody.

JOHN GLASS . I am watchman of Wych-street. Watkins called Watch, at the top of the street, near Drury-lane. I came up - he said he had lost his watch, and was enquiring of the prisoner where the other woman was, who was with her. He did not appear to suspect the prisoner then. She said she would take him to the house where she was, which was the Artichoke, White Hart-yard. I asked her to describe her, and from her manner I suspected her, and said,

"I must search you." I found the watch in her breast - Watkins described it before he saw it. When I first felt it in her bosom, she said it was only the bones of her stays.

JOHN SHEARMAN . I am constable of the night. She told me she drew the watch from his person, and that he had not been in her company.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it me.

JOSEPH WATKINS . I am certain I did not.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

MARY BARRS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-38
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1183. MARY BARRS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , four pair of trowsers, value 25 s. ; the goods of Edward Hewitt .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing eight yards of fustian, his goods.

ELIZA HEWITT . I am the wife of Edward Hewitt , a tailor , of Charles-street, Old Gravel-lane. The prisoner came to me for work; I gave her materials for two pair of trowsers, and next morning I gave her materials for two more pair - she never brought them home - she was to have brought them on the 28th. She gave me the name of Smith, No. 74, Shakespeare-walk. I went, but found no such person or number. I met her on the Saturday, and she denied ever having seen me. I told her to come home with me, and when we got part of the way, she said she would give me 15 s. in part, at half-past three o'clock. I went to several places with her, but never got the money, and gave her in charge. I have not recovered the things.

MARY NEWMAN . I live in Charles-street. I know the prisoner had the property from the prosecutrix.

Prisoner's Defence. I told her I lost them in Wellclose-square.

ELIZA HEWITT . She said afterwards that she lost them in New Gravel-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JAMES LEEPER.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-39
VerdictGuilty
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

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1184. JAMES LEEPER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , one ass, price 10 s. , the property of John Astling .

JOHN ASTLING . I am a labourer , and live at Kensington . I keep my ass in a field at the back of the work-house. I lost it on Sunday, the 4th of August, and found it on the Tuesday. I had seen it safe on the Sunday morning. I do not know the prisoner.

ISAAC HAWKINS . I am a constable. I found the ass in the possession of one Fishlock, at Fulham, in the stable.

ROBERT CHAMBERS . I live at Walham-green. I saw the prisoner on Sunday, the 4th of August, about a quarter past three o'clock, coming over Stentford-bridge with the ass, about two miles from Kensington work-house, he was alone, and asked if I wanted to buy it - he asked 6 s. for it. I said it would not suit me; he went on towards Fulham with it. Fishlock was apprehended on the charge. I told his father I had seen the prisoner with it.

WILLIAM TOMLINS . I work in a garden, and sell potatoes. On Sunday the 4th of August, between three and four o'clock, I saw the prisoner with the ass between Mr. Jeffs, and the Crown, public-house, at North End - he was alone riding the ass, and had a stick. Fishlock was with me, and offered 5 s. for it. The prisoner said it was all right; that his uncle was coming behind with white trowsers on, and that he lived in Hales-court.

GEORGE JENNINGS . I live at North End. On the 4th of August, I saw the prisoner riding the ass. I was going to hit the donkey; he said,

"Don't hit it, my uncle is coming behind." I have seen it since, and know it is the same.

JAMES SHIELDS . I am a constable. Fishlock's father fetched me to take the prisoner. He said he gave 2 s. 6 d.

for the ass, and sold it again for 5 s. His father is a watchman.

GUILTY, Aged 13.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

ABRAHAM HENRY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-40
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14.

1185. ABRAHAM HENRY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , one watch-chain, value 6 l.; three seals, value 4 l., and two rings, value 2 l., the goods of Samuel Douglas Ellem , from his person .

MR. SAMUEL DOUGAS ELLEM . On the evening of the 29th of August, about nine o'clock, I was returning to my house in the Commercial Road, with Mr. Taylor and my family, my watch was in my fob, and my coat was buttoned over it. About three minutes before the robbery, the prisoner looked me full in the face and passed me, and opposite Philpot-street , he came on my right side, and seized my chain; the ring gave way - he got the chain and appendage, and then ran off. I pursued, and Captain Taylor called Stop thief! he was stopped before I lost sight of him - he had no hat on. The property was found. I said I would give 5 l. 5 s. for them, and the man who stopped him went with others in search, and found them.

JAMES BENDAL . I am a labourer. I was crossing Stepney-fields, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running into the fields, and others pursuing him; he was the first - I secured him. Mr. Ellem came up in a moment, and said that was the man who had robbed him. He was taken to the watch-house. I went with a lanthorn in search of the property - we found it in a field where he had run.

GEORGE FENNELL . I am a labourer. I was in the field with Bendal, and saw the prisoner running into the field. Bendal seized him. We picked up the seals just by the spot where he was taken.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Several people ran, and I ran as well, and was taken in a cluster of twenty people, who might have dropped it as well as me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN BOYLE, CORNELIUS READING.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-41
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1186. JOHN BOYLE and CORNELIUS READING were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of September , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Scardfield , from his person .

THOMAS SCARDFIELD . I live in Cambridgeshire. On Sunday, the 1st of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was going down Tottenham Court-road , towards my lodgings in Carmarthen-street, with my wife. A man came up, and asked if I had lost anything; I felt and missed my handkerchief, which I had used a very short time before. I found the prisoners in custody with it.

JAMES HICKS . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in Tottenham Court-road, and saw the two prisoners following Mr. Scardfield. I watched, and saw Boyle take the handkerchief out - they were both in company. I seized Boyle - he dropped the handkerchief and began to cry.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN BOSTON . I met Hicks, and told him to watch the prisoners. We saw them following the prosecutor. I saw Boyle take the handkerchief. Hicks took him, and I took Reading.

READING'S Defence. I was going to my uncle's; this man laid hold of me. I asked what I had done - he said I should see to my sorrow.

BOYLE - GUILTY . Aged 15.

READING - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

RICHARD MITFORD.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-42
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1187. RICHARD MITFORD was indicted for that he, on the 4th of May , at St. James, Clerkenwell , being possessed of a certain Bank bill of exchange, which is as follows, that is to say,

Bank Post Bill.

London, 1st of May, 1822.

A. 5, 1822. No. Q. >2665.

At seven days sight, I promise to pay this my sole bill of exchange, to Mr. John L. Rogerson or order Fifty Pounds Sterling, value received of Mrs. E. Rogerson.

For the Governor and Company of the Bank of England. W. HUGHES.

50 Entered F. TWISS.

afterwards on the same day, at the same parish, feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain indorsement upon the said Bank bill of exchange, which is as follows, John L. Rogerson ; with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , against the statute .

SECOND COUNT. That he, being possessed of a like Bank bill of exchange, upon which was written the like forged and counterfeit indorsement; feloniously did dispose of and put away the said last mentioned forged and counterfeited indorsement, he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, against the statute.

THIRD COUNT. Calling the instrument a promissory note, for payment of money, which the said Richard Mitford being possessed of, feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause, and procure to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the false making, forging, and counterfeiting a like indorsement, with intent to defraud the Govenor and Company of the Bank of England, against the statute.

FOURTH COUNT. The same as the second, only calling the instrument a promissory note for payment of money instead of a Bank bill of exchange.

FIFTH AND SIXTH COUNTS. The same as the third and fourth, only calling the instrument a bill of exchange instead of a promissory note for payment of money.

SIX OTHER COUNTS. The same as the six former, only stating the prisoner's intention to be to defraud John Lindo Rogerson .

SIX OTHER COUNTS. The same as the six former, only stating the prisoner's intention to be to defraud Samuel Norman .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and LAW conducted the prosecution.

A Release under the Seal of the Bank of England, to Mr. Rogerson, was here put in and read - the Seal being proved by Mr. Best, the Secretary.

JOHN LINDO ROGERSON . I am clerk to a horse dealer, and live in King's-mews, Bedford-row. In April last I became acquainted with the prisoner, by the name of Richard Mitford - he called on me first, in consequence of a letter, which I addressed to him - I was not at home. He called next day; he said he came in consequence of an advertisement about a situation, which I had replied to - he gave me his card (producing it)

"Mr. Mitford, No. 9, Manchester-buildings." He said he had not interest himself, but it was through a friend that he could procure a situation - he was merely the agent. I had several interviews with him on the subject - he requested some sort of security as a pledge of my sincerity in the transaction, provided I should obtain the situation. This did not pass at the first interview. He required that I should deposit a sum of money in the Bank, and take a post bill, payable to my order; this was the first proposition he made - he said he thought it would be the easiest mode, and attended with no expence, and would be most satisfactory to myself; as the post bill would be payable to my order, and could not get into circulation without my endorsement, and in the event of my not procuring the situation, he would return the Bank post bill to me. In consequence of this, I paid 50 l. into the bank, and took the Bank post bill in question. (Looking at a paper) All except the figures here are my writing; it is the ticket I gave to procure the bill. read. (Mrs. E. Rogerson, payable to J. L. Rogerson or order 50 l). On the evening of the day I procured the bill, he called on me. I said I objected to give the Bank post bill out of my possession, because in the event of my not getting the situation, I should have some difficulty in getting it back. He said I could have no difficulty in getting it back, because being unendorsed it could be of no use to him. I gave it to him unendorsed, and gave him no authority to endorse it. He left me, saying he would see me in a few days. This was on the first of May. I did not see him after till he was apprehended. Not seeing him according to appointment, I went to Manchester-buildings on the Monday, but could not find him. On the following day, the 7th of May, I stopped the bill. He never called after receiving the bill. I received a variety of letters on the subject (looking at some) these are them - (looking at the bill) this is the bill I gave him. I never procured any other bank post bill in my life. My name is on the back of it - it was neither written by me or my authority. My real signature is at the bottom; as having received the amount at the Bank afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was not the name of Bloomfield mentioned by the prisoner - A. In the course of casual conversation, at one interview that name was mentioned. He did not say it was through Bloomfield's interest that it was to be obtained. He only said Bloomfield was sporting his figure about the town, and he understood he was a relative of Sir Benjamin's; but never said he was to procure the situation, or that he wanted it to deposit with him.

Q. Did you not place the bill in his hands as part of the consideration you was to pay him if he procured the situation - A. It was given to shew that money was forthcoming, and provided I got the situation I was to indorse it, and if not it was to be returned. I should have asked him to return it to me to be indorsed if I got the situation. I understand they frequently pass by mistake without being indorsed. I can swear to the bill by the number, Q. 2665, which I observed before I gave it him. I made a memorandum of it, but recollect it without the memorandum. I do not know that I ever took a Bank post bill before. I took the memorandum with me to the Bank to stop the bill, and may have left it there.

MR. LAW. Q. Did you give the prisoner the same Bank post bill you received at the Bank that day - A. I did, I never had any other made payable to myself.

FRANK TWISS . I am a clerk in the Bank post bill office. (Looking at the bill and ticket) This bill was made out by me, in consequence of this ticket being delivered. Here is Q. 2665, these are my figures, and the number I inserted in the Bank post bill - it was dated the 1st of May. When I had drawn it it was passed on to Hughes the cashier, to sign.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Was the acceptance on it when issued - A. No; it was accepted on the 3d.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am a cashier in the Bank. The signature to this bill is my writing; it is in part cancelled; it was perfect when I signed it.

Cross-examined. Q. Who cancelled it - A. The clerks in the office.

THOMAS DEBENHAM . I am shopman to Samuel Norman , pawnbroker of Prince's-street, Soho. I have seen the prisoner several times paying the interest on articles of his father's - he used to come regularly about once a-year. He came on the 4th of May to redeem three pledges, which amounted to 30 l. 10 s. 4 d.; he paid me a bank post bill (looks at one) - this is it; the indorsement was on it then; I looked to see if it was indorsed, and gave him the difference, and on the Monday I took the bill to our bankers, Messrs. Marsh and Co. Berner's-street, with other cash, amounting to 100 l. 2 s. 11 d. I produce our banker's book. I always knew the prisoner as Captain Stracy .

JOSEPH GOLIGHTLY . I am clerk to Messrs. Marsh and Co. bankers in Berner's-street. I cannot say whether I received a Bank post bill from Debenham. The entry of 100 l. 2 s. 11 d. in his book is my writing; the money was put in a drawer, after being twisted up all together; it was then taken away by Mr. Lloyd and entered.

JOHN LLOYD . I am clerk to Messrs. Marsh and Co. I have an entry of 100 l. 2 s. 11 d. paid in by Debenham; there was a 50 l. Bank post bill, No. Q. 2665, dated 1st May, among it.

GEORGE BARKER . I am clerk to Messrs. Marsh and Co. I received the amount of the Bank post bill at the Bank of England on the 10th of May.

WILLIAM LANGTON . I am clerk in the Bank post bill office. On the 10th of May this bill was presented for payment, with others, amounting to 140 l. I paid it to Marsh and Co.; I gave the ticket in payment, and cancelled the bill, by tearing off part of the name of Hughes - the cancels are put away in a bag and burnt.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Do you know whether it is destroyed now - A. I cannot say - I put them in a bag, and when the bag is full, it is the porter's duty to burn them.

ELIZA ROGERSON . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I first saw the prisoner in April at my house - I saw him several times; he called about procuring my husband a situation - all their interviews were on that subject. I knew him by the name of Richard Mitford . On the 7th of August I went to Quebec-street, and placed myself in a house opposite to No. 1, and saw the prisoner come out of No. 1; I followed, and overtook him turning the corner into Oxford-street, and said,

"Mr. Mitford, how do you do?" He looked at me, and said he had not the pleasure of knowing me; I said that was very odd - he certainly must recollect Mrs. Rogerson. He then begged my pardon, and said, Yes, he did recollect me. I asked why he did not come to Mr. Rogerson, according to his letters; he said he had done that which made him afraid to come to the house, and could not come, unless I promised him protection, and then he would call and pay some part of the money. I walked up as far as the corner of Orchard-street with him, and asked him for his address; he said it was not convenient to give it me, but he would call on Saturday and see Mr. Rogerson; we parted.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner when I was in company with Jeffries, at No. 1, Quebec-street, on the 7th of August.

ELIZABETH AMER . I live at No. 9, Manchester Buildings. The prisoner came to my house in May, and left on a Sunday evening in the same month, saying he had a friend ill in the country, whom he wished to see. He paid me very regular, and always conducted himself exceeding well.

JOSEPH JARMAN . I have a house, No. 1, Quebec-street. The prisoner was a tenant of mine from the 7th of June; he took the house for one year, at 200 l. per year, in the name of John Stracy .

Joseph Carstairs , of High Holborn, writing master, was called to prove the letters received by the prosecutor were the prisoner's hand-writing, the prisoner having been a pupil of his; but as the witness would not swear that he believed them to be so, they were not produced evidence.

(The bill was here put in and read.)

THOMAS ARMSTEAD . I belong to the Bank. I know that the cancels which are kept in the bag have been destroyed since the 10th of May.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen, I beg to state, I am totally innocent of writing either the letters, the card, or any of the writing laid to my charge; I was merely an agent in the business; and the bank post bill was not in my possession half an hour before I handed it over to my employer, who kept it four or five days - it was returned to me by a man whose wife washed for me, with the indorsement on it. I asked him who indorsed it - he said Mr. Rogerson, and that he saw him. I asked if he enquired for me - he said No; and supposing it to be genuine, I paid it away.

JAMES LANDER . I was servant to the prisoner in May last. I went with a message from him to Bloomfield, at a shoe shop in a passage near Clare-market, and brought him back a 50 l. bank post bill.

" John L. Rogerson " was written on the back - (looking at the bill) - that is the name. I gave it to the prisoner.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Where do you live - A. In lodgings at present, but I do not know the number - it is the Cobourg coffee-house. I lived a year and a half with the prisoner; he went by the name of John Charles Stracy . I did not live with him in Quebec-street - I have been there. He kept a groom, a black servant, a cook, and housemaid. I left him about two months before. I never saw the bill before Bloomfield gave it me.

Q. Who put the indorsement on it you do not know - A. Yes, I saw a man indorse it.

Q. Will you swear that - A. Yes, he indorsed it at the Lamb, public-house, Lamb's Conduit-street, in the parlour. Mr. Bloomfield sent me to him with it, to get it indorsed - he said I should see a gentleman in the parlour, and to ask his name; Bloomfield said it was Rogerson.

Q. You was to enquire for him - A. Yes; I went and found a man in the parlour, with a pot of beer before him - I asked if his name was Rogerson; he said Yes.

Q. Your master sent you to Bloomfield - A. Yes, to know if he could do any thing for him.

Q. Why did you not state that you saw the bill indorsed before - A. I was rather flurried, never having been in a Court before. My master sent me to Bloomfield, to know if he could do any thing for him; Bloomfield said he wanted nothing, and asked if I was in a hurry; I said No, and he asked if I could take a Bank post bill to a gentleman to indorse, and I took it to the Lamb, to Mr. Rogerson, by Bloomfield's order. I found a gentleman in the parlour, and asked if his name was Rogerson; he said Yes, and he supposed I came from Bloomfield, and that he had been waiting some time. I gave him the bill, and he wrote on on it

" John L. Rogerson ;" he let it lie on the table, and asked me to drink - I drank twice out of the pot of beer. He then took it up and said it was dry, and gave it me with his compliments to Mr. Bloomfield.

Q. Well - A. Bloomfield had desired that when I had taken it to Rogerson and got it indorsed, I should take it back to Mr. Mitford, at his lodgings; and when I got back to Manchester Buildings, Mr. Mitford was not at home. I waited some time, and when he came in he asked how Bloomfield was; I told him he wanted nothing, but had sent him a Bank post bill for 50 l. Mr. Mitford said,

"Don't talk nonsense - how is the poor fellow?" I then gave him the Bank post bill - he looked at it on both sides, and asked if I saw Mr. Rogerson indorse it; I said I did, and drank with him. He then asked me where I saw Rogerson indorse it; I told him at the Lamb - I gave him the bill, and he put it in his pocket.

Q. You have used the name of Mitford, I thought you knew him by the name of John Charles Stracy , Esq. - A. Yes; the reason he altered his name was, because he was likely to be arrested. He told me to bring him some linen on the Monday following.

Q. Where to - A. To his lodgings in Manchester Buildings. This was on a Saturday in May. When I came on the Monday morning, he said Bloomfield and I were d - d rogues connected together to ruin him. I told him all I knew about it.

Q. Does not your daughter live with the prisoner - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Does she visit him - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Where is the Cobourg Coffee-house - A. In Seymour-place, Bryanston-square; I have only been there since I left Mr. Mitford. I have done nothing since I left

him. I have been a gardener, and come from Leicestershire; I lived with the prisoner at Stratford, but never in town.

JOHN LINDO ROGERSON re-examined. I sent several letters to the prisoner, and received answers. I never saw this witness before; I was never at the Lamb, in Lamb's Conduit-street, in my life, but I know the person who keeps it. I believe I have seen Bloomfield once, but never spoke to him.

Prisoner. As soon as I was told I was deceived in the indorsement, I sent to Mr. Norman, to request he would hold the bill, and I would bring him the money in a few hours; he returned for answer that it was too late - he had paid it away.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

Of uttering.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

ELIZABETH JONES, JOHN MORRISON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-43
VerdictNot Guilty

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1188. ELIZABETH JONES and JOHN MORRISON were charged on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with the wilful murder of a certain new born male child .

ELIZABETH BIRD . I live at Phoenix-place, Somers Town. In August last, Jones lived in Drummond-place, Somers Town . I understood from her that she was a widow . I had known her for about a month; she took in washing - I occasionally assisted her. On the 21st of August, at ten o'clock in the morning, I saw her at her lodging; she had two rooms on the second floor. I saw her in the front room, which was the sitting room - she said she was very poorly, and appeared so; she attributed it to the fatigue of the hot weather, and she had had a quarrel with her landlord. I stopped all day - I washed down stairs in the kitchen. Her daughter Emma brought me a message that her mother was poorly, and wished me to stop, and do as much as I could, and that her mother could not come to help me. About two o'clock, I went up stairs with a pail of water - I sat down half a minute, and heard her call out as if she was ill. She called to her daughter to fetch up Morrison, who lived below - I was then in the front room and she was in the bed room. I thought I heard her scream as if she was sick, and I went into the room where she was - I just opened the door and put my head in for a moment. I thought I heard the cry of an infant, and flew back in a moment - I heard it only once, and being so short a time I might be mistaken, as I never was at the birth of an infant. When I looked into the room she was standing by the side of the bed with one hand on the bed, and the other on the wall. I withdrew; her daughter at this time was gone down for Morrison, who lived below - the prisoner said to me,

"Go go," as if for assistance, I ran down stairs in haste to get assistance, and by the time I got to the street door, her daughter came and said I need not call anybody - I met Morrison coming up stairs as I went down. I did not fetch assistance. In about an hour and a half her daughter fetched me up stairs, saying her mother wanted to speak to me; I went up to the bed room, she was lying on the bed with her clothes on - nobody else was in the room; I asked how she did - she said she hoped it was safe over; I asked if it was her labour, she said, Yes. I asked her if she did not want a nurse, as I would fetch one if she would let me, and she consented - I could not get the one I intended, but brought the first I met with, who was Catherine Richards . The prisoner had never told me she was in the family way - I had heard it, but never took much notice of her. When she told me it was her labour, I said that she never told me she was in that way; she said she thought I knew it, and that the people knew it where she lived before. Some blood was on the floor by the bed side, which Richards cleaned up.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You only looked into the room for a moment - A. No. I thought I heard a child cry. I went before the Grand Jury, they threw the bill out.

CATHERINE RICHARDS . I never saw the prisoner till I was sent for to assist her in a miscarriage - I went up stairs, and did not think of asking for the child; but she said there was the child, pointing it out - it was in a cloth. She said she wished it was alive; I said

"Poor thing, I am afraid not. I am in the habit of dressing young children." She said she wished it was alive, that I might dress hers, as she had looked out the baby clothes yesterday. She was lying on the bed at the time, and the child was lying on the ground in a cloth - it was dead before I got there, but was not quite cold. I fetched Mr. Wakefield, the surgeon. I never attended the birth of a child - I have had children myself. Mrs. Jones said she did not want me any more; she gave me 6 d. I saw no baby linen. I was so flurried, I did not notice what sort of cloth it was in.

MR. GEORGE WAKEFIELD . I am a surgeon, and live at Somers Town. I was called in by the witness, Richards. I went into the prisoner's bed room, between three and four o'clock - she was lying on the bed. Nobody else was in the room. She said she had been delivered of a still born child, and that it was by the side of the bed. I took the child up, it was wrapped in a dirty cloth like a towel. I examined it, and found it was dead, and nearly cold. I examined it attentively, and had there been any marks of violence on it, I should have seen it.

The rest of this gentleman's evidence went to describe the situation of the room, and the child, & c. which it is presumed better to omit. He could not say whether it was born alive, and if it was it might have died in delivery, or from various causes.

WILLIAM HAUGHTY . I am an officer of the parish. We went to the house; I searched for baby linen, and found some in the drawer; the prisoner opened the drawer, and produced a variety of things which appeared to be baby linen.

EMMA JONES . I am the daughter of the female prisoner. My father has been dead ten years; my mother has not been married since. I am sixteen years old. I did not know she was in the family way. I have brought the baby linen; I believe it was in the house at the time. I remember Bird going for assistance. Morrison, before he went into the room, told me to tell her she need not fetch any one. I had fetched him by my mother's orders; I did not see him in the room; I was not there till after the doctor came. Morrison went in; I do not think he stopped more than five minutes. I did not know that there was any baby linen in the house; I do not remember my mother having a child during my father's life. When Morrison came out, he said my mother had had a child; he is a boot and shoemaker; I never knew him practise as a midwife.

ELIZABETH WYATT . I have known Mrs. Jones nearly five years. She told me about four months ago that she was in the family way, and engaged me to nurse her; she did not say when she expected to want me, nor desire me to make any preparation. I went to see her about twice after; she still appeared pregnant; the last time I saw her was about a month before she was put to bed. Nothing particular occurred. I told her, when she wanted me, if she sent I would come. I did not make any baby linen. She sent for me on the evening the child was born. I was then living at the Crown and Anchor.

- PASSMORE. I am an undertaker. Morrison came to me on Thursday morning, the 22d of August; I was from home; he came again in the evening, and found me at home; he said he wanted a box for a still-born child, of which I understood him to say his wife was delivered the day previous; he said he should have been highly gratified if the child had lived. He gave me the length on a string. The box was made and taken home.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

WILLIAM ADAMS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-44
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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1189. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for that he, on the 3d of August , at Enfield, upon William Edwards , a subject of the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument feloniously, & c. did stab the said William Edwards , upon the face under his right eye, with intent of his malice aforethought to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT. Stating his intent to be to disable him.

THIRD COUNT. Stating his intent to be to do him some grievous bodily harm, and stating the stab to be under the left eye.

MARY HOCKETT . I lived at Edmonton on the 3d of August last. The prisoner lived next door but one to me; a woman named Eastaff lived with him. On the evening of the 3d of August, about eleven o'clock, I heard a noise of people quarrelling in Adams's house. I went out, and Eastaff called out murder twice. William Edwards , who was at my house, opened the door, and ran out; I followed him; he went into the front yard of Adams's house, to Adams, who was beating the woman he lives with. Edwards went up to him, and put his hand on his shoulder, and desired him not to beat the woman; the prisoner immediately ran into his mother's house, which is next door to his own, and fetched a pitchfork, and swore he would have his bl - y eye out, and immediately stabbed the fork into his right eye and face; one prong went into his right eye; and he then went into his mother's house again. Edwards went in after him, and struck him; but before that, John Edwards took the fork from the prisoner. I went in and desired William Edwards to come out; he came out, and the prisoner took an iron bar and struck me over the head, which knocked me down senseless. I do not know what happened after that, but I was taken home insensible. As soon as William Edwards went in after the prisoner, he struck at him, and could not hit him, but fell back senseless, and was taken to my house; he was ill for a long time; the doctor attended him for a month at my house, and did not expect him to live for the first fortnight and three days; he appeared to me in great danger. The prisoner was not drunk; he had just come home from work. I never heard of his mind being at all affected.

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I lodged with Hockett. On the night of the 3d of August I heard a woman cry murder. I went into the prisoner's yard, and the woman begged of me to take him off her, or he would murder her. I put my hand on his shoulder, and said,

"Don't kill the woman." I was in front of him; I gave him a little push, to separate them. He directly cried out for the fork, and ran in and fetched it; he was gone about a minute. I stood in the yard, not thinking he was going to stick me with it. He came out, and stuck me right in the face, and knocked me back some distance with it; he pushed it right into my face. One of the prongs ran in just under my eye, and went up into my brain, and the other prong went by the side of my head; it knocked me backwards against some palings. I followed him into his mother's house after the fork was taken from him. I struck at him, but did not hit him; I became insensible, and cannot say what passed. The stab gave me great pain; it went right into my brain. I was confined to my bed three weeks and three days, and was in great pain. I can see very little with the eye now; I cannot work now, for my head is bad.

JOHN EDWARDS . I remember the night of the 3d of August. I followed William Edwards out of Hockett's house. I am no relation of his. I heard the cry of murder, and saw the woman down on the ground. William Edwards walked up to the prisoner, put his hand on his shoulder, and told him not to kill her, and pushed him a little way from her - not with violence - it was not a blow. Adams said something with an oath, which I did not understand, ran into his mother's house, and brought the pitchfork out and stabbed him immediately in the face. I heard it sound as if it penetrated into the head; it pushed him backwards against some paling. Edwards held his hands up, as if to save himself from farther harm, as the prisoner had drawn the fork out of him. Adams's brother came up, and tried to get the fork out of his hand, and in the scuffle the brother cried out that he was stabbed. I then made my way into the house, pushed his brother aside, and took the fork from him; I took it into Hockett's, and left it in care of his daughter. I saw William Edwards again that night; he lay down quite in a stupid state, and appeared as if he wanted to fall asleep. The eye appeared bloodshot an hour or two after, and there was a little skin off it at the corner. I did not observe that the prisoner was drunk; he was in a rage; I am certain he thrust the fork into William's eye. I did not see him again for a fortnight - his eye was nearly closed then.

SARAH BONNY . I live at a place called Botany Bay. The prosecutor is my son; I saw him on the Tuesday morning after the Saturday on which this was done. I stopped with him eight days and nights; he was very ill indeed, and a little senseless, and complained very much of his head. He was not sensible for a minute together, for seven or eight days; he did not know me for some time when I went to him; he afterwards came to his senses better, and began to recover.

WILLIAM STOKES . I lodge opposite the prisoner's mother. On the 3d of August I heard the quarrel, and ran

out - I saw William Edwards come out to the prisoner; the woman was lying on the ground, and he beating her. Edwards said the prisoner ought to be ashamed of himself, to use the woman so; the prisoner said,

"What odds does it make to you?" William Edwards pushed him on the shoulder, to push him away from the woman; the prisoner immediately went and fetched the fork from behind his mother's door, and said he would stop it into the man, and did so; he shoved it into his face - Edwards fell against the paling. I went in and saw no more.

WILLIAM CUFFLEY . I apprehended the prisoner on the Tuesday after this affair. I brought the fork from the office.

MARY HOCKETT . The fork was brought to my house. I kept it till it was delivered to Cuffley.

Prisoner's Defence. I had worked over hours, and my master gave me ale instead of money. I left work, and found some young men dancing with the woman I live with. She jawed me and I pushed her out of the house. William Edwards came out, hit me on the left breast, and knocked me down. I picked up the fork, thinking it was a stick, and hit him, and after that he came into the house, and knelt on me, knocked me about and tore my shirt collar. I have witnesses to prove that he hit me three times before I touched him.

MARY EASTAFF . The prisoner lodged at my place, and I did for him. On 3d of August he came home about half past ten o'clock. He was at work for Mr. Poisey at harvest till then. When he came in, his mother and this young man were in the house having a drop of beer.

Q. They were in your house - A. No; at his mother's house. Shortly after the beer was out, they clubbed together and sent for more, and while it was drinking William and John Edwards came in and danced, and drank, and Mrs. Hockett came in and asked William Edwards if he was coming out to supper, he said, Yes; he went, and shortly after we joined to have a pint of beer a piece all round, and the prisoner asked me to lend him a pint, I refused, and shortly after he and I had a few words. He told me to go out of his mother's house. I said I would not. He shoved me out of the door, I hollowed out, but what I hollowed I do not know. I saw William Edwards come up and strike the prisoner, he shoved him down first.

Q. You was then on the ground, was not you - A. Yes. The prisoner got up; William Edwards hit him and made his nose and mouth bleed, and smothered his smock frock with blood; his mother washed that, but his shirt was torn all to pieces. I don't know any more, for I turned in directly.

SARAH ADAMS . I am the prisoner's mother. Some people were at my house on this night; there was a quarrel between Eastaff and my son; I was sent to fetch three pints of beer, and when I returned, (being fetched) I found my son laying on the ground, in the house, bleeding, and William Edwards beating him; I took hold of his collar and pushed him out of doors; his shirt was torn off his back, and there is the blood on the floor now, for I cannot get it out.

Q. You saw nothing of the pitchfork - A. No. I produce his shirt.

WILLIAM EDWARDS re-examined. I was at Mrs. Adams's for a few minutes on this night, and drank half a pint of beer, then Hockett fetched me. I had no quarrel at all with the prisoner, there was not a cross word spoken.

MARY HOCKETT . I went to tell Edwards his supper was ready; he came out immediately with me, quietly, there was no quarrel at all.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury, supposing there might have been some previous provocation.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

PATRICK FLYNN, JOHN HERRING.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-45
VerdictNot Guilty

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1190. PATRICK FLYNN and JOHN HERRING were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Godfrey , on the King's highway, on the 9th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, against his will, one bag, value 2 d.; one sovereign; eighteen shillings, and one sixpence , his property.

JOHN GODFREY . I am a labourer . On the 9th of July, about twenty minutes past ten o'clock in the morning, I went into the Robin Hood, public-house, in St. Giles's, and had half a pint of beer - I had nothing else all day. While I was there five of this party were drinking. One of them told me to sit down and take my beer. The prisoners were two of them; one of them who is not here shoved against me, and I gave way; they had seen me take out my purse to pay for the beer about two minutes before, I returned it to my right hand breeches pocket. When they shoved me, Flynn put his arm round the one who was pushing, and drew out my purse; they all five them went off, and a woman followed them out; there was a sovereign, eighteen shillings, and three-halfpence in my purse, which I have not recovered. I went to get up, and Herring said,

"If I followed them, he would rip my ***** out;" and seeing a knife in his hand I was afraid, and did not follow immediately. I saw a beadle of St. Giles's come in, and told him; and I then followed them - and saw them turn the corner and share my money. After that one of the party came up; it was neither of the prisoners; he said something - they then got away. I saw Flynn in the afternoon in St. Giles's; he was secured. Herring was taken some time afterwards. I had seen Flynn several times before, and am sure of them both.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You knew Flynn before - A. Yes, by sight. I did not know where to find him. I was as sober as I am now; I had drank nothing but a tea spoon full of beer; I only wetted my lips. I was with no girls - there was a woman at the public-house window with eggs, who said, come in; I spoke to her, but did not go in; two women followed me into the house, but were not with me. I did not speak to them, nor they to me, except to thank me for paying for a quartern of gin, which they asked me to give them. I was not a minute with them; they drank it, and away they went. Flynn followed me in and stood behind me. I had my money in my hand after the girls went out. I did not drink a drop of gin.

GEORGE BASEY . I apprehended Flynn on the 9th of July, and found nothing on him.

WILLIAM PRICE . I apprehended Herring in Church-lane, on the 11th of July. I found nothing on him.

FLYNN'S Defence. I went in to have a pint of beer, and saw the prosecutor sitting with two girls, and a pot of beer

before him. My little sister fetched me to breakfast - I was not in the house five minutes. There was only a parcel of women there. I went home to breakfast, and coming down Ivy-street some boys were there pulling the prosecutor about. A boy came up and said the prosecutor was robbed - I said I could not help it; he said if they had left him enough to get some tobacco, he would not have cared, and asked me for money for some.

HERRING'S Defence. I did not go there till half past nine o'clock. I was taken into the office four or five days after. He said he did not think I was the lad. The patrol said,

"Yes, that is the lad - he had a cut in his face."

JAMES MURPHY . I am a boot-closer, and live in Church-street. On the day Flynn was taken, I saw the prosecutor come up to the corner of George-street with two girls of the town - he appeared intoxicated. I went into the Robin Hood , after that, to see the time, and saw him with a measure of gin in his hand; he helped it out to the girls. I went home to dress to go to Chelsea. I went in again, and Flynn's sister came and asked him to go to breakfast - he was sitting outside the house on the cellar flap; he went away with her, and during his absence the prosecutor came out and said he was robbed, and supposed it was either the women in his company, or some boys, and if he could have some tobacco he should not concern himself about it. He said

"I have been robbed by two d - d w - s or some of the boys." I believe the women were inside the house at this time.

COURT. Q. Did you see Godfrey go into the house - A. Yes; he went in with two girls. He was there twenty minutes or better before he came out.

Q. Where were you all the time - A. Looking out of a window right opposite. The street is narrow. I was waiting for a man, who was going to Chelsea with me. I saw Flynn sitting on he cellar flap.

Q. Is Flynn an acquaintance of yours - A. I do not think I have spoken two words to him in my life. I told my wife of this, and was asked to come forward and say what I had seen.

WILLIAM PRICE re-examined. The prosecutor never said he did not know whether Herring was the man.

FRANCIS GATES . I was at the office. I never heard Godfrey say Herring was not the man. I never told him he was the man.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN LEWIS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-46
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1191. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Barratt , from his person .

MR. THOMAS BARRATT . I live in Mark-lane. On the 25th of July, I was coming out of change, about half-past four o'clock - I felt somebody behind me pressing, and then felt something drawn from my pocket; I turned round, and perceived the prisoner putting my handkerchief into his pocket. A gentleman came up, and we secured him, and took it from him. He said he picked it up.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am an officer. I was on duty, and saw Mr. Barratt with the prisoner, and a handkerchief in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman said his pocket was picked twice before, and he was determined to make an example of me. I never put it near my pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 52.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN FORDHAM.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-47
VerdictGuilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1192. JOHN FORDHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , one coat, value 10 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 10 s., the goods of Joseph Cheese , and one coat, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Stewart .

JOSEPH CHEESE . I live at the Minerva Printing-Office, in Leadenhall-street . I had a coat and trowsers in a drawer in my bed-room adjoining the office, the prisoner was an apprentice there, but did not sleep there; I missed them on Saturday the 3d of August; I had seen them on the Tuesday before; the drawer was unlocked; Mr. John Darling is the master; I found them in pawn on the Monday morning in Houndsditch. I am nineteen years old.

CHARLES STEWART . I am apprentice to Mr. Darling, and sleep on the premises; I lost a coat from the room where I sleep with Cheese; I saw it safe on Saturday the 3d of August, and missed it at eleven o'clock at night, and found it in pawn.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many work-men are there - A. About sixteen; we did not discharge any men about that time; they all sleep at home.

THOMAS COX . I am servant to Mr. Barker, pawnbroker, Houndsditch; I have a coat and trowsers pawned on the 3d of August, between ten and eleven o'clock at night; I am certain the prisoner is the person who pawned them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM CARWOOD . I am in the service of Mr. Sadler, a pawnbroker in Bishopsgate-street; I have a coat pawned on the 3d of August between ten and eleven o'clock at night by the prisoner; I am sure of his person.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I took the prisoner in charge on Monday at the pawnbroker's; he told me where he had concealed the duplicates in the office, and I found them there.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

FREDERICK SIMPSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-48
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1193. FREDERICK SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , one piece of linen cloth, containing twenty-four yards, value 3 l. , the goods of George William Brealey .

GEORGE WILLIAM BREALEY . I am a linen-draper , and live in Aldersgate-street . On the 30th of August this cloth was missed; I had seen it four or five days previous; I had not sold it; Harrison brought it to me that day.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a marshalsman. On Friday the 30th of August, a little before eight o'clock in the morning, I was going up Long-lane with a prisoner, and saw the prisoner at the bar, standing at the corner of Red Cow passage, leading into Cloth Fair, I observed something bulky under his great coat; I passed him a few paces and turned round; he was running; I left my prisoner in charge,

and followed and overtook him in Middle-street, Cloth Fair; I pulled open his coat and found this Irish linen; he said he picked it up, but did not say where. In taking him to the Compter he said it belonged to him, for he bought it. I found the owner.

RICHARD HOLMES . I am shopman to the prosecutor; I saw the Irish in the shop the day before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a hawker not ten minutes before, for 2 s. 6 d. a yard.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

ANN IRVIN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-49
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1194. ANN IRVIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , two yards and a quarter of cambric, value 24 s., the goods of George Oliver , privately in his shop .

GEORGE OLIVER . I am a linen-draper ; and live in Skinner-street . On the 6th of September about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and asked to look at French cambric, which I showed her, she bought one-eight of a yard, which came to 1 s., which she paid; there were seven or eight different kinds of cambric on the counter; she looked at a print and asked the price, and said by and by she should want a gown; I left her looking at the print, which hung in the middle of the shop, I was putting the cambric away, and went into the back shop, and on turning my eye, I saw her nearer to the cambric than when I left her, but did not see her take any thing; she left the shop in a few seconds; only myself was in the shop. In about half an hour I went to tie up the cambric, and missed two yards and a half; no other customer had been in; I saw her again at six o'clock, in custody, in Blackfriars road; Jones had brought the cambric to me before.

Prisoner. Q. Was there not a black man standing by my side - A. No; a person came in to ask me to buy a shawl; he did not come near the counter.

BENJAMIN JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Gibbs, linen-draper of Blackfriars road; the prisoner came into our shop between half-past ten and eleven o'clock; in consequence of what passed there, I stopped her, and found this remnant of cambric in her pocket, and one-eighth in her basket.

EDWARD HEDDINGTON . I am a constable; I apprehended her at Gibbs's, and found the cambric on her person; which I produce.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it rolled up in brown paper in Fleet-market, and put It in my pocket without opening the paper.

EDWARD HEDDINGTON . There was no paper round it.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

ROBERT RICE, THOMAS RUTTER.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-50
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1195. ROBERT RICE and THOMAS RUTTER were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , one coat, value 6 s., and one pair of breeches, value 4 s. , the goods of Thomas Tomlinson .

THOMAS TOMLINSON . I am a labourer . I live at Merton, Surrey. These clothes were in my brother's stable, in Flyinghorse-yard, Bishopsgate .

GEORGE TOMLINSON . I am a gentleman's servant. My brother's clothes were in the stable. I saw them safe at eight o'clock the night before the prisoners were taken. I locked the stable soon after eight o'clock, went home, and returned at ten next morning. On the 15th of August, my brother came and missed them; somebody had broken down some boards in the loft, to get in. I know Rice used to sleep in the stable; and I saw Rutter, the day before, asleep in a cart, opposite the stable-door. The yard is locked up at night by gates.

MARTIN SUTTON . I am servant to Mr. Bradly, pawnbroker, Brown's-lane, Spitalfields. I have a coat and a pair of breeches pawned on the 15th of August, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning. Both the prisoners came in together; Rutter had them under his arm; they appeared to be brothers, from their manner, and both took part in the pawning; they wanted 1 l. on them. I gave them 10 s. I heard of this in the afternoon. Rutter said the coat was his father's, and not his own, on my saying it was too large for him.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable. I was fetched to Flyinghorse-yard, and found both the prisoners concealed, one in one stable, and the other in another. I charged them with this robbery; they seemed confused; Rice said Rutter took the things, and that they were pawned in Paternoster-row. I found 5 s. on Rice, but neither of them had a duplicate. Rutter said it was torn up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

RICE's Defence. My father turned me out of doors, and I slept in the stable; a man came in the middle of the night, and in the morning he asked me to go and sell them, and he would give me part of the money.

RUTTER. I own I am guilty.

RICE - GUILTY . Aged 14.

RUTTER - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN WIGNELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-51
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1196. JOHN WIGNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , forty-eight snuff-boxes, value 6 s.; thirty-two bone chessmen, value 6 s. 6 d.; thirty-two ivory chess-men, value 10 s.; twenty-three wood-coloured bones, value 7 s. 8 d.; nine clothes-brushes, value 18 s.; six hat-brushes, value 7 s. 6 d.; seven hair-brushes, value 7 s. 6 d.; five shaving-brushes, value 5 s.; one shaving-box, value 3 d.; two glaziers' diamonds, value 3 s.; seven glass-bead necklaces, value 1 s.; and one duster-brush, value 3 s. 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Kent and George Kent .

MR. JAMES EDENBOROUGH . I live in the Poultry , next door to Messrs. Thomas and George Kent , who are brush manufacturers . The prisoner had been in my service about twenty months as errand-boy . In consequence of suspicion, on the 14th of August, I had his box opened; he opened it himself in the officer's presence, and the articles stated in the indictment were found there, which the prosecutors claimed in his presence; he said he found them in Oxford-street. We have a laboratory in the cellar, and one of the gratings which divide the premises were loose, but there was also a communication from the top of the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERCASE. Q. You think he might get through the grating - A. Yes. I cannot say that he did get through.

JOHN CROWDER . I am servant to Messrs. Kents. I saw this property at the Mansion-house, on the Monday after the prisoner was apprehended; some of them have our private mark on them, the rest are articles we deal in, and are worth between 5 l. and 6 l. I had seen the chessmen on the Friday before; they were done up in a paper, with my writing on them; the goods were in the warehouse on the ground floor. They were never sold.

Cross-examined. Q. How can you say nobody else sold them - A. I saw them safe at night, and missed them the first thing in the morning.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am a constable. I was fetched, and took charge of the prisoner; he was desired to walk up to his bed-room, at the top of the house; he opened his box in my presence, and I there found all these articles; he said he found them in Oxford-street, in a bundle. Mr. Kent claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

GEORGE DAVISON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-52
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1197. GEORGE DAVISON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , three gowns, value 30 s,; one petticoat, value 1 s. 2 d.; one spencer, value 19 s.; and two pieces of linen, containing three yards, value 3 s. 6 d. the goods of Charlotte Tallis .

CHARLOTTE TALLIS . I am servant to Mrs. Westwood, who lives in Jewin-street , and keeps a chandler's shop. I have lived eleven years there. On the 16th of August, these things were locked in a box, in a back-room on the third floor; the prisoner had come to lodge there on the 15th of August, in the front room; the box contained the articles stated in the indictment. I got up at seven o'clock in the morning, but did not go into this room till about three o'clock, and found my box removed out of the back-room into his room. There were other lodgers on the second floor; it was broken open, and these things taken away; we expected him to return to dinner, but he never returned; on the 20th, my brother secured him in the Haymarket. I have never found my property; nobody slept in the room but him; the rest of the lodgers remain now.

ELIZABETH WESTWOOD . I keep the house. I let the prisoner the room at 3 s. 6 d. per week. Tallis' box was kept in the back room. I did not get up till nine o'clock; he was gone then, and never returned. Tallis found her box broken open, and the things gone.

WILLIAM TALLIS . I lodge with my sister in this house. I was informed of this. I met the prisoner in the Haymarket; he looked at me very hard. I turned round and told my shopmates, that he had robbed me. I stopped him; he said he would give me a reference to where he lodged, and if he had got the money, he would make it up; he acknowledged it.

RICHARD ESSEX . I have lodged at this house nearly four years. I saw the prisoner the night he came to lodge there. After he was taken, he was brought to the house; the officer asked him what he had to say; he said, I do not deny it.

JOHN BARRS . I took charge of him, for breaking open the box; he said he would not deny it, and we might take him and hang him, if we liked.

Prisoner's Defence. I contradict that I ever acknowledged it. I took the room, having heard of a job in the neighbourhood; and in the morning when I went to work, the master said he could not employ me, which was the reason I did not return.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

WILLIAM SMITH.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-53
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment

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1198. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , two pounds ten ounces of soap, value 10 s. 6 d. , the goods of William Walton and Joseph Walton .

MR. WILLIAM WALTON . I am in partnership with my brother Joseph Walton ; we are tallow chandlers and melters , and live in Little Britain ; the prisoner was in our service as porter for fourteen years, and in consequence of suspicion I entertained, I followed him out of the warehouse at two o'clock in the afternoon of the 10th of August, as he went to dinner; he had a parcel in his hand - I stopped him, and said,

"Smith, what have you there?" he said a pair of shoes, which was correct; I said,

"Have you any thing else about you?" he said No, he had not. I put my hands to his coat and found he had. I took him back into the counting house, and took from his coat pocket one cake of soap broken in half, and concealed in an old worsted stocking; he begged pardon, and said it was the first time he had done it; it weighed two pounds ten ounces. I asked what he had done with the soap he took the night before - he denied that.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. He expressed his contrition - A. He did. I believe he has a family, but they are all grown up.

THOMAS BAMFORD . I am in Messrs. Walton's employ. I had suspicions and watched the prisoner; I saw him go through the shop and down into the cellar with a candle, as if to draw beer; as he came up he walked as if he had something in his breeches; I told my master, and he went out in about an hour and a half, and was discovered.

JOHN DRUCE . I am a constable. I took charge of him; he begged Mr. Walton would forgive him, and he would do so no more - he seemed sorry.

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS DOBBINSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-54
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15.

1199. THOMAS DOBBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , one frock, value 4 s.; one petticoat, value 3 s.; one shirt, value 2 s., the goods of James Breet , and one shawl, value 17 s. , the goods of Hannah Dearnley .

HANNAH DEARNLEY . I am a widow , and take in needle work; I live in Queen-street , Poplar; my shawl was inside a bureau bedstead; it was safe on the 24th of July. Mrs. Breet lodges in the same house. I missed it on the 4th of August, and found it in pawn next day; the prisoner lodged in the garret - he had no business in my room. I had lent it to the carpenter of a ship on the 24th of July, to pawn; he redeemed it and sent it to me by the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had the carpenter access to your room - A. No; he went to sea before they were stolen.

SARAH BREET . I am the wife of James Breet ; I lodge on the first floor. I lost a frock and petticoat, and sheet, from a drawer that was seldom locked. I never knew the prisoner to be in my room. I did not miss them till they were found at the watch-house; they were safe on the 28th of July.

JOSEPH COLTMAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 4th of August, at the Queen's Head, public-house; I found a key on him, which he said was the key of his box; it was brought to the watch-house; I opened it, and found the things claimed by Mrs. Breet; he said nothing about them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN DODD . I am servant to Mr. Dickens, a pawnbroker at Limehouse; I have a shawl pawned for 5 s. on the 3d of August, I believe by the prisoner, but cannot be certain.

Prisoner's Defence. They were given to me by the carpenter, instead of money which I had lent him.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JAMES NEEDHAM.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-55
VerdictNot Guilty

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1200. JAMES NEEDHAM was charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition only, with feloniously killing and slaying John Lloyd .

JOHN ALEXANDER FISHER . I am a gatekeeper of Marylebone park . On the 12th of August I was sitting outside the park railing, exactly opposite the Crescent. A lady and gentleman came from the Crescent arm in arm; they advanced about a yard on the road, and a horse and gig at full gallop came directly upon them, and struck the lady on the side of her head, knocked her bonnet off, and they both fell with great violence; and the wheel went over the gentleman's body. I turned round and saw the chaise going on without any body in it - the gentleman got out or fell out. The lady and gentleman were brought into my lodge; he appeared very much hurt. A surgeon was sent for and he was put on my bed, and was sent to the Middlesex Hospital. The affair was so sudden that I could not see who drove the gig - I could not tell whether he was driving, or whether the horses ran away with him.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You are very deaf - A. Yes; several people came over to my Lodge - Mr. Steel was among them.

JOHN JONES . I am a shoemaker. On the 12th of August I was coming up the New Road, and saw a man in a gig; I do not know the man rightly, but he was very much intoxicated. The reason I think so was that every whip he gave the horse he fell from one side to the other. I saw him strike several times. He sat on one side and then on the other, and fell from one side of the chaise to the other. The horse was gallopping in a way it ought not to have gallopped. I was not close to the chaise at the moment the accident happened; it had passed when I came up; I saw the person lying on the ground, and paid more attention to that. I did not see the person in the gig get out or fall out. I carried the man to the hospital on a shutter. I held Mr. Steel's horse while he went into the lodge.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What time was it - A. About a quarter past five in the afternoon. The chaise passed me near the turnpike, by the end of Portland-road; I followed it, on seeing it gallop; he galloped at a very quick pace, and he had the reins in one hand and the whip in the other, and reeled from one side to the other; but the reins were loose - he was tipsy.

FRANCIS STEEL . I am a silver smith; I was riding on the day in question, and saw the deceased after the accident happened, but not before I saw the chaise come through the turnpike by Warren-street, which is four or five hundred yards from the spot. The horse was gallopping. I saw him gallop from the gate to where the accident happened; the prisoner was the driver; I did not know him before, but I saw him thrown out of the gig when the wheel went over the man's body; the horse ran up the New Road; he was leaning back in the chaise, holding the reins very tight; he had them in his left hand and the whip in his right. The chaise went zig-zag, and the whip touched the horse, but he was not striking it; the horse was going at a great rate - it appeared running away. There was only a snaffle bit in the horse's mouth, which I think was improper. He did not appear to be urging the horse on; his endeavours appeared more to keep himself in; he appeared to be in liquor; the lash of the whip fell backwards and forwards, but he was not striking. He was so tipsy after the accident, that two men held him by the arms to keep him up. He went into a public-house. I asked his name and address - he said his name was Needham, and that he lived in the Borough. He appeared very much intoxicated.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The chaise did not go in a straight direction - A. No; he leant his head quite over the back of the chaise; he was bailed and has surrendered. He did not appear injured by the fall, he had some brandy and water at the public-house.

THOMAS CONSTABLE . I sell fruit at the Park gate; I saw Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd crossing, but did not see them knocked down; I saw the gig a short distance before the accident happened, it was coming along fiercely; I did not notice the driver, he held the reins with both hands, but I do not know whether he had a whip; I did not see him thrown out.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. A. You had a front view of the gig, and think he had the reins in both hands - A. Beyond a doubt.

MR. THOMAS WOOD . I am house surgeon at the Middlesex hospital. The deceased was brought in there one Monday in August by Jones; his name was John Lloyd ; he had fractured several of his ribs; he lived about an

hour; I opened his body, and found in addition to five ribs being fractured, a considerable quantity of blood in the chest, and also in the abdomen; a carriage driving over him might occasion this injury, and that was the occasion of his death; he spoke very incoherently; I asked his name; he could not answer so as to be understood.

GRIFFITH RICE . I know the deceased, his name was John Lloyd ; I saw his corpse at the Middlesex hospital; he was a relation of mine; his wife was a laundress; he was out of a situation.

Prisoner's Defence. No one can feel more sorrow from this unfortunate circumstance than I do; but no blame can justly be attributed to me; the witnesses who state I was intoxicated are wholly mistaken; I had been engaged in town till late in the afternoon, and went to see my daughter, who was visiting her father-in-law at Pentonville. I passed on, and at the end of Tottenham-Court-road the belly band broke; I endeavoured to pull up, but the horse became unmanageable, and the band flapping about increased his fright; I used every exertion to pull in, but could not succeed, and the unsteady motion of the gig shook me about, which might make the witnesses think I was beating the horse; but I was pulling the reins with both hands. I called out to the unfortunate man to get out of the road, and was almost immediately after thrown out of the gig, and no doubt the effects of the fall might make the witnesses think me intoxicated; I did every thing in my power to prevent the accident.

MRS. MARIA RAWLINGS . I live at Pentonville. The prisoner's daughter was visiting at my house. He called on this day, about ten minutes before six o'clock to see her, and left just after the clock struck six; he was then perfectly sober. He drank nothing at my house. He lives at Notting Hill.

RICHARD STEEL . I am a carpenter. My father was on the Coroner's Inquest. I heard the verdict from him, and then made known what I knew. I was in the New-road when the accident happened. I stood and saw the horse coming along at a furious rate, about thirty yards in front of me; I stood with my back to the rails to see it pass, and just as it came by, he called out Hoy three or four times. The deceased and his wife were at that time crossing the road, and the prisoner trying every effort to stop the horse. He sat on the seat with both reins in his hand, and I think the whip lay over the dashing iron. He had both his hands on his breast, pulling as tight as he could. I did not observe the belly band. The chaise ran on with great rapidity, and he was thrown out about three yards from where the accident happened - he appeared much hurt by the fall, as if stunned. His forehead was grazed, and the back of his hands hurt. I ran to the deceased, and some people took him from my hands - I went to assist the prisoner; he appeared perfectly sober, but quite stunned - his mind seemed to wander very much, and he staggered a little when we picked him up.

ELIZA LEE . I keep a fruit stall by Regent's Crescent, close to the gate, and saw the gig pass me some distance before it came to the gentleman. I saw the gentleman in the gig, sitting with the reins in both hands, pulling as hard as he could, and the horse with his mouth wide open - the belly band was flapping about, which I think frightened the horse more. The whip was not in the prisoner's hands.

JOHN KNIGHT . I saw the belly band broken. I believe the prisoner was sober.

JOHN COULSON . I am porter at the lodge. I saw the gig fifty yards before the accident happened - the prisoner was pulling the horse back all he could, but it was quite unmanagable - its mouth was quite open, and the belly band hung at its legs, which frightened it. I watched him two hundred yards up the road, and saw him thrown out. I really think he was sober.

FRANCIS STEEL re-examined. If the belly band had been broken, I think I must have seen it.

MARY POULSON . I saw the accident. The prisoner sat in his gig, pulling with all his might, to keep the horse from going on - I only saw him pass the lodge, and did not notice the belly band.

SAMUEL BISS . I am driver of a Paddington stage. I saw the prisoner in his gig, at a quarter to seven o'clock. The belly band was broken, and I lent him a chain to mend it. He appeared sober, and got into his gig again - his hand was cut. I put a man in the gig to drive him home.

JOHN CARMODY . I live in the prisoner's neighbourhood. I saw him about a mile from home on this night. His head and hands were cut. I am certain he was sober.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

MATTHEW PENNELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-56
VerdictGuilty > theft under 40s
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1201. MATTHEW PENNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of August , two coats, value 1 l.; one pair of breeches, value 10 s.; one pair of gaiters, value 2 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 10 s., the goods of Emanuel Goodhart , in his dwelling-house .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES COOPER . I am servant to Mr. Emanuel Goodhart , a sugar refiner , who lived at this time at Bromley . On the 15th of August, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, he went to town. His clothes were kept in the wardrobe on a shelf, in the closet - I had not seen them for some weeks. The other servants have nothing to do with them. The street door is sometimes open. Between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I was going towards the dressing room, where I had been three hours before - I opened the door and saw somebody going from the dressing room into the water closet; I opened the door, and found the prisoner there - I seized his arm, and asked what brought him there; he said he had lemons to sell - I said it was a curious place to come to sell lemons. I found my master's clothes lying on the dressing room by the closet door, that they were kept in. They consisted of the articles stated in the indictment - they were loose just as they were taken off the shelf. He said he did not know how they came there, and begged to be let go, saying it was the first time he had done such a thing. They were not lying there when I was in the room before, and the closet door was shut, but I found it open.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You cannot swear he took them out of the press - A. No. We have five servants and a groom.

COURT. Q. Were the coats good - A. Yes. They are worth more than 40 s. I am certain - I am not a good judge,

but I think them worth 4 l. I found them lying down on his basket of lemons, as if they were thrown down on it. The dressing room is on the ground floor.

Prisoner's Defence. Two or three things which he says are false. I was hawking lemons - I went to this house, and asked if they wanted any, nobody answered - I thought I saw some one go in at this door, so I went in to ask, and this man opened the door, and said I wanted to rob the house.

GUILTY, Aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

DAVID BARNES.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-57
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1202. DAVID BARNES alias BARNARD , was indicted for burglary, in the dwelling-house of Alexander Read , about two o'clock in the night of the 13th of August , and stealing one tea caddy, value 2 s.; four spoons, value 1 l.; one pair of spectacles, value 5 s.; one pair of sleeve buttons, value 1 s., one snuffer stand, value 2 s., and one snuff box, value 1 s. , his property.

ANN READ . I am the wife of Alexander Read ; we live in Flask-lane, St. George, Hanover-square . On the night of the 13th of August I went to bed last, and fastened all the windows and doors; I heard no alarm in the night, but about seven o'clock in the morning the servant called me; I came down and found the back door cut through in three places and the bolts undone; the door was perforated over the bottom and over the top bolt, and a hole large enough to admit a person made in it, and near enough for them to undo the bolt; the door was open; I missed the articles stated in the indictment, which are worth about 2 l.; there was no appearance of candle having been burnt.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer. On the night of the 16th of August I was present when the prisoner was apprehended with another man, in Henrietta-street, Covent Garden; and found two centre bits on him, which I have compared with the marks on the door; they fitted; we found a variety of implements on him; I have brought part of the door here to compare the centre bit.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I assisted in apprehending the prisoner about a quarter past twelve o'clock at night; I produce two centre bits which were found on him, also a dark lantern, with two pieces of candle, a cord, a stock, a phosphorus box, a crow bar, eleven skeleton keys, a pick-lock key, two of Bramah's patent latch keys, three chamber door keys, and a blue bag, all found on him; the lantern and bag were in his hat.

SAMUEL LACK re-examined. I searched his lodgings, and found a tea caddy among other things there; I shewed it to him, he said it was his own, and claimed every thing found there.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You only know them to be his lodgings from something told you - A. The landlord is here; it was in the presence of the Magistrate that he said the property was his.

COURT. Q. What he said about the property being his, was before the Magistrate - A. It was; the depositions made were read over to him by the Magistrate's clerk; I heard it read over to him, that he said the goods were his own. (The witness was here dispatched to the office, for the original book in which the examination was taken down, and on returning, his examination was as follows.) I produce the book the examination was taken in; I know the signature to it is the Magistrate's; he told the Magistrate that the property was his own; this is not written down.

THOMAS JONES . I am gaolor of Bow-street. When the prisoner was called on for his defence, he said, the whole of the property which was sworn to was his own; the Magistrate's clerk was ordered to take it down; he was writing, but I could not see what he was writing; I was called out of the office. The clerk is out of town.

Cross-examined. Q. What is his name - A. John Richmond .

SAMUEL LACK re-examined. Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing of this sort at any other time - A. Yes, more than once or twice, before the examination.

Cross-examined. Q. He did not know what you had taken away - A. I gave his wife, (as he called her,) a list of them, and produced them all before the Magistrate.

JOHN SWAINE . I live in Maiden-lane, Covent-garden; the prisoner lodged in my house for seven weeks, till he was apprehended, in the back-room on the first floor; his wife was in the room when the officers searched it.

Cross-examined. Did his wife lock up the room when she went out - A. I do not know, there was a lock on the door.

SAMUEL LACK . I found the caddy in the first floor back room; a woman was in bed there with her clothes on.

MRS. READ. The tea-caddy is mine, and was in a cupboard in the kitchen, on the night of the robbery; which cupboard was broken open. I am certain it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the caddy for 2 s. 6 d.; the Magistrate did not ask if the things were mine, or I could prove how I got it.

GUILTY. Aged 16.

Of Larceny only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN LEVY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-58
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

1203. JOHN LEVY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Jones , on the 2d of July , on the King's highway, at Isleworth, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 6 l.; one seal, value 6 d., and one piece of ribbon, value 1 d. , his property.

SAMUEL JONES . I was at the Castle, public-house, at Isleworth, on the night of the 1st of July, at a dance. I danced with Sarah Spruce . I am a journeyman miller , and live near Balduck, Hertfordshire; I had come to Isleworth fair, having friends there; I left the house with Spruce between two and three o'clock in the morning of the 2 d; I came up by the King's Arms public-house, and turned up Walpole-lane ; I never saw her before; I went about one hundred yards up the lane, and in three or four minutes I heard some steps; I looked down the lane, and saw three men running towards me; they ran up to me, and with their heads all three drove me against the brick wall; they ran all three abreast, as if running for a wager; one of them hit me in the face with his hat; they then seized me round the middle; one held me on each side, and the middle one drew my watch from the fob, with the seal and ribbon, and 14 s.

or 15 s. from my breeches-pocket; I found my pocket turned inside out; directly they did this, they ran off; I was held so tight, I could not resist; I pulled as much as I could; they robbed me in less than a minute, and ran up the lane towards Twickenham; the only blow I received was, one of them struck me with his hat; as the last man run from me, I said,

"D - n you, I shall know you." I am positive the prisoner is that man; I saw him running off with my watch, and the seal hanging down; he drew it out of my pocket; I had seen him in the public-house that night, and they were in the street just before I turned up the lane, walking at a distance from each other; I recollected the men again; I knew the dress of the others, but could not swear to them; I was sober; I had only been to two public-houses that evening; and was in a mill for two hours; I might have drank four pints of ale in all, and no spirits at all; I was quite sober, and knew what I was doing very well; I saw the prisoner's features well in the house, and noticed him as I went up the street; he was taken, I believe, on the 3d, but I had then gone into the country.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You came from home to go to the fair - A. No, on purpose to see my relations. I was perfectly sober when I was robbed; it was getting daylight; I saw them coming when they were a hundred yards off; the last man was dressed in a dark corded jacket, which looked dirty - a pair of fustian trowsers, about the same colour - and I took great notice of his complexion; he had no coat or apron on; he had a hat. I stood talking with the woman. The state of my dress prevented my following them. I should have been afraid to run after them, if I could. I saw Campbell, the constable, soon after, and told him I knew one of them, and described his dress. The constable brought the prisoner to me on the 6th of July; he was then dressed in the same jacket and trowsers as when he robbed me, but had a white smock frock over them. I never said I did not know either of the men.

Q. Did you not say you fixed on the last man, because you thought him like a man you saw in the fair - A. I went up the street after I was robbed, and met a man in the street, dressed nearly the same as one of the three, and collared him; but as soon as I came to look at him, I told him I did not think he was the man. His trowsers were fulstian, but a little lighter than the prisoner's, and he was taller. I was in a fright when I stopped him. I never charged any other man. I understand the prisoner lives at Twickerham.

Q. You met Spruce by accident - A. Yes; in the room, I gave her a glass of ale. I have talked with her about this two or three times. When I took the man in the town, I did not say I thought he was the last man, but thought him one of them.

Q. Did you not ask her to go back and help you, because you did not know the men - A. No; I said to her,

"You must know these men; and as I do not, tell me who they are." I did not know where they lived. I know the prisoner by his face and dress.

COURT. Q. When you apprehended the other man, did you take him for the prisoner, or for one of the other men - A. For one of the others. I thought the girl might know where they came from, which was the reason I asked her to assist me, but I knew the prisoner's person.

SARAH SPRUCE . I live at Hounslow; I was at the Castle at Isleworth, dancing with Jones; I went out a little before him, he joined me in the street. I went up Walpole-lane with him, and had not been there five minutes, before three men came up the lane from Isleworth, running one after the other; two held Mr. Jones, while Levy robbed him. I did not see them before, one run against him with his head and two seized and held him, while the other robbed him; the prisoner is the man who robbed him. I had seen him before that day; I had a little acquaintance with him, but not much; I knew his face quite well. I had seen him that day in the fair, and also at the Castle in the evening, and had spoken to him, but was not in his company. When I walked up the street with Jones, the prisoner and two others stood outside the public-house; I did not speak to him then. Jones was as sober as possible. I am positive he is the man. After robbing him, all three took to their heels, and ran towards Twickenham; the prosecutor did not follow them, but went to a public-house to get assistance. I saw him lay hold of another man in the street, and let him go again.

Cross-examined. Q. How old are you - A. Twenty-one; I have no parents. I went to the fair alone; Jones was a stranger to me till I met him. I saw the prisoner at the Castle, but was not in his company that day; he had two more men with him, whom I should not know; one wore a white smock frock; they were both Twickenham men; the prisoner lives on Twickenham Common. I was standing in the lane with Jones; two men ran against him, and Jones said,

"Do you mean robbing me?" Levy said,

"I do," and pulled his watch out, and handed it to one of the others instantly, and then turned his pockets out. I knew Levy instantly - he wore a fustian jacket and trowsers, and a hat, but no apron.

Q. Why not tell Jones you knew one of them, and where he lived - A. I did not know it would be required till I was taken before the Justice. Jones went to the Castle to look for them; when he asked if I knew them, I said, I did not think I did, he said he really thought I knew them; I said, I did not, and afterwards that I knew one.

Q. Did not you give your reason for not going back with him, that you were ashamed - A. That was not the reason. I told him one was a Twickenham man - and told him the name.

Q. Did he not say he did not know any of the men, and you must go with him to point them out - A. Yes, he went to look for them. I went before the Justice on Monday - the robbery was on a Tuesday. The constable says the prisoner gave himself up. I did not see him about; he called when I was out, and left word that he was innocent.

COURT. Q. When Jones first asked if you knew them, you said you did not - A. Yes; I did not know that he wished to go on with it - but when he said he would. I told him directly, on the same night, and said he lived on Twickenham Common; this was before Jones applied to the constable.

THOMAS WEBB . I am constable of Twickenham. On the 3d of July, I was applied to by the Isleworth constable about this. I apprehended the prisoner on Twickenham Common on the evening of the 4th of July; his person was

described and his name mentioned to me; I had no difficulty in finding him. I had searched his house on the 3d, and next day about nine found him near his home; I told him he was my prisoner, and he surrendered; I understand he had been to surrender at my house on the day before. I had not seen Jones myself; he was sent for and came. Spruce was examined on the 4th, I think.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe Spruce was brought up before the Monday - A. She was with the constable looking after him. East the headborough is not here; I believe he went to him also to surrender; he lived with his mother on the common. I think Spruce was not examined till Monday. The prisoner was dressed then in a smock frock. We all went before the Magistrate on the 6th.

WILLIAM STELWELL . I am an officer of Isleworth. Jones applied to my fellow constable Campbell on the 2d; the robbery had happened that morning; I did not see him till he came from the country. Campbell, I, and the girl went to Twickenham Common, to find the prisoner. I believe one constable went to his mother's house; I don't know of his surrendering himself.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you ask the girl his name - A. No, nor did she tell me.

SAMUEL JONES re-examined. Q. Did you learn the prisoner's name from the girl that night - A. Yes; I went with the constable to her; I asked her immediately after the robbery, if she knew the men; she said she did not; I said,

"I know you do;" she said,

"I don't know them all, I know one;" I asked his name; she said Levy; that she had seen him hay-making, and he had a thumb off one hand; she did not know which. This was when I went with the constable, which was about ten or eleven on the morning of the robbery; this was the first time she mentioned the name of Levy. Campbell the constable was with me; I gave him the prisoner's name and description; and when the Magistrate's clerk sent to me, I came to Isleworth.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

JOHN WEST . I live at Twickenham. The prisoner lives on the common with his mother; I have known him from a child; he bore a good character; I had seen him about his business every day as usual, till he was taken. I was at the fair with him on this night, and went to the Castle with him about half past twelve, and remained in his company. We went from there home to Twickenham in the morning - we remained at the Castle till about four o'clock. Thompson was in our company till four o'clock. There were a great many people at the public-house - it was the first day of the fair. He was not out of my sight five minutes of the time. We joined his company at half past twelve o'clock - I met him as I was going home.

COURT. Q. You met him - A. Yes; and hearing music at the Castle, we went in. I was going home with Thompson; we intended to go home, but hearing the music, the girl and I agreed to go in, and he said he would go with us. There was a dance at the further end of the room; neither of us danced, but sat there drinking.

Q. Had you been at the fair all the evening - A. I went at nine o'clock. We only had three pots of beer, and two glasses of spirits. We met no acquaintance there. I heard of the prisoner being charged with this on the Wednesday morning, and he delivered himself up. I attended before the Magistrate.

HANNAH THOMPSON . I live at Hounslow, and have known the prisoner better than twelve months; he lives with his mother on Twickenham Common. I was at the Castle in the fore part of the evening, with Levy and West; we did not stop all the evening, but returned on hearing the music, at half past twelve o'clock.

Q. Did Levy walk with you there, or did you find him in the house - A. He came to us up stairs in the room - this was the first time I saw him; we continued with him from half-past twelve o'clock, till four o'clock in the morning; he was not out of my sight all that time.

COURT. Q. Where had you been with West - A. To the fair, and was at the Orange Tree, public-house. I was in his company from seven o'clock, and was at other public-houses with him.

Q. Drinking and dancing - A. Yes.

Q. Did you leave the Orange Tree intending to go to the Castle - A. Yes.

Q. Why - A. There was music there; they were shutting the Orange Tree up. Levy came in about five minutes after we got there - we sat in the room, none of us danced. When we came out, we went to Twickenham.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

JAMES SIMPSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-59
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1204. JAMES SIMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , at Chiswick, one mare, price 2 l. 10 s. , the property of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN . I live at Turnham Green. On the 19th of August, I lost a brown mare. I had put her on Turnham Green on the evening of the 18th, about eight o'clock as usual, for the night. I went about five the next morning, and it was gone. I gave fifty shillings for it. I found her in Sharp's-alley, near Smithfield, in the possession of James Bagnall , between five and six o'clock that evening. I am certain it is mine. I had had her about six months. I had seen John Kent and the prisoner walking together on the green the night I turned it out. Kent has absconded since, he lived on Turnham Green.

JAMES BAGNALL . I am a pig dealer, and live in Sharp's-alley; the prosecutor came on the 19th of August, and claimed a mare which I had bought of the prisoner in Smithfield market, between six and seven o'clock that morning, for thirty shillings. I asked his name, and where he brought it from; he said that it was his master's, that his name was James Austin , of Enfield, and he was servant to John Clark , of Enfield Chace. I said,

"You must find your master before I pay for the mare," he came and said he could not find him. I asked him to find somebody who knew him, which he did, and I paid him for it - he went away directly; he said he came from Enfield Chace that morning. I had seen the man about who said he knew him. It was not horse market day, which was the reason I would not pay him directly.

RICHARD BUSH SKILLERN. I am an officer of Bow-street; I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of August at Peckham Fair on this charge, in consequence of the witness's description.

Prisoner's Defence. I know I sold it, but did not know it was stolen; I was employed to bring it to sell, and paid

the money to the man I had it from; he was a stranger to me, and said he lived at Enfield.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 29.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS, JOSEPH WILLIAMS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-60
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceDeath; Death

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1205. WILLIAM WILLIAMS and JOSEPH WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , at St. George's, one watch, value 4 l.; one seal, value 10 s.; one key, value 5 s.; one shirt, value 4 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 3 s., and one nightcap, value 6 d., the goods of Richard Harris , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD HARRIS . I rent a house in Batty-street, in the parish of St. George in the East . On Sunday the 14th of July, my watch hung over the chimney-piece in the parlour; I had not seen it there that morning, but a quarter of an hour before I saw it in the bed-room, and Sarah Harris took it to hang it there at six o'clock; I saw the prisoners at the bottom of the street, about twelve doors off, that morning, and have seen them peeping in at my window several mornings before. I lost the articles stated in the indictment; the linen lay on the parlour table; I saw it there at six o'clock; I was in the back kitchen, and heard somebody in the house; I went up and ran out at the front door, and saw the prisoners in Phillip-street running, about eight roods off; I followed and overtook them by Dean-street; I was close to them when they dropped the handkerchiefs, shirt, and cap, and made their escape. I took the things up; I am certain of the prisoners. William William 's dropped the shirt; I did not see the other drop any thing; he was first; their brother Henry was running with them, and dropped the other things; I took the things to the Thames police, and half an hour after went with the officer to their house, and found the prisoners and knew them. William Williams had changed his clothes before we got there; we found the coat there which he wore when he was running; I have never found the watch again.

Prisoner JOSEPH WILLIAMS . Q. Did you see me running - A. Yes; I never said I had not seen him.

ANN BRITAIN . I was cleaning my door on the morning of the 14th of July; and saw the prisoners standing at the top of Queen's-court, Batty-street; it was after six o'clock; the court is four doors from Harris's house; they were looking towards his house; I went in doors, came out again, and missed them; I went to the top of the court to look, and William stood at the right hand side; I stopped a few minutes, and presently they both passed me with a bundle; it was William and another who is not here; I said,

"You villains, you have been robbing some person this morning, I hope you will be detected;" they grumbled something, and then William said they would cut my bl - head open; I said no more. There was a third one running with them, but I cannot speak to him; I called stop thief, and saw the prosecutor following them; I am sure of William; I have frequently seen Joseph in the neighbourhood.

JAMES JORDAN . I am a tobacco-cutter. I heard the cry of stop thief, and caught at Henry Williams by the collar in East Smithfield; he was then running alone; I did not see the prosecutor.

JOHN MURRANT . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners in St. Catherine's on the 14th of July at a house; Jordan was with me, and directed me there; William had a fustian jacket on; Harris said he wore a brown coat, and I found one hanging at the back of a chair; Harris gave me the shirt, two handkerchiefs, and cap, they were both in the room.

RICHARD HARRIS . They are the things I picked up; William dropped the shirt, and Henry the rest; I am sure Joseph was running with them; the property is worth above 5 l.; the watch alone is worth four guineas.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS 'S Defence. I got up and took a walk, returned to breakfast; it was not ready; and while I was cleaning my clothes, my brother came down from bed, and had no sooner put on a clean shirt, than the prosecutor came in and said he saw me running with Henry, who they say is my brother-in-law, which is not the case. We were examined twice, and the officers said there was no evidence against us; but at the third examination the people swore they saw us drop the things.

JOSEPH WILLIAM 'S Defence. I was in bed from six o'clock on Saturday, till a quarter of an hour before I was taken.

MARIA VINCENT . I live in Great Garden-street, but at the time the prisoners got into trouble I lodged at their mother's house, on Saturday evening the 23d of July -

Q. Are you come to speak about the 23d of July - A. I think it was the 23d; it was the day before they were taken. I know that Joseph was very ill, and came in about six o'clock - he slept in a chair till eight o'clock, and then his mother persuaded him to go to bed, which he did, and I saw no more of him till Sunday morning, between seven and eight o'clock, when I heard somebody knock at my door, as I thought; I opened it, and it was Joseph coming down stairs. I asked how his head was; he said it was very bad. I saw no more till the officers came, and took him - but I do not think Joseph was out of the house.

RICHARD HARRIS . I am certain of Joseph - I had seen him for several mornings before. I saw the three brothers together that morning. Henry is much taller than him.

W. WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

J. WILLIAMS - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 15.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

FRANCES WADDELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-61
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1206. FRANCES WADDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , at St. Martin in the Fields, one lace petticoat, value 1 l.; two night gowns, value 10 s.; one pair of stockings, value 1 s.; four table cloths, value 8 s.; four towels, value 2 s.; two shifts, value 14 s.; two silk petticoats, value 30 s., and one silk handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Hannah Maria Williams ; and one coat, value 1 l.; one waistcoat, value 5 s.; two shirts, value 7 s., and one silk handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Evan William Thomas , in the dwelling-house of the said Hannah Maria Williams .

HANNAH MARIA WILLIAMS . I rent a house in Trinity-place, Charing-cross . The prisoner was employed by me as charwoman ; she was at the house every day for three weeks, and went home at night. On Saturday, the 6th of July, she left after eleven o'clock at night; I was in the sitting-room when she went; I had seen her about a minute before, but did not see her go out. Next morning I

was surprised at finding a feather bed and bed clothes thrown out of the back parlour window into the yard; this made me look round, and I missed the property stated in the indictment. Nettleton the constable came about nine o'clock, and asked if I had been robbed; he produced the property to me; the feather bed and clothes were in my room the day before.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and I took the property stated in the indictment out of her lap; I have had it ever since; the lace petticoat that was found in pawn was not in it. The prosecutrix saw the things next morning, and claimed them in the prisoner's presence; she had said she brought them from her sister's at Chelsea, and told the prosecutrix that she pawned the lace petticoat. She at first said they were her own. I asked her to describe the marks - she told me of some marks, and others she told me wrong. I went to find her sister, but could not; I returned, and told her it was false, and I must detain her. In the course of the night she wanted to see Mr. Williams, not Mrs. Williams, but Mrs. Williams came with me; the prisoner then said she took them from the house, and cried very much. I know nothing of the prosecutrix. I saw a person who turned out to be Evan William Thomas - he lodged in the house.

EDWARD GRAHAM . I am watchman of St. Martin's. I saw the prisoner on Saturday night, the 6th of July, in Northumberland-street, Strand, about a quarter past eleven o'clock; she had a bundle and a man's coat hanging out of it; I gave her and the bundle in charge of Nettleton; she said the things were her own.

MRS. WILLIAMS. The property is mine; she had fetched the linen from the mangle, and delivered it to me just before she left; they were put into the kitchen; she could go down and take them after leaving me. The coat and waistcoat were taken from the wardrobe. I missed nothing till Sunday morning. My things are worth 57 s. Mr. Thomas's things were in my care. I asked her at the watch-house what was the reason she threw the bed out of the window - she made no answer. I asked why she took the things - she said she did not know.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say you would forgive me, at Bow-street - A. I did not.

EVANS WILLIAM THOMAS . The coat, waistcoat, two shirts, and handkerchief, are mine, and are worth 38 s.; they were in Mrs. Williams's care.

Prisoner. He does not lodge there.

EVANS WILLIAM THOMAS . I have been there three months, and lodge there; I have paid nothing since I have been there; she keeps the house.

Prisoner's Defence. He is not a lodger; the prosecutrix lives with him.

MRS. WILLIAMS. It is my house - I pay the rent and taxes. Mr. Thomas is on a visit for as long as he thinks proper. I have lived there five years.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

JOSEPH HARGRAVE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-62
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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1207. JOSEPH HARGRAVE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Aaron Holloway , on the King's highway, on the 9th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two seals, value 20 s.; one key, value 9 s., and one chain, value 1 s. , his property.

AARON HOLLOWAY . I am a gentleman's servant . I lived last with Mr. Essex, and am now out of place. I was in Strutton-ground at the corner of Pear-street, coming out of a cook-shop, about a quarter past one o'clock in the night. The prisoner came up, and gave me a gentle tap with his left had, and snatched at my watch - the chain broke, and he got off with it, and the seals. I pursued him, and by Perkin's-rents he escaped. On the 13th, I saw him at Queen-square, and am sure of him - I was perfectly sober. I had been to the play, and went into the shop to have some soup.

WILLIAM COGGINS . I am a shoemaker. On the 9th of August, I was with Holloway, and saw the prisoner rob him. I had seen him before that night, but never to converse with him. I saw him hit the prosecutor on the breast, and snatch the seals. I was about three yards off, and am certain of him.

WILLIAM HEDGES . I am a gentleman's servant out of place. I lived last with Charles Cortel , Esq. I was with the prosecutor on the 9th of August; I had been to the play with him. I saw the prisoner put his hand on the prosecutor's breast, and snatch the seals with his right hand - he snatched with violence, but did not strike with violence. We pursued him, but he got off. I never saw him before; he was in custody on the 13th. I am sure of him; it happened under a lamp.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I am a patrol. I and Shields apprehended the prisoner on the 12th, and found twelve shillings on him.

Prisoner's Defence. On Thursday night I was at home by ten o'clock, and in bed by eleven. On the Monday following, I went to the One Tun, public-house, and was taken by Scott, who said it was for taking a whittle from a woman; he let me go out two or three times, so that I could have escaped.

WILLIAM SCOTT . I let him go out, not expecting he would run, as I could have taken him very shortly; he was not out of my sight.

GUILTY. Aged 24.

Of stealing from the person, but not with force or violence .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

WILLIAM CALLAGHAN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-63
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceDeath

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1208. WILLIAM CALLAGHAN was indicted for that he, on the 16th of July , at Allhallows, Honey-lane, feloniously was at large, without any lawful cause before the expiration of the term of seven years; for which, at the General Session of the Delivery of the Gaol of Newgate, of our late Lord the King, holden for the City of London, on the 13th of January, (59th George the Third,) he was ordered to be transported .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

Before Mr. Recorder.

HENRY BROWN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-64
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > public whipping

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1209. HENRY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th September , one pocket book, value 1 s., the goods of Thomas Clifford Angel , from his person .

THOMAS CLIFFORD ANGEL . I am an wholesale glover , and live in Mortimer-street, Cavendish-square. I lost my pocket-book from my coat pocket between Leadenhall-street

and Holborn . I left home at twelve o'clock, it was in my pocket then; on returning to the warehouse, I missed it. I had come from St. Bartholomew's Hospital, and passed through Giltspur-street; it was at the time of the fair - I got home a little after two o'clock. I found it next day at Guildhall, it contained nothing but memorandums; it might have dropped from my pocket; it never did before.

JOHN CARLILE . I am a constable. On the 4th of September, I was at the fair on duty, and saw the prisoner there; I did not know him before. I saw him take a tobacco box out of a person's jacket pocket, which induced me to watch him. I secured him, and found this pocket-book on him; he said he picked it up in the fair - a letter was in it, directed to the prosecutor, who claimed it; he pleaded distress - and appeared alone.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the fair.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JAMES ROUND.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-65
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1209. JAMES ROUND was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of John Henry Cook , from his person .

MR. JOHN HENRY COOK . I am a short-hand writer , and live at Cook's-court, Carey-street; last Tuesday evening, between seven and eight o'clock, I was going from home, and between the Museum tavern, and the Surrey Institution, I felt something pull at my pocket; I turned round and saw the prisoner, and followed him across the road. I think nobody was near enough to take it but him. I followed him till he got on the pavement by Blackfriar's-bridge ; he then turned round, and on seeing me pursuing him, he ran into the middle of the road, and took the road towards the City; he was stopped before he got off the bridge - but before he was stopped he threw down the handkerchief; I picked it up. I lost sight of him when he got into the crowd - but he was taken. I am certain he is the man I followed; I charged him with picking my pocket, he turned round and said,

"Who says I have taken the handkerchief?" I said,

"Yes, here it is;" he denied it I believe.

THOMAS WARREN . I am apprenticed to a hatter, and live at Charles-street, Blackfriars. I was on the bridge, and saw the prisoner running; there was a cry of Stop thief! he appeared to be the person pursued - I stopped him. Mr. Cook came up in about three minutes, and said he had lost his handkerchief; the prisoner denied taking it. Mr. Cook produced it, and charged him with it - he denied it, and said we might search him, for he had nothing about him.

DANIEL TURNER . I am constable of St. Bride's. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; I took him in charge. Mr. Cook charged him with picking his pocket; he denied it. The handkerchief was produced. I have kept it ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming over the bridge, and saw a lad pick Mr. Cook's pocket of his handkerchief. I crossed the road, heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran after him. A gentleman stopped me. I said I was no thief. I am totally innocent.

MR. COOK. I saw nobody near him, nor was he pursuing any one.

THOMAS WARREN . He was pursuing no one.

GUILTY. Aged 20.

Of stealing, but not from the person . Strongly recommended to Mercy. Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN PERRY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-66
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1210. JOHN PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , one work-box, value 12 s., and one inkstand, value 8 s. , the goods of George Machin .

GEORGE MACHIN . I am a hardwareman , and live in Leadenhall-street . On the morning of the 6th of August, between nine and ten o'clock, these things were stolen. I saw them safe a few minutes before; I saw some boys loitering about the shop, and one less than the prisoner came in and go out immediately. I saw him take these things off the counter; we pursued him; there were four of them; I saw the prisoner throw the property out of his apron; they all went different ways, and I took the prisoner.

JAMES HARDING . I took charge of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

MARY O'NEIL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-67
VerdictNot Guilty

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1211. MARY O'NEIL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , four sheets, value 6 s.; two blankets, value 4 s.; one bolster, value 5 s.; two pillows, value 8 s.; one candlestick, value 1 s.; and one pair of bellows, value 1 s., the goods of Benjamin Hammond , in a lodging-room .

BENJAMIN HAMMOND . I live in Grub-street, Cripplegate . My wife let the prisoner two garrets, furnished, in my presence, at 7 s. per week, on the 3d of August. She stated herself to be married; her husband came home every night. On the 5th of August, I suspected she was taking away the goods, as she took out a bundle every day till the 8th; and on the 9th, between twelve and one o'clock in the night, I gave her in charge. Her husband was in the room at the time. The room was nearly stripped; the man was discharged by the Alderman. The sheets were taken off the bed that day.

JOHN STORR . I am servant to Mr. Reeves, pawnbroker, Redcross-street. I have a sheet pawned for 2 s. on the 6th of August, by a woman of the name of Neil. I cannot say who she was.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOB WATKINS . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby. I have a bolster pawned on the 7th of August, by the prisoner, for 2 s.

JOHN BRUSHILL . I am a pawnbroker. I have a pillow pawned on the 5th of August, by the prisoner.

CHARLES SAUNDERS . I am a pawnbroker. I have a blanket pawned for 2 s. by her.

JOHN KER . I am a constable. I found a duplicate on her, by which means I got a sheet, pawned for 2 s. Next day, I found the rest of the duplicates in her shoe.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOSEPH MACKRELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-68
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation

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1212. JOSEPH MACKRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , at St. Lawrence, Jewry, eighteen yards of kerseymere, value 6 l., the goods of William White , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WHITE . I am a Blackwall Hall factor . I rent a house in Cateaton-street, in the parish of St. Lawrence, Jewry . The prisoner was in my service as porter ; he did not sleep in the house. On Tuesday, the 9th day of July, having, among other things, taken an order for a half piece of kerseymere, I went to that part of the warehouse where I expected to find it. I could not say when I had last seen it. On my looking for it, the prisoner turned very pale, and asked if I wanted that half piece of drab kerseymere? I said, Yes. [It was worth 6 l. or 7 l., and could not be bought for less from the clothier.] He said,

"I have pledged it." I said,

"What do you mean?" He said,

"I have pawned it, Sir." I said,

"What right had you to pawn it?" He said,

"None at all;" and that it was pledged at Mr. Chaffers's, in Watling-street. I went and found it there, and am sure it is mine.

JAMES YOUNG . I am servant to Mr. Chaffers, a pawnbroker, in Watling-street. I have a piece of kerseymere pawned on the 29th of June, by the prisoner, for 3 l. 10 s. - we made it measure twenty yards and a half - in the name of James Mackrell . Mr. White claimed it about the 9th of July.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am a constable. I received him in charge.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say. I leave it all to my friends, and the mercy of the Court.

Four persons gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Strongly recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOSEPH MACKRELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-69
VerdictGuilty

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1213. JOSEPH MACKRELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , twenty yards of kerseymere, value 6 l.; two yards of woollen cloth, value 2 l. 10 s.; eight yards of other woollen cloth, value 9 l.; two yards of other kerseymere, value 15 s.; three pair of boots, value 24 s.; six knives, value 4 s. 6 d.; six forks, value 4 s. 6 d.; one carving-knife, value 1 s., and one carving-fork, value 1 s. , the goods of William White .

WILLIAM WHITE . On the 9th of July, after the first discovery, I questioned the prisoner further what other goods he had pawned, and he said,

"I have pledged that half piece of claret mixture at Mr. Mitchell's, St. Mary Axe."

HUGH RAY . I am servant to Mr. Mitchell. I have eighteen yards of cassimere pawned on the 6th of July, by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES YOUNG . I am servant to Mr. Chaffers. I have eight yards of cloth pawned by the prisoner, and also two yards of cassimere.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

WILLIAM POULTNEY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-70
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1214. WILLIAM POULTNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Mackworth Gustavus Yonge , from his person .

MACKWORTH GUSTAVUS YONGE. I am a warehouseman . On the 22d of August, I was in Newgate-street , going home. I had my handkerchief in my hand when I went out. I did not miss it. Abrahams laid hold of the prisoner, told me it was taken, and produced it. I cannot say it is mine.

BENJAMIN ABRAHAMS . I am a constable. I was returning from the counter, and saw the prisoner, in company with another, standing against a post in Newgate-street. I watched them, and saw Mr. Yonge pass with a lady; I did not see a handkerchief in his hand; the prisoner and his companion immediately followed them; he laid hold of the pocket with his right hand, and drew the handkerchief out with his left. I took hold of his two arms - his companion escaped. I informed Mr. Yonge the prisoner had concealed it between his legs; he looked at it, and gave me his address; he had an apron on.

MR. YONGE. The handkerchief resembles mine, and has my wife's initials. I had one of her's in my hand, but do not remember putting it in my pocket; she misses one.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it lying on the ground, and picked it up to offer the gentleman, when the officer seized me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

WILLIAM SMEETON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-71
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16.

1215. WILLIAM SMEETON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of August , 40 lbs. weight of lead, value 7 s., the goods of Isaac Norman , and fixed to a certain dwelling-house of his .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Three Weeks .

Before Mr. Recorder.

MICHAEL BRYAN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-72
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1216. MICHAEL BRYAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Kingsford Morris , from his person .

THOMAS KINGSFORD MORRIS. I live near Canterbury. On the 26th of July about twelve o'clock, I was going from Soho-square towards Jermyn-street, and in Prince's-street I stopped to look in a caricature shop, and a person asked if I had lost any thing; I felt and missed my silk handkerchief; he pointed to some boys who were making off, and said they had taken it; one boy was taken who said he had not got it, the prisoner was brought into the watch-house, and soon after the handkerchief also.

JAMES COOK . I am a poulterer, and live in Prince's-street, three doors from this shop; I saw Morris looking at the prints; the prisoner in company with seven or eight boys went up; I saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket, and draw the handkerchief out; they all set off; I told Mr. Morris, and pointed out the prisoner;

we both pursued, they turned round Compton-street; I saw Webb at the corner, and told him; the prisoner was secured in Soho-square, and brought into the watch-house five or ten minutes after; I lost sight of him for some time, but am quite sure of him.

ANDREW MYERS . I am a pencil-maker, and live in Dean-street. I heard the alarm, and on turning round I saw the prisoner in custody; as they were taking him to the watch-house, I saw him take off his hat, take a handkerchief out and try to throw it down, but I caught it before it got to the ground.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am constable of St. Ann's. I saw Cook, who pointed out the prisoner and the boys to me; I had seen him before with five or six boys; he was at the corner of Compton-street running with another boy; I only lost sight of him in turning the corner; he was stopped; I took one of the others; Myers gave me the handkerchief, and said the prisoner threw it out of his hat; he did not deny it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN REARDON . I am a watchman, and live in Dean-street. I heard the alarm; I stopped the prisoner, who was running.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman said there were the three letters of his name on it, but on seeing it, said he could not swear to it.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

CATHERINE BROWN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-73
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1217. CATHERINE BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , one pair of sheets, value 4 s., and one quilt, value 2 s., the goods of Hugh Parsons 's, in a lodging room .

BRIDGET PARSONS . I am the wife of Hugh Parsons , we live in Blue Anchor yard, Whitechapel . The prisoner look our back parlour for a lodging, at 4 s. a week, on the 2d of September; next night about twelve o'clock, I heard a noise in the neighbourhood, and found the watchman bringing her back; they brought her into the passage; she ran away, and I missed the quilt and sheet from the room; she was secured and taken to the watch-house with the quilt; I had never allowed her to take them.

JOHN BEAUMONT . I am a watchman. I met the prisoner in Rosemary-lane with the bundle; she said she brought it from her lodging; I asked if the furniture was her own; she said, No; in the meantime two women came up and accused her of taking it; I detained her.

(Quilt produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The sheets were very old; my landlady came into the room in the afternoon, and asked where they were; I said I knew nothing of them; in the evening I was disappointed in receiving money; and took the quilt, thinking I could get a shilling on it, and redeem it next day.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS NEWBY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-74
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1218. THOMAS NEWBY was indicted for feloniously exposing for sale certain silver plate, the same having forged and counterfeit stamps thereon, he well knowing the same to be forged , with intent to defraud the worshipful Company of Goldsmiths .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Justice Best.

THOMAS NEWBY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-75
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

1219. THOMAS NEWBY was again indicted for selling certain silver plate, (i.e.) a silver tea pot, having impressions of forged and counterfeit marks, resembling certain stamp marks used in pursuance of 55th George Third, he knowing them to be forged and counterfeited , with intent to defraud the King .

MR. BOLLAND declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

There were two other indictments of a similar nature against the prisoner, on which he was also acquitted.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN HOLLAND, WILLIAM KING.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-76
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceDeath; Death

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1220. JOHN HOLLAND and WILLIAM KING were indicted for sodomy .

HOLLAND - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 42.

KING - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 32.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

ROSINA DAVIS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-77
VerdictGuilty > theft under 40s
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1221. ROSINA DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , two pair of bracelets, value 7 l.; one necklace, value 1 l.; nine yards of poplin, value 36 s.; three yards of silk, value 15 s.; one petticoat, value 10 s.; one spencer, value 5 s.; one frill, value 4 s.; six yards of lace, value 50 s.; two veils, value 3 l.; one net dress, value 15 s.; two scent bottles, value 3 s.; one fruit knife, value 2 s.; and one cross and beads, value 2 s.; the goods of William Staff , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH STAFF . I am the wife of William Staff ; we live in Beaumont-row, Chelsea . The prisoner lived servant of all work with me until Saturday, the 20th of July, and left about seven o'clock in the evening; she had lived seven months with me. I missed several things previous to her leaving; she laid the suspicion on the laundress, when I mentioned them to her, and the laundress gave up the washing in consequence of it; and after she was gone, I missed most of these things. I missed the jewellery about three days after the prisoner left - I missed two pair of gold bracelets and a necklace out of a drawer - I had lent them to my daughter to wear about Christmas, which was the last time I saw them. In consequence of missing them, I accompanied Handley and Cooper to search her box; she was then in service at the Foreign Office in Downing-street, with Mr. and Mrs. Mountain - I saw her there - she came to me at the area steps. The officers accused her of it, and we followed her immediately up into her room, and desired her to open her boxes, which she did. The officers took her boxes to the office, and they were sealed; I saw the property found there. I said nothing to induce her to confess.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I accompanied Mrs. Staff to the prisoner; she ran up stairs as fast as she could, as soon as we said Mrs. Staff had missed property. We followed her up. I saw her box opened, and produce it. I found in the kitchen drawer a book and some articles of

wearing apparel. I asked if the things in the drawer belonged to her, and she said they did - Mrs. Staff claimed them. I asked her whether the bracelets and necklace I found in her box belonged to her; she said they were given her by a young man who was dead, and she was in mourning for him - and a piece of poplin and a piece of silk she said were bought in Bond-street; but Mrs. Staff had given me two patterns with which they corresponded. She said the wearing apparel was her own, but Mrs. Staff claimed it. She was taken before the Magistrate and examined twice - I cannot be positive whether what she said was taken down or not.

MRS. STAFF. The bracelets match exactly with an earring I have brought with me - I swear they are mine; here is a necklace and a pair of bracelets, worth 3 l. at least, they were taken out of one drawer; the wearing apparel was in twelve different places, and taken at different times. There is no one article worth above 40 s. but the necklace and earrings.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. Have you lived at Chelsea all the time she was with you - A. Yes; my husband is not there a month at a time; he has not been in the house since. The last time I saw the bracelets they were in my daughter's possession - she had them on about Christmas; I believe they were taken from her drawer; she is nineteen years old, and has nothing to do with the domestic concerns. I keep but one servant - I paid the prisoner her wages on the 20th of July.

Q. Had you not sent her to borrow some money in order to pay her - A. Yes; I never told her I would give her some things instead of money. I gave her a good character, because I thought she deserved it.

COURT. Q. Did you hear her say how she came by the jewellery - A. Yes; she said a young man named Fisher, who was dead, gave it to her. The necklace and bracelets might have been put away separate - a single one is not worth 40 s.

GUILTY. Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

ROBERT SWADDLING.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-78
VerdictNot Guilty

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1222. ROBERT SWADDLING was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , eight crown pieces, one hundred and sixty half-crowns, three hundred shillings, and two hundred and eighty sixpences, the monies of Thomas Cody , in his dwelling-house .

ANN CODY . I am the wife of Thomas Cody - we live in Spring-gardens, Mile-end New-town . Thomas Flynn is my son. I do not know the prisoner - I saw him with my son at the top of the court, about half-past three o'clock on the afternoon that I missed this money. I had 44 l. in silver, in my box, which was in my bed room; it was sometimes locked, and sometimes not. On Tuesday, the 30th of July, about half-past ten o'clock at night, I missed it - I had not seen it for three weeks before, and have not recovered it. I missed my son the same night - he was found nine days after; an officer brought him to the office.

THOMAS FLYNN . I am twelve years old. I knew the prisoner before this - he asked me if my mother had any money; I said, Yes; I did not say how much. He told me to take it - I told him it was in my mother's box. He gave me a key to unlock the box, but I found the key in it. I went away from him to open it, and left him at the top of a court, two or three yards off - he knew I was going to open it, and get the money. He agreed to wait for me till I brought it to him; he was not to wait to give me notice if anybody was coming - he said he would stop there to receive the money. He was not near enough to hear me if I called to him. I did not come out for half an hour, he was then gone - I found him at his house, which is about thirty yards from my mother's.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JAMES GARDNER, WILLIAM BRIGHT, GEORGE VIGINTON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-79
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath; Death; Death

Related Material

1223. JAMES GARDNER , WILLIAM BRIGHT , and GEORGE VIGINTON were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Harper , in a field and open place near the King's highway, on the 8th of August , at Edgware, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one pair of shoes, value 1 s.; five sovereigns, and eighteen shillings , his property.

JOHN HARPER . I am a labouring man . On the 8th of August, I was at Edgware fair . I had just finished my work; there came a very heavy thunder-storm, and I went into a hay-shed, out of it. I had taken money for my work, at half-past one o'clock. I saw the three prisoners and another in the shed; the other man's name is Gardner. I was in the shed above an hour, or an hour and a half. They all remained there, and asked me to buy a pair of shoes of them. I said I wanted none; and asked where they got them. Gardner said, Saunders of Brentford made them, and that he had made his father's shoes for years; that his name was Gardner. I then knew his father. They said they were nearly starving, and had been in the shed all night, and had no money, and must sell their shoes. The storm being over, I was going away. Young Gardner jumped down with the shoes, and wanted me to buy them. I said I did not want them; he asked 3 s. 6 d. for them. I refused; he at last said I should have them for 18 d., and I bought them; this was the prisoner Gardner. We were all talking together; I had an opportunity of observing their persons. I went into the fair, met a friend, and went to have a pint of beer with him, at a booth; and while we were drinking, up came these four lads, and said,

"Holla, old boy! give us a drop of beer." They emptied the pot; and one of them said, they would be a pint towards another pot. I ordered a pot; the landlord brought it. I had no change, but six sovereigns. I pulled my purse out; it was narrow, and I could not get my fingers in. I shook it, and out fell the sovereigns. I paid for five pints of beer, and they paid for one. I then twisted my purse up, and put it in my watch-pocket, with the sovereigns, and put 19 s. and three-farthings into my breeches pocket; there were shillings and half-crowns amongst it. They went away; I sat there some time. I went out of the booth to ease myself, and before I could get my clothes down, I saw all four running towards me; the prisoner Gardner struck at me, and I struck at him, and the other three immediately pulled me down on my back; some fell on my legs and arms, and they shoved a

handkerchief into my mouth. I thought I should be strangled; I could not move hand or foot, or call out. They cut out my watch-pocket, where the sovereigns were, and took the silver out of my left-hand pocket, and the pair of shoes I had bought of them. It was done in five minutes. It was about ten o'clock in the evening, and was neither dark nor light. I could see them plainly, and am quite sure the prisoners are three of them. One of them said to the other,

"Have you got it?" he answered,

"D - n his eyes, yes, I have." I am certain they are the men. After they took my money, they jumped up, and away they ran; and as soon as I could catch my breath, I followed them; they ran into the fair. I searched every booth, but could not find them. I thought I would go to the hay-shed. I went and concealed myself behind the shed, and about three o'clock the three prisoners came back with three girls of the town. I laid there till daylight, then got a constable, who took them and put them in the cage - they were not searched till about eleven o'clock, when they were before the Magistrate at Edgware, and Gardner said his brother took all the money away; the Magistrate said he would send them to the house of correction for a month; his brother was not in custody. Gardner was not threatened in any way; what he said was taken down. One of them cut his fingers in cutting my pocket, and left blood on my coat. Their hands were not examined.

Q. You was in their company for an hour and a half by day light - A. Yes; and they were in the booth about half an hour; it was about eight o'clock, and quite daylight; they robbed me before ten o'clock.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are you pretty well known at Edgware - A. I work at Harrow; I have a large family - they are on the parish in consequence of my being robbed - I had not a halfpenny from the parish for twelve months before. The Magistrate knew me because he knew my master. I had received 6 l. 5 s. from Mr. Gould, for cutting twelve and a half acres of beans. I had not above three pints of beer all day, and was as sober as I am now. I told Captain Anderson the Magistrate that I could swear to them, and told him the whole story, but he did not commit them on this charge; they were not searched.

Q. On your oath did you not tell the Magistrate you could not swear to the two taller lads - A. I said I could swear to all four, but as to the little one I could swear to him better than the rest. I told him which was the one who struck at me, but I could not say which of them thrust the handkerchief into my mouth.

Q. Will you swear you did not say you were uncertain about these two men - A. To the best of my knowledge I did not. I will not swear that I did not say so. I said they are the men who robbed me, and I will swear to them. I can swear to them, and the clothes they had on and all, and the Magistrate told me to go to Clerkenwell, and indict them - he committed them for a month, and I went and had them detained.

Q. Did you not take out a warrant before another Magistrate - A. Yes; at Brentford, on the Monday, as they were to come on Friday. I went to Gardener's father to enquire about his brother as they called him - but found he was not a brother; this was nearly a month before the warrant was taken out. I did not ask the father for 2 l. to make it up, but he offered me money several times. He wanted to get me into a hobble.

COURT. Q. Did you state the same story to the Magistrate at Edgware as you have now - A. No, I did not, because he would not give me leave to speak; he told me to hold my tongue. I mentioned the robbery to him. I never expressed a doubt of Gardner, for he is the man who came up and struck me. The other two and another were present.

FRANCIS BOWYER . I am an officer of Isleworth. I apprehended Gardner on Monday, the 9th of September, opposite the Three Pigeons, public-house, at Brentford. I know nothing of the robbery.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know him before - A. Yes, from a boy. I never knew any harm of him; he has had very good situations. The other two surrendered in the evening on hearing the charge.

WILLIAM STELWELL , I am a constable of Isleworth. Harper brought a warrant to me. I went and took Gardner - he bears a good character. The other two came to my house to surrender themselves.

The prisoners made no Defence.

WILLIAM POWELL . I am an appraiser, and live at Brentford. I was in company with Gardner's father when the prosecutor was talking to him - it was last Sunday three weeks. I heard the prosecutor ask him for 2 l. to settle it - the father was going to give it him at first, but I persuaded him not.

COURT. Q. Who mentioned it first - A. I did not hear the beginning. They had been talking about it before, and came over to the public-house to settle it. Gardner came over with the money in his hand, and I persuaded him not to settle it, as it was compounding felony. The prosecutor said he would take 1 l. then, and 1 l. in a month's time. This was at Brentford. Harper lives at Sunbury, seven miles off.

WILLIAM GABBATUS . I am a shoemaker, and live at Brentford. Three weeks ago last Sunday, I heard the prosecutor say he would make it up for 1 l. now, and 1 l. in a month's time, and two securities for the money, which was refused.

GARDNER - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

BRIGHT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

VIGINTON - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Jury, as they did not appear bad characters .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

THOMAS COLE, JOHN HARRIS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-80
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

1224. THOMAS COLE and JOHN HARRIS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Brown , on the King's high-way, on the 21st of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one hat, value 2 s., and one handkerchief, value 2 s. , his property.

EDWARD BROWN . I am a gardner . On the 21st of August, I was at the Wheat Sheaf, public-house, near Fulham , with my wife; I was sober; I saw both the prisoners together. Cole asked for a pint of beer - the landlord refused to draw it. About five minutes after, Cole struck me on the stomach with his fist three or four times. I had never spoken to him. I had a pint pot in my hand,

and got away as well as I could - he followed me and kept striking me; and whether he took my hat off, or whether it fell off, I cannot say - they went away directly. I followed them. Harris was in company with him, whether he interfered or not, I cannot say; they were both gone when I missed my hat and handkerchief, which was in it. I accompanied the officer in pursuit, and on our return we met Cole with my hat on his head; Harris was with him. When Cole saw me, he threw the hat off and ran away. I followed and took him to the office; Harris was taken also. My handkerchief was not found; I searched for it in the house - it was not dropped there.

SARAH BROWN . I am the prosecutor's wife, and was with him at the public-house. I saw the prisoners there; Cole came up and struck my husband, and in the scuffle his hat was gone; he struck him two or three times - the prisoners went away immediately together. I looked for the hat in the passage, it was not there; the handkerchief was gone also. I saw the prisoners taken - there were five of them together. I saw Cole put his hand to the hat which was on his head, draw it off, and said,

"Oh! D - n my eyes;" I picked it up - he ran away; Harris stood still, and was taken.

JAMES DINGLEY . I am a patrol. I assisted in taking the prisoners; Mrs. Brown gave me the hat; Cole threw it off his head, and tried to run away. Harris was six or seven yards from him - they both ran. I stopped Harris, and my partner stopped Cole. Harris had not got above five or six yards; there was three or four of them together, the other got away.

(Hat produced and sworn to.).

WILLIAM JUDD . I am a patrol. I assisted in taking them. I saw Cole throw the hat off, saying,

"Oh! G - d d - n it," and tried to escape - I seized him; Harris was there. Brown said he was one of them, and I took him. I cannot swear that he ran; he resisted being handcuffed.

SARAH BROWN . Harris did not stir from the place where he stood. I did not see him run, if he had I think I must have seen him; he might have run while I stooped to pick up the hat.

COLE'S Defence. I was returning from Parson's Green, and went in for a pint of beer; as I came out of the passage, I met an old man with his face cut, and said he had been ill used by Brown the fighting man, better known as the

"Sprig of Myrtle." I saw Brown, and asked him if he was not ashamed to strike an old man, he said No, and struck me; the landlord said it was a shame, and put me out of the house. I said it was a shame, and sat down till my wounds had done bleeding - I then went to look for my hat which had fallen off, I found one, but could not see whether it was mine or not; in about five minutes a woman threw out another hat; and in about half an hour, some people took me - they said,

"That is the man who has got the hat." I said, I had got two; they said if I would stand treat, they would take no notice of it. I refused, and one who said he was an officer, took me.

EDWARD BROWN re-examined. I do not get my living by fighting. I am a gardener; they call me the

"Sprig of Myrtle." I am not a prize fighter. I swear positively that I struck no man there - he was not shut out, for I pursued after him on missing my hat.

Q. Did you ever fight for a prize - A. About three months ago I fought for twenty-five guineas, and have fought before that.

SARAH BROWN . I saw no man with his nose bleeding, nor heard of any man being beaten. My husband never touched the prisoner till he struck him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Justice Best.

THOMAS LONG.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-81
VerdictGuilty > theft under 40s
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1225. THOMAS LONG was indicted of stealing, on the 15th of July , one time piece, value 3 l. the goods of Thomas Hempson , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH HEMPSON . I am the wife of Thomas Hempson ; we live in Ellis-street, Chelsea , and keep a butcher's shop . On the 15th of July I had just gone out, and on my return saw the prisoner coming out of the shop door; I asked what he wanted, he answered nothing; I turned my head and saw a dress lie in the shop, which I had left on the parlour table behind the shop; I stopped him and asked what he had got, and from under his jacket he pulled the time piece, and laid it on the shop board, saying he did not mean to take it away; I called for assistance; my son came and secured him; the timepiece was kept on the mantlepiece in the parlour; I saw it there about ten minutes before; I had left nobody in the parlour. I have had it for twelve years; it is worth 3 l., and is a very good one. I left my child at the door when I went out, but he went away.

GEORGE SPENCE . I am a constable. I took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN HEMPSON . I am the son of the prosecutrix. She called me; I came up through the private door, and got outside; I laid hold of the prisoner; he had just laid the timepiece down; we gave him in charge.

LEWIS SKELTON . I am a watch and clock maker, and live in Duke-street, Aldgate. The timepiece is worth no more than 30 s.

Prisoner's Defence. I called at the door, and knocked once or twice but got no answer, the timepiece lay on the shop board, and something on the floor; I was coming into the shop, as I wanted some steaks; she came and said I was robbing the place.

MRS. HEMPSON. He had it under his jacket.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

MARY GINGELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-82
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1226. MARY GINGELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , at St. Pancras, in the dwelling-house of John Prouse , two sovereigns, and two 5 l. Bank-notes , his property.

JOHN PROUSE . I am hostler to Mr. Martin, I rent a house, No. 1, North-mews, Burton-crescent, in the parish of St. Pancras . The prisoner was a servant , and lodged at my house; I lost two sovereigns, and two 5 l. Banknotes on the 15th of June; she was then lodging at my house - I received them from John Boyd , and gave them to my wife, and saw her put them in a chest of drawers; I saw her take out two sovereigns, and leave two sovereigns, and two 5 l. Bank-notes in the drawer; this was on the 11th of June; I have never recovered them.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Is it your regular dwelling-house - A. Yes, I pay the rent, the prisoner left on the 2d of July.

JOHN BOYD . I am a carter, and live in Leigh-street, Burton-crescent. On the 3d of June I paid Prouse two sovereigns, and two 5 l. Bank notes; I have the numbers of the notes, one was dated the 18th of February 1822, No. 8755.

Cross-examined. Q. Is the memorandum in your writing - A. Yes. I made it the morning before I paid them away.

MARY PROUSE . I am the prosecutor's wife. I received two 5 l. Bank-notes, and two sovereigns from my husband, and put them in a box in a chest of drawers in the front parlour, on the 11th of June - on the 15th of June I missed the box, notes, and sovereigns; the box was not locked; the prisoner lodged in the front room up stairs, but she sat down in this room with me in the day-time. She had a child at my house; she left on the 2d of July; I did not suspect her then; she said she was going home to her father's in Wilts, and left my house to go there; and on the 26th of July I met her at the bottom of Holborn-hill; my husband was with me, and took her.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you keep a shop - A. I did at that time, I never took a note in the shop, I did not see the notes after the 11th.

WILLIAM MARTIN . I am driver of the Marlborough coach. On the 2d of July the prisoner went by my coach, and paid me the fare with a 5 l. Bank note, which I paid into the Marlborough Bank on the 15th of July - I kept it in my bureau till then, with other notes; I do not recollect taking any other 5 l. Bank notes, except one, which I paid in with it; I have got the note from the Marlborough Bank again, and produce it; I cannot positively swear it is the note I received from the prisoner; I put the private mark on the one I had of her, but it is the same mark I put on all notes paid me by passengers, which is the letter M. I am sure it is a note I received from a passenger, and do not recollect receiving any other 5 l. note from a passenger about that time.

Cross-examined. Q. You mark all your notes with the letter M. - A. Every Bank note I take of a passenger; I received the other 5 l. note on the 4th of July, which I also paid in, but that is marked different, because it was not taken from a passenger; I can swear I paid the note in, which I received from her - my attention was called to it about three weeks after; I cannot swear that I received no other 5 l. note from a passenger, but do not recollect it - the mark has no date to it; I think I can swear it is the note I paid into the Bank; the number of the notes were given to me; I took them to the clerk, and asked if I had paid either of those in.

COURT. Q. You know the mark on it is yours - A. Yes, and I paid no other 5 l. note into the Bank so marked; I have them both here, the other is marked W. H. C. for White Horse Cellar.

JOHN BOYD . Here is my name on the back of the note, it is No. 8755, dated the 18th of February 1822; I am sure it is one of those I gave to Prouse.

Cross-examined. Q. You speak from your memorandum - A. I know it, for it has my name on it; I took it from my father-in-law; I copied this memorandum out of my book.

JAMES SMITH . I am an officer. On the 26th of July I was sent for and took the prisoner, I found three sovereigns, and 12 s. 6 d. upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the money.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN HORTON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-83
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1227. JOHN HORTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , one coat, value 10 s.; two waistcoats, value 20 s., and two pair of trowsers, value 20 s. , the goods of Henry Northcote .

HENRY NORTHCOTE . I am a tailor , and live in Bird-street, Grosvenor-square ; the prisoner was my journeyman - he was in my service fourteen days. On the 22d of July, he came to work - I gave him the key of the shop, and in an hour and a half I went into the shop, and he was gone, and these things also. I found the shop door locked. I owed him 2 s. 6 d., which he never applied for. I found him nine days after in bed, in Shoe-lane, and asked if he would come and work out the things he had stolen. I did that to get him to the shop - he said he would, and was very willing to come; he came, and I gave him in charge - his brother brought me some duplicates and the key on the night of the robbery, which led me to the pawnbroker's; nobody but him had access to the shop.

JOHN FLOWER . I am shopman to Mr. Cotterell, pawnbroker, in Shoe-lane. I produce a coat and waistcoat pawned by a woman named Martin, on the 22d of July; she is not here.

WILLIAM HENRY BARWICK . I am servant to Mr. Reeves, a pawnbroker, in Snow-hill. I have a pair of trowsers pawned on the 22d of July; I do not know by whom.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I am an officer. On the 1st of August, I took the prisoner in charge; the prosecutor gave me the duplicate in the prisoner's presence, and said the prisoner's brother brought them to him - the prisoner said nothing to it; as we went to the watch-house, he said he had sold the rest of the things to a Jew.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot deny taking them - but did it under the influence of liquor. I sent my brother with the duplicates to the prosecutor, who agreed to take my brother's note of hand, and after ten days he apprehended me.

HENRY NORTHCOTE . I have got his brother's note of hand now - he was to pay me the next week.

GUILTY . Aged 3.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

JOHN HITCHING.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-84
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1228. JOHN HITCHING was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , one shirt, value 1 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s., and one handkerchief, value 1 s. , the goods of John Chappel .

JOHN CHAPPEL . I am a sailor , belonging to Margate. On the 4th of August, I lost my shirt out of my bag from the vessel, and found it the same day

on the prisoner - he was at work on board; he said he bought it of a boy belonging to the vessel.

BENJAMIN ABEL . I took the shirt off the prisoner's back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

WILLIAM JOHNSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-85
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1229. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , one shirt, value 1 s., and one gown, value 1 s. 3 d. , the goods of John Hibbert .

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . I am a constable of Hatton-garden. On the 22d of July, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner by John Hibbert 's shop, in Little Gray's Inn-lane ; he was standing close to the door. I saw him pull something down, and walk fast away; I pursued him and asked what he had got - he said, nothing. Upon searching under his coat, I found a gown and shirt - he said he found them; he had not a farthing about him, and said distress drove him to do it.

JOHN HIBBERT . I keep a shop in Little Gray's Inn-lane; the shirt and gown are mine - they hung on the door-post.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Confined Two Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

SARAH JONES.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-86
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1230. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , one gown, value 14 s., and a pair of boots, value 1 l. , the goods of Robert Whitehead .

ROBERT WHITEHEAD . I live in Bunhill-row . On the 30th of August, I saw the prisoner in my shop with a bundle under her arm. She asked if one Bell worked for me, and then went out. She ran, I overtook her and brought her back - she threw a bundle down, saying it was only a bundle of rags. I found the gown and boots in it, which were safe two hours before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave them to me in the passage.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOSEPH JOHNSTONE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-87
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1231. JOSEPH JOHNSTONE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , one watch, value 1 l.; one chain, value 10 s., and one key, value 1 s. , the goods of John Labern .

ANN LABERN . I live in Upper Park-street . On the 16th of August, the prisoner came to enquire about a furnished room we had to let; the watch was in the room into which he came - I saw it half an hour before, and missed it while he was there, and followed him out. I saw my husband two doors off, who pursued him.

JOHN LABERN . I saw the prisoner two doors from the house. I am lame, and got Dale to pursue him - he brought him back and I saw the watch found in his breeches. He ran away.

ABRAHAM LORIMER . I am a constable. I took the watch out of the knee of his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person who offered it for sale, and I gave him 30 s. for it. I called at two or three places to enquire about an apartment, and on going to the prosecutor's, she followed and accused me of the watch.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

RICHARD ROBERTS, JAMES HOBDELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-88
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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1232. RICHARD ROBERTS and JAMES HOBDELL were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of July , one coat, value 1 l.; two pair of trowsers, value 1 l.; two waistcoats, value 10 s.; one shirt, value 5 s.; one petticoat, value 4 s. 6 d.; one pair of drawers, value 1 s. 6 d.; one apron, value 1 s. 6 d.; one night cap, value 1 s., and six yards of corduroy, value 16 s., the goods of Richard Chappell , in the dwelling-house of John Buncombe .

RICHARD CHAPPELL . I keep the Globe tap, Shoe-lane . I occupy a room at John Buncombe 's, in Shoe-lane . I saw these things safe, about an hour before they were stolen - they were locked in a box, in the two pair back room. The prisoners were entire strangers. On Saturday, the 20th of July, between two and four o'clock, a neighbour came, and told me something - I went up stairs, and double locked the bed room door. I saw the two prisoners going backwards and forwards in Shoe-lane; I lost sight of Hobdell, and kept my eye on Roberts, who stood by St. Bride's workhouse gate. I watched him for half an hour; he went quickly by the house into Fleet-street, and went back again - I kept watching him. I saw Hobdell come out of the private door of the house, and run with him, and give him the bundle - I pursued them both into Fleet-street; they both ran towards Fleet-market, but on opposite sides of the street. I took Roberts just by Bride-lane, with the bundle - I brought him back, and sent for a constable. The bundle contained the articles stated in the indictment, all of which I know to be mine. I went to my lodging, examined my box, and found the whole room ransacked; the lock had been opened by a key. On the Tuesday following I saw Hobdell, and am quite sure of him.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You live in a room in Buncombe's house - A. Yes; he lives in the house. I know his name is John, because I sent to him to know, and he gave me a receipt for rent in that name. I saw the prisoners in my tap together, about a week before the robbery. I watched them for an hour and a half before the robbery, and can swear to both of them.

Prisoner HOBDELL. Q. Was I dressed the same when you took me as before - A. No; he had a long brown coat on at the time of the robbery.

WILLIAM THORN . I live opposite the tap in Shoe-lane, and am a shoemaker. I have known Roberts eight years, and Hobdell two. On the 20th of July, about half-past one o'clock, I saw Hobdell pass my shop window; I went to the door to watch, and saw Roberts coming; on seeing me he crossed the way; they joined at the bottom of the lane, by Fleet-street, and had some conversation - Hobdell left Roberts, and went into the private door, of No. 113, where the prosecutor lodged - he came out in half a minute without anything, and joined Roberts seven or eight doors off. I saw them talking together - I went and told Chappell; he went up to fasten his door, and in about an hour and a half, I saw Hobdell going towards Fleet-street

with a bundle, and beckoning to Roberts, who was watching at the corner of a passage; he followed him very fast, and when they got a few doors down Fleet-street, Hobdell handed the bundle to him. I pursued Roberts, and stopped him at the corner of Bride-lane, and Chappell came up. I saw the bundle opened; it contained clothes. On the Tuesday following, I saw Hobdell in custody, and am positive of his person.

Prisoner ROBERTS. Q. Are you certain you saw me following Hobdell - A. I am. He took the bundle on this side of Fleet-street, and ran across.

Cross-examined. Q. You knew Hobdell before - A. Yes. I did not know where he lived at the time. I believe Buncombe's name is Benjamin. I went to fetch his name, and saw him write it - the first letter was B.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a constable of St. Bride's. I know Buncombe keeps an eating-house in Shoe-lane. I do not know his Christain name. I was sent for to take charge of Roberts with the bundle. I found a bunch of common keys in his waistcoat pocket, three of which open the prosecutor's bed-room door.

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a street-keeper. I heard the cry of Stop thief! and stopped Hobdell on the Tuesday.

Cross-examined. Q. Roberts's son rose the cry - A. I believe he did.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HOBDELL'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

ROBERTS - GUILTY. Aged 33.

HOBDELL - GUILTY. Aged 26.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

WILLIAM LOCKTON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-89
VerdictNot Guilty

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1233. WILLIAM LOCKTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , one pair of shoes, value 8 s. , the goods of Richard Willis .

RICHARD WILLIS . I am a boot and shoe-maker , and live in Cheapside . The prisoner was seven years in my service, as journeyman . In July last, a lad named Buckley was in my service. In consequence of suspicions entertained against him, he absconded. I did not see him again till about six weeks ago. I have seen a pair of shoes produced from Mr. Chaffers's.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. When did he abscond - A. About a year ago.

THOMAS BUCKLEY . I am fifteen years old. In July 1821, I was errand-boy to Mr. Willis; the prisoner was journeyman. In that month, I saw him go into Mr. Chaffers's shop, in Watling-street, and stopped till he came out. I asked what he had been doing; he said nothing at first, but told me he would give me 2 s. if I would not say what he went for; and said he took a pair of shoes out of Mr. Willis's shop, and had pawned them. I took the 2 s., and did not tell.

Cross-examined. Q. How long did you stay with your master after this - A. About seven months. I was discharged when I went away. My mother said my master had found a pair of shoes at our house; the prisoner had stolen them. My mother gave me 10 s., and I went to my uncle in Ireland, and returned two or three months ago.

HENRY ROGERS . I was shopman to Mr. Chaffers. I have a duplicate of a pair of shoes pawned in July 1821. I have seen the prisoner at our shop several times, but I cannot say he pawned the shoes.

JOHN HAWKES . I was shopman to Mr. Chaffers. I took the shoes in for 3 s. 6 d.; I cannot say of whom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. PAYNE. I am clerk to the Sitting Alderman at Guildhall. The prisoner was examined before Mr. Alderman Cox, on the 31st of July. I took down what he said. (Reads.)

"The prisoner says he is totally innocent of every thing charged against him, and denies ever going in his life to the pawnbroker's." A statement had been made, that he had been to Chaffers's.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN WILLIAMS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-90
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1234. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , ten keys, value 13 s., and one ring, value 6 d., the goods of Edward Green ; and one sovereign, four half-crowns, and three shillings , the monies of George Conway .

EDWARD GREEN . I keep the Magpie and Stump, Fetter-lane . The prisoner came and took a bed for one night, on the 4th of July. He was to sleep in the two pair back-room, with two other persons. Conway slept in the next bed to him, and went to bed after the prisoner; the prisoner went to bed a little after ten o'clock, and about a quarter past one o'clock, I heard somebody stumbling or falling down stairs. I ran down stairs, and close to the front door passage, I found the prisoner in the act of putting on his shoes. I asked what he did there; he said he was going by the coach at a quarter to five o'clock, and was afraid of being too late. I said, I thought all was not right, and was a great mind to give him in charge. He said, I might depend on his being no thief. I said, he should take off his coat, and he took it off. I asked if he had any money; he said, None. I said he should go back into the room, and see if any thing had happened to either of the parties. I told him to take off his bat; he did so, and I heard something rattle. He said it was only some money he had - I said,

"You said you had no money." I then let him go into the bed-room; I took his hat and coat into my bed-room, returned, and awoke the parties in the room. The first man said in his presence, that his silver was all gone except 6 d. Conway then sat up, and took his trowsers from behind the pillow, and said he had lost one sovereign, four half-crowns, and 3 s.; he had no money left. I searched the bed where the prisoner had slept alone; he had been in the room a minute or two, while I went into my own room. I found between the bolster and mattrass an old canvas purse, which he claimed. I said,

"Here is money; you said you had none." I found in it a sovereign, four half-crowns, 5 s., and five sixpences. Conway claimed them; he said I might depend on it, it was his. Behind the mattress, I also found a bunch of keys, which we had lost about five weeks before; he had lodged there twice before. The other man said the rest of the money was about the sum he had lost.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The other man did not know what he had lost - A. Not exactly. The prisoner had no watch. I found a bill in the purse, which was his. He took his shoes up to the room at night.

GEORGE CONWAY . I slept in the room. I went to bed after the prisoner. I had a sovereign four half-crowns, and 3 s. loose in my trowsers pocket. I put them under my pillow. The prisoner and another person slept in the room, each in separate beds. I did not awake till Mr. Green came. I examined my trowsers, found the money all gone, but the trowsers replaced as I had put them; it could not have dropped out by accident. His purse contained the money I lost. I had not been in bed many minutes before I thought I heard my bed-curtains pulled aside; I turned round, and saw the prisoner's arm extended to my bed; he was looking stedfastly at me; he was in bed. Some few minutes after, he got out of bed, and said he could not sleep with a light in the room, and wished to put it out. I refused, as the girl was coming to fetch it.

Cross-examined. Q. What are you - A. A marble paper maker. I was sober, and am certain the money was in my pocket. I had not marked it.

JANE DAVIS . I was servant at the house. I took the light away from the room about half-past eleven o'clock; the three men were then in their separate beds.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am the watch-house keeper. The prisoner was given into my charge. I found several duplicates of things pawned on that day, on him; three of them are dated that day, and the amount of the whole is 2 l. 13 s.

Cross-examined. Q. The things pawned produced more than you found on him - A. Yes. One pledge is for 25 s.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

EDWARD STAKELOM.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-91
VerdictNot Guilty

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1235. EDWARD STAKELOM , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , one pocket book, value 3 s., the goods of Thomas Morgan , from the person of Mary Ann , his wife .

MARY ANN MORGAN . I am the wife of Thomas Morgan ; we live in Percy-street, Gray's Inn-road. On Saturday last, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was in Fleet-market with a lady, and am sure my pocket book was in my pocket when I went into the market; about the middle of the market I was hustled by three or four men, and the instant I got from them I missed my pocketbook. I am certain the prisoner is one of the men; he was a stranger before; he spoke to me, for I complained of their pressing on me, and he said, if I could not come there in a good temper, I had better go home. I let go my friend's arm and ran out of the market, being alarmed. I put my hand in my pocket and found it cut; my gown and petticoat were cut right down. I saw the prisoner again on the Monday, in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields - I was then alone - I was convinced he was the person; I gave no alarm. I saw him again at half-past nine o'clock that morning, at Mr. Loveday the pawnbroker's, offering some duplicates, which were part of the contents of the pocket-book. I charged him with being the person who stole my pocket-book; he denied it, but said he had found it; he held it out - I snatched it from him, and gave it to Mr. Loveday. A constable was sent for, who secured him.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. The market was much thronged and crowded - A. Not particularly so; I found nothing unpleasant till this bustle; there might be ten or twelve round me; I was passing a butcher's shop; there was no oyster stall near. The prisoner was scuffling with the men and bustling to stop the progress of the people - he in particular pushed me about.

Q. How was he scuffling with the other men - A. Boxing each other with their arms. There was nothing but duplicates and memorandums in the pocket-book. When I saw him in Queen-street, he was not pointed out to me. I had been to the pawnbroker's in Covent-garden and Long-acre, as some of the duplicates belonged to these shops, and found somebody had been there. He said he found the pocket-book.

CHARLES D - LOVEDAY . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Calthorpe-place, Gray's Inn-road. I know Mrs. Morgan. On Monday morning, a little before ten o'clock, the prisoner came into one of the boxes of my shop, and presented two duplicates, which he said he wanted out; Mrs. Morgan had been in the shop two minutes before, to stop them; they were for a child's coat, earrings, and a piece of silver. Mrs. Morgan was still in the shop. I went round the passage and beckoned her out; I took her to the box door, and asked her if she knew the prisoner; she said in his bearing she knew him perfectly well; that he was the man who robbed her. I told him the prosecutrix had lost a pocket-book, and he had better give it her, as I dare say she did not wish to hurt him. He produced a pocket-book, and said he picked it up; she claimed that and the two duplicates. There were some papers in it, and another duplicate of my shop; he went to the passage-door, pretending to call a person who was with him - none came. Two officers took him.

Cross-examined. Q. He came under no concealment - A. None at all.

MRS. MORGAN. The duplicates are for things I pawned myself, in the name of Smith.

CHERUBIM LACY. I live in Francis-street, Gray's Inn-road. I went to market with Mrs. Morgan. I noticed a scuffle and people pressing on her; and Mrs. Morgan soon after missed her pocket-book; they pressed on me at the same time. She shewed me her pocket, which was cut and slit down. I remember the features of one man, but have not seen him since. I do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it in the middle of the market - A. About the middle; there were a great many round; we were close to a butcher's. I saw no oyster stall.

JOHN BLAKE . I am a constable. I was going by Loveday's, and heard prosecutrix say to the prisoner, that he was the man who hustled her on Saturday evening; he said he was an honest man - that he found the pocketbook, and if she would pay him for finding it, he would deliver it up; she insisted that he was the man, and I took him. I found three silver tea, and four plated spoons, and two dessert spoons, two pair of earrings, one brooch, one ring, and one knife, and four duplicates on him. Mrs. Morgan claimed them all.

MRS. MORGAN. They are all mine, and what I had pawned - and the duplicates of which were in my pocketbook; the four duplicates are mine; they had been redeemed from Turner's, Bridge-street, and Page's, in Long-acre.

I lost eleven duplicates in all - two are missing, and the goods redeemed.

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am a constable. I was with Blake, and assisted in taking the prisoner; he said he found the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the pocket-book near my stall, in Fleet-market, at half-past twelve o'clock, as I was packing up my things.

The prisoner called witnesses to his character, who also stated that he kept a fruit and oyster stall in the market, and was at his stall on the night in question.

MARY ANN KEITH . I live in Love-grove, Fleet-market. On this Saturday night, the prisoner's wife employed me to mind the children. I was there till one o'clock in the morning. I saw him come in - he told his wife he had found a prize - that he had picked up a pocket-book; he opened it on the table, and found nothing in it but tickets; he cannot read or write, and did not know what to make of them; this was about half-past twelve o'clock; he said he found it by his stall in coming home.

COURT. Q. Does his wife read - A. No, nor I; he went out about twenty minutes past seven o'clock on Monday. I do not know how he found his way to the pawnbrokers.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS GRIFFITH.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-92
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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SEVENTH DAY. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17.

1236. THOMAS GRIFFITH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , two reams of paper, value 2 l. 10 s. , the goods of James Moyes .

ALFRED SPENCER . I am servant to James Moyes , printer in Greville-street, Hatton-garden . The prisoner was employed in the warehouse ; on the 29th of July I saw him take a bundle of paper from the warehouse, and go away with it; it was between twelve and one o'clock - I was in Greville-street; I told Liber of it at five o'clock; he could not have taken it for the use of the business.

MARY STOKES . I am a laundress. I washed for the prisoner about five weeks; on the 29th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, he came for a pair of stockings, and asked permission to leave a bundle of paper till he returned; he left it - it was taken away in my absence.

LOUIS LIBER . I am warehouseman to Mr. Moyes. On the 29th of July I missed a bundle of paper, containing two reams; in consequence of information, I went on the 30th to Stokes's with the constable, and fetched away a bundle of paper; I gave it to Limbrick; it was my master's, and was part of his stock on the 29th of July.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was he employed under you - A. Yes, he has been there eighteen months, and bore a good character, but has lately got into bad company.

ELIZABETH JAMES . On the 29th of July I was at Mrs. Stokes's, and saw the prisoner bring in this paper.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

MARY GRAY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-93
VerdictNot Guilty

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1237. MARY GRAY was indicted for that she, being servant to James Dodd , did steal, on the 13th of August , five caps, value 20 d.; one pair of curtains, value 3 s.; three pincloths, value 4 s.; one bed gown, value 1 s.; one piece of calico, value 6 d.; one coat, value 1 s.; one apron, value 1 s.; four towels, value 2 s.; three pair of socks, value 3 s.; one pair of sleeves, value 1 s.; one pair of watch pockets, value 6 d.; two collars and frills, value 1 s.; four pieces of furniture, value 4 d., and two pair of stockings, value 1 s. , his property.

JAMES DODD . I live at Hammersmith . The prisoner was servant to me for a month and four days; she conducted herself with great propriety until the 10th of August, (my wife had died a few days before she came) - she then followed me into the parlour with a knife in her right hand, and struck me two blows with her left; I followed her into the kitchen, took the knife from her, and - she ran to the kitchen fire, and seized the tongs, and brandished them over my head; I took them from her, and got an officer; she gave no reason for attacking me - we took her before the Magistrate, and charged her with the assault - the Magistrate advised me to pay her her wages and get rid of her. On the same day when her wages were paid, she brought her boxes into the passage; I requested her to open them, and she refused; I said, if she was an honest woman she need not be afraid; she did not open them - the officer took her again before Mr. Hood, the same Magistrate, and opened them in his presence, and found this property - she said they were mine, that she had put them there to preserve them, and that she intended to return them.

EDWARD PAGE . I am a constable. On the 10th of August I was ordered to put the prisoner out of Mr. Dodd's house; I asked her to bring her boxes down stairs, and go as quick as she could - she was a long time - when she came down, Mr. Dodd wished to have them searched; she said she did not strike her master intentionally. She refused to open her boxes. I took her before the Magistrate; she said she could not find the key; I took her back to the house - she found the key; we returned to the office - she opened the boxes - these things were found. She said she must have put them there by mistake, in her fright.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Soon after Mr. Dodd hired me, he informed me he intended to make me his wife, we lived together as husband and wife, and I considered the property of one to be the property of the other, our clothes were intermixed, and I hope I shall not be considered criminal in putting some things in my box.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

DANIEL COTTRELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-94
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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1238. DANIEL COTTRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , at St. Leonard's, Shoreditch , seventy yards of satin, value 14 l., the goods of Thomas Bibbins Stanbridge , in his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT. The same, only stating it to be the goods of Mary Lum and Robert Lum .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

PETER GRELLET . I am foreman to Mary Lum , and Robert Lum , they live in Stewart-street, Old Artillery

Ground. On the 18th of March last, I delivered a piece of seventy yards of satin to one of Mr. Stanbridge's men to be dressed; I had a small strip of the same piece in my possession; I applied for it about a week after, and it was not forthcoming. Mr. Stanbridge has paid for it.

EDWARD MILES . I am servant to Thomas Bibbins Stanbridge. The prisoner was his servant . On the 18th of March I received seventy yards of satin from Grellet, and took it to Mr. Stanbridge, and left it in the warehouse. I went with the officer in search of the prisoner last Friday week, and found him - I neither promised or threatened him - he said he had taken the silk; and in our way to the office, he said he picked it up in the passage of Mr. Stanbridge's warehouse - one warehouse joins the house, and the other is at the bottom of the garden - it is all enclosed within one wall, and is in the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch - it is all within the court-yard, and shuts in with gates.

WILLIAM DUFFY . I am clerk to Mr. Stanbridge. On the 18th of March I received the satin from Miles, and made the entry of it in the book, which I produce - I put a number in the book, and marked the number and name L.M. in red chalk on the satin, and gave it out in the usual way to be dressed. It was applied for about a week after, and could not be found. The prisoner left Mr. Stanbridge's service soon after the inquiry was made about him.

BENJAMIN HARROLD . I am a potato-merchant. The prisoner came to lodge with me in January. He left me about a month ago. I pressed him hard for money; he said it was not in his power to pay, but that if I chose, he would give me a piece of goods as security. I said I had rather he would leave me some of his furniture; he gave me a pawnbroker's duplicate, and went and transferred the goods, that day, into my name, and left that duplicate with the pawnbroker, and took another in my name; it was satin; he said he had taken it in part for a bad debt. I wanted him to go to the pawnbroker's with me, but he gave me a piece of paper instead.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. On the 5th of September, I accompanied Miles to Mitchell-street, Whitechapel, and found the prisoner there. We asked if he had any duplicates about him; he immediately produced this duplicate out of his pocket. I told him what I came about, but neither threatened or promised him; he said,

"This is part of Mr. Stanbridge's property." The duplicate was for twenty-one yards of satin, pledged for 2 l. 6 s. 6 d. He said his landlord, Harrold, had taken the ticket of the other part instead of rent. I took him to the office, went to the pawnbroker's with the ticket, and they brought the satin to the office. I found his wife and family in the greatest distress. The prosecutor's house is in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch.

WILLIAM MORRISON . I am clerk to Messrs. Robinson and Kirkam, pawnbrokers, in Bishopsgate-street. I know the prisoner. On the 20th of April, he pawned some satin; here is the duplicate for twenty-one yards of satin, for 2 l. 6 s., which is what he pawned on the 30th of April. (Looks at the ticket found on him.) The other ticket belongs to our house, but is not made out by me. I produce the satin it refers to. I originally received both pieces of the prisoner. The other was thirty-five yards, pawned on the 4th of April for 4 l.

PETER GRELLET . I have no doubt of their being part of the piece delivered to Mr. Stanbridge; it exactly corresponds with the pattern, and there is a particularity in the selvidge, by which I know it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been a housekeeper in a very respectable way of business for a number of years; but my circumstances became embarrassed. The shortness of time prevents my obtaining gentlemen of the first respectability to my character; the prosecutor, however, can speak to my character for years. I have four children, and my wife expects to be confined every moment with a fifth. I was never charged with any offence, but distress has brought me into this situation, and I trust my great distress will in some measure tend to mitigate my sentence - and implore your mercy towards a penitent man.

Eight witnesses gave the prisoner an excellent character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 35.

Strongly Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, in consequence of his character and distress.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

MARY AGNES LOUISA BUTLER.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-95
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceImprisonment

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1239. MARY AGNES LOUISA BUTLER was indicted, for stealing, on the 10th of August , in the dwelling-house of Robert Cotterell , one pen-knife, value 6 d., and seven 5 l. Bank notes , the property of William Drew .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

ELIZA COTTERELL . I am the wife of Robert Cotterell ; we live in Surrey-street, Strand ; the prisoner came to board and lodge with me. I had known her three or four months before this, for a period of four or five days. On her coming the second time, she said she had been in France, and was going to return again in a week or a fortnight - and that since she had left me she had been married, and called herself Mrs. Butler; we all sit in the dining room. Captain Drew boarded and lodged with me at the time; she came to lodge with me eight days before this happened; Captain Drew's writing desk stood on a small table in the dining room window; he went out on Saturday. I went to bed about twelve o'clock that night, leaving the prisoner alone in the dining room, where the desk was. She was standing by the sideboard where the bed candlesticks stood. I had a daughter ill at the time - she had gone to bed about an hour after; I had been up stairs about half an hour - I went from my room into my daughter's to get something from her drawers. I saw the prisoner about two steps from the top of the stairs, coming up; her bed room joined mine, and is up four pair of stairs; she caught by the banisters of the stairs, and made a noise as if very much agitated - she had a candle; I asked what was the matter - she said she was tired; I told her not to make such a noise. I went into my bed room, and thought I heard somebody at my door; I opened it and found she was at my daughter's door just adjoining; she said she had put out her candle, and that my daughter was giving her out a light; she went to her own room. About two o'clock in the afternoon of the next day, which was Sunday, I saw Captain Drew's writing desk; (the prisoner had gone out a few minutes before one o'clock.) The desk was in its usual place, with the lock next the window; I lifted it up and

put a table cloth under it to press, and it opened. I took it into the front parlour, and locked it up in a cupboard, of which I kept the key. Captain Drew had gone out on Saturday night, and returned on Sunday morning - he was not at home many minutes - and then went out to dinner; this was before I found the desk open. I did not see him till next morning at breakfast; as I had gone to bed before he came home. I produced his desk to him exactly in the same state as I took it from the dining room table. In consequence of what passed, a Bow-street officer was sent for - he searched the servants, and all parts of the house. Miss Butler was in her bed room, and had not been down that morning; when he had searched all but her room, I went to tell her, and found her door was locked; I knocked at it, and got in in about ten minutes; I stood just within the door, and requested her to dress herself - and when she had done so, I called the officer up, and saw him search her drawer. I saw two 5 l. notes found in the rosette of the bed, at the top of the bed post - the officer took them; there was a clasp of a pocket-book found in her drawer, which I had seen in a pocket-book of hers before; she had brought it down a few days before and shewed it me. When it was found it was separate from the book, it looked like silver. I did not hear her say where she got any of the money.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. How long have you been married - A. Seven years; we have a residence at Cambden in Gloucestershire, where Mr. Cotterell resides, as his profession as a conveyancer calls him there; he is in Court now, and comes to town four or five times a-year and pays the rent, his name is Robert Dover Cotterell ; I did not look into the desk. I cannot say whether the prisoner is in the family way; she had to go up four pair of stairs to bed.

Q. Had you searched the bed before the officers - A. No, I went into the room first, and when the officer took hold of the rosette, the notes rattled; he took his hand away, and I took and pressed it down, and said,

"What is this rattling?" he pulled down the rosette, and said

"Notes" - he was going to examine the other rosette at the time.

Q. Had not Miss Butler complained of losing her pocket-book on Saturday night - A. Yes, and that the key of the place she kept her night clothes in, was in it. I was searched myself after the servants.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. From two o'clock, when you found the desk, was it under lock and key in your possession - A. Yes.

MR. WILLIAM DREW . I am a master mariner. In August last, I boarded and lodged at Mr. Cotterell's. The prisoner boarded there at the same time. I received sixteen 5 l. Bank notes from Messrs. Grotes. I have no memorandum of my own, of the particulars. I had seven of them in my possesion on Saturday the 10th of August; I went out on that evening, and immediately before I went out, I said in the prisoner's presence that it was too much money to take out in my pocket, and I would put it in my desk - I took three sovereigns out of the notes, and put the seven notes in my desk in the dining room in her presence. A gentleman who dined with me, and was going out with me (I believe Mr. Cotterell's daughter), and a Mr. Briscoe were present. I locked my desk, and am positive I left it locked, and took the key with me - it was a common lock, and new about a week before. I came home the following day, about one o'clock, and did not look at my desk at all. I stopped at home about twenty minutes, changed my dress, and went out again - I slept out that night, and came home about eight o'clock next morning, and about nine I saw Mrs. Cotterell, who produced my desk to me from the cupboard in the other room, which was locked, and found the desk open. On laying it open, I missed my penknife; I searched further, and missed the notes from under the place where I kept the pen knife. I desired Mrs. Cotterell to call the servants up, which she did - I told her to keep them all in the parlour till I returned. I went to Bow-street, and brought an officer - all the servants and Mrs. Cotterell were searched; nothing was found on them. The desk had evident marks of being broken open. I remained below while the officer went up to Miss Butler's room. He asked Mrs. Cotterell to go up and sit in her room till he came up. Some money and Bank notes were found - they then called me into the room. She disclaimed all knowledge of the two 5 l. Bank notes found in the bed; but said the sovereigns were her own. I have heard of another 5 l. note being found.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When you came home on Sunday, did you see Mrs. Cotterell - A. No, I did not see her all Sunday.

MARY ANN ASHCROFT . On the 10th of August, I was servant to Mrs. Cotterell. Miss Butler was the last person up except myself - I met her on the first floor stairs, as she was going to bed; my mistress had gone to bed about half an hour. After Miss Butler went to bed she rung the bell twice very violently, and asked if I had seen her pocketbook, for she had put it on the bed, and afterwards she said she put it under the bed. She told me to look carefully for it, as she said I must have seen it if it had been moved out of the room. I am the only servant who goes up stairs - she said the keys of her drawers were in her pocketbook. I had never seen the pocket-book. She said she could not get at her night clothes for want of her keys. On the following day, as I was coming out of my mistress's room, I saw her. She said I must look for her pocketbook, for she had not a farthing of money, but what was there; this was between twelve and one o'clock. She said she had found the keys of her drawers on the carpet; but she had no money, and I must find her pocket-book. She went out before dinner, and returned between nine and ten o'clock at night. She had not been out between twelve and one.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did you not find her a key - A. I got her three keys on Saturday night, and one of them opened her drawer. I recollect a bonnet being brought home for my young mistress on Saturday night. I did not hear Mrs. Butler offer to lend her any money. I looked in every part of the room for her pocketbook.

JAMES ELLIS . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Monday, the 12th of August, I went to the house, to search. I produce the desk - force had been used to it at some time or other. I cannot say whether it was opened by force or not. I searched the servants as well as Mrs. Cotterell, also the boxes and rooms, but found nothing. I sent Mrs. Cotterell up to the prisoner's room, and when she gave me notice I went in and told Miss Butler that Mr. Drew

had been robbed; that I had searched the servants and lodgers, and also Mrs. Cotterel and the rooms, and requested leave to search hers - she consented. The first place I examined was the top drawer of a chest of drawers, and in that I found four parcels of money wrapped in paper, and sealed up - the prisoner opened the first paper, which contained twenty sovereigns. I have the papers of some of them, but cannot distinguish them. Part of the money was given to the prisoner. Another paper contained 20 s. in silver, and another 10 s. in silver, all in shillings; there was another with ten sixpences; there were two loose sovereigns, 4 s. in silver, and 4 d. in copper, in the same drawer - it was a single chest of drawers. She was present at the search. I saw a clasp in the drawer where the money was, which Mrs. Cotterell has since delivered me. (The clasp was here produced, which Mrs. Cotterell identified as the same she spoke of). I proceeded in my search; no person told me where to look. I did not find any thing more at that moment, but left the room, for Mrs. Cottrell to search the prisoner. After she had done this, I was called in again, and recollecting there were parts of the room I had not searched, I commenced again. I searched the bed furniture - nobody assisted me. At the foot of the bed, in the drapery, there were three rosettes - I put my hand on the one on the right hand, and felt something rattle; I felt the next, to see if they were stuffed with paper, when Mrs. Cotterell directly said,

"What is that rattling in the rosettes?" and put her hand to it, taking hold of the outside. I examined it, and took out two 5 l. Bank notes, which I marked at the time and produce; they were doubled up separately, not in any envelope. I asked the prisoner if she knew how they came there; she said she knew nothing of them, they were not hers. She said the money was her own, and she had had it by her some time, three weeks or a month; she did not say from whom she had it. The paper containing the sovereigns was a printed report, dated only a few days previous. Another 5 l. note came into my possession on the 27th of August, and I went with a Mr. Price, a surgeon of Kensington, to Tothill Fields, where the prisoner was, about it.

Cross-examined. Q. She was in bed when you first went to the house - A. I understood so. She did not know I was searching the people below. I found Mrs. Cotterell in the room; I saw somebody search the bed clothes before Mrs. Cotterell went to it, but not the furniture; I stood looking at them while they moved the bed clothes. The prisoner told the Magistrate that the money was sealed up as a provision to take her to France.

FRANCIS NEWCOMBE . I am clerk to Messrs. Grote and and Co. On the 26th of July I paid Mr. Drew 180 l., in eight notes of 10 l., sixteen of 5 l., and 20 l. in gold - the 5 l. notes were numbered from 17035 to 17050 inclusive, and all dated the 19th of June, 1822; they lay in regular order when paid to him - the lowest number being the top note - (looks at No. 17044, 17047, and 17048, 5 l. notes) - these are three of them; date and all correspond. I have the book in which they are entered by myself.

MR. DREW. I received sixteen 5 l. notes from the banker's; I kept them in the order I took them; I paid away the eight first the day I received them, for seamen's wages; I took them regularly from the top; I paid away another on the day of the robbery; I took the outside one to pay that, but which outside I cannot say - it must have been been either No. 17043 or 17050 - I put the remaining seven in my desk, and did not miss them at all.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where had you kept them - A. They were always in my possession. I think they were in my desk till the day of the robbery, and I put them into my pocket on that day, expecting to leave town. I am sure I paid away the eight top ones, beginning with the lowest number. I paid them at the Seamen's Register-office, on the Commercial-road. I never gave two 5 l. notes to one individual. I went there straight from the banker's.

GEORGE PRICE . I am a surgeon, and live at Kensington. On Sunday, the 11th of August, I sold a bottle of lavender water to the prisoner. I have no doubt of her. It was, as near as I can recollect, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; it cost 2 s. 6 d. She tendered a 5 l. note - (looking at No. 17044) - this is it. I wrote on it, No. 8, St. James's-place, St. James's-street; that was the address she gave me. She said Mrs. Gray was the person she took the note from, but that she herself lived in St. James's-place; that Mrs. Gray kept a school at Brook Green. The lavender water was in a very remarkable bottle - (looks at one) - this is it. I went with Ellis to Tothill-fields afterwards, and saw the prisoner in bed.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You do not mean to be positive to the prisoner's person - A. It is very painful to say so, but I am positive. My shop is open on Sundays. I was not told I was going to see the person who paid me the note. I gave her four sovereigns, and 17 s. 6 d. in silver, consisting of half-crowns, shillings, and about eight sixpences.

JAMES ELLIS re-examined. This bottle was given me on the morning of the search; it was standing on the parlour mantle-piece. Mrs. Cotterell or the servant gave it me.

HORATIO CURTIS . I am assistant to Mr. Morison, a chemist at Kensington. To the best of my belief, the prisoner is the person I saw on a Sunday in August - the latter end, I think. A gentleman called next day, about a smelling bottle which the person left behind her.

MR. ADOLPHUS. I will not pursue this, my Lord.

WILLIAM SEERS . I am a pastry-cook and live at Kensington. I think the prisoner was the person who was in my shop one Sunday, about a month ago - I think it was the 11th of August. She asked me to change a 5 l. note. I said I could not. She said she had been putting her little boy to school, and wanted change to go back by the stage. She was only in my shop a little time, but I think the prisoner is the person.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. What time was it - A. Between six and seven o'clock in the evening - I think it was nearly dark.

ANN GRAY . I keep a school at Brook Green, for persons of the Roman Catholic persuasion. I know Mrs. Butler. I had not seen her for seven years before the 10th of August. I did not give her, or any body for her, a 5 l. note.

- HODGES. I am a bootmaker, and live in Piccadilly. The prisoner came to lodge at my house on the 12th of July, and left on the 2d of August. She told me

she was going. She did not board with me. She owed me six guineas, and did not pay.

The prisoner read an exceeding long defence, much of which was in so weak a tone of voice as to be quite inaudible. From what could be collected, it went to deny any knowledge whatever of the robbery - that the money found in her possession she had received from a person, but whose name, from a delicacy to the family, nothing should induce her to disclose, although promises of the prosecution being given up were made to her, if she would disclose the source from which she received it. That when the officer was searching her drawers, Mrs. Cotterell stood within a few inches of the rosette, apparently looking for her pocket book, and then directed the officers' attention to the rosette; and that she left her bed-room door open on Sunday, which was no indication of her guilt, if the property was in her possession.

MRS. COTTERELL re-examined. I know the prisoner brought the bottle of lavender water home on Sunday night, and left it on the table. I put it on the mantlepiece, and gave it to the officer. I dare say her door was open on Sunday. I did not point out the rosette to the officer.

MARY ASHLOCK . I saw the bottle of lavender water in her hand on Sunday evening, when I let her in. I do not know what she did with it. Her bed room door was always left open. I searched on and under the bed, in her absence on Sunday, for the pocket book, but not on the top; it has never been found.

MRS. COTTERELL. The clasp produced is the one I saw on her pocket book. She brought it down one morning, saying,

"See how this little rogue has broken my pocket book!" I did not suspect that the desk was broken open; I thought Mr. Drew had left it open. The notes were not visible till the rosette was turned down; they were completely inside.

- HODGES re-examined. When the prisoner left me, she owed six guineas. She had promised to pay me several times in the course of the week.

JOSEPH SINGLETON . I am a porter. I brought a letter with money in it to the prisoner, about three weeks before she was taken, from Boodle's club-house.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Where is your stand - A. I have an apartment. Mrs. Butler sent me to Boodle's for an answer to a letter; she then lodged at a china shop in Piccadilly. I lodged in Bury-street at that time. I will not swear it was not six weeks before she was taken up; she was three weeks at a bootmaker's, and it was about a week before that. I often went on messages for her. The letter I carried to her seemed to have both notes and money in it. I cannot swear what was in it, for I gave it her in the drawing room, and she took it into the bed room, and broke it open, but by the feel I thought so. I always went on her errands.

COURT. Q. Did you feel the letter, to see if there was money in it - A. It was hard, and felt as if there was notes and money in it; it felt hard and soft, and was sealed several times round.

GUILTY. Aged 25.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house .

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Richardson.

WILLIAM READING, BENJAMIN SOLOMON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-96
VerdictsGuilty; Not Guilty
SentencesDeath

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1240. WILLIAM READING was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Westwood , about four o'clock in the afternoon, of the 28th of July , at St. Ann, Westminster, (no person being therein) and stealing two hundred watches, value 600 l.; ten watch chains, value 20 l.; thirty seals, value 10 l.; two ear-rings, value 1 l.; twelve pins, value 12 s.; four spoons, value 18 s.; twelve thimbles, value 12 s.; ten pencil-cases, value 15 s.; six sovereigns; eight half-crowns; twenty shillings; ten sixpences, and one 10 l. Bank note , his property; and BENJAMIN SOLOMON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

MESSRS. CURWOOD and PLATT conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT WESTWOOD . I am a jeweller , and live in Prince's-street, in the parish of St. Ann, Soho . On Sunday the 28th of July, about twelve o'clock, I left my house with nobody in it. I double locked the door - there is a bar which falls down beside the lock. I returned at half-past eight o'clock the same evening; it was daylight then. I found the door on the single lock, and the bar lying down on the floor - all the glass cases were open, and all the watches gone, and the cases emptied of all their contents, except trifling things. None of the gilt or steel things were taken; but all the gold. I missed about two hundred watches. I cannot say how many of the seals were taken, as my wife managed the jewellery - there were more than ten seals, and a great number of gold pins, and several silver things; also a great many gold earrings, silver thimbles, spoons, and pencil cases. All the articles taken were either gold or silver, and coral ear rings and necklaces. I missed six soverigns, a 10 l. note, and 3 l. in silver; the sovereigns were left in my till - I had marked them on Saturday night, so as to know them again, and am sure they were in my possession on Sunday morning.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Was your wife out with you - A. Yes; I have found some pins, but none of the watches or seals - Reading was taken somewhere by Marlborough-street, on Monday afternoon, and on Tuesday, I went to the House of Correction with an order from the Magistrate to search him. I said,

"You have a 10 l. note of mine, turn out all the papers you have;" he had a paper in his hand, but would not give it up, but was obliged - he had a watch in his fob, I did not claim that - it was shewn to me before the Magistrate - his name was on the dial - I said, it was possible that name might be put on since the Sunday, and tried to see if it was burnt in, as many of those I lost belonged to other people, and I did not know them - I found it was burnt in; I advertised my loss, but did not state the sovereigns in the advertisement, as the officer said I was to be quiet about the note, and stop it at the bank - I did not think it necessary to advertise the sovereigns - I generally mark all my sovereigns, but the two in question I could pick out from ten thousand.

Q. You have sent many sovereigns into the world with the same mark - A. Not with the same mark, they were marked in a particular way - I took them in the dusk of the evening, and had not an opportunity of looking at them by daylight till Sunday morning.

Q. When he was searched at the House of Correction, were not the six sovereigns taken from him produced - A.

Only five were produced - they were not returned to him to my knowledge - they were produced before the Magistrate on the Thursday. My wife had gone to Deptford on Saturday night, and I went to her on Sunday, and left the house securely fastened. I have no servant, as the house is too small to keep one.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do not you keep any servant - A. Yes; in the day time, my wife managed the jewellery business entirely. I marked the sovereigns as I have marked others, nearly ever since sovereigns have been in circulation; but lately I have marked them different, as I have been told there must be no gold taken off; I mark them on the edge with a pen-knife, and bruise it down again so that none is taken off.

MR. PLATT. Q. Was Reading asked to give up the paper in the gaol - A. Yes; he refused, and Mr. Isaacs, his solicitor, told him not to give it up. Hassel has it; five sovereigns were taken from him at the House of Correction, six had been found on him, but he had changed one before he got there. Prince's-street is a great thoroughfare.

COURT. Q. What do you mark your sovereigns for - A. To try if they are gold.

GEORGE DRAKE . At the time of this robbery I lived at No. 2, Richmond-street, nearly opposite the prosecutor's house. I have known Reading from a lad, he was a play-fellow of mine - I knew him well, and cannot be mistaken in him. On Sunday the 28th of July I saw him at the corner of Upper Rupert-street, in company with four or five other men, at a few minutes after one o'clock; they were not more than fifty yards from Westwood's house - I was going home at the time, and went home, and from my window saw him in company with one of the four men - I saw them loitering about there from one o'clock till half-past four o'clock, first on one side, and then on the other, they were not all four together all the time - the last time I saw Reading he was by himself, leaning on a post. When I saw him with one of them, the other two were on the opposite side. Reading had on a brown coat and blue trowsers. I am sure of his person.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. His mother lives in the neighbourhood - A. Yes; at the first house out of Wardour-street.

ISABELLA ALLEN . I live in Richmond-street, nearly opposite Westwood's. On the Sunday afternoon that his house was robbed, about twenty-five minutes to four o'clock, I saw a young man in a brown coat come out of his house - I did not notice his trowsers, he was a short young man with a pale face, (looks at Reading,) I cannot speak to him, he is not like him in dress, but is like him in size, he came from the prosecutor's house, as if going up King-street.

THOMAS FOXHALL . I am a watchman of St. Ann's, Soho, in the liberty of Westminster. About twelve o'clock on Monday the 29th of July, I took Reading in custody - he had a watch, and a seal apparently gold attached to it; I am positive that he had a seal. I took him to St. Ann's watch-house, and sent for Westwood and the constable, who examined him in my presence, and found on him six sovereigns and 2 s. and a silver watch - the seal was gone then. I said nothing to him about it. I am positive he had a seal, for he played with it all the way he went - it was on his ring when he entered the watch-house; and while I was speaking to one of the Watch Committee, he must have made away with it - I could not find it. We returned the sovereigns back to him; the prosecutor was not there then.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. The Magistrate was sitting when you took him; why not take him to the office - A. I waited for Westwood, to know whether he was the man. The watch-house is in Dean-street, a good way from Marlborough-street. Westwood came to the office in the evening, but was not at the watch-house. Bidgood was with me when I took him. We searched the watch-house, but found no seal. I did not hear the prosecutor claim the watch found on him. He said the dialplate might be altered in a few hours. The sovereigns were returned to him at the watch-house.

COURT. Q. Were the sovereigns produced to Westwood in your presence - A. Yes, at Marlborough-street he pointed out a mark on them; they were not returned to the prisoner after that.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. I first saw the prisoner at St. Ann's watch-house, on Monday morning about twelve o'clock. I found he had no seal on his watch, only a key; I cannot say whether the ribbon went through the key, or whether there was a ring. I asked him where the seal was gone; he said he never had any on. I searched him minutely, but found none. I found six sovereigns and 2 s. on him; I returned the sovereigns to him, and he changed one in the watch-house.

WILLIAM HASSELL . I am clerk at the House of Correction; the prosecutor brought down an order for Reading to be searched - and he was searched in my presence; five sovereigns and a watch were found on him. Westwood said the sovereigns were his - he said they had a private mark on them; he did not explain it; he was rather agitated. I was before the Magistrate on the Thursday following, and had kept the sovereigns all the time.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Did not the Magistrate ask what the mark was - and did he not ask to see them before he showed it - A. Yes; he claimed the whole five at the House of Correction, but was much agitated at the time, as he thought to find a 10 l. note as well. Before the prisoner was searched, he said he expected to find a 10 l. note, and some sovereigns; I do not recollect that he said how many. He pointed out two of the sovereigns at Marlborough-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did he say at the prison that there was a mark on them - A. He said he marked all his sovereigns - but what his wife took, she did not mark; he had them in his hand when he pointed out the mark to the Magistrate. I produce them; I marked them all myself on the King's neck.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. Have you any paper which you took from Reading - A. Yes; he put his hand in his pocket and took it out. I asked for it - he would not give it me for some time. I said,

"Will you give it to your solicitor." Mr. Isaacs took it, and would not give it up; but Mr. Atkins came, and then Isaacs gave it me; it is written with pencil; I copied it, but produce the original.

(Original read.)

"Jem, go to Sam Caxel, and he will tell you where I live;

and tell Harr - to give you the purse out of drawers, and what is in her pocket, the rings on her finger, and have them somewhere that safe; be careful that nobody takes you off."

William Reading."

Directed to Jas. Reading , 3, Allen's-place, Clerkenwell.

ROBERT WESTWOOD , (looking at two of the sovereigns.) Under the dragon in the milling is a small notch, more like a bruise. I can swear these are the sovereigns I marked on Saturday night, and saw safe on Sunday morning. I had marked other sovereigns, but know I had these on Saturday night after dark - and not being able to look at them well then, I looked at them on Sunday morning; they are marked in a particular place. I did not mark the others in any particular place.

Q. Can you, as a conscientious man, undertake to swear they are the sovereigns you had on Saturday night - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You marked them before you lost them - A. Yes, I did not put another mark on them at the office - but Hassell did. I dare say I have passed hundreds, but not marked in this way, because it is only lately that I bruised them down again; if you mix them with a thousand I will pick them out.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. For the last six months you have marked sovereigns in this way - A. Yes; I do not always mark them on a particular side; these are marked under the dragon, and under the head. I will not say I have not marked others in the same place.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. Your general habit of marking is by raising the gold with a penknife, and putting it down again - A. Yes; I looked at them on Sunday morning, and recollect the very place I marked them, and find the marks there; my reason for cutting them was to ascertain whether they were good gold - not in order to know them again.

COURT. Q. Did you cut the others - A. I think my wife took the others; she weighs them instead of cutting them.

MR. CURWOOD. Now, my Lord, we will produce our evidence against the receiver.

CHARLES COPE . In August last I saw seven pins in the shop window of Mr. Green, of Oxford-street, jeweller, and knew them to be my manufacture - and what I sold to Mrs. Westwood, at two or three different times, some nine or ten months ago - and others three or five months ago - and two black ones among them. I had sold her fourteen months ago; I informed her of it, and have since seen four of them; they were on four separate cards.

MARY JORDAN . I bought two pins of Mr. Green, on the 4th of September; Clements has them.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I produce them; also two which I got by executing a search warrant at Green's.

MARY JORDAN . Here is a pearl one which I know, and the other is like what I gave him.

CHARLES COPE . These are four of the pins I sold Westwood.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How many did you make - A. Three black, twelve garnet, and six pearl. I sold her but two of the black ones.

GEORGE JOHN GREEN . I am a dealer in jewellery, and live in Oxford-street. I sold two of these pins to Jordan; and two were taken from my shop; I bought them of Mr. Alexander a month or five weeks before they were taken away, which was last Thursday week.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you keep any books - A. Yes; but in this case I took no account of the purchase, as I owed him money, and gave him a bill for 10 l., which is due on the 4th of October. I do not know what date it was drawn at; he brought the pins to me in my shop - there were eight or nine of them. I gave him 2 s. each. I have dealt with him some years; he deals in furniture and jewellery - and buys goods at sales; and lives in Duke's-place, Hounsditch, but has no shop. I am a jeweller and clothes salesman; my bill book is at home.

COURT. Q. What are they worth each - A. I sell some at 2 s. 6 d., 3 s. 3 d., and 3 s. 6 d.; the trade price is 2 s. each,

ROBERT WESTWOOD . The trade price is about 18 s. a dozen.

GOMPERTZ ALEXANDER . I sold some pins to Mr. Green six or seven weeks ago. I had them from the prisoner Solomon about twenty-four hours before. I bought between two and three dozen of him. I cannot tell what I gave for them, it is so long past. I recollect giving him a sovereign and some silver. I cannot say how much silver, or whether it was 20 s. or not.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What did you do with them - A. I went to sell them immediately. Green says he bought some of me. I know I sold him pins, but cannot say they were the same I bought of Solomon. It is impossible to swear to pins.

COURT. Q. Did you mix what you bought of him with others - A. Not with other pins; I had no others.

Q. Did you sell Green the pins you had from Solomon - A. Yes. I sold the rest to different pawnbrokers; some to Parker of Holborn - nearly two dozen. I do not recollect what Green gave me, for he owed me something, and I took a bill of him. I have paid it away, I cannot exactly recollect who to. I have not got my book, and cannot tell the date or amount without it.

Q. Pray, did you happen to be taken up as a receiver of these stolen goods - A. Yes; and at the second examination I stated that Solomon was the man I bought them of. I could not recollect at the first time. The Justice did not tell me I must produce my books.

Q. Do not you remember seeing me there - A. Yes. The Justice asked if I had any books which contained an entry on this subject; I told him I did not keep an account of what I sold or bought.

Q. Did he not ask you for your books, and you said the only book you kept was in Hebrew - A. I do not recollect it. I said I kept a bill-book; some entries are in Hebrew, and some in English.

COURT. Q. Do you think you sold Green a dozen pins - A. It was not a dozen.

HYAM ALEXANDER . I am son of the last witness - he was taken up about the pins, and after that, Solomon was taken and brought to our house. I said to him,

"Don't you remember the pins you sold to my father?" He said,

"Well, and what of them?" He was then taken to the Mansion-house, public-house, which is opposite the Mansion-house. He walked about the room there, and appeared agitated. I said,

"I dare say you can recollect of

whom you bought the pins." He said it would take him time to recollect. He then sent a man to Winfield-street. I asked who he had sent for; he said, for a person who might recollect. His solicitor afterwards came and conversed with him; he then said he knew nothing of the pins.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Had your father been examined at the Mansion-house a day or two before this - A. He was examined at Marlborough-street - my brother was in the public-house when this conversation took place, but not all the time, and the officer was in and out occasionally.

COURT. Q. At the first examination, your father could not tell who he had them from - A. He could not at that moment.

HANNAH ALEXANDER . Before my father was apprehended, I saw Solomon at our house. I did not notice what he said. It was five or six weeks ago, I think. He came and said,

"Mr. Alexander, I have some pins for sale."

Q. I thought you said you could not recollect what he said - A. I thought you meant what he said before. I and Amelia Isaacs immediately left the room.

ISAAC ALEXANDER . I was at the public-house when Solomon was in custody. I asked if he recollected selling my father these pins; he said he recollected something of the pins, and if he had the papers which he had at home, he might recollect of whom he bought them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was your brother present - A. No.

THOMAS GOOK . I know the name of the parish Westwood lives in is St. Ann, Westminster. I live in the adjoining parish.

READING'S Defence. I know nothing whatever of the transaction.

SOLOMON'S Defence. I know nothing of it.

READING - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

SOLOMON - NOT GUILTY .

Prisoner READING. There is a woman who can prove that a tall thin man came out of the house.

THOMAS GOOK . There was a taller man in custody, but it could not be proved against him.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN GEDLING.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-97
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1241. JOHN GEDLING was indicted for embezzlement .

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a salesman , and live in Rose-street, Newgate-market. The prisoner was in my employ as salesman , and was entrusted to receive money on my account. On the 10th of July, William Perdue was a debtor of mine - his duty was to account to me for what he received regularly every evening. Perdue owed me 9 s. The prisoner absconded on the 10th of July, and never paid me Perdue's money. His wages were paid every Saturday night - he did not ask for them. I afterwards applied to Perdue for the money. He had 15 s. a week, and only worked part of the day.

WILLIAM PERDUE . I live in Castle-street, Fleet-market. I owed Mr. Taylor 9 s. The prisoner brought me the bill on the 10th of July - I paid him 9 s. in silver, and am sure part of it was in shillings. He gave me the bill, which I produce. I did not ask him, nor did he write a receipt. Mr. Taylor came about a week after, and I told him I had paid the prisoner.

THOMAS TAYLOR . The bill is my clerk's writing.

JAMES KEMP . I am a constable. I found the prisoner at the Compter. Taylor was there, and charged him with this. He said he had lost some of the money, and did not like to return.

Prisoner's Defence. When I received this 9 s., I was very much intoxicated, I lost part of it, and did not like to return, as I could not pay the arrears.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Six Months

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN GEDLING.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-98
VerdictNot Guilty

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1242. JOHN GEDLING was again indicted for embezzling three sovereigns, seven shillings and sixpence .

There being no proof of the identical money paid him, he was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

ANN ALDRIDGE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-99
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1243. ANN ALDRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , one table cloth, value 3 s., and one apron, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Hill .

THOMAS HILL . I live in Smithfield. The prisoner was in my service for eight or ten weeks - I did not miss the property till the officer brought me the duplicate. She had left me. I did not give her leave to pawn them.

ROBERT UPSALL . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Barbican. On the 20th of April, I took a table cloth in pawn for 2 s. - I do not know who pawned it. The duplicate produced is mine.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. On the 20th of August, I apprehended the prisoner. I found the duplicate of the table cloth on her, pawned in the name of Ann Sims , also one of an apron pawned on the 26th of July, in Turnmill-street, for 4 d., in the name of Ann Hall. She was then in service in Bunhill-row.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Two Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

GEORGE WALSBY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-100
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1244. GEORGE WALSBY was indicted for embezzling five sovereigns, which he had received on account of James Bampton , his master .

HENRIETTA BAMPTON . I am the wife of James Bampton , a coal-dealer ; we live in Brackley-street, Golden-lane. The prisoner was our porter to carry our coals - he was to account for what money he received every time he came in. On the 18th of June, I gave him a 5 l. note to get five sovereigns at the Bank, I wanted it for the purpose of business, and had sent him for change before - he never returned. He was taken up the latter end of August.

JAMES BAMPTON . I only know the prisoner absconded on the 18th of June, and in August, I took him in the Hackney-road. He lived four months with me.

GEORGE SMITH . I am a headborough. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house, and in the morning I took him to Worship-street - he said he had received the

money, and in Petticoat-lane he lost the pocket-book, and money together. He did not say what money he had received.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the note to the Bank, and got five sovereigns for it. I went into Petticoat-lane to buy a jacket. I took off my own to try one on, and in putting it on again, I found my pocket-book and handkerchief gone. I was afraid to return.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

ABRAHAM SKINNER.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-101
VerdictNot Guilty

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1245. ABRAHAM SKINNER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , one brass bracket, value 2 s. 6 d.; one brass box, value 3 d.; one file, value 6 d.; one screw driver, value 3 d., and two union sockets, value 6 d. the goods of John Lawton .

JOHN LAWTON . I am a brass founder , and live in King-street, Snow-hill. The prisoner worked for me about two years as journeyman ; about ten days ago I heard he had been fitting up gas work on his own account, and on Wednesday last I went to the Bull, public-house, opposite my house, and there I saw these articles which I knew to be mine. I had sent him to do no work there. The property was not new; the files have my name on them; the tools were in his basket, but the bracket and socket were fixed there. He never told me he had done the job.

WILLIAM SPENCER . I keep the Bull, public-house. Last Sunday fortnight, the prisoner fixed the brackets and sockets at my house; I desired him to do it for me; he brought his basket of tools, and left the basket which I shewed Mr. Lawton; he claimed some of them.

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. These things were delivered to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the pipe which I fixed, at Stanton's in Shoe-lane, and have had the rest of the apparatus some time.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

ELIZABETH LEWIS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-102
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1245. ELIZABETH LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , one tea spoon, value 2 s. the goods of James Robotham .

MARGARET ROBOTHAM . I am the wife of James Robotham , of Great Tower Hill . The prisoner was in my service for two days and a half; she was taken up, and the officer brought her to my house, and produced the duplicate of a spoon; the pawnbroker brought it to me. I had seen it safe the morning she came into my service, which was on the 27th of August. I lost three.

WILLIAM PERDUE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Houndsditch. On the 27th of August, I took the tea spoon in pawn for 1 s. 6 d. from the prisoner in her own name.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I took her in charge at Goodman's yard, and among other duplicates found one for a tea spoon on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS WORCESTER.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-103
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > whipping

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1246. THOMAS WORCESTER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , five gowns, value 18 s., and one petticoat, value 2 s. , the goods Sarah Harvey .

SARAH HARVEY . I live in an alley in Bishopsgate-street . These things were in my room on the second floor; the prisoner's mother lived in the same room; they were locked up in my box. I went out on the 21st of August, between eight and nine in the morning, returned at seven at night, and found the box broken open, and the things gone. Nobody was in the room; the door was always open. Next morning I found the five gowns at three different pawnbrokers, but I have not found the pocket. The prisoner slept in part of the room, which was divided off; he did not come home that night, and was not found for about a week afterwards; he was taken on the Wednesday following; but had never returned.

MARY HARRISON . I live in the house. On the day the box was broken open, I saw the prisoner in the road, walking to and fro, until eleven o'clock in the day; he had a box which he carries out to mend umbrellas; the third time he came up I saw a gown and petticoat sticking out of his jacket, which was buttoned. I told Mrs. Harvey of it.

GEORGE FLAMP . I am servant to a pawnbroker in Bishopsgate-street. I have a gown pawned for 4 s. by the prisoner, between nine and ten o'clock.

JOHN HEATH . I am servant to a pawnbroker. I have a gown pawned on the 21st of August for 3 s. in the name of Hunter. I do not recollect the prisoner.

WILLIAM HARDING . I am a constable. I got a gown from Robertson a pawnbroker.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JAMES JONES.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-104
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > whipping

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1247. JAMES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , a carcase of a lamb, value 20 s. the property of John Stevens .

JOHN STEVENS . I am a butcher , and live in Crawford-street, Marylebone. On the 27th of July I bought the carcase of a lamb, and left it in care of George Allen in Newgate-market .

GEORGE ALLEN . I am a porter at Newgate-market. I weighed half a score lambs for Stevens, and hung them on the hooks; I employed a boy to take them to the cart.

WALTER TYLER . I am fifteen years old. On the 27th of July, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in the market; he took a lamb off the hook, and went up Warwick-lane. I thought he was helping Allen; I went after him; Allen asked how many lambs I had carried, and I said seven, and told him another man took one; I saw him the same day about one o'clock in a public-house; I knew his person before about the market. Allen fetched an officer, who took him. The lamb has not been found.

ABRAHAM GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. I received him in charge for stealing the lambs - he denied it - the boy was positive of him.

Prisoner's Defence. If the boy saw me take it away,

it is astonishing he did not raise an alarm when he was left in care of them.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

CHARLES GRAY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-105
VerdictNot Guilty

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1248. CHARLES GRAY was indicted for a misdemeanour .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS KING.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-106
VerdictGuilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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EIGHTH DAY, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 18.

1249. THOMAS KING was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , one silver spoon, value 10 s. , the goods of James Taylor .

WILLIAM BAKER . I live in Upper George-street, Bryanston-square, and am a pawnbroker. On Monday the 9th of September the prisoner brought two spoons to my house; my apprentice desired him to call in the morning, and detained the spoon - he called about seven o'clock next morning, and said, Mr. Daker, a coal-dealer of Portland-street, gave it him to pledge, that it was a bit of lark, and he wished to have the spoon back again - he gave me his right address, No. 4, Harriot-street, and said he was in liquor the night before. I kept the spoon, but did not detain him, as he gave me his right address.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer. On Tuesday the 10th of September the prisoner was apprehended by another officer. I went to his lodging; he was not at home.

JAMES BEASLEY . I am butler to Mr. James Taylor . I am a distant relation of the prisoners. On the 10th of September the officer came to enquire if I had lost a spoon. The prisoner used to call twice a-week for my linen, and was there on the afternoon of the 9th, about four o'clock. I do not know Daker. I did not miss it till the officer came - it was my master's, and his crest is on it.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. He bore a good character - A. I never knew the reverse. I think he was rather in liquor.

HENRY BUCKERIDGE . I am an officer of Marylebone. I apprehended the prisoner at the Constitution public-house on Tuesday afternoon; he said he was very sorry for it, and that he found it in George-street.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

PETER HENRY NEILY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-107
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > whipping

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1250. PETER HENRY NEILY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , two handkerchiefs, value 5 s., the goods of Samuel M'Cleary , from his person .

MR. SAMUEL M'CLEARY. I live in Adam-street West, Portman-square. On the 17th of July, about nine, or half-past nine o'clock in the evening, I was returning by the Marylebone stage, on the seat behind outside. On arriving about the New Church I missed a handkerchief from each of my coat pockets. I told a friend who was by my side, and upon our looking round we saw the prisoner hanging by the coach on the step; he could reach my pocket. I charged him with it, got down and seized him; he denied it, but at last drew out one handkerchief from his bosom, and said it was his own; he was taken to the watch-house, and after considerable search, the watch-house keeper found the other tucked in his stocking.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner at the watch-house - he said he knew nothing about it. I found the handkerchief in his stocking.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JAMES MARSLIN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-108
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > public whipping

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1251. JAMES MARSLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of September , four knives, value 1 s., and four forks, value 1 s. , the goods of George Luxton .

GEORGE LUXTON . I keep the Orange-tree, public-house, Orange-street, Red Lion-square . On the 2d of September the prisoner came and called for a glass of beer, the knives and forks were in the parlour cupboard, he was alone in the room.

ABEL GARNHAM . I was in the passage of the public-house, and watched the prisoner - I saw him rummaging in the closet, and saw a handkerchief containing knives and forks on a chair. I knocked at the glass, and asked what he was doing; he folded them up and put them in his pocket. I went in and stopped him, he claimed the handkerchief.

JOHN AIKEN . I am a constable. I took charge of him. The knives and forks were given to me - there are four of each.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JAMES MOORES, JAMES NICHOLAS MOORES.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-109
VerdictGuilty; Guilty > lesser offence
SentenceNo Punishment > sentence respited

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1252. JAMES MOORES and JAMES NICHOLAS MOORES were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry William Southwell , about three o'clock in the afternoon, on the 21st of July , (no person being therein) and stealing three collars, value 1 s.; six handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; two shirts, value 10 s.; one sheet, value 2 s.; one table cloth, value 2 s.; one frill, value 6 d., and three pieces of lace, value 1 s. ; his property.

HENRY WILLIAM SOUTHWELL . I live in Seething-lane, Tower-street. I had a temporary residence at Islington , and slept there for two months - I had the whole house. I left the house about half-past two o'clock, on the 21st of July, leaving nobody there. I caused the front shutters to be closed, and locked the door. I cannot say whether the back door was shut - when I returned it was nearly dark; I found the house had been entered. If the back door was open, they might have got in that way. I missed the property mentioned in the indictment, worth about 30 s.; the prisoners were apprehended next day, and the property found.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Whether this linen was in the house, or at the wash, you cannot say - A. No.

RICHARD LEGGATT . I am an officer. I saw the prisoners on the 22d of July, in King-street, Islington, and on James Nicholas Moores I found this property in a a bundle under his arm. I found nothing on the other; they were both coming up the street - I first stopped Joseph Moores , and asked what he had got; he said he did not know. I said it was strange; he said his master did not always tell him when he sent him out with a bundle what it was; that his name was Nicholas, and he lived at Islington - and was going to his father with the bundle. James had gone on, and came back and asked what was the matter. I said I had stopped the boy to know what he had got; he said, he did not know. James said,

"Nor does he know". I said,

"Is the bundle yours;" he said it was; I said,

"Do you mean to say, that the property in that bundle is yours;" he said it was - and that he would not have it opened in the street, and wanted me to go to his house. I went a little way with him - he said he was a smuggler, and that the bundle contained silks. I said, I must be satisfied what he had got - he refused; I said, I must be satisfied, or I should take him to the office. I told Woolham and another who were with me, to take the prisoner with the bundle to the watch-house; he refused to give it up, fell on the ground, and began kicking. We at last got them both to the office.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE WOOLHAM . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was in company with Gregson, and saw the prisoner coming down King-street. Leggatt's account is correct.

JAMES MOORES 'S Defence. Some men gave them to my son by the Rosemary Branch, as he tells me.

JAMES NICHOLAS MOORES - GUILTY. Aged 14.

Judgment Respited .

JAMES MOORE - GUILTY. Aged 35.

Of stealing only .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JAMES MOORES.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-110
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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1253. JAMES MOORES was again indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Napier , about three o'clock in the afternoon of the 21st of July , (no person being therein) and stealing one tea kettle, value 9 s., and two tumbler glasses value 18 d. , his property.

JAMES NAPIER . I live in Gray's-buildings, Lower-road, Islington . On the 21st of July, I went out and left nobody at home - I fastened the house securely, and returned about eleven o'clock, it was then dark. My family were all out, but not with me. I found nobody at home. Neither the doors or windows were broken - there was no appearance of breaking. I cannot tell how the persons got in. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, from the first and second floors. They were worth 4 l.

GEORGE WOOLHAM . I am an officer. On the 23d of July, I searched the prisoner's house - he was then in custody; his wife informed me that he lived there. He had told me he lived at Hoxton; I did not hear what number, being engaged.

RICHARD BECKETT . The prisoner told me he lived at No. 27, Reeves-place, Hoxton. I went there, and in the up-stairs parlour found this copper kettle and two tumblers.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you find them at No. 27, or 37 - A. I have made a mistake. He at first told me 27, and then 37. I found them at 37; it is not a lodging house. I only found his wife and daughter there.

JAMES NAPIER . The kettle is mine. I will not swear to the tumblers, but I lost two like them.

THOMAS BOYLE . I am apprentice to Mr. Napier. I know the kettle, as I have cleaned it.

JOHN UPTON . I am an officer. On the 21st of July, I was by Gray's-buildings, Islington, and met the prisoner walking towards Napier's, and looking up at the houses.

THOMAS GREGSON. I saw the kettle found.

GUILTY. Aged 35.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

THOMAS HOWIS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-111
VerdictNot Guilty

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1254. THOMAS HOWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , in the dwelling-house of Alexander Walker , one promissory note, for payment of, and value 15 l. 10 s. , his property.

ANN WALKER . I am the wife of Alexander Walker , who is a warrant officer in His Majesty's service. In December he lived at Wapping . The prisoner was my landlord . On the 29th of December, I sent for him to come and take his quarter's rent. I said,

"Mr. Howis, I dare say you want money?" He said, Yes, he did. I said,

"Here is four sovereigns, if you will deduct the land-tax." He said he would not. I said,

"I cannot pay you then, if you won't." He went away, and came about ten minutes after with a broker, and said,

"Now, will you pay your rent?" I said,

"Yes; here are the sovereigns; deduct the land-tax." He refused. My daughter said to the prisoner,

"You have put a broker into my mother's house; walk out." He went out. I told my daughter to fetch my pocket-book, and take out the land-tax receipt; instead of that, she took out the promissory note for 15 l., and laid it down on the purse, and then she got the receipt; then the prisoner came through the passage, laid hold of it, and took it up. I took hold of his hands, and said,

"Mr. Howis, don't rob me; that paper is valuable." He took it away; I could not hold him. One of the witnesses went after him, to see if he would give it up; he would not. I have never got it back. The note was drawn on John Thomas , at twelve months after date, and is due on the 26th of next October.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What is the broker's name - A. He lived in Old Gravel-lane. There was no distress made.

Q. Why not go before a Magistrate - A. I did, three weeks ago, and was told to indict him at Hicks's Hall. I did not wish to hurt him, if he would give it up. He indicted me at the time for striking him.

Q. You preferred this indictment after he indicted you - A. Yes. I waited to see if he would give it up.

CATHERINE JOHNSTONE . On the 29th of December, I was in the house of the prosecutrix. She sent for the prisoner,

to pay the rent, and asked him to deduct the land-tax, which he refused. She took out the pocket book, and put the note on the top of the bedstead. I saw the prisoner take it off and go out. I saw it in his hands last Michaelmas. it was drawn on John Thomas .

Cross-examined. Q. I thought your name was Debus - A. No. It was once. I have been married ten years. My husband's name is George; we have been parted eighteen years; we parted at Smithfield; I was not tied up there. I saw the prisoner at the White Swan; he told a man there, that he had Mrs. Walker's note, and never intended to part with it.

COURT. Q. You have parted from your husband eighteen years - A. Yes. His name was Debus. I have been married to another ten years. I know nothing about Debus.

ANN WALKER . I am the daughter of the prosecutrix. On the 29th of December, my mother sent me for the prisoner. He came in; she offered him four sovereigns, if he would deduct the land-tax; he refused. I took the promissory note out of my mother's pocket book, to look for the receipt; it was a 15 l. note, given by John Thomas , who is a seaman; I believe it will be paid. He went out of doors with it. My mother said,

"Don't rob me." He shoved her against the table, and made his way out. I have been to him since for the note; he refused to give it up.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he not given your mother notice to quit - A. Yes; and she quitted on the 31st of December. She employed a lawyer to get the note back. She took no steps till after she was taken to Clerkenwell; she always meant to indict him, but was waiting for the broker, who was in confinement. About three quarters of an hour after he took the note, he came in and said,

"Search me now." My mother said, that was of no use.

MARK BARRINGTON . I am a Greenwich pensioner. I was at Walker's house on the 29th of December; they sent for the prisoner to get his rent; he came, and Mrs. Walker said,

"Here is your rent, and 9 s. I have paid for land-tax." He would not deduct it. I saw the 15 l. promissory note, drawn by John Thomas. I cannot read, but I witnessed the note, as I know Thomas, and knew it was the note I witnessed; she pulled it out of her pocket book, to get the land-tax receipt, and put the note on the bedstead. The prisoner had been ordered out of the house; he came in again, and snatched the note up; I followed him out, and saw my mark on it. He refused to deliver it up. I asked him several times; he said he would see her d - d before he gave it her.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you lodge in the same room with Walker - A. No. I sleep in the parlour; this happened in the parlour. I should know the note again by my mark. I saw it drawn; it was on a stamp. I have been to his house twenty times to ask him for it; he always said he would see her d - d first. He charged me with an assault at Clerkenwell, but they laughed at him. I have arrested him for money he owes me.

Q. He has walked here to-day, not being in custody - A. Yes.

The prisoner, in his defence, denied having ever seen the note, and stated that the witnesses had combined together against him, because he had refused to assist Barrinton in personating a seaman who had a large property coming to him from Government.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Justice Best.

THOMAS GORDON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-112
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1255. THOMAS GORDON was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Clark , on the King's highway, on the 22d of August , at St. Mary, Whitechapel, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch chain, value 6 d.; one ring, value 3 s.; two seals, value 30 s., and one key, value 4 s. , his property.

WILLIAM CLARK . On the 22d of August, about a quarter to ten o'clock at night, I was coming up White Lion-street, Whitechapel , with my wife, and the prisoner came out of a gateway, ran against me, and snatched at my watch. which broke the chain. I put my hand to my fob, and found the watch was safe; the moment he had committed the robbery, he called Stop thief himself. I immediately followed, calling Stop thief also.

Q. In what way did he run against you - A. He pushed me not violently, he merely ran against me to shove me off my guard; he shoved me on one side, for half a yard, or three quarters and broke the watch chain.

Q. Did that shove prevent you from protecting your property - A. It did, my Lord, it was a push. As soon as the chain broke he ran down the yard, and I followed; he was out of my sight for a moment or two, while he turned the corner; he was then secured. I am positive of him. It was about dusk. While I was pursuing him, some persons came round, pretending to inquire what had happened, and endeavoured to stop me. I drove through them, and immediately after somebody struck me a violent blow over the arm; it was very sore next day. I still pursued; he was in custody of Page, when I overtook him; nobody was running between me and him; there were plenty following us. My seals were found on the spot where he was taken; he said nothing.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. It was dark - A. Yes; I had a good view of his face; he had a hat, a black coat, waistcoat, and black handkerchief, but I saw his face by the light from a public-house window; he ran about a hundred yards before he was taken.

Q. If you had not lost your watch, or been attacked, you would not have noticed the push - A. No; I should have felt my fob immediately; he rushed up against me - I was alarmed.

ROBERT HOCKLEY . I am a watchman of Whitechapel. I went on my beat at about ten o'clock, in White Lion-street, and heard of the robbery; and about half-past twelve o'clock that night, under the window of an eating-house in White Lion-street, I picked up the seals, and the gold ring and key were about half a yard from them. I found them about one hundred yards from Rosemary-lane. I gave them to Partridge.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I am beadle of the parish. I produce the chain and seals.

WILLIAM CLARK . The prisoner was stopped near the eating-house in White Lion-street. The ring, seals, and key, are mine.

Cross-examined. Q. Any person could throw them there - A. Nobody but him was running before me.

PETER PAGE . I am a mariner. I stopped the prisoner about fifty yards from Rosemary-lane, opposite a passage abreast of the eating-house, or the next house to it. Nobody was running before him - I had not met a person all the way from Prescott-street. He wished me to let him go, saying he saw the thief running ahead; I said I was positive nobody was ahead of us, and I thought he must be the thief. I detained him till Clark came up. I did not hear any thing drop from him. He put his hand down by his side when I told the prosecutor to take hold of his arm.

Cross-examined. Q. He was running towards the spot where the robbery was committed - A. He was running up the street - I do not know where the robbery was done.

WILLIAM CLARK . He gave a turn round, and Page met him coming towards the spot where I was robbed.

Prisoner's Defence. I had left my master about five minutes, and saw a mob coming down crying Stop thief! I met two men, who said a man had been robbed, and the thief was gone up White Lion-street. I ran with the rest; the gentleman stopped me.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 27.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

WILLIAM MILTON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-113
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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1256. WILLIAM MILTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Davis , on the 13th of August , in the King's highway, at St. Giles in the Fields, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, two night caps, value 3 d.; three frills, value 2 d.; one habit shirt, value 1 s.; four pieces of muslin, value 2 d.; four handkerchiefs, value 1 s., and four petticoats, value 2 s. , the goods of Mary Davis , widow .

THOMAS DAVIS . I am eleven years old. (The witness being questioned appeared perfectly to understand the importance of an oath.) On the 13th of August, about a quarter before nine o'clock at night, I was in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields , with these things in a bundle; my mother was about three yards before me. I was struck on the head by the fists of somebody, and knocked down. I stuck fast by the bundle, and was dragged along with it, and was struck again, and then they got it from me. I do not know who did it.

MARY DAVIS . I am a widow. I was with my son on the 13th of August in Great Queen-street; he was behind me; I did not see any thing done to him; I heard him cry

"Mother, I have lost my bundle." I immediately turned round and cried Stop thief! I was too much frightened to notice any body. The officer took the prisoner that night; I do not exactly know the day of the month.

GEORGE HARRIS . I am the watch-house keeper; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house about half-past nine o'clock at night, on the 12th of August, with a bundle of linen; the prosecutrix had part of it returned before the Magistrate.

PATRICK CRAWLEY . I was called, and took the prisoner to the watch-house. Barwell gave me the bundle, which I delivered to Harris.

THOMAS BARWELL . I attended Covent-garden market. On the 12th of August, about half-past nine o'clock, I was by the side of Queen-street Chapel, down the Archway, and I saw the prisoner take the bundle from the boy, but did not suspect that he was robbing him; I was about twenty yards off; the boy was on the ground; the prisoner pulled him along, and snatched it from him; the boy cried to his mother, and both cried Stop thief! I pursued and took the prisoner, and took it from him, and gave it to Crawley; he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Are you certain of him - A. Yes. There is a gass lamp there. The moment I seized him, he said it was his brother, and that he took the bundle from him, because he should not go that road as he did not wish him.

MARY DAVIS . These are things I had to wash for persons, and have their initials on them - I am certain of them. I do not know the prisoner, he is not my son.

The prisoner made no Defence, but six witnesses gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his Youth and good Character.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

ELEANOR SMITH, MARY LOWE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-114
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence; Not Guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1257. ELEANOR SMITH and MARY LOWE were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , one hundred bobbins, value 2 s. and 2 lbs. of silk, value 8 l., the goods of Abraham Jones , in the dwelling-house of William Metcalfe .

HANNAH JONES . I am the wife of Abraham Jones , and live in Saunders'-garden, Hoxton. I had this property at Metcalfe's public-house, next door to the Public-Office, in Worship-street . I had it on the table under my arm. I bought half a pint of nuts, some of them fell; I stooped to pick them up, and in the interval the bundle was gone. The prisoner Smith was going out at the door when I missed it - she had just got up from me. I followed her into the yard; she went into the privy. Lowe stood in the yard with my bundle down by her side - I asked what she did with it; she said it was not mine, it was her friend's who was in the privy. I took it up; she held it, insisting that it was not mine. Vann and Waters came, and took her - she would not part with it till then. I had seen her drinking with Smith.

PATRICK THOMAS MASON . I was in the passage of the house, and saw Smith come out with the bundle, which she handed to Lowe, who was waiting outside for her.

THOMAS WATERS . I am an officer. I came out at the back of the Office, and found the women quarrelling - the prosecutrix charged Lowe with stealing the silk. Vann took Lowe, and the prosecutrix gave him the bundle, which she had taken from her. I found Smith concealed in the privy, and took her.

THOMAS VANN . I was coming into the yard, and took Lowe. Smith was in the privy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SMITH'S Defence. I was there with a bundle of my own. This woman asked me where the privy was - I said backwards, and whether I took this bundle by mistake I do not know. If I meant to steal it I should not have gone out the back way.

LOWE'S Defence. I asked her to go into the yard; she had the handle in her hand, and asked me to hold it; but I did not know it was stolen.

THOMAS WATERS. I found Smith in the privy - but

not in a situation she would have been in if she went there for a neccesary purpose.

SMITH - GUILTY. Aged 43.

Of stealing, but not in a dwelling-house .

Confined Six Months .

LOWE - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN BROWN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-115
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1258. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , at St. Giles in the Fields, one coat, value 30 s.; one waistcoat, value 8 s.; two pair of trowsers, value 12 s.; two shirts, value 9 s.; one handkerchief, value 2 s., and one tobacco box, value 2 s., the goods of John Cary , in the dwelling-house of William Morgan .

JOHN CARY . I live in Plumtree-street, in the parish of St. Giles . I occupy the back room of the second floor of William Morgan 's house. On Monday, the 26th of August, about five o'clock in the evening, I was at work in the shop below - and in consequence of what was said, I went up into my room, and found the door broken open. I had locked it half an hour before. I missed the property stated in the indictment, which is worth about 3 l., or more; the suit of clothes were nearly new, and cost 6 l. 4 s. I had them about fifteen months, but only wore them on Sunday. I value them altogether, at 3 l. I am sure I could not buy them for that. I went to Bow-street on the 27th, and saw the prisoner with one of the shirts on his back, which I am positive is mine.

JOHN PURTON . I am an officer. I took the shirt off the prisoner's back; he resisted very much. I was obliged to knock him down, and get two more to pinion him.

(Shirt produced and sworn to.)

MARY MORGAN . The house belongs to my husband, William Morgan . On the 26th of August, at five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner come down stairs, and go out of the passage with a bundle under his arm. I did not see his face, but only his dress; he is dressed exactly the same now, and is the same height.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the shirt.

GUILTY - DEATH Aged 33.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JAMES ROBOTTOM.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-116
VerdictGuilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1259. JAMES ROBOTTOM was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , two pair of pantaloons, value 2 s.; one bed-tick, value 1 s.; one druggett, value 2 s., and one book, value 6 d. , the goods Robert Barron .

ROBERT BARRON . I live in Caroline-place . On the 19th of June, between four and five o'clock in the morning, the watchman alarmed me. I found the prisoner in custody with this property.

CATHERINE BROWN . I am the wife of the prosecutor. I saw the pantaloons safe the night before in the lumber-room, and the rest of the things; they belonged to my son, who is seventeen years old; my husband had paid for them.

JAMES WARD . I am a groom. About five o'clock in the morning I saw the prisoner come over the wall from Barron's premises, and leave these things on the wall; he ran up the yard into No. 2, and there we took him.

THOMAS GREEN . I am a watchman. I found the prisoner behind the privy door of No. 2, Caroline-place; he had got over three walls. I charged him with the theft; he said he was very sorry, but I did not know his wants; that he had pawned his waistcoat the night before, and shewed me the duplicate.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Being locked out, I went there for shelter, as it thundered. I was never in the yard.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

RICHARD RUSSELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-117
VerdictGuilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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1260. RICHARD RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , twenty three pencil cases, value 12 s.; three toothpicks, value 1 s.; one silver pen, value 18 d., and one pen-holder, value 2 d. , the goods of Thomas Potter .

THOMAS POTTER . I live in Clare-street, Clare-market . On the 19th of August, I lost the articles stated in the indictment from my shop window. I did not miss them till Avis informed me.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. On the 19th of August, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I was in Duke-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields, and I saw the prisoner and two others under the archway. I stopped him. I saw the prisoner go on the steps by the side of the archway; Lack came up and searched him, and took these things from him. I had seen one of them go up to Potter's shop.

SAMUEL LACK . I stopped the prisoner and found these things on him; he said he had nothing about him, and then said he picked them up in Drury-lane.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in Drury-lane, wrapped in a handkerchief.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JULIA WEATHERALL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-118
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1261. JULIA WEATHERALL was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , three shirts, value 14 s.; five frocks, value 5 s.; one petticoat, value 4 s.; three yards of calico, value 18 d.; two pair of stockings, value 3 s., and one waistcoat, value 2 s. , the goods of James Connelly .

HANNAH CONNELLY . I am the wife of James Connelly, and keep a fruit stall, and live in Poplar-place, Pancras . On the 9th of July, the prisoner was my servant ; she came to me about two o'clock on the 9th; she asked leave to go to St. Giles's, and took my key in order to make tea when she returned. I waited till seven o'clock - she never returned. I missed these things, and found the duplicates of part of them on the mantle piece. I took her at ten o'clock at night, at a house where she lived before she came to me; the watchman found an apron and two handkerchiefs of mine on her. I said,

"How could you rob such a poor woman as me." She said," What a piece of work you make about a few trifling articles."

JOSEPH LUCKING . I am a watchman. I went to her lodging and found two handkerchiefs and an apron on her; she said, what a piece of work there was about such trifles.

HENRY RUSSELL . I am servant to Mr. Tomlinson, pawnbroker. I have several articles which the prisoner

pawned; the duplicates produced are what I gave her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

MARY RUSHTON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-119
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1262. MARY RUSHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , one teapot, value 7 s. , the goods of James Russ .

JAMES RUSS . I live in Oxford-street. On the 28th of August, my wife put a teapot out for sale; it was stolen.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am a constable. I stopped the prisoner in Oxford-street, on the 28th of August, about two hundred yards from Russell's house, and found the teapot in her bag, she said she bought it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it of a ragman for 6 s.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOSEPH MOORE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-120
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

1263. JOSEPH MOORE was indicted for that he, on the 8th of August , being servant to James Hunt , did steal sixteen dolls, value 16 s., and one basket, value 2 s. , his property.

JAMES HUNT . I live in Newby's-court, Spitalfields; the prisoner was my servant. I engaged with him on the 6th of August; I was to clothe and board him. He stopped with me two days, and then left me, with the coat, worth 2 s., which I had given him to wear, and a basket of sixteen dolls, worth 15 s. 11 d., which I had employed him to sell. He was taken on the 11th of August, at his father's. I asked him what he had done with my property; he said, he had them taken from him. I said,

"Is it possible they could take coat and all?" He said, Yes.

THOMAS ALMOND . I am an officer. I received him in charge. He told me he sold the property to a man in Smithfield for 7 s., and had been to the play and spent part of the money, and bought victuals with the other.

Prisoner's Defence. I stood in Fleet-market with the dolls; a man sent me for change, and on returning, basket and all were gone.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

THOMAS LENTON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-121
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1264. THOMAS LENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , one set of harness, value 8 l. , the goods of Albert William Jones .

WILLIAM SUTTON . I am servant to Mr. Albert William Jones of Woodford. On the 14th of July, I lost this harness, and found the prisoner with it at Worship-street, on the 15th.

JOHN GARVA . I am a constable. I produce the harness, which was brought to the watch-house with the prisoner.

JOHN ILES . I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoner in Hackney-marsh, with the harness. He said it was his master's, Mr. Lee, of Woodford.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in a sack at Epping Forest. Somebody called to me to lay it down, but I thought I would take it to the public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

EDWARD LINDON, ELEANOR GOMERY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-122
VerdictGuilty; Not Guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1265. EDWARD LINDON and ELEANOR GOMERY were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , one blanket, value 4 s., and one sheet, value 4 s., the goods of Margaret Crosston , widow , in a lodging-room .

MARGARET CROSSTON . I am a widow, and live in Cock-lane, East Smithfield . The prisoner lodged with me, as man and wife, for three weeks. I missed my blanket and sheet, and charged them with stealing them; they abused me, and threw me down stairs, and would not let me into the room.

THOMAS HOLBORN . I am an officer. I was sent for on Thursday, the 23d of July, to take the prisoners in charge for stealing the goods; the prosecutrix sent for me. I asked them where the duplicates were - the woman gave them to me, the man said nothing.

WILLIAM SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker. A blanket was pawned on the 19th of July by Gomery, and a sheet on the 17th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GOMERY - GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year .

LINDON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

CHRISTOPHER GUYMER, EDWARD FORDHAM.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-123
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1266. CHRISTOPHER GUYMER and EDWARD FORDHAM were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , twenty-four ducks, value 3 l.; four live geese, price 14 s.; two live fowls, price 7 s.; one live turkey, price 1 s., and two sacks, value 2 s., the property of Joseph Hunter ; and two live fowls, price 4 s. , the property of Robert Reeves .

ROBERT REEVES . I am a milkman , and live at Layton. On the 8th of August, I lost two fowls from a house, which I was taking care of in Essex. I found them at Worship-street, on Saturday the 10th.

SIMON EATON . I am servant to Mr. Joseph Hunter , of Low Layton; he lost the poultry stated in the indictment, and a sack. I found them at Hackney watch-house.

WILLIAM WEST . I am servant to Mr. Hunter. I left the sack hanging in the stable on Wednesday night, and missed it on the following morning. Reeves lives next door.

JOHN ILES . I am a patrol. I stopped the prisoners in Hackney Marsh, between three and four o'clock in the morning of the 8th of August, and found twenty-four ducks on Fordham, also two Guinea fowls, and a turkey, also a large screw wrench. I found on Guymer four geese, six ducks, and two fowls, and a sack.

JOHN GARVA . I am an officer. I shewed the poultry to Reeves and Eaton, they claimed it - I found a candle and matches in Fordham's pocket, and on Guymer a tinder-box, flint, and steel.

(Sack produced and sworn to.)

GUYMER'S Defence. The sack is mine. I bought the fowls near Epping.

FORDHAM'S Defence. I bought my poultry at Wanstead.

GUYMER - GUILTY . Aged 27.

FORDHAM - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

BRIDGET CALLIHAN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-124
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1267. BRIDGET CALLIHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , one watch, value 30 s.; one chain, value 1 d., and three keys, value 1 d. , the goods of Luke Nowlan .

SARAH NOWLAN . I am the wife of Luke Nowlan . The prisoner ironed for me. I lost the watch one Saturday about ten weeks ago - I had seen it safe about nine o'clock in the morning, and missed it about three.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had nothing to say against her before - A. Nothing.

THOMAS JOHNSTON . I am servant to Mr. Nicholson, a pawnbroker. The prisoner offered the watch in pledge on the 6th of July, but Mr. Nowlan having been to stop it, I detained her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN BROMLEY, HENRIETTA BISHOP.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-125
VerdictsNot Guilty

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1268. JOHN BROMLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , two books, value 30 s., and one table cover, value 5 s. , the goods of William Bassett ; and HENRIETTA BISHOP was indicted for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM BASSETT . I am a bricklayer , and live in Dean-street, Soho . On the 30th of July I lost a table cover, and two books from my parlour. I do not know Bromley.

THOMAS PEWTNER . I am servant to Mr. Summers. I have a table cover pawned by Bishop, on the morning of the 3d of July, and the same morning she offered in pawn Fox's Book of Martyrs; I had received notice of the robbery, and stopped her.

MR. BASSETT. I believe the cloths to be mine. I can swear to the book; I went to Mr. Walker's, and found the Bible concealed in a turn-up bedstead. Bishop said Mrs. Walker sent her to pawn them; I did not take Walker; she has now absconded.

CHRISTOPHER TUTON . I am a stationer, and live in Berwick-street. On the 30th of July, about a quarter past seven o'clock, I saw three men at the corner of Dean-street; one of them crossed over and entered the prosecutor's premises; Bromley also crossed, and passed too and fro by the house; I went to Leigh-street, and on my return I met all three again; Bromley was then with the men who went in, they had a basket in their hands.

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. On the afternoon of the robbery I took Bishop in custody at Walker's lodging, next morning Mrs. Walker absconded. On the Saturday following I went to Queen-street, Seven Dials, and saw Bromley at work on a seat; I asked the landlord (Henley) if he was his son, he said, Yes; I came away, soon after Bromley came down, and I stopped him; I told him I believed his name was Gibbons; he denied it, and said it was Henley, and that I had just been to his father's apartment; I took him to the watch-house; he then confused he was the person who was called Bromley, and that the book was given him by Mrs. Walker to carry up stairs.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

RICHARD ARCHIBALD, HARRIET BROWN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-126
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1269. RICHARD ARCHIBALD and HARRIET BROWN were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , one gallon of rum, value 16 s. and one stone bottle, value 1 s. the goods of John Bennett .

JOHN BENNETT . I live at Ratcliffe Highway . On the 30th of August, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I lost this rum out of my bar; I saw the prisoners in the house that night; they lived together. I went to their room about two in the morning, and found the rum in my jar; they were both in the room.

THOMAS SELBY . I am a watchman. I took charge of them. Archibald said he met three Irishmen, who came in and left the rum there.

(Jar produced and sworn to.)

ARCHIBALD'S Defence. Four men asked me where they could sit down to drink a little liquor; I took them to my room; they drank what they wanted, and while I was out they put the jar in my closet.

ARCHIBALD - GUILTY . Aged 22.

BROWN - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

HARRIET WISE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-127
VerdictNot Guilty

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1720. HARRIET WISE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of August , two shirts, value 4 s., and two cravats, value 2 s. the goods of John Wynn .

SARAH COOK . I am servant at the Saracen's Head, Snowhill. On the 3d of August the prisoner came for two shawls to be washed. She said Dawson sent her and I delivered them to her.

MARY DAWSON . I sent the prisoner for this linen; she was not my servant.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

HARRIET WISE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-128
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

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1271. HARRIET WISE was again indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , two shawls, value 4 s.; one quilt, value 2 s.; one table cloth, value 1 s.; and one tea spoon, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Dawson .

MARY DAWSON . The prisoner lodged with me. I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and found them in pawn My husband's name is Thomas.

WILLIAM MASTERS . I am servant to Mr. Turner, a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned a quilt and shawl on the 19th of July, at different times.

JOHN WENBORNE . I am servant to Mr. Cotterell, pawn broker. I have a table cloth and tea spoon pawned I believe by the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

ABIGAIL CALLAGHAN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-129
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > sureties

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1272. ABIGAIL CALLAGHAN , was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MESSRS. LAW and BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

HANNAH STOKES . I am the wife of Leonard Stokes , a showman. On the 6th of September we were at Bartholomew Fair , and between three and four o'clock the prisoner was at the door of the show; the price of admittance was a halfpenny; I asked her for the money; she gave me a sixpence, I gave her 5 1/2 d. Two officers immediately came up and asked what she had given me; I gave them the sixpence.

JOHN CARLILE . On the 6th of September, I was on duty at the fair with Buxton, who pointed the prisoner out to me - I saw her go to Stokes's show; she gave a sixpence, and took change - I ran up and asked Mrs. Stokes to let me see the sixpence. I took her into the show, and found nine shillings, two half crowns, and two-pence halfpenny in halfpence, on her, all good. She refused to say where she lived. We took her to the Compter, and then went with Harrison the marshalsman, to a stall, about sixty yards from the show, and found a little boy serving there, about ten or eleven years old - Harrison searched the stall, and under the nuts found a piece of cotton containing two bad sixpences, and a bad shilling wrapped in it. I gave the sixpence to Buxton.

WILLIAM HENRY BUXTON . I am a constable. I was on duty with Carlile at the fair when the prisoner was taken. I had followed her from Cloth-fair to the show. I knew her before, and knew she had a stall at the fair, as I saw her bringing fruit where, which she dealt in. She refused to tell us where she lived - she was searched, and the money stated found on her. I went with Harrison to a stall, and found a little boy there. We found two sixpences and a shilling wrapped in cotton, under some nuts. I produce the sixpence I received from Carlile, and the money I received from Harrison.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I was at the Compter when she was brought there - I had seen her before, and knew she had a stall at Smithfield-bars. I went to the stall where I had once seen her about a week before, and found her son there, who is about twelve years old. I found under the nuts wrapped in cotton two bad sixpences and a bad shilling. I am certain it is her stall - I did not see her at it that day. I know she was there two days before.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am the assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. The sixpence uttered is counterfeit - the other sixpence are counterfeits, and of the same die as the other; the shilling is also counterfeit - they are merely washed.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman asked me to let my boy mind her stall, while she looked for her child. It is not my stall.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and to find Sureties .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN GREENWOOD.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-130
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1273. JOHN GREENWOOD was indicted for a like offence .

ANN WOOD . I am a haberdasher, and live in Trump-street. On the 9th of August, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in and asked me to give him large change for small; he was quite a stranger; he produced a shilling and a sixpence; he said he was intoxicated, and had met with an accident; I looked at the money and said it was bad; he made no answer. Smith came in immediately and took him.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable, and live in Honey-lane, Market. On the 9th of August, at nine o'clock in the morning, I took the prisoner in Wood's shop; I saw him go in and produce money, he had taken it up, and was coming out. I searched him and found one bad shilling, one bad sixpence, two good shillings, one good sixpence, and thirteen pence three farthings in copper on him. As I was taking him to the Compter I saw his hand in his jacket pocket, he drew it out, and I saw a piece of paper in it. When I got to the Compter, I took his hand out of his pocket; he then struck me in the mouth; I knocked him down, and took six sixpences, and two shillings from him him, all bad; I found some yellow soap and fat on him.

MR. POWELL. The sixpences found in his hand are all bad, and of the same die, and appear not to have been in circulation; the two shillings are also bad, and from the same die, one of them has been rubbed with fat.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he had changed a sovereign, that he stumbled in the street, and his money fell from his pockets, he picked up two shillings, and a Jew picked up the rest and gave him.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN COLEMAN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-131
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > public whipping

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1274. JOHN COLEMAN was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MR. GEORGE LAWRENCE ANDREWS . I rent a counting-house No. 33, in the parish of St. Olave, Old Jewry. I occupy it with my partner Robert Jackson ; I left it all safely locked up on Saturday afternoon, between four and five o'clock, on the 26th of June. I returned at nine o'clock on Monday morning, and found the door fastened as usual; the woman who cleans it had locked it up; my desk has four flaps, all of which were forced open; I had left nothing of value there; the prisoner was in custody.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The woman usually fastens it - A. I fastened it myself; she has a key as well as me.

ESTHER WILSON . I have the care of the house, and also a key of the counting-house. On Monday the 27th of June, I and my husband went out at three o'clock; the door and all the counting-houses were safe; we returned about five o'clock, and on opening the street door I found it only single locked; my husband had double locked it; we found the prisoner up stairs; he came down and was secured; the prosecutors' counting-houses is on the first floor; I found the desk broken open, and the papers strewed about; I had left the counting-house key in the door.

Cross-examined. Q. How were the desks opened - A. With a crow bar; the street door must have been opened with a false key. I locked the counting house door.

JOHN WILSON . I went out with my wife about three o'clock. I double locked the door myself; she found it only single locked. I left nobody in the house;

when we got in, my wife went down stairs; I stood at the door looking out for a few minutes; I heard a window thrown up, and presently another; I then heard one of the office doors slam too - the prisoner appeared on the top of the stairs; I secured him, and said,

"What do you here?" he said, it is only me, and flew at me - seized me by the collar; and said,

"D - n your eyes, I'll soon do for you?" I kept my hold; my wife came up, and we all got out together. I never lost sight of him till he was secured. I found all the counting house doors had been opened. Mr. Andrews's desks had been opened, and papers thrown about.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner; I found the desks broken open. I searched him, and found a key and crow bar in his breast coat pocket; the impressions on the desk corresponded with the crow - and the key opened the street door.

GUILTY .

Confined two Years , and twice publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

EDWARD .
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-132
VerdictGuilty

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1275. EDWARD JONES was indicted for obtaining goods by false pretences .

JAMES SAVAGE . I am warehouseman to Mr. John Last , a hosier of Maiden-lane, Wood-street, in the parish of St. John Zachary. Mrs. J. H. Titcombe was a customer of ours. In the afternoon of the 3d of August, the prisoner came and produced an order which I have. (reads.)

"Mr. John Last , Please to send by bearer, one dozen of men's white cotton, 2 s. 6 d., and one dozen of women's ditto, about 3 s. J. Titcombe, Knightsbridge." He said he brought the order from Mr. Titcombe, which I believed. I looked out the goods, and gave him a dozen caps, as he said Mr. Titcombe had omitted them. I had never seen him before; he went away with the goods. I saw him again on the 21st, and am sure of his person; he was about twenty minutes with me.

JONATHAN HENRY TITCOMBE . I am a haberdasher and hosier, and live at Knightsbridge. I have been a customer of Mr. Last's about fifteen years. The prisoner once lived with a friend in the City - he was never my servant; he knew the houses I dealt with. The order is not my handwriting, nor any of my servants. I sent a young man on the 3d of August without an order, but not for such articles; these goods never came into my possession.

HENRY TURNPENNY . I am one of the day patrol. On the 19th of August, I took the prisoner in charge for another person. Savage made this charge against him; he said nothing to it; he said he had no lodging.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he was employed to take the order by a stranger.

GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

EDWARD JONES.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-133
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1276. EDWARD JONES was again indicted for the like offence .

MARY ANN NORBERRY . I live in Birchin-lane; the prisoner lived in my service about three weeks; he left on the 6th of June. I keep a shell-fish shop; Mr. John Hughes owed me 5 l. 17 s. 4 d. I never sent the prisoner for any money.

JOHN HUGHES . I live in Finch-lane. On the 11th of June, I owed Mrs. Norberry, 5 l. 17 s. 4 d. The prisoner came on the 10th or 11th. I know he had lived with the prosecutrix; he asked for 15 s. on her account as she wanted to make up a bill, and was short of silver. I gave it him; he asked at first for 10 s. or 15 s. I gave him 10 s. He then said 15 s. if I pleased.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

CHARLES BOND.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-134
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Corporal > public whipping

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1277. CHARLES BOND was indicted for obtaining goods by false pretences .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

MR. THOMAS FISHER , JUN. I am a lace-merchant; my partners are James Fisher , Isaac Fisher , James Stroud , and H. Robertson; we live in Cheapside. The prisoner came to our warehouse on the 13th of August, about five in the afternoon, and asked for bobbin laces; he selected four pieces, worth 65 l., and while selecting them, he said that he was James Turner of Woodstock, and was known to Messrs. Rogers and Company of Bread-street. I handed him a memorandum book, in which he wrote his address and reference. I produce it. He directed the goods to be sent to the Swan with two Necks before seven, as he was going out of town that evening. Our clerk made enquiry, and the goods were sent.

EDWARD FISHER . I am servant to the prosecutors. I packed up the goods which Mr. Fisher gave me, directed them to James Turner of Woodstock, and gave them to the porter.

WILLIAM MAXWELL . I am assistant at Mr. Reeves's, pawnbroker on Snowhill. The prisoner came to our shop on the 17th of August, about noon, and offered a quantity of lace for sale; he said there was above four hundred yards, and wanted 20 l. that evening. I said we could not purchase it without enquiry, and he left it for me to make enquiry. I advanced him 16 l. on the first day; he came again afterwards - I gave him in all 35 l. 10 s., which I thought the value of it, and took a receipt for it, which he signed in the name of Davis. I sold the goods to Amber and Co.

MR. REEVES. I am a pawnbroker; the witness gave me the lace; I went to Messrs. Amber and Co.'s, St. Paul's Church-yard, to ascertain the value, before the settlement of the money. I afterwards caused the prisoner to be apprehended.

MR. CHARLES AMBER . I am in partnership with Mr. Hoggin. I produce the lace, which I had from Reeves.

RICHARD BENJAMIN WATTS . I am in the house of J. and E. Rogers, warehousemen. James Turner of Woodstock is perfectly well known to them. The prisoner is not that person.

THOMAS WOODHOUSE . I have known the prisoner nine years by the name of Bond. I never knew him live at Woodstock. I have not seen him for eight years.

GUILTY .

Confined Two Years and Publicly Whipped

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

EDMUND BURKE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-135
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment; Transportation

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1278. EDMUND BURKE was indicted for perjury .

MESSRS. ALLEY and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

The record of the conviction of Tobias Burke was put in and read.

(See Sixth Session, page 371.)

HENRY BUCKLER. I am short-hand writer. I remember the defendant being examined on the trial of Tobias Burke , for bigamy, in this court. I saw him sworn, and took down his evidence. In the course of his examination, the following questions were put. (Reads.)

"Q. While you were there," (meaning at the house of James Butler , at Cashel in Ireland,)

"did you ever see any ceremony of marriage performed by any body - A. None whatever." After some farther examination, he was asked,

"Q. I give you notice, that you will be contradicted if you deny this; but on the oath you have taken, did you not give your brother away - A. I did not. Q. Neither on the 11th or 12th" (meaning 11th or 12th of June 1815) -

"A. I did not. Q. Did you not give your brother away in marriage, either on the 11th or 12th, to Mary Butler - A. Never, since the day of his birth. Q. In all the time you were in Butler's house, did you see any marriage ceremony going on whatever - A. No."

JULIA BUTLER . I am the daughter of James Butler , who lived in 1818 at Cashel in Ireland. I had a sister named Mary; she was married at my father's house, in the summer of 1815, to Tobias Burke , the prisoner's brother; he was tried here for bigamy. The prisoner was present at the marriage; he gave his brother away at my father's house, in marriage to my sister, at Cashel. They were married by a Catholic priest; my sister is a Catholic.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long is it since you came to this country - A. I came last May. I believe I am about nineteen years old; my birth-day is some time in August. My parents tell me that is about my age.

Q. The marriage took place in 1815 - you were then about twelve years old - A. Twelve, or upwards. The marriage was in June, in the afternoon, after dinner, about dusk - we generally dine about five. I do not think the priest dined there - he lived in the same street. I generally go to bed about ten o'clock. There was no feast, only our own family were present. There was a party next night, my sister Eliza and Mrs. Conden were present - she is rather older than Eliza. I cannot mention every body who was present; my father was there - he is dead; my two sisters; my brother-in-law O'Carney - he is dead; and there was Mrs. Stapleton, a cousin of mine.

Q. Why could you not as well have told us at first that your cousin Stapleton was present - A. I did not recollect it. I have not given the subject much consideration, except that I want to get home; it is with the greatest reluctance that I appear here.

Q. What claim have you and your sister put in for your expences on this and the last trial - is it not upwards of 300 l. - A. I believe it is, travelling expences, the voyage, loss of time, and all; I have been detained here since May; I mind my mother's business at home; she is in the wine and spirit trade, and deals in hides; we also retail spirits. The most respectable houses in Ireland sell retail. We were not in the public line at the time of the marriage. There was wine and punch drank. I went to bed, and the marriage was much more than an hour before that. Tobias Burke used to go to mass after the marriage - I did not know him above a week or ten days before. My sister had been to Dublin, and whether she was acquainted with him there I do not know. Mrs. Stapleton was not asked to come over here; I believe her age was about twenty at the time; she lives at Tipperary. I did not dine at the table - I might run in and out at dinner time. I do not think the priest dined there.

Q. Do you expect any remuneration for what you have done here? - A. I expect the amount of my bill.

MR. ALLEY. Q. The second wife's father agreed to pay the expences of you and your sister's coming here - A. Yes; we do not expect to be paid for giving evidence. My mother constantly keeps one man servant, and sometimes has five or ten employed in the gardens. I was in and out of the room at the time of the marriage; and what has happened since it took place I cannot say.

Q. All you can recollect is, that you were present when your sister was married, and that the prisoner gave his brother away - A. Yes.

EMMA BUTLER . I am sister to the last witness, and am now about twenty-three years old. I was present at my father's house at Cashel, when Tobias Burke married my sister - it was in June, 1815; the Reverend Dr. Wright, the Catholic priest, married them; the prisoner was present, and gave his brother away in marriage to my sister Mary, - I am positive of it.

COURT. Q. Where did your sister go to live afterwards - A. At Dublin; they lived together till they had two children; I saw the prisoner frequently afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was present at the marriage - A. My father and brother-in-law (Michael O'Carney), the servants, my three sisters, and I believe my mother, my two cousins (Ryan and Stapelton), and I believe Catherine Ryan ; I cannot exactly say whether it was Catherine, but there was another person named Ryan; she was twelve or thirteen years old; my sister Conden was present; she is older than I; she does not live with my mother. I do not think the marriage took place so late as seven o'clock. I knew for a week previous that it was to take place. Tobias Burke had been at our house for about a week - he came from Dublin for the purpose of being married. I expect my expences for coming here; I do not know how much - my loss of time has been very great. I believe our expences are 300 l. or 350 l.

Q. Who sent to Ireland to bring you over - A. Letters brought us over; we were not subpoenaed, but understood we should be if we did not come - our business has been at a great loss, no person being able to take care of it, my mother being old. The priest did not dine there. Tobias Burke and my father sent for him. I believe I sat up till two o'clock - I don't know when Julia went to bed. There was not much drinking. Tobias and the prisoner, my father and O'Carney, sat up till four o'clock - they did not drink enough to make them drunk - I believe they were all sober on going to bed; they had wine and whiskey. I never saw Tobias at mass before the wedding, but have many times since. I believe our loss, through our coming here, will be more than 300 l.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were you examined on the last trial - A. Yes; and alter that was subpoenaed to come here; I am very anxious to get my expences, to get away; I have made frequent application to go, nothing but the subpoena has kept me here. I am certain the prisoner is the person who gave his brother away.

COURT. Q. How long did Burke live with your sister,

after the marriage, in Cashel - A. They stopped at our house nine or ten days; Dr. Wright and O'Carney are dead.

MR. PHILLIPS addressed the Jury on behalf of the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months , and then Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOSEPH PRICHARD.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-136
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceMiscellaneous > fine

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NINTH DAY. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19.

1279. JOSEPH PRICHARD was indicted for embezzlement .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

SAMUEL CLARK.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-137
VerdictGuilty
SentenceCorporal > whipping

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1280. SAMUEL CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July , one telescope, value 10 s. , the goods of William Kilsby .

WILLIAM KILSBY . I am a broker , and live at Brentford . On the 18th of July I missed this telescope; I had received information, and saw the prisoner that morning by the Market-place; I secured him, and found it in his breeches pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM BARNES . I am an hatter, and live at Brentford. On the 18th of July I saw the prisoner looking into Kilsby's shop from the opposite side of the way; he then went over, took up the telescope, then went towards the back part of the shop, came out and went down Kilsby's gate-way; I pursued, he was secured five minutes after, and appeared very sorry for it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS SEAL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-138
VerdictNot Guilty

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1281. THOMAS SEAL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , four yards of printed cotton, value 9 s.; and one box, value 1 d. , the goods of Susan Clark .

SUSAN CLARK . I am a weaveress , and live in Rose-street, Bethnal-green. On the 5th of September, between two and three o'clock; I went through Bartholomew Fair , and had two duplicates in my pocket in a box, for a piece of printed cotton, and two books; before I got through the fair, I found my pocket had been picked of the box. I went to the pawnbrokers to stop the duplicates, but found the cotton had been redeemed from Castle's, Church-street, Bethnal-green; this was about four o'clock the same day; when the prisoner was apprehended the box was found on him.

JAMES MARLOW . I am servant to Mr. Castle. The prisoner fetched out this cotton on the 5th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon. I saw him at Worship-street the next day, and the cotton he redeemed was produced.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you ask him any question - A. No.

JOHN HEATH . I am servant to Mr. Goaling, and live in Shoreditch. The prisoner came between four and five o'clock, and produced the duplicates of two books, pawned for 1 s., saying he wanted to redeem them. The prosecutrix had been before - I asked where he got the ticket; he said he found them in Cloth-fair. I asked if he had any objection to wait till I sent for the woman, he said No, and sat down. There were two other persons in the shop, who could have prevented his leaving.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say he found them in a box - A. No. He said he thought there was no harm in redeeming them.

GEORGE LACK . I am a constable. I was sent for, and found the cotton and box on the prisoner with the duplicate of the books, and the cotton was in his hand.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a tailor, and have lived at New Cross thirteen years. I found the box in Cloth-fair.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS JEFFS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-139
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

1282. THOMAS JEFFS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , 7 lbs. of cheese, value 3 s.; three bottles, value 6 d.; two quarts of wine, value 10 s., and 3 lbs. of lamb, value 1 s. , the goods of William Allen .

ELIZABETH ODELL . I am servant to Mr. William Allen , of Stoke Newington ; he is a quaker . On the 18th of August, we went to bed about ten o'clock. We left some roast beef and lamb, and the rest of the things named in the indictment, in the pantry - they were stolen in the night. I saw part of the lamb in the prisoner's house that morning. Some cheese was also produced at Worship-street.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. On Monday the 19th of August, I searched the prisoner's house - he was not at home. I found a part of a leg of lamb, a piece of cheese, and a bottle marked the same as Mr. Allen's bottles, and it smelt of white wine. I found some keys also, two of which are skeleton keys, and a dark lantern. I and Vann were in search of the prisoner until the Sunday following, when we found him concealed behind the bed room door of the house, and in the cupboard of that room I found a bottle of port wine, marked the same as the others, and another bottle below, marked the same with a little wine in it, and another piece of cheese. He said he thought he should go this time; but he did not care if he could escape the dancers - that he could account for how he got the bottles, but he did not to either of us.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you make a strict search the first time - A. Yes.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. After the prisoner was apprehended, he said it was all over with him, but he did not care for any thing but the dancers, which means hanging.

(Cheese produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS FOWLER . I am servant to the prosecutor; about a dozen and a half of wine was stolen that night - The bottles produced are marked the same as my master's, with a diamond; we bought it of Messrs. Lesters.

JOHN TRINGHAM . I am servant to Messrs. Lesters, who serve the prosecutor with wise; these bottles are marked the same as ours.

Cross-examined. Q. You mark all your wine so - A. All the old.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

PETER DORAN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-140
VerdictNot Guilty

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1283. PETER DORAN was charged (on the Coroner's Inquisition only,) with killing and slaying Thomas Waylan .

MR. ALLEY conducted the prosecution.

MICHAEL DONAHOE . I saw the prisoner and the deceased in the yard of the Cricket house last Tuesday three weeks. The prisoner came into the yard - the deceased was standing there; the prisoner went up and said,

"What is this you have been saying about me?" The deceased said,

"What I have said I don't deny - you have robbed me of a sovereign." The prisoner replied,

"Oh! you rascal!" and struck him right in the face. I endeavoured to get between them; the deceased said," It is no matter, Peter - I don't want to quarrel with you, but you have robbed me of a sovereign. He struck him again - the deceased said,

"You did rob me, and I think myself as good a man as you." They both struck; we pacified them, and he was putting his clothes on again. The deceased said he did rob him, and they fought again; the yard was slippery with the rain, and the deceased fell. He got up and struck at the prisoner, who fell against the wall; the prisoner caught him by the breast, and threw him against the seat; he again said,

"It is no matter - you robbed me of a sovereign." We prevented them from fighting further. He lived a fortnight after.

Cross-examined. Q. The deceased was in a violent passion - A. Very. I cannot say whether he fell from a blow or not.

WILLIAM DUNN . I knew the deceased and the prisoner. After the quarrel, the deceased sent for me and the prisoner. I went in after the prisoner. The deceased said he sent for me on purpose to say, that he owed no malice to the prisoner. I left them together drinking wine. I brought a pint of wine in myself, for the deceased to drink, and saw him drink some.

Mr. LAWRENCE CHRISTIAN SALNOUE . I am a surgeon, and live at Ratcliffe-cross. I was ordered by the Coroner to open the body of the deceased. I examined the head, chest, and belly; the liver was unusually enlarged, it extended down to the right hip - and over to the left side, and ran up into the chest very high; the chest had bloody serum mixed with matter; the head and brain were perfectly natural. I think he could not die by the accident; his death might be accelerated by it - a blow on the head could not affect the liver. I think he would have died without the fight.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had not seen him before death - A. No; all the symptoms might have existed without any violence whatever; they were most probably produced by previous disease. I think it might be accelerated by the exertion of fighting.

Q. But suppose he drank the greatest part of a bottle of wine, might that have accelerated his death - A. Certainly. The liver was full of blood - his death would have taken place very soon, without any battle.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

WILLIAM NORTH.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-141
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1284. WILLIAM NORTH was indicted for sodomy .

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 54.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

WALTER BLANSHARD.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-142
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1285. WALTER BLANSHARD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of the Honourable Henry Vane , commonly called Lord Viscount Bernard , at St. Marylebone, about six o'clock in the afternoon of the 17th of August , ( John Davis and others being therein,) and stealing twenty-nine towels, value 14 s. , the goods of the said Honourable Henry Vane , commonly called Lord Viscount Bernard.

WILLIAM YORK . I am footman to Lord Bernard; his Lordship's name is Henry Vane - he lives in Portman-street, in the parish of St. Marylebone . On the 17th of August, I left the house about half-past six in the evening, to go into the privy, leaving John Davis and other servants, in doors; the area door was shut, and the latch was down. While there, I saw the prisoner come down into the area, open the door, and go into the passage. He unlocked the housekeeper's room door, (the key was in the door,) and went in. I came out of the privy as quick as I could, and met him coming out of the room into the area, with these towels under his arm. I seized him; he begged for mercy. I took him into the kitchen; he there dropped them - they are worth 14 s. I sent for an officer.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge, with the bundle, and have kept it ever since.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JAMES MITCHELL.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-143
VerdictNot Guilty

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1286. JAMES MITCHELL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John King , about six o'clock in the afternoon of the 31st of July , (no person being therein,) and stealing one tea board, value 3 s.; one coat, value 5 s.; two shifts, value 4 s.; two petticoats, value 3 s.; one pair of stays, value 6 s.; one counterpane, value 5 s.; three pair of stockings, value 1 s.; one pillow, value 2 s.; one pair of sheets, value 5 s.; one blanket, value 3 s.; and three gowns, value 4 s. , his property.

FRANCES KING . I live with John King as his wife, but am not so. He lived at this time in Frederick's place, St. Luke's . On the 31st of July, I went out at one o'clock in the day, leaving nobody there. I double locked the door, the windows were fast. I did not return till next morning, between ten and one o'clock. I then found the window shutters down - they take down outside. I missed this property. I lost some crockery also, which I have since seen.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. How long had you lived there - A. Four months. King sleeps there occasionally; I pay the rent with his money - he lives with me when his business does not call him from town - he has contracts in different parts of the country. The prisoner's back door is by ours; his wife and a man came and offered me money to settle it - I refused.

COURT. Q. The clothes are yours - are they bought with King's money - A. Part of them.

LETITIA JORDAN , aged seven years, was called; but not

appearing to understand the nature of an oath, was not sworn.

MARY JORDAN . I am a widow. My little girl was in the habit of going to King's on errands, and on the afternoon of the 31st of July, between five and six o'clock, she came and told me something. About an hour afterwards, I went to our privy, and found four basins, a wash-hand basin, and a mug. I went to King's house, and saw the door wrenched open - a chair was against it, and there were also some blue plates by the door. I went up stairs, and missed the bed clothes.

ELLENOR RANDALL. I live near King's. I saw the crockery lying there; I do not know who put it there.

JOHN GREENING . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in consequence of what Letitia Jordan said, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, in bed, very much in liquor, he said he was innocent. I found nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

ALEXANDER BROWN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-144
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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1237. ALEXANDER BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , at St. Ann's, Westminster, seven sovereigns and one sixpence, the property of William Furneaux , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM FURNEAUX . I am a shoemaker , and live in West-street, Soho, in the parish of St. Ann's, Westminster . The prisoner lodged in my house with his mother. On the 11th of July I lost seven sovereigns and a sixpence from my breeches pocket, which was in the kitchen drawer; I saw it safe about a quarter past ten o'clock, and missed it about ten minutes before eleven. The prisoner was in the kitchen between ten and eleven; he went away, and did not return till he was taken, which was on the 23d.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Have you found your money - A. No; I had it ready to pay my rent, which is 42 l. a year. His mother lodges with me now.

ELIZA FURNEAUX . I am eleven years old. (The witness being questioned, appeared perfectly to understand the nature of an oath.) The prisoner lodged at our house; I remember the last day he was there I was in kitchen, and I saw him there. In the morning after my father and mother went up stairs, a knock came to the door; I went up to open it, leaving him alone in the kitchen; I then went up to call my father; I was not gone more than five minutes; when I came down, the prisoner was standing up against the drawers, with his right hand in his pocket; there was only one chest of drawers in the room. He went out of the kitchen, and a few minutes after he passed my father, and went out at the street door. I locked the kitchen door, and took the key to my mother. Nobody had been in the kitchen but him. I saw my mother give my father the key; he went down to wash his hands, and ten minutes after I heard of the money being lost.

Cross-examined. Q. Had nobody else been in the kitchen - A. No; my mother had the key; there are several lodgers.

SARAH FURNEAUX . I am the wife of the prosecutor; my daughter brought me the key; I gave it to my husband, and about five minutes after he came up to me and missed the money. I saw the prisoner at the watch-house when he was taken; he was neither threatened nor promised any thing. I asked him how he came to take the money - he said he did not know how it was, but he did do it - he had left the house about ten minutes before eleven o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. The lady said I had better confess and tell the truth; I said I knew nothing of it; she said,

"Now do tell, and I will go for your mother - and if she will give me a pound or two at a time, I will make it up." As to my keeping from home, I had had words with my father. Mrs. Furneaux said.

"Now tell me what you mean to do - if you give me any thing at a time, I will take it."

SARAH FURNEAUX . I said no such thing.

Three witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

JOHN PAVEY.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-145
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1288. JOHN PAVEY was indicted for bigamy .

MARY THOMAS . I live in Baker-street, near the Cobourg Theatre. I was a widow - I first saw the prisoner on Sunday, the 4th of June - he overtook me on the bridge, and introduced himself to me, and walked as far as Hanover-street, Long-acre, with me. On the Monday following he called at my lodging, and on the 14th of July I was married to him. He represented himself as porter in a warehouse in the Strand, and as a bachelor, and said he had never lived with a woman in his life - I questioned him about that. We were married by the Rev. Mr. Knight, at St. Clements Danes, by banns. My mother and Martha Jones were present. I had lived with him five weeks, when a woman came and said she was his wife, and had a child. I told him of it - he said she was not his wife, and that it was a bastard. I am not pregnant. I have an annuity of 35 l. a year.

Prisoner. Q. You knew all about it before I married you - A. I did not.

MARTHA JONES . I was present when the prisoner and Mary Thomas were married at St. Clements.

ELIZA WESTON . I am Thomas's mother, and was present at the marriage, and saw the ceremony performed.

JOHN M'CORMIC . I am a carpenter. I was present at St. Bride's when the prisoner was married to Bridget Toole . I know she is now alive - I saw her not two months ago. She had one or two children by him - one is living.

SARAH WEBB . I have known Bridget Toole many years, and was present when she married the prisoner, about seven years ago. They had four or five children - one is now alive. He has left her about a year.

WILLIAM PEARCE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in St. George's-fields. I produce copies of the registers which I examined with the originals in the book, and swear they are true copies.

(Read.)

Prisoner's Defence. The certificates are not right by the church books - she got a man to make them for her.

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Two Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Best.

WILLIAM STRODE.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-146
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1289. WILLIAM STRODE was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of David Richards , from his person .

DAVID RICHARDS . I am a cloth dealer , and live in Staining-lane. On the 17th of July, a little past three o'clock, I was in Great Russell-street . I felt a pull at my cost pocket, and missed my handkerchief, and upon turning round I saw two young men walking behind me - the prisoner was one; nobody else was near. A gentleman came up and pointed the prisoner out - he instantly ran off; I pursued, and saw him throw the handkerchief away - I lost sight of him for about five minutes, but am sure of his person.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. No violence was used - A. No. They ran down Tavistock-street.

WILLIAM RAWLINGS . I am an ironmonger, and live in Great Russell-street. I was returning from Tottenham Court-road into Russell-street, and heard a call of Stop thief! the prisoner passed me - he was the person pursued. I immediately went after him; he was stopped before I lost sight of him. Mr. Richards came up in about five minutes. The prisoner called Stop thief! and threw the handkerchief away.

Cross-examined. Q. He was taken easily - A. Yes. He was quite out of breath.

JOHN BARTLETT . I am a beadle. I was in Great Russell-street, and heard the cry - the prisoner also cried Stop thief; I stopped him. The handkerchief was given to the prosecutor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was running down Great Russell-street, and met a person in a long blue coat, who threw the handkerchief in my face, and ran away. I heard a cry of Stop thief! after me, and thought I was entrapped. I called after the person, and believe he was taken; but the officer gave him his liberty.

DAVID RICHARDS . I saw him take the handkerchief from his left hand side, and throw it down before I lost sight of him. If it had been thrown at him I must have seen it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS FOWLER, RICHARD WELLS, THOMAS MORGAN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-147
VerdictGuilty; Guilty > with recommendation
SentenceTransportation; Transportation

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1290. THOMAS FOWLER , RICHARD WELLS , and THOMAS MORGAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , one handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of a certain man , whose name is unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM JUDD . I am a dismounted patrol. I was in Pall Mall on the 6th of August, at half-past one o'clock, and saw the three prisoners together - I passed them opposite Carlton-house. I saw them talking together. They passed me a second time. I saw Wells and Morgan feel several gentlemen's pockets. They at last made a stand behind a gentleman - Morgan and Wells were close to his pocket, and Fowler stood close behind them, and sprend his coat out to cover them. The gentleman had a little girl with him, and lifted her up to see His Majesty pass on his carriage, driving out. Wells then took hold of the skirt of the gentleman's coat, and held it while Morgan drew the handkerchief out - Fowler was covering them all the time. Morgan put the handkerchief into his breast - I seized him, and took it from him. I attempted to take Wells, but he stooped down and slipped under me. I took Fowler, and held one in each hand. I tapped the gentleman on the shoulder, shewed him the handkerchief, and said I was going to take them to Queen-square; he turned round. I called on the people to take Wells; they refused. There were about fifteen regular pickpockets about. A man laid hold of Wells, and Ball came up and secured him. They were all secured without getting out of my sight. My hat was knocked off, and I was hustled. I never saw the gentleman again. W. Kerr, was marked on the handkerchief; but I do not know him, nor who he is.

WILLIAM BALL . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was nearly opposite Carlton-house. I secured Wells. Judd had the other two. He was shoved about, and there was a cry of

"rescue." I do not know the gentleman. There were fifteen or twenty thieves about.

FOWLER'S Defence. No one was with me.

FOWLER - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

MORGAN - GUILTY. Aged 13.

WELLS - GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy . Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

MARY ANN SMITH.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-148
VerdictNot Guilty > no prosecutor

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1291. MARY ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , one handkerchief, value 3 s. , the goods of John Dutton .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

MARY ANN SCOTCHING.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-149
VerdictNot Guilty

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1292. MARY ANN SCOTCHING was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , two sheets, value 8 s.; three pillows, value 15 s.; two pillow cases, value 2 s.; two towels, value 1 s.; one handkerchief, value 6 d.; one snuff box, value 2 s.; two night caps, value 3 d.; eight pounds of cheese, value 4 s., and one blanket, value 4 s. , the goods of George Swinbourne .

GEORGE SWINBOURNE . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Fore-street, Cripplegate ; this property was taken from my house. The prisoner lived servant with us about five months - she left of her own accord on the 7th of August; she had been asked about several things which were missing, and was much offended - she was a married woman; two days after she left, I got a warrant to search the lower part of the house in Old-street, under a broker's shop. I found a handkerchief, a snuff box, a pen knife, and half a cheese, which I knew by a mark on it; she was present, and did not deny the room being hers; and said she had the handkerchief to carry some things home.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Did you see her husband - A. He used to call for her at night, and go away immediately.

ELIZABETH SWINBOURNE . I went to the prisoner's lodging after my husband; and in her room I found the rest of this property. Before she left, I had enquired after the towels which were missing; she said she knew nothing about them - and she considered it an insult, for she had never been suspected, and therefore would leave the place. I found the towels and sheets very dirty; she was in custody.

Cross-examined. Q. There are wages due to her - A. Yes, she would leave immediately, and I was too busy to settle with her.

JOHN MANCE . I am an officer. I went on the 9th of

August, with the search warrant with Mrs. Swinbourne, and found the property in Old-street Road - the prisoner sent for the key of the room, and went in with us. I told her what I came about - she said we might search, for she had nothing of the kind. I took her to the office. I got the key from her, and went again with Mrs. Swinbourne, and found the other property, which she claimed.

ELIZA KEEN . I was fellow servant with the prisoner; my mistress complained of losing property; the prisoner's husband used to call for her of an evening - sometimes he stopped at the door, and sometimes came up stairs in the kitchen. I never saw him carry away any bundle - the bedding was up stairs. I saw him come one Sunday morning with a basket, but never saw him carry anything away.

MRS. SWINBOURNE. The property is mine - the marks on some of them are cut out.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS NEWMAN, JOHN WARREN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-150
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceImprisonment; Imprisonment; Corporal > public whipping

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1293. THOMAS NEWMAN and JOHN WARREN were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , two bushels of chaff, value 16 d.; one bushel of bran, value 10 d.; two pecks of beans, value 2 s.; and two bags, value 3 s. , the goods of Robert Lambert .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT LAMBERT . I am a stage coach proprietor , and live at Blackwall. The prisoner Warren has been in my service about fourteen months; in consequence of his suspicions, on the 9th of August, I sat up with Fardell on my premises, and about half-past eight in the evening, I saw about a peck and half of beans concealed in the hay-rack; I used to give out sufficient provender for the horses every evening, and had served beans out that evening, and the horses ought to have had them. About half past three o'clock in the morning, Warren got over the gates, which were barred, Newman then got over; they had then nothing in their hands. I saw them return; Warren then had a little bag, and Newman a four bushel sack nearly full; Warren opened the gate directly - they got out - we went after them and took them. Newman then had a four bushel sack full; he had put down his bag to open the gate; we took them to the watch-house. Neither of them had any business there; the sack contained chaff, bran, and beans.

JAMES FARDER . I am in the employ of Mr. Lambert. On the 9th of August I sat up with him, and saw the prisoners. I took Warren; a nose bag of beans were close to him.

(Bags produced and sworn to.)

NEWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Three Months .

WARREN - GUILTY . Aged 36.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

THOMAS JOHNSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-151
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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1294. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , three brass cocks, value 6 s.; and two live tame pigeons, price 2 s. , the property of John Sloper .

JOHN SLOPER . I live in Cross-road, Stepney-green . On the 19th of August, between four and five o'clock in the morning, this property was stolen, which was safe the night before. I only had two pair of pigeons. Between four and five o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by a knocking at my door - I went down and found the prisoner in custody. The pigeons were returned to me alive; two of the cocks were pulled out of beer casks, and the beer running about; the other was from the water butt, the pipe was cut.

RICHARD SMITH . I am a watchman of Mile-end. On the 19th of August, about a quarter before five o'clock, I was going down the green on duty, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I found the prisoner and Wilkinson both on the ground, struggling together; he charged the prisoner with cutting some pipe away, and pointed to Sloper's house. I took the prisoner under an archway, and there the lead pipe lay; I found three brass cocks on him, and a small bundle containing something alive, a few yards from him. I gave it to Wilkinson.

ROBERT WILKINSON . I am a neighbour of the prosecutor. I got up at twenty minutes past four o'clock to go to labour; I heard a noise, and went into the privy, and as I came out I saw a handkerchief put on the wall, and two pieces of lead pipe; the prisoner then made his appearance on the wall - I asked him what he did with the pipe, he said it was his - he immediately ran to the gate, unbolted it, forced the lock open, and went out - and began to swear, and said he was out. I seized him, and down we fell. Smith came and secured him - he said,

"Now I will give in." I saw the cocks found on him. Smith gave me a bundle which contained two pigeons.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

JOHN KEEN, HYAM PHILLIPS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-152
VerdictNot Guilty

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1295. JOHN KEEN and HYAM PHILLIPS , were separately indicted for misdemeanours .

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

EDWARD BARBER, WILLIAM GODDARD.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-153
VerdictGuilty; Guilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1296. EDWARD BARBER and WILLIAM GODDARD were indicted for a conspiracy .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

REV. FRANCIS LEE . I am a clergyman. I was chaplain to the Prince Regent, and live at Chelsea. In May last I saw an advertisement in the Times newspaper, in consequence of which, I went to No. 3, Whitefriars. Goddard was in the stable there. I told him I came to see the horses which had been advertised in the Times; he said,

"These are the horses;" he was cleaning them. I asked whose they were - he said they belonged to Captain Barber, of the Inniskillen dragoons; that he was his groom, and had been so two years, from the time he left Mr. Roberts, the Bank Director; he had had the care of the horses two years, during which time Captain Barber had had them - that they were sound and young horses, under age, and he was very sorry his master was going to part with them - and was only sorry he was not going with them; that his master was going abroad, which was the only reason he parted with them; that they had been regularly hunting in Warwickshire, with Lord Milton's bounds; and sometimes had been in harness; that they were half-brothers, and were both bred by Mr. Swan, of Warwickshire;

he said he had been in the habit of having the care of them, and sometimes of waiting on Captain Barber as his servant, and was very sorry to leave the horses, and would be glad to go with them. I said I should want a a person to take care of them, and would consider of it. While we were in conversation, the defendant Barber came in; I said,

"Is this Captain Barber?" he (Barber) said,

"I am, and these are my horses." Goddard was present. Barber said he had had the horses two years - that they were very good and young horses, under age - the one six, and the other seven years old, and no more; that he had hunted them regularly with Lord Milton's hounds, in Warwickshire, all the last season, and had driven them. I had known Lord Milton, and we talked of him and his affairs. He said he was a man of that county himself, and that his father and family lived at Harl-lodge, Stratford; that he bought the horses of Swan, who bred them; and that they were half-brothers. He asked a hundred and ten guineas for them, and said that Goddard had been his groom for two years. I afterwards asked him Goddard's character - he said he was an excellent groom, and understood horses very well - and he would warrant the horses. I saw Goddard again next day, by appointment, to examine them, as I had not seen them out of the stable. I found him in the stable alone. My son was with me, and a rough rider. Goddard spoke in the same way about the horses - that they had never been lame, and that nothing had ever been the matter with them. I asked him what his wages had been with Captain Barber - he mentioned about thirteen guineas, and 20 l. a-year for clothes, and 12 s. or 14 s. for board wages, and more when he travelled. I said his terms were higher than I usually gave, but I should prefer a man who had been acquainted with the horses, and mentioned what I would give. Captain Barber came into the stable, and spoke in the same favourable terms of the horses - and that they were just the figure of horses I wanted. In the course of the day, I shewed him a sort of warranty which I thought it would be proper for him to send me by post, and he said he would sign that - (looking at it) - this is it. I saw him sign

" Edward Barber , Harl-lodge, Stratford-on-Avon;" and I added to it what he said would be his address in town, until he should go to France,

"No. 5, North-street, Lambeth;" he described the defendant Goddard as an excellent servant. I said I gave 25 l., and should not object to 20 l. a year for clothes - he said he gave more. He agreed to take five guineas off the horses, and give me the horse-cloths, &c. into the bargain. I was to give him a hundred and five guineas. I saw the horses out that day, but it poured with rain, and he was afraid they would catch cold, and was anxious they should not be out long. I said I thought there appeared a little lump on the fore leg of one horse, and that he went a little stiff with it. He said on his word of honour as a gentleman and an officer, there was nothing the matter with them, or he should have told me. He said his servant frequently waited on him in company, and had regularly had the care of the horses. I said,

"Upon this warrant I will have the horses" - he said,

"Then if you please to make a deposit, if it be only 5 l. so that nobody whatever shall see the horses." A pen and ink was sent for. I wrote a draught on Messrs. Coutts and Co., for 5 l., and delivered it to him - I drew it payable to Barber, and most likely to Captain Barber. I went again next day and saw Goddard, and agreed with him to be my servant, and to accompany the horses. I was to give him twenty-five guineas a year, twenty pounds for clothes, and twelve or fourteen shillings a week board wages; unless I boarded him myself. Captain Barber came in again, and I spoke to him on the subject of his servant becoming mine - he agreed to it, and that he should accompany the horses. I asked for a pen and ink to write a draught for the remainder of the money; he said,

"If you will go into my hotel, we will settle it there;" he took me to the Sussex hotel, and asked me to take some refreshment, which I declined. I wrote the cheque for 100 l. on Messrs. Coutts and Co. I had no sooner written it, than he took it up, and said,

"Well, as you have given my servant half an hour to get the horses ready - I will go and hasten him, that he may not be later - I will return almost immediately." He took the cheque with him. I stopped half an hour; he did not return - I was tired with wating - I had some conversation with the waiter, and then went out into the stable to see for the parties - the stable was shut up, nobody could be seen. I could see neither of the defendants - the horses were found in the street with a man named Jones on them, whom I think I had seen in the stable as helper - they were opposite another hotel in the street. I mounted the horse that had a saddle on it, and Jones rode with me to Messrs. Coutts's banking-house. Barclay had left me half hour; one of the clerks said they had not paid the 100 l. cheque, but they had the 5 l. I went to a stable near my own house, and left Jones with one of the horses, while I rode to Mr. Bloxham, a veterinary surgeon of the Horse Guards, to shew him the horse I suspected. He saw it, and in consequence of what he said, I sent a letter to Barber, addressed at No. 5, North-street, Lambeth; which letter was afterwards returned by the post to me; I never received any answer from Barber; I went back to the stable, and found Jones was gone. I had him apprehended. Goddard never came into my service; I have not seen Barber since, till to-day; I parted with my cheques, depending on his honour, and on the representation of both the defendants; I advertised them, offering a reward, and went with Mason to the Red Lion yard, Tottenham Court-road, and saw Goddard leap out of a window, and run away.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You paid the draught at the second interview - A. Yes; I took my son and the rough rider. I am a little skilled in horses, but I did not particularly examine them, it was so wet a day; I do not think the rider was as experienced as I then thought; I only had them once up and down the street, and expressed a wish to have a longer trial, but I relied on his word of honour as an officer. He said he would return to me in the coffee-room immediately - I gave him the cheque about one o'clock. I kept the horses about a month, and then sent them to Tattersall's. The saddles, &c. were worth about 5 l.

CHARLES BOLTON . I am a clerk at Messrs. Coutts's. Mr. Lee keeps an account there; I produce two cheques drawn by him, one of 5 l. paid on the 7th of May, and 100 l. paid on the 8th, by the entry in the book; I suppose the last was paid about two or three o'clock; I believe Barber

to be the person I paid it to; it had been paid an hour and half before Mr. Lee called to stop it.

CAPTAIN SAMUEL ANTHONY BLOXHAM . I am veterinary officer to the 1st regiment of Life Guards. On the 8th of May, Mr. Lee shewed me one horse, and next day I saw both - the first was lame in the fore leg, and the second lame in both fore legs - they were decidedly not recent maladies. Had they been sound, they would have been worth a hundred and forty guineas; but they were lame, and six or seven years old. I do not think any thing had been done to their mouths. There was a considerable obstruction of the limbs - the pair are not worth above forty or forty-five guineas. They frequently hunt lame horses.

Cross-examined. Q. They were lame, as if they had been a good deal worked - A. Yes; they were unfit for the streets - they were grand horses, if you cut off their knees.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was it a permanent lameness - A. Yes; they were not sound, nor fit, according to the warranty - they were quite unsound.

The warranty was here read, describing the horses, as stated by Mr. Lee.

JANE HART . I keep the house No. 5, North-street, Lambeth. The prisoner Barber did not live there in May last-he has lodged with me, and left on the 30th of March - he did not give up his lodging till the 4th of April - he came in February.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Any letters coming directed to him would have been forwarded - A. Yes. I was going to let my house, or he would have continued with me. I was to send his papers somewhere in China-row, Lambeth. He passed as Captain Barber, and had a sevant. I do not recollect seeing Goddard. I think his servant was taller and stouter than Goddard.

AMBROSE PARISH . I am a clerk in the Marshal's office of the King's Bench prison. The defendant, Barber, came into the rules on the 4th of May, and remained till yesterday - he was detained for a debt of 48 l. 10 s., and was in the walls the latter part of the time - he was locked up in June. China-row is not in the rules.

MATTHEW LEONARD COLEMAN , ESQ. I was in the War-office. I have searched the books, to find if there was a Captain Edward Barber in the Inniskillen dragoons, but can find no such name in this year's list. I have looked through the Inniskillen regiment, and find that one Edward Barbor was appointed in 1811, as a cornet in that regiment, and continued in the army till 1813.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You know nothing about the army in Spain, or other parts where British subjects served - A. No. Our books contain an account of every person in the service.

JOHN VICKERY . I am an officer. In consequence of instructions from the prosecutor, I made several searches in May last for Captain Barber, but could hear nothing of him. I had a second warrant handed over to me, by which I found him living in the rules of the Bench.

MR. ELLIOT. I keep the Red Lion, Tottenham-court road. I keep the stable yard. Goddard lived with me for sixteen months - he left me in May last. He acted as groom or servant to a gentleman whom I did not know. I have seen the gentleman come into my yard on his horse; the prisoner Barber is the person. They were with me a week and three days, with their horses, and then they went away. Goddard paid the bill. The last time I saw Barber was a fortnight or three weeks before Goddard left; they had two horses at my stable - they were never changed - not the last horses; but I believe they brought horses to me three different times - they never stopped above a week. A gentleman came to look at the horses twice. Goddard was sometimes at home, and sometimes not - he was in and out of town. Sometimes he was absent four or five days, or a week, but never longer together. He would stop at home three weeks or a month - he had no horses there. I do not know how he was employed - he was always dressed as a respectable man.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. His wife lived sixteen months with you - A. Yes. Barber never lodged with me, but has put horses up at livery with me.

COURT. Q. Did Goddard tell you he was a gentleman's servant - A. I never asked him. I considered him as a groom, as he brought horses - he brought horses before he came to lodge with me. I considered Barber as his master - he called himself Captain Barber. Goddard always ordered the bills, and I made them out to Goddard.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Were you at home when Mason and Mr. Lee came - A. I will not say I was at home. Goddard left me because his wife wished to live in a public street. I did not see him after the officers came. I did not see him jump out of a window.

JOHN BALDUCK . I am coachman to Mr. Abraham Robarts ; and have been so above nine years - and know all the grooms employed in the stables of Mr. Robarts' father, who has been dead three years. Goddard was never groom there.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How many grooms has he - A. Three; I frequented the stables of the family, and never knew Goddard.

MR. ANDREWS addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendants.

BARBER - GUILTY .

GODDARD - GUILTY .

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

JOHN ORPEN.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-154
VerdictNot Guilty

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TENTH DAY, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20.

1297. JOHN ORPEN was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , one deal board, value 2 s. , the goods of Henry Peto .

JAMES LEICESTER . I am a watchman of Portland-place. On the 11th of August, after I had called half-past ten o'clock, I was just by the Park-crescent , and saw the prisoner standing against a board, and saw him put his hand through a hole; he then got up and pushed this plank over; the moment he got it over, I went to him - he dropped it, and made into the house adjoining, which he had the care of. I said,

"What have you been at there?" he said,

"There is a plank, you had better go and put it over again." I knew him before.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Have you and he never quarrelled - A. No; he has come to me, and told me to drive away the women; there was a fire in the

house, and I fetched the engines; and he has spoke about me since.

Q. Did you not say,

"You are always meddling with me, and now I will have you" - A. I said,

"I have got the person who is always speaking about me."

THOMAS GRISSELL . I am nephew to Mr. Henry Peto , a builder. We were building eight houses, and this hoard was round them; there were boards left there.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

ANN HAYES.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-155
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1298. ANN HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , one shirt, value 6 s.; two petticoats, value 3 d.; three handkerchiefs, value 3 d., and two gown sleeves, value 3 d. , the goods of William Doncaster .

MARY ANN DONCASTER . The prisoner came into my service on the 6th of April, and on the 3 d of July, as she was leaving, she was searched, and the duplicate of a shirt found on her; the rest of the things were in her box; she said they had been put there by somebody; and that she bought the duplicate; she cried very much when I asked her for the key.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ISAAC LEVY . I am a pawnbroker; the shirt was pawned with me, and redeemed by the prosecutrix. I do not know who pawned it.

Prisoner's Defence. My young mistress used to leave things about the room. I happened to fold them up and put them in my box by mistake.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

JANE GIBBS.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-156
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment

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1299. JANE GIBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , one watch, value 10 s.; one ribbon, value 1 d.; one seal value 1 d. and one key, value 1 d., the goods of Paulo Rossa , from his person .

PAULO ROSSA . (Through an Interpreter.) On Friday night, the 8th of September, I went into a public-house in Smithfield with two others, and saw the prisoner there. I asked her to have a pot of beer; she left the house first. When I came out, she followed and asked me to go with her; I said I had no money. I went into a little passage - she held me by my coat, and said I had better stop; she pulled my watch from my pocket, then said,

"The watchman is coming, I must go." I felt it was gone, and pursued her. I fell down - the watchman took her. I was sober.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You spoke English to her - A. I only understood a little. I did not give it her to hold.

HENRY MORGAN . I am a patrol. I was going down Sharp's-alley, and saw the prosecutor and prisoner talking together. I desired them to go on, and as I returned, she was running towards Chick-lane. I said,

"What are you running for?" she said,

"Hush!" the prosecutor came running after her, and said she had taken his watch. I stopped her, and took it out of her pocket; she at last said she would not deliver it before she had her half-crown - he was rather in liquor.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the watch to hold while he went to his companions for money; he did not return as soon as I expected, and I went away.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Fourteen Days .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

, WILLIAM CORBETT, JOSEPH CORBETT, JOHN WATSON.
11th September 1822
Reference Numbert18220911-157
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence; Not Guilty
SentenceDeath; Death; Death

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1300. FRANK PURDOM , WILLIAM CORBETT , alias WATSON , JOSEPH CORBETT , alias WATSON , and JOHN WATSON , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Crawley , at St. Mary, Whitechapel, about ten o'clock in the night of the 30th of July , with intent to steal, and stealing, one watch, value 3 l.; fifteen sovereigns; forty crowns; eighty half-crowns; two hundred shillings, and two hundred sixpences , his property.

THOMAS CRAWLEY . I rent a house in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane, in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel . On Tuesday the 30th of July, I was at home. I do not know whether my window was up or down. The window is down a gateway, on the first floor. I saw it three hours before half open. Eliza Press alarmed me about half-past nine o'clock - it was dark then, and rained. I heard there was a man up the gateway with a ladder. I went out at the side door, looked at the window, and saw a light in the room. I called out,

"Is that Mary?" nobody answered - I called again loudly, and heard a man behind outside whistle, and call

"Grover;" I looked back and saw the man; then looked at the window, and saw the back of a strange man in the room - I hollowed out Murder! that I was robbed, and that it was other people's property, and not mine. The man jumped out of the window, which is about twelve feet from the ground - I caught him in my arms, and to the best of my knowledge it was William Corbett - he struggled with me; others came to his assistance, I think two persons - they laid hold of my legs, and pulled me down, and with their assistanc he got away. I held him about a minute, and believe that to be the man (pointing to William Corbett ) - I think as far as my knowledge leads me, that he is the man. I was shoved and lugged about by them; but not struck with any violence. They all went off together, and I pursued calling Stop thief! as I ran down the yard, he looked back close to a lamp, and I saw his features, and heard money jingling in his coat pocket. They got away but were stopped that night. I saw Purdom and the two Corbetts in custody between twelve and one o'clock that night, and knew all three of them to be the men. William Corbett came out of the house, and Joseph Corbett and Purdom are the men who were outside the house, and ran away with him. I knew their persons before, they lived near me. As I returned from following them, which was in about five minutes - I found Frank Purdom standing in the yard. I seized him and said,

"You are the man who formed this plan" - he said nothing, but tried to get away - I took him into my house, and sent for a constable, who took him. He said nothing at all to it; after he was taken, I went up to the room where I had seen the man, and found my box open; there had been a silver watch, about fifteen sovereigns, about forty crown pieces, about eighty half-crowns, about two hundred shillings, and also about two hundred sixpences. The box was locked. I found it broken open, and the property gone. I had seen it three or four hours before. I found a dark lantern in it, a light. I had

laid the money by for my brewer, who was coming on the 1st of August. I settle with him once a month; the prisoners knew that I had laid by the money for the brewer - the three Watsons had seen me take money up to the box several times - they are brothers. When I first went into the house, they were customers there. I have known them upwards of two years. I have heard them say, when the brewer's clerk came for the money, what a swag it was. I have not found either my money or watch. I had never seen the dark lantern before. On the same day before this robbery was committed, I had 35 l. in copper money, and William Watson and Purdom had been in and out, and seen me counting the money, and said, what a swag of money it was! They were coming in and out of the taproom every minute, and could see the money. As I was running down the gateway after the men, Purdom laid hold of my right wrist with his two hands, saying,

"Crawley, what is the matter with you?" I made no answer, but tried to pull myself from him; if he had not stopped me, I should have caught hold of them.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. You keep a public-house in Rosemary-lane - A. Yes; it is called the Bunch of Grapes in the licence; but it is now called the Two Brewers. I caught the man in my arms, as he came from the window. Two others came and got him away. I did not see more than two - they all ran off together; it is dark under the gateway. To the best of my knowledge, William Corbett , from seeing the side of his face in the room, and his make and shape, is the man. I had a full view as I pursued. I knew them all well, and knew where the Corbetts lived.

Q. After pursuing and losing sight of them, you suspected who they were - A. I knew who they were; I saw them up the gateway; I am not mistaken; I was not under the gateway when I was knocked down, and could see them; I had seen Purdom at my house once that night, and saw John Watson and Joseph Graze at the door a few minutes before the robbery standing in the doorway, and told them to go away, and not stop up the doorway; William Corbett was not in my house that night, to my knowledge; he was not in the tap-room when I was under the gateway; the persons ran round the yard which goes into Rosemary-lane; I did not see John Watson about, except a few minutes before the alarm; I never said, that I knew neither of the Watsons were concerned; nor did I tell the Magistrate that the man called Grover three times instead of once. Mine is a regular and good house, it was a bad one when I first went to it, but since I have been there I have got rid of the people who resorted there, till within the last month; Purdom has resorted there eight or nine weeks; he laid hold of my hands as I was pursuing them; I had settled with my brewer on the 4th of July, and paid him every thing, which was 100 l.; I was the first person who went into the room. I always kept the key of the box - nobody else had access to it, or knew what was in it; my servants knew money was kept there. Anybody in the back yard could see into the room, as the yard rises - part of the room is over the gateway, and the window is nearly over the gateway. I do not think the box could be seen outside - but they could see me going towards it; they saw me send the copper (which I was counting) to the brewer. I told the officers by name who to take - and went with them.

ELIZA PRESS . I live with my parents in White's-yard. Crawley's house is on one side of the gateway, and my father's or the other. I know all the prisoners persons before this. I saw three or four men in the yard - Frank Purdom was one of them; this was about five minutes before the alarm. I saw nothing else. I went and told Crawley three or four men were in the yard - I went home, and directly after, as I was standing at the door, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw Frank Purdom take hold of Thomas Crawley , who was running after some men who were running away; he stopped him for about two or three minutes. Purdom was then on the other side of the way, the others were strangers to me. I picked up a hat under the gateway just by where the window is. The window was open when I went to inform Crawley, and I told him of it. I had not noticed it before that.

Q. If any person jumped from it, would it be in your sight - A. No, unless I was at the back of the house. I should not see them at the front door. My father is a carman - carts are kept in White's-yard.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. After seeing somebody in the yard, you saw some persons run through the gateway; they were strangers - A. Yes, I know all the prisoners.

Q. Crawley ran after the strangers, and when he returned to the gateway he met Purdom - A. Yes. Purdom touched him on the shoulder, and said,

"What is the matter." and then Crawley took him.

COURT. Q. Did you see Purdom attempt to lay hold of Crawley after he came back or before - A. After; and he took him into the public-house.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When you saw the strangers run did you continue at the door till Crawley took Purdom - A. Yes. I believe he touched him but once. I think it was about ten minutes after the alarm. I could not see the persons' faces, and do not know whether they were strangers or not.

SARAH PRESS . I am sister of the last witness. I remember the night of the robbery. I went out for a drop of water, and saw a man go behind a cart, in the carman's yard - I did not see anything else then, and did not know that man then. I went up stairs, and looked out of the window, and saw Frank Purdom go out of the gateway with a ladder in a direction towards the window the thieves entered. I did not see him place it anywhere. I went down stairs, and told my mother. My sister went immediately to Crawley. I had noticed the window about a quarter of an hour before, partly up. I saw nobody but Purdom that I know. I saw two men, but did not know who; they were walking backwards and forwards for about ten minutes. I heard the cry of Stop thief! afterwards, but did not look out of window. I knew Purdom before, by seeing him about for two or three weeks.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. What kind of a coat had he on - A. It was like a frock, which came down only a short way, and was tied, light knee breeches, white stockings, and shoes. The window I was at is on the first floor, over the gateway. I looked down on his head. I did not tell my sister that it was Purdom. I said it was a man; I did not know him behind the cart, but saw that it

was him when he had the ladder; it was a lightish night, and I think the moon was about half; there was light enough to distinguish a person. I could see him very well. Our window is not over the gateway - it is two doors from it. I told nobody about Purdom, till I was at Lambeth-street next morning.

COURT. Q. At the office you said Purdom was the man you saw with the ladder - A. Yes.

MR. PLATT. Q. Was not that after Crawley gave his evidence - A. Yes.

MARY WOOD . I live in Blue Anchor-yard, close to Crawley's house. I had a weekly place at the time of the robbery in Butcher-row, Towerhill. About half-past nine I was in Mrs. Cullum's house, Blue Anchor-yard, sitting by the fire, and heard Crawley call Stop thief! I ran out directly, and saw Billy Watson run up the yard, with some others. I had known him a long time, by his living in the neighbourhood. Crawley was pursuing them - I heard money jingling in Watson's coat pocket, as he ran; it appeared to me as if there was a great deal of money, by the sound. I could not distinguish how many more there were. I told of this on the same night, and gave this account next day before the Magistrate.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was it a dark rainy night - A. It was darkish, but did not rain. The sound appeared to me to be money jingling, and not keys - I thought it was halfpence.

WILLIAM SIGGERSON . I am fifteen years old next March, and live in Blue Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane. I attend the bricklayers. I was at my father's bed room window, ten or twelve yards from the covered passage. I knew the three Watsons, by their resorting to the King of Prussia, public-house. I did not know Purdom. I saw William Watson running up the yard, and Joseph after him. (I had heard no alarm); and a little after, I saw Crawley running up, calling Stop thief! I am quite sure of their persons. Joseph said to William,

"Run it, you b - r," three times. I told Crawley of this next day, before I went to the Justice. I did not know of the robbery till after I saw them running.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Have you ever been in trouble - A. Never. I cannot say they did not come out of Crawley's tap-room.

ELEANOR BRITTON . I live in White's-yard, about ten yards from Crawley's. My husband is a labourer. I came out about half-past nine o'clock at night, with some beer in my hand, and Johnny Watson , the prisoner, stood on the step of Crawley's door - Frank Purdom , who had a light dress on, stood looking in at the window - I knew them before. The window is close to the yard where the carts are kept. I went in with the beer; it was wet that night; I had just pulled my coat off, and as I laid it down I heard Crawley cry out Stop thief! I went outside the court, and went over to a neighbour's house; Crawley was then running down the yard, and when he returned up the yard, he laid hold of Purdom, and took him into the house, until the officers came and took him. I heard him say,

"You rascal, you are one of the thieves who have robbed me this night;" he said,

"No, Mr. Crawley don't say so, when I have been drinking in your house all the night." About half an hour after, William Watson came up to me with a pipe in his mouth, as I stood by my landlord's door, and asked me what was the matter; he walked away and I went in.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. He came up with a pipe in his month as if he had come out of a public-house - A. Yes. I was at my landlord's door, which is about five doors from my own, and nearer to Crawley's. I cannot tell which way he came.

Q. Did you see anybody running before Crawley - A. No. There was a mob gathered round his door. It was rather dark, and there were a good many people about. He came back in about five minutes, having hold of Purdom; I do not think it was more than five minutes, but cannot speak to a few minutes, and will not say it was not ten minutes. I did not know Purdom before; but am sure he is the man, for I looked him full in the face, and when I saw Crawley having hold of him, I said,

"Why that is the man I saw looking through your window when I came out with my beer." I have frequently seen him pass up and down, and had seen him at Crawley's house sometimes; he was not in the house at that time, for as Crawley came back, he said to him,

"Did not you take hold of my two hands, and rescue that man from me;" Purdom said,

"Do not think I have done such a thing, for I have been drinking in your house all night." I had seen him outside looking in at the window.

CATHERINE M'GREE. I live in Blue Anchor-yard. My husband is a labourer in the East India Company's service. My house is about two minutes walk from Crawley's. I know the three Watsons, but do not know Purdom. I was standing at my door, and heard the cry of Stop thief! Three men were running, and Crawley was pursuing them - Joseph Watson was one of them, the other two I could not distinguish. Crawley was crying out Stop thief! they went by my place into Rosemary-lane - I saw Joseph Watson tap one of them on the shoulder, and tell him to keep on straight.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Were they running as fast as they could - A. Yes. It was a star-light night, as well as I can remember. I saw them by the light of the lamp a good distance off. I am positive of him.

THOMAS CRAWLEY re-examined. When the witness Press alarmed me, I was in my door-way, between the taproom and the bar - I could not see in the tap-room room then, but I had been serving there all night.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you seen William Watson there that night - A. In the fore part of the evening he was in and out - the last time I saw him was about four or five o'clock in the skittle ground - I was in the bar; there was not above a dozen persons in the taproom. I was in the tap-room, about five minutes before the girl came. I have a parlour, but nobody was there - five or six people were in a little room at the back of the bar.

MARY MAYNARD . I live in White's-yard, about five doors from Crawley's. As I was going to bed, I looked out at the back window into the cart-yard, and saw a man in a light dress - the yard is no thoroughfare - he was stooping down under a waggon, and in a few minutes after an alarm of robbery was given; I found a ladder under the waggon a few minutes after I heard of the robbery. I knew Purdom's person before; it did not strike me then that it was him, but I thought so afterwards - I attended the second I examination, and he was then dressed in

the same way as the man whom I saw in the yard; it was a light millwrights jacket, and lightish breeches; my house looked into the yard; I never saw a ladder there before that night, it appeared like a lamplighter's ladder. I have known John Watson nearly all his life; I saw him about nine o'clock, standing by Crawley's door; he went into the tap-room. I stood at the door; he came out of the tap-room, and I missed him all in a moment; he did not speak to me.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How far is your bed-room from where you saw the ladder - A. Thirty or forty yards; it was rather cloudy.

Q. If you had not seen Purdom in custody, you would not have thought it was him - A. I do not know that. I do not swear to him. I can swear to his dress; as I knew him so well before, I did not give it a thought that it was him - my attention was not drawn to him then, as there was no alarm.

SAMUEL MILLER . I belong to Lambeth-street office. I was sent for to take charge of Purdom; I saw the ladder found under the waggon in the cart-yard, about twenty yards from the window - it was a light ladder, and long enough to reach to the window; it might be returned to the waggon in half a minute. I went to the house of Watson's mother directly after, in Cable-street, about five minutes walk from Crawley's, and found John Watson in bed with a candle burning. I left him there, as he promised to appear next day - but he did not; he was brought by a Thames police officer to the office some days after. I had heard he was in custody a day or two after the robbery, and had not been to look after him. While we were in the room, Joseph Watson came to his mother's door, and we apprehended him; he denied any knowledge of the robbery; and said he could prove where he was - this was about ten o'clock at night. William Watson was brought into custody next morning by a constable of St. George's. All three were examined together. William Watson was not at home when I went there. I believe he lived with his mother.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You did not take John, considering that he had nothing to do in the in the robbery - A. I did not consider so at that time - he promised to come next morning, but did not.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I went with Miller to Crawley's, and received Purdom in custody - he said nothing to me. I received information, and found a hat on the steps of the corner-house opposite Crawley's, very muddy. I do not know to whom it belonged.

PURDOM'S Defence. (Written). On the night of the robbery, I was asleep in the furthermost box of the taproom, and had been so near an hour and a half, which the landlord well knows. Previous to this the landlord had been in pursuit of some man who he said had robbed him. Presently he rushed into the tap-room with either a sword or poker, and made a rush at me. I ran out of the room - he said I was one who had robbed him. I leave it to you to say whether I should have stopped in the room asleep if I had robbed him.

WILLIAM WATSON 'S Defence. I own to being in the house from seven till near nine, drinking with two gentlemen named Payne and Knightly.

THOMAS PAYNE . I am a tobacco-pipe maker, and live in Crown-court, White's-yard, Rosemary-lane. I was at Crawley's public-house on the night of the robbery - the prisoner, William Corbett , was there. I got there about half-past eight o'clock; he came in after me. I heard Crawley give an alarm of Stop thief! William Corbett was then in the tap-room, in the next settle to me. I am sure he was in the tap-room when the alarm was given.

COURT. Q. When were you applied to to give evidence - A. One day last week; I knew William Corbett had been taken up for robbing the house.

Q. Did you ever tell Crawley he could not be the person, for he was in the house at the time he called stop thief - A. Yes, I told Mrs. Crawley so that night; I ran to the door immediately on hearing the cry, and saw Crawley come back from towards East Smithfield; I went into the tap-room again.

Q. Was William Corbett in the house then - A. No; he went out the instant the cry was raised. I believe Crawley had hold of somebody when he came back. I did not go out of the house - I was at the door five minutes - I was at the door when he came back.

Q. How came you to stay so long at the door when there was a cry of thieves - A. I thought I had no business with it. I stood at the door till Crawley brought that man back.

Q. And you went out the moment you heard the cry - A. Yes; William Corbett went out at the front door by the bar, which is the same door I went out at.

Q. Now, on your oath, did no