Old Bailey Proceedings.
2nd April 1800
Reference Number: 18000402

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Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numberf18000402-1

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THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 2d of APRIL, 1800, and following Days, BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , ESQ. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY, AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1800.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; the Right Honourable LLOYD, Lord KENYON, Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir NASH GROSE, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER, Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

William Sumner ,

John Breasher ,

John Gwillim ,

Samuel Davies ,

John Austin ,

John-Mans Bury ,

Thomas Thompson ,

Edward Penny ,

William Rawdon ,

Thomas Dunning ,

Francis Barker ,

Hugh Gibson .

First Middlesex Jury.

Edward Haley ,

James Winwood ,

Thomas Wackerill ,

Thomas Tupp ,

Henry Delano ,

Thomas Wrightson ,

William Skelton ,

John Cock ,

John-Lewin Newman ,

Thomas Robinson ,

John Bellis ,

George Young .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Essex ,

Thomas Briggs ,

John Weedon ,

William Fisher ,

Thomas Collett ,

Benjamin Barge ,

Stephen Briggs ,

Thomas Church ,

William Colcher ,

William Gee ,

Thomas Young ,

Thomas Evans .

WILLIAM DAVIS.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-1
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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244. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October, 1798 , a hempen sack, value 1s. 6d. and a bushel and a half of onions, value 3s. the property of Harry Stowe .(The case was opened by Mr. Trebeck.)

BENJAMIN POTTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Trebeck. On the 24th of October, 1798, I met the prisoner, about seven in the evening, in Chiswick-lane; he was servant to Mr. Stowe; he had a sack on his back, and when he saw me he threw it into a ditch; I then went up to him, and said, Will, what have you got here, and kicked my foot against it; I said they were onions; yes, master, says he; Mr. Stowe's foreman, Jefferys, was with me, and his son; he said he had them from Russel Bourne , and was going to take them to Joe Bates's; Jefferys's son said, father, this is our sack, it was in our warehouse when we locked the door; I said then we will go to Russel Bourne , and see where he got it from, and then he ran away.

JOHN JEFFERYS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Trebeck. I am foreman to Mr. Stowe, gardener and farmer: On the evening of the 24th of October, 1798, I was with Potts; I met the prisoner about seven o'clock at night; I had locked the door before I came out; when I returned, after I had been with Potts, I missed a sack of onions; I am sure it was my master's sack; he threw it into the ditch, and ran away; I carried them home and kept them for a twelvemonth, till they were quite rotten; the prisoner had worked for me about two months.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along and picked up these onions; I did not throw them into the ditch.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

JOHN NOTT, ROBERT GINGER, JANE NOTT.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-2
VerdictNot Guilty

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245. JOHN NOTT , ROBERT GINGER , and JANE NOTT, otherwise ALLEN , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Harriet Dupree , widow , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 7th of February , with intent the goods therein being to steal, and burglariously stealing a silver salver, value 7l a silver teapot, value 3l. a silver milk-pot, value 20s. two silver salts, value 5s. three silver forks, value 10s. three silver table-spoons, value 15s. a silver teaspoon, value 1s. a silver tea-pot strainer, value 1s. a silver extinguisher, value 1s. a gold thimble, value 5s. an amber snuff-box, value 5s. two gold trinkets, value 10s. a satin gown and petticoat, value 10s. three petticoats, value 15s. a shawl, value 15s. two cloaks, value 21s. four Bank-notes, value 40l. two other Bank-notes, value 10l. and six other Banknotes, value 6l. the property of the said Harriet.

The charge not being brought home to the prisoners, they were All Three ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

CATHERINE RAFFEEDY.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-3
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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246. CATHERINE RAFFEEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , seven yards of muslin, value 17s. the property of Charles Scott , privately in his shop .

CHARLES SCOTT sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in Cranbourn-street, Leicester-fields : On Monday the 24th of March, the prisoner at the bar and another woman with a child came into my shop, about three o'clock in the afternoon; I was in a back-parlour at the farther end of the shop; I stepped forward and set two seats for them; I walked back into the parlour; my young man was serving behind the counter; about ten minutes afterwards my young man informed me that he had missed a piece of muslin; the prisoner was then in the shop; I turned up her cloak, and there I found the muslin, with her gown-tail over it; I am sure it is my property.

THOMAS MALLAND sworn. - I am a constable:(produces the property;) I received it from Mr. Scott.

Scott. This is the same muslin that I found under the arm of the prisoner; it is mine.

JOHN WEBSTER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Scott: The prisoner and another woman with a child came into the shop; the other woman asked to look at some muslin; I shewed her some, and it was not the sort she wanted; I shewed her two or three pieces; she bought a quarter of a yard; the prisoner was very close to the counter; I turned round to cut off a quarter of a yard, and I saw her with her hands under her cloak, which gave me a suspicion; the prisoner wanted to look at some calico, and while she was looking at the calico I looked over the muslins, piece by piece, and missed the first piece I had shewn the other woman; I did not say any thing till I had cut some calico; by that time Mr. Scott came into the shop, and I told him I missed some muslin; I looked over the

wrapper again, but could not find it; I then said to the prisoner, I believe you have got it; she said, no, she had not; Mr. Scott then opened her cloak and I saw it under her cloak; this is the same piece of muslin. GUILTY. (Aged 36.)

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

EDWARD DAVIS.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-4
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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247. EDWARD DAVIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jessica Davies , about the hour of four, in the night of the 26th of February , with intent the goods therein being to steal, and burglariously stealing a muslin handkerchief, value 9d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6d. a piece of patch-work, value 6d. a counterpane, value 15s. two window-curtains, value 1l. 10s. a pair of buckles, value 10s. a ring, value 1l. two silver tea-spoons, value 4s. a gold pen, value 5s. a bracelet, value 4s. and two china mugs, value 2s. the property of the said Jessica.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JESSICA DAVIES sworn. - I live at Haverstock-hill , in the road to Hampstead; I let lodgings; at the time of the robbery I had no lodgers: On Ash-Wednesday I left the house in a perfect state of security, the key of the street-door, and the key of the garden-wicket, I put in my pocket; I did not return to the house till the 9th of March; I took the keys out of my pocket to unlock the garden-gate and found the door open, the street-door open, the parlour-door open, and the articles mentioned in the indictment gone, and the drawers turned topsy-turvey; I saw, at Worship-street, a half-handkerchief, a pair of stockings, and a piece of patch-work of mine; I have not seen the other things since; the house had been plundered, to the best of my knowledge, to the amount of between two and three hundred pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You have an indictment against other persons for stealing part of the things you lost from your house? - A. Yes, I have.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the officers belonging to Worship-street: I apprehended the prisoner at the bar, Mason and Ray were with me, on Sunday the 9th of March, at his lodgings in Plumbtree-court, Shoe-lane; he was in bed; and by the bed-side, in a bag, were these four iron crows; in a cupboard, in the same room, these two little crows, a dark-lantern with a candle in it, and thirty-one picklock keys, (produces them); on the 18th of the same month, these crows were delivered to Mason, and I received them again of him,

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You had taken Wright, the accomplice, some time before? - A. Yes, three days.

Q. He told you where to find these things? - A. Yes.

PETER MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was with Armstrong: There was some patchwork in the prisoner's lodgings which we did not take then, but went a day or two afterwards and took it; there was a net night-cap which Mrs. Davies owned; on the 18th of March, I went to her house at Hampstead, and tried these crows, they exactly fitted the front door, and there is the mark of the paint of the door-post on them; I myself opened the beauset, in the front parlour, with this picklock-key.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner's wife was taken up, and discharged? - A. Yes.

Q.And this piece of patch-work remained in her possession for two or three days afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q.So that she might have disposed of it, if she had supposed it improperly come by? - A. Yes.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.(Produces a piece of patch-work, and a pair of stockings): On the 9th of March I went with Armstrong and Mason, and saw a piece of patch-work; on the 11th I went again, and Mrs. Davis told me where she had carried it to; I went and got it.(Produces it).

Mrs. Davies. This is my property, it has my mark upon it.

Ray. I also found in the prisoner's apartment a number of duplicates, and among them a handkerchief for nine-pence; the pawnbroker is here.

THOMAS COTTERELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a pawnbroker: I took in this handkerchief of a woman, I cannot say who it was.

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I know the prisoner, and I know Mrs. Davies's house at Haverstock-hill: On Monday the 24th of February, I went with the prisoner to look for a house; we walked past the house, and saw it shut up; we went again the next day, and saw it shut up again; then we put some pebblestones in the door, by the post, to know whether any body came in or out; we went there again on the Wednesday morning between four and five, we found the stones in the door as we left them, and Davis unlocked the wicket-door with one of his picklock-keys; then we both of us went into the court-yard to the door of the house; Davis tried his picklock-keys to undo the door of the house, and they would not fit; then we came away from the door, and put some stones in, and bolted the garden-door; then we went away, and returned again on Thursday morning about four o'clock,

we found then that the stones were out; then Davis unbolted the garden-door, and went to the street-door, and opened it with the rooks; then Davis and I went into the passage, and Davis pulled out some phos, and lit a candle; then he pulled some keys out of his pocket, and with one of them he undid the parlour-door; then we went to the beauset, and took two silver tea-spoons out, a muslin handkerchief, a pair of cotton stockings, a counterpane, two window-curtains, a piece of patchwork, a pair of buckles, a ring, a gold pen, a bracelet, and two china mugs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Will you swear that the patch-work was taken that night? - A. I cannot swear it.

Q.You went there several nights with other persons? - A. Yes.

Q. It is rather extraordinary what Davis took you for, he did all, and you looked on? - A.He took me with him to help.

Q. How came such an honest fellow as you to get into such bad company - you were an honest industrious labourer? - A. I had been concerned in some robberies.

Q. You told the officers where you found these things that have been produced? - A. Yes.

Q.You did not leave them at Davis's lodgings yourself I dare say? - A. No.

Q.If you had not swore something against somebody you might have been hung yourself? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. Wright came to me, and said, I must be out of the way for a dog, the officers were oat to take me; and he brought these keys to my place, and left them there; I never was near this house with him; he gave the patch-work to my wife, and the crows and dark-lantern; and he gave her the handkerchief to pawn, I was ill in bed at the time.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 23.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

JOHN HANSON.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-5
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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248. JOHN HANSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , six hen fowls, value 10s. and one cock fowl, value 1s. the property of Elizabeth Vaughan .(The case was opened by Mr. Vaillant).

CHARLES SIMMONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. On Monday the 3d of March, about six o'clock in the morning, just on the other side of Gunnersbury-lane, I saw the prisoner with a barrow, I was sure it was Hanson; I went up to him, says I, Jack, you have got to the old trade; no master, says he, I have not, I am going to London with some things for my wife; I said, I doubt you have been at the old trade, you had better have left it off; I told him I insisted upon seeing what he had before I left him; I walked with him some distance, and then he said he would tell me the truth; he told me he had got some fowls that he had bought at Chertsey-market; I said, Chertsey-market was on a Wednesday; and asked him why he had not disposed of them before; he said, he had bought them of Towers, of Purbright; I then took out my pocket-book and pencil, and put it down; he said Mr. Phillips, of Richmond, knew him; I said, it is a lame story, John; I walked on to Turnham-green, where I saw some more people, and I stopped him, and searched his baskets; there were four hens in the upper basket, and nine in the lower; he wanted to go to Walham-green; I got a constable, and took him into custody, and he was taken to Bow-street; I took the fowls to the constable's house, and found them quite warm; I took the fowls from Bow-street to Twickenham, sealed with my seal.

EDWARD BENSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am servant to Mrs. Vaughan, Montpellier-row, Twickenham; she lost five hens and a cock, on Sunday night, or Monday morning the 3d of March; I afterwards saw them again at Mr. Simmons's.

Prisoner's defence. I received the fowls from a man at Kew-bridge, to fell for him.

GUILTY . (Aged 49.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

JOHN BARNETT, JOHN COLLEY.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-6
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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249. JOHN BARNETT alias JACOB FARROW , and JOHN COLLEY , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Green , about the hour of seven in the night of the 26th of December , and burglariously stealing a silver watch, value 30s. a steel chain, value 2d. a glass seal, value 2d. a pair of silver salts, value 16s. two silver table-spoons, value 16s. four silver teaspoons, value 4s. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 4s. a pair of plated sugar-tongs, value 6d. a pepper box, value 5s. eighty-five guineas, a Banknote, value 20l. another Bank-note, value 2l. and another Bank-note, value 1l. the property of the said Charles.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

MARY GREEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of Charles Green: On the 26th of December last, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I went out; I live at Stepney , my husband is a journeyman butcher , he went out early in the morning; I fastened the door, windows, and all; I returned about seven o'clock, and found the window-shutters broke open; they had tried the door in two

places, and broke the window; I went into the front room, and looked at my beauset, and missed a pair of silver salts, a silver pepper-box, two tablespoons, four tea-spoons, and a pair of tea-tongs; I went up stairs into the chamber, I missed a silver watch, and my money, there was about a hundred and five, or a hundred and seven pounds, in cash and notes; I sent for my husband immediately, and he came home.

JOHN COOKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell-office, (produces a silver watch, a pair of silver salts, two tablespoons, four tea-spoons, a silver pepper-castor, and a pair of silver tea-tongs:) I received these things from Jacob Jiggett, on Monday the 17th of February, in Essex-street, Whitechapel; I have had them ever since.

Mrs. Green. These are all my husband's property.

Cooke. I apprehended Barnett at the White Lion in Shadwell; Holebrooke and I detained him, and charged him on suspicion of divers robberies; Robus was not apprehended by any person; he came forwards voluntarily, and was admitted an evidence for the Crown.

JACOB JIGGETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a weaver; I keep a house in Essex-passage, Essex-street, Whitechapel: These are the same things that I delivered to Cook, the officer, the day after Christmas-day; the two prisoners and Solomon Robus came to me altogether with this property; they offered to sell it me; they said I could always make my own money again; they asked five shillings and sixpence an ounce; they pulled out some money and Bank-notes, and shared twenty-six guineas a-piece; they shewed me the Bank-notes, there were three or four; I said I was no scholar, and I could not tell what they were; and they put them back into their pockets; about two months afterwards Cook came to my house, and I delivered the things to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Did Cook apprehend you? - A. Yes, and I have been in prison ever since.

Q.Were not you surprised when you saw the guineas? - A. Yes.

Q.Then you refused to buy the things, I suppose? - A. No.

Q.Then you gave information to the Magistrate, the next day? - A. No, I did not.

Q.How long have you been a weaver? - A. Since I was twelve years of age.

Q.Did you ever happen to be in trouble? - A. Yes, I was tried once in this Court.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What might you be tried for? - A. For manslaughter, and acquitted.

SOLOMON ROBUS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I went with the two prisoners to Mr. Green's at Stepney, on boxing-day at night, between seven and eight in the evening; we wrenched open the window-shutters with an iron crow; Jacob Farrow got in at the window, and Colley and I stood watching about the window; Farrow, brought down eighty-five guineas in gold, and a twenty-pound Bank of England note, a two-pound note, and a one-pound note; a silver watch, and two large table-spoons; four silver tea-spoons, two silver salts, a silver pepper-box, and a pair of silver sugar-tongs; they were sold to Mr. Jiggett; we shared the money between us at Jiggett's; twenty-six guineas a-piece; the notes were saved till the next morning; we offered to sell them to Jiggett, and he could not read them; we sold him the silver.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You offered to sell the notes to Jiggett, did you? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you ask him for them? - A.Nothing at all.

Q. Did he ask you how you got the notes? - A. No.

Q. You have been in custody yourself ever since you were first taken? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You have been twice tried and acquitted? - A. Yes.

Barnett's defence. Jiggett makes it a practice to come up every sessions to prosecute men.

Barnett, GUILTY , Death . (Aged 23.)

Colley, GUILTY Death. (Aged 20.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

WILLIAM CAMPTON.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-7
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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250. WILLIAM CAMPTON , alias DAY , was indicted for that he, in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, on the 28th of December , in and upon John Gurney did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a half-guinea, a seven-shillings piece, and a Bank-note, value 5l. the property of the said John.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN GURNEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to John Wigstead , Esq. On the 28th of December I was sent with a load of hay to Whitechapel-market; it was sold for six pounds; I received the money; Thomas Smith , the carter to Mr. Nixon, was with me; I went with him into Mr. Brown's, and had a pint of beer.

Q.Did you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; I had seen him on the Tuesday in the Christmas week; he came into Brown's house, and Smith asked him to drink out of our pint of beer; he had a sinock frock on; I had a good deal of talk with him; he asked me if that was not Mr. Wigstead's team, I told him it was; I pulled my money out, and said I did not think Mr. Brown had settled

right for the hay; he looked at the Bank-note, and gave it me again; I went to Shoreditch-church, and left him in the house; he asked me where I was going with my hay; I told him to London-wall; I went on as far as Enfield-park by the side of my horses; it was not very dark; the prisoner came up to me with another man, and the other man up'd with a stick and knocked me down, and he fell upon me; then the prisoner came up, and picked my pocket.

Q. How far was he from the other man when he knocked you down? - A. A very little way, about as far as I am from you; he pulled my purse out of my pocket; there was a 5l. Bank-note, a seven-shilling piece, a half-guinea, and two shillings; he gave the other man the purse, and he got off me; then the prisoner came up to me again, and felt in my pocket again; he put his hand against my watch, and said, d-n you, here lies your money now, and he took out a loose sixpence that was in my pocket; then he laid hold of my hand, and said, young fellow, good night; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Did you say, before the Magistrate, that the prisoner was the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sober at this time? - A. Yes, as sober as ever I was in my life.

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am carter to Mr. Nixon: I went with Gurney as far as the Park-gate; the prisoner was drinking with us at Brown's house; I know nothing of the robbery.

JOHN ELLISON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I apprehended the prisoner at the Three Jolly Butchers, at Newington; he tried to get away from me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. He lives at Stoke-Newington, and there it was that you apprehended him? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I am a labouring man , and live at Newington; I was at home all that week ill.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 32.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

THOMAS ROBINSON, THOMAS JOHNSON, JACOB LAUGHER, THOMAS BUNYAN, JAMES WITHERS.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-8
VerdictNot Guilty

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251. THOMAS ROBINSON , THOMAS JOHNSON , JACOB LAUGHER , THOMAS BUNYAN , and JAMES WITHERS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , a heifer, value 12l. the property of Martha Flack .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM SAMUEL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a labouring man, I am servant to Mr. Flack, of Waters-place: I was driving a heifer of his mother's on Sunday the 2d of March, Hall was with me; we got to Islington , and there these young chaps set the dogs at the beasts, and the heifer was separated from the rest; it was driven to St. John's-street.

Court. Q. How many did your herd of cattle consist of? - A.Four sheep, and one heifer.

Court. It would be too much, in this case, to say it is a felony; Gentlemen, you must acquit the prisoners.

All Four NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

ANN DENNIS.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-9
VerdictGuilty > theft under 40s
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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252. ANN DENNIS, otherwise SUSANNAH DREW , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , ten curtains, value 1l. 10s. two counterpanes, value 10s. three petticoats, value 5s. an apron, value 2s. a frock, value 1s. three child's petticoats, value 3s. a cradle quilt, value 1s. two yards of muslin, value 5s. a night-gown, value 2s. three sheets, value 15s. a table-cloth, value 5s. three yards of lace-edging, value 2s. three yards of dimity, value 4s. and two pair of plated candlesticks, value 2s. the property of George Diggles , in the dwelling-house of Robert Diggles .

GEORGE DIGGLES sworn. - I live in Pump-court, in the Temple; I am the son of Robert Diggles , who lives in Dean's-yard, Westminster : I lost various articles from my father's, from the latter end of July to the 5th of December; I went out of town in September, or October, and on my return, I found the things missing, (ripeats the articles mentioned in the indictment); the prisoner was servant to me, in the capacity of nursery maid; I sent her to my father's with the child while I was in the country; I did not suspect the prisoner till some time after; she gave me some duplicates, by which means I found my property at the pawnbroker's.

SAMUEL- WILLIAM CHANNEREAU sworn. -I am a pawnbroker in the Great Sanctuary, Westminster: The prisoner at the bar pledged a number of goods with me. (Produces them.)

Mrs. DIGGLES sworn. - These articles are my husband's property.

Prisoner's defence. When Mr. Diggles charged me, Mr. Hindes was present.

For the Prisoner.

- HINDES sworn. - Mr. Diggles sent for me to go with him to Dean's-yard, Westminster; that his servant had robbed him, and he had me to go with him, which I did; there were about eighty-one duplicates taken from her; Mr. Diggles said, it was a dangerous piece of business, he must hang her; there were a quantity of ribbons and things, and I sealed up the trunk, and left it; I went to the Broad Sanctuary, and Mr. Diggles said, if she

will redeem them once within a month, then she may go at large; I never took her into custody at all. GUILTY. (Aged 25.)

Confined eighteen months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

WILLIAM ELLWOOD.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-10
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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253. WILLIAM ELLWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a wether sheep, value 30s. the property William Sherborn .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM SHERBORN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a farmer at Bedfont : I missed a wether sheep from a field, on the 15th of March; soon after six o'clock in the morning, my shepherd informed me of it; I went and observed that a sheep had been killed about twenty yards from the field; suspicion fell upon the prisoner; I got a search-warrant, and went to his house directly, he was not at home; we found the head and pluck in a chest of drawers, and the four quarters up stairs; I then sent my man to take the prisoner; I found the skin close by where the sheep had been killed, the skin had my marks upon it; I compared the skin with the carcass, and it tallied exactly; there was a piece of sat off of each shoulder in the skin, and when I looked at the carcass, I found Just such a piece out.

- WELLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I informed my master that I missed a sheep, and he came and found the place where it had been killed, and then I went and apprehended the prisoner; the skin was compared with the carcass, and it fitted; the prisoner said he had found it.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to get a bundle of wood, and found it in a sack.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 38.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

ROBERT GOODWIN, DENNIS GREEN, WILLIAM GOODWIN.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-11
VerdictsGuilty
SentencesDeath; Transportation

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254. ROBERT GOODWIN , DENNIS GREEN , and WILLIAM GOODWIN , were indicted, the first two for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Holdsworth , about the hour of two in the night of the 22d of February , and burglariously stealing a silver gravy-spoon, value 5s. four silver table-spoons, value 10s. two silver desert-spoons, value 2s. five silver tea-spoons, value 3s. a silver wine strainer, value 3s. a silver skewer, value 2s. a silver toast-rack, value 10s. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 10s. a silver pencil-case, value 1s. a cloth surtout-coat, value 1s. a cloth surtout-coat, called a spencer, value 1s. a man's hat, value 1s. a boy's hat, value 1s. a pair of leather boots, value 1s. a tea-chest, value 2s. seven linen table cloths, value 7s. five linen napkins, value 5s. two linen sheets, value 2s. a linen shift, value 2s. three cotton handkerchiefs, value 1s. three pounds of bacon, value 1s. and three pounds of starch, value 1s. the property of the said Benjamin; and William Goodwin for receiving, on the 24th of February , a silver toast-rack, value 10s. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 10s. part of the before-mentioned goods, knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

BENJAMIN HOLDSWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On the 22d of February, I went to bed a little after ten o'clock, the windows and doors were fastened; my servant alarmed me in the morning about seven o'clock, I got up, and missed the articles mentioned in the indictment, (repeats them); I had pulled off the great coat that day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you speak of the house being fastened of your own knowledge, or from the information of the servant? - A. I put out the fire, and I observed that the bolt of the lock of the kitchen-door was put in a little way, but not sufficient to resist; I saw it in a little way, but I cannot say how much; that was the door where they must have got in.

ELIZABETH WEBSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am cook to Mr. Holdsworth: I bolted the back kitchen-door on the 22d of February, before I went to bed; I got up the next morning about seven o'clock, and found the back door open; I went into the kitchen, and missed a pair of sheets, and some table-cloths, but I cannot say how many, and some napkins; I then went up stairs and informed my master of it.

FRANCES HUMPHREYS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Mr. Holdsworth: I cleaned four silver table-spoons, and a silver gravy-spoon, about ten o'clock at night; the 22d of February I put them in the knife-box, in the parlour; in the morning I found the lid of the box open, and they were gone.

WILLIAM CROUCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a pawnbroker, in Ray-street, Clerkenwell: On Monday the 24th of February, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, William Goodwin , came to me to pledge a silver toast-rack, and a pair of silver sugar-tongs,(produces them); he wanted 14s. on them; I looked at them, and saw a crest on the tongs; I asked him if they were his own; and he said they were; that he kept a house in Penton-street, Pentonville; I asked him what they cost him; and he said, the toast-rack cost him thirty five shillings, and the tongs fifteen shillings; he said, where he bought them he had the mark put on them, but he could not tell what the mark was; I sent for an officer,

and he was apprehended; I went to Hatton-garden office, and there he said that his brother gave them to him to make money of; he was committed for further examination.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.He made no resistance at all, but went very quietly? - A. Yes, he did.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden: I apprehended Robert Goodwin, and Green, in Daubigne's-placo, Pentonville; William Goodwin told me that was where Green lodged; I found Robert Goodwin , and Green, in bed, with another man, the next morning; I found a spencer, some table-linen, sheets, and some bacon, (produces them); the table-linen, and the sheets, I found between the sacking of the bed and the bed, and the other things I found in different parts of the room; I told them what we were come for, and Goodwin said to Green, we are dead men; then we took them to the office.

LEVI OBURNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I made a second search at the prisoner's lodgings: I found a quantity of plate in a hole in the wall, tied up in this handkerchief. (Produces it).

Mr. Holdsworth. The plate has my crest upon them; I know them to be mine.

Webster. This table-linen is my master's.

Mr. Gurney. Q.It was day-light when you came down in the morning? - A. Yes.

SAMUEL BURROW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I took William Goodwin from Mr. Crouch's, to the office; he begged me not to go to the office, he would give me any thing rather than I should take him to the office; he said his brother lived next door.

The prisoner Robert Goodwin called Captain Hawes , who had known him four months as a foldier in the West London militia, and gave him a good character.

Robert Goodwin , GUILTY Death . (Aged 20.)

Dennis Green, GUILTY Death. (Aged 19.)

William Goodwin , GUILTY. (Aged 23.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

THOMAS SMITH, SYLVESTER SMITH.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-12
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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255. THOMAS SMITH and SYLVESTER SMITH were indicted for that they, on the 11th of March , in the King's highway, in and upon Joseph Levien did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a gold watch, value 20l. a gold watch-chain, value 2l. a gold watch-key, value 5s. a silk purse, value 6d. and five guineas and six shillings, in monies numbered , the property of the said Joseph.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOSEPH LEVIEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On the 11th of March I was coming from Slough to London in a post-chaise and four, I was stopped by two men with white handkerchiefs over their faces; one of them demanded my purse; I instantly put my hand in my pocket, and gave him my purse; he had a pistol in his hand; they were both at the same door of the chaise; the purse contained five guineas, a shilling with a mark upon it that I took at Bristol, and another Queen Anne's shilling; they asked me for my pocket-book; I told them I was just come from France, that I had been a prisoner in France, and had no pocket-book; one of them d-'d my eyes, and said, if I did not immediately deliver it, he would blow my brains out; he told me not to palaver; I then repeated that I had no pocket-book; he then demanded my watch, which I gave him; it was a gold watch, with a gold chain, and a gold key; he then desired me to give him more money; I told him I had no more money; he told me to make haste; one of the post-boys turned round, I think, and told them they had better take care, there was a chaise coming up, or a stage; they answered they did not care; I then gave them some more money, it was silver; I then gave them an order upon Mr. Robert Kingston for four guineas, in favour of myself; they asked me again if I had no more money; I told them, no; then they wished me a good night, and God bless me; I have no knowledge of their persons at all, the transaction was so sudden; I wanted the post-boys to proceed with me to Bow-street, but they would not; I went to Hounslow and got fresh horses, and drove to Bow-street; I was robbed about two o'clock; I was very quickly at Bow-street; I saw my watch after at Bow-street; I am sure it was the same that was taken from me; I scratched my name in it with my own hands; I also saw the same purse that I had lost, yesterday, at Hicks's-hall; I had also produced to me a part of the order that I gave to the persons that robbed me.

RICHARD COOPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am stable-keeper at the Red-lion, Tottenham-court-road: The day before the robbery the prisoner, Thomas Smith , came to our yard, and hired two horses, for his master and himself, to go to Hampstead; he was to lead one, and ride the other, and to return the next day, about the middle of the day; I had often seen him at the yard.

HENRY WARE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am ostler at the Black-dog at Bedfont: On the 10th of March the two prisoners came to our house between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; the horses that I have seen since were the horses that they came to our house upon; they asked if I had got two good stalls for the horses, and asked if a

Mr. Edwards had changed there with four horses, and I told them, no; to the best of my knowledge they are the same persons; they went away about seven in the morning.

WILLIAM SCARLETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am waiter at the Black-dog: The two prisoners slept at our house the night before the robbery; one of them has got his finger off; his glove was on, but the finger of the glove was dropping.

MARY TILLIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of William Tillier, a shepherd, at Heston: I saw Thomas Smith, on the 11th of March, at ten o'clock, at eleven, and half an hour after one o'clock, and another gentleman, riding backwards and forwards by Butchers' Grove; Heston-lane goes up to Butchers' Grove, upon Hounslow-heath; my house is at the bottom of the lane; the gentleman that was with him was a taller man, a head or better, as he sat upon the horse; the last time I saw them they were coming from Butchers' Grove as hard as they could come by; coming up the hill one of their horses flagged; I saw nothing particular but the horse, and the black whiskers the man had got by the side of his head; and they had white handkerchiefs up to their mouths, or over their faces, I cannot be sure which; I observed them as they went along, pulling the handkerchiefs off from their faces and tuck them into their pockets, half in and half out.

GEORGE WATSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am just turned of sixteen years old: I picked up a purse in the hedge, in Beggar's-lane, the day of the robbery, between two and three o'clock; Beggat's-lane leads to Sudbury-green, about a mile on this side of Harrow; Mr. Crocker and Taylor came down to our house, and I gave it to them; I saw two gentlemen in Greenford-green tearing some pieces of paper; one was taller than the other; but I cannot tell who they were; I did not pick any of them up; but some days after I picked up some near the same place, and gave them to my father; my father is here.

JOHN WATSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. My little boy gave me some pieces of paper; I picked up two pieces myself, and he picked up the rest. (Produces them.)

SARAH MIDDLETON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of William Middleton; we keep the Swan, at Sudbury-green, two miles from Harrow, near London; I saw one of the prisoners once, and the other three times, before I saw them at Bow-street; they were together at my house the day before the robbery was committed; they were on horseback, they had a glass of brandy a-piece, the horses were very warm.

Mr. Levien. I know this to be part of the same order that I gave them, when I was robbed; here is my name in my hand-writing.

WILLIAM ADAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at the Swan, at Sudbury-green; the day of the robbery, I saw the two prisoners there together, about three o'clock; I have seen the horses since, and know them to be the same.

SARAH HOWARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of Thomas Howard ; I keep a public-house at Willsden, about five miles from Tyburn; the two prisoners stopped there and drank, they were on horseback.

THOMAS GATES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a labourer, I live at the Castle, Child's-hill, in the parish of Hendon, across the Harrow road; I saw the two prisoners there on the day of the robbery, about four o'clock in the afternoon, they staid about half an hour or rather better; I am quite certain they are the persons.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a patrole belonging to Bow-street; in consequence of information, I went to Paddington-turnpike; I apprehended Thomas Smith , about six o'clock in the evening of the day of the robbery; I saw him first coming down the Harrow-road, towards the Paddington-gate, he had another with him; they did not come down to the gate, but hurried off short by the White-lion, and went up Bell-lane; I, and Smith, and Taylor, ran round and met them; Smith and I stood at the side of a watch-box, Taylor walked along the path, Smith walked up towards them, and immediately seized Sylvester Smith 's horse's bridle, John Smith holloaed out, grab; Thomas Smith rushed forwards past me on horseback, Sylvester Smith's horse was loose, he jumped off his horse, I immediately mounted it, and pursued Thomas Smith down the New-road, from Paddington, into Portland-road, and from thence into Titchfield-street, and there I seized him; he struggled with me, and struck at me several times with this stick, (produces it;) I had a cutlass, with which I struck at him; I apprehended him, it was three or four minutes before any body would assist me; I took him to Mr. Carpmeal's, in Bow-street; I searched him there, and in his side-pocket, I found this dagger; in his outside great-coat pocket, I found this pistol loaded; in his great-coat pocket I found some bullets, and flints, and powder; I found on his neck a white handkerchief, and in his pocket, this white handkerchief, with a knot in it as you see it now; in searching his sob, I found this watch.

Mr. Levien. This is the watch I lost on that day; I am positive it is mine.

Crocker. I found in his breeches, between six guineas and a half, and some gold in his waistcoat, a half-guinea and some silver; in his right-hand

boot, a half-crown and one shilling, and in his coat-pocket I found this Welch-wig. (Producing it.)

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was with Crocker, at Paddington-gate; Taylor and I pursued Sylvester Smith ; I made him dismount, I secured the horse, and cried grab; he directly ran into a field, and I pursued him; he had a pistol in his hand; he threw his pistol away when I got close to him, and a white handkerchief; I picked up the pistol, and said, Sylvy, is it loaded, and he said it was not; I told him, he might as well tell me if it was, and then he said it was; I had known him before. (Crocker produced the purse.)

Mr. Levien. This is the purse that I lost on that day.

Sylvester Smith 's defence. I know nothing at all of it.

Thomas Smith 's defence. I saw two men riding speedily, with handkerchiefs, and afterwards this man came up and asked me to give him a list, as I had a led horse, which I did; I picked up the watch in the ditch; he is quite innocent of the robbery for any thing that I know.

Thomas Smith, GUILTY Death . (Aged 27.)

Silvester Smith, GUILTY Death. (Aged 39.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

ANN EVANS.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-13
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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256. ANN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , a sheet, value 3s. three aprons, value 3s. and a child's bedgown, value 1s. the property of Robert Levitt .

MARY LEVITT sworn. - My father is a bootmaker , No. 3, Packman's-court, Chandos-street ; between five and six o'clock on Sunday evening, the 23d of February, I had been of an errand, and as I was coming down the steps next door, I saw the prisoner come out at our door, the door shut after her with a pulley, she had a very large bundle in her lap; I asked her what she had got, and where she had been; she told me she had been up to the lodgers, and then she ran away, I ran after her and lost sight of her; then I came home, and went down into the kitchen, and saw that all the things were gone off the line, they were all there when I went out; the next morning I got up, and went out to see if I could see her at any of the old iron-shops, selling the things; I saw her go into a baker's shop, I am sure the prisoner is the same person, I knew her by sight before; I desired them to detain her while I fetched my father; she got away from the gentleman, and ran down the street; I called stop thief, and she was pursued and taken.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - On the 24th of February, I was sent for to come to Mr. Levitt's who gave me charge of the prisoner; I began to search her, and in the left-hand sleeve of her gown, I found a half-crown piece, two shillings and a penny; and in her pocket I found two shillings and three halfpence, in copper; Levitt then gave me six pieces of duplicates, and I put them together, they make two duplicates, and I put them together and two more duplicates; Levitt said, he picked them up close down by her side; I then went to Mr. Salkeld's in the Strand; one of the duplicates was for a child's bed-gown and a sheet, the other was belonging to a Mr. Howgill, a pawnbroker, for two apons.

ROBERT LEVITT sworn. - I picked up the pieces of duplicates by the side of the prisoner in my passage; I gave them to Donaldson, they were torn in five or six pieces.

ROBERT SIMPSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Howgill, Brydges-street, Covent-garden; this is the duplicate that I delivered to the prisoner, (produces a coloured apron and a coarse apron;) I took them in on the 24th of February, from the prisoner at the bar, in the name of Sarah Thomson, St. Martin's-lane.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Salkeld; this is the duplicate I delivered to the prisoner, (produces a coloured apron and a child's gown;) I took them in from the prisoner, on the 24th of February, between eight and nine, in the name of Mary Boyd , Off-alley, in the Strand.(The property was deposed to by Mr. Levitt.

GEORGE HAYNES sworn. - (Produces a sheet;) I took this in of the prisoner at the bar, on the 24th of February; I live with Mr. Brown, in Longacre, she pledged it in the name of Sarah Lake.

Mrs. Levitt. This is not mine, it is one I took in to wash.

Prisoner's defence. There were two men running, and to save my child I stood upon the threshold of the door; I had some coals in my lap.

Mary Levitt . She had no child with her.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY .

confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

LAZARUS JACOBS.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-14
VerdictNot Guilty

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257. LAZARUS JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a flannel waistcoat, value 1s. 6d. a pair of stockings, value 1s. a cradle quilt, value 6d. and two shawls, value 2s. the property of Daniel Jewson , the elder. Two pair of stockings, value 1s. the property of Daniel Jewson , the younger. Two pockets, value 1s. a frock, value 1s. a handkerchief, value 6d. and a petticoat, value 6d. the property of Mary Ann Jewson ; and two frocks, value 3s. a flannel petticoat, value 1s. two bed-gowns, value 1s. a

skirt, value 6d. a pin-a-fore, value 6d. and a pair of worsted stockings, value 3d. the property of Maria-Ann Jewson .(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

ELIZABETH KINGSNORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I have washed for Mr. Jewson three years, he lives in Black Swan-court, Tower-street .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. No, I think it was rather a taller man than that; I was at work in the kitchen; on the 4th of February, I think, on Tuesday, I saw a man's hand take a bundle out of the kitchen, I did not know what it contained, I ran out directly, and cried, stop thief.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of the prisoner till he was taken? - A. I cannot say whether I did or not.

Q. Do you know Mr. Stephens, the butcher? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in Mr. Stephens's custody? - A.No; I saw him take hold of somebody.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and say whether that is the man you saw Stephens take hold of? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you know what coloured coat he had on? - A. No.

THOMAS STEPHENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I keep a butcher's shop in Tower-street, the corner of Black-swan-court: On the 4th of February I heard a cry of stop thief, about half past seven in the evening; I pursued the prisoner at the bar; he was walking when he passed me, but the poor woman that gave the alarm, said, that was the man; she desired me to lay hold of him; I laid hold of him, and he ran from me; I pursued after him, and caught him by the corner of Water-lane, which is opposite Mark-lane, about a hundred yards from Mr. Jewson's house; I never lost sight of him at all, from the time that she said that was the man; when I first saw him he had two bundles in his hand; he threw them away from him after I laid hold of him; he then got away from me, and I followed him again, and caught him; it was a moonlight night; I never lost sight of him; the constable has got the bundles.

ANTHONY WOODLANDS sworn. - I am a constable: (produces two bundles;) I received them from Mr. Stephens, at his shop; I have had them ever since.

Stephens. These are the same bundles that I saw him throw away; Kingsnorth picked up the bundles, and gave them to the constable.

DANIEL JEWSON , sen. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No. 4, Black-lion court: (looks at the bundles;) part of them belong to my children, and the rest to myself.

Prisoner's defence. I have been in the habit of apprehending many persons, and bringing them to justice in this Court; I was coming by this court, and heard the cry of stop thief; I saw a man come out of the court as fast as possible, and throw the bundle down; I caught hold of the bundle to secure it, and followed after him; the butcher who is in Court laid hold of me; I told him I was pursuing the man, and he let me go; I pursued the man, and Stephens then came up again, and knocked the bundle out of my hand; they took me back; I was searched by the constable; I had nothing about me but this handkerchief.

For the Prisoner.

GEO. PINCHES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a boot and shoe-maker: I never saw the prisoner before he was taken up; I was in Tower-street when he was stopped; I went to Mr. Palmer's, to carry a pair of shoes home; I was going past a court where there was a butcher's shop at the corner; I saw a man run out of the court, and I heard a voice crying stop thief; the man that ran out of the court threw the bundle down; then I saw the prisoner pick up the bundle, and the man that threw the bundle down went across the road, and down Water-lane; a butcher stopped him at the end of the court, with the bundle, and let him loose again; then he went after him again, and he would have caught the man that dropped the bundle if the butcher had let him alone; the butcher said he would be d-'d if he would not give him a night's lodging in the Compter; I told him it was the wrong man, but he would not hear any reason.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where does Mr. Palmer live? - A. No. 21, Great George-street, Brick-lane; I live in White-court, Spitalfields; I was going into the Borough afterwards.

Q. What happened to bring you into Tower-street? - A. I was going with Palmer into the Borough.

Q. How long has he been a customer of your's? - A. I never made him but one pair of shoes; he is a watch-maker; he asked me if I would take a walk with him into the Borough; I told him I was going to Mint-street myself.

Q. The invitation came from Palmer to you then? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever take a walk with Palmer before that night? - A.Never; we had been in company before.

Q. You went next day before the Magistrate? - A. No; the business was over before I could get there, or else I would have done the man the service to speak the truth, that I have spoke now.

Q. What time in the evening was it? - A.Nearer seven than six, to the best of my judgment.

Q.Were there many persons in Tower-street at that time? - A. A great number of people.

Q. Were there a great number of people when the man ran away? - A. He was too light-heeled for that.

Q. How came you not to go in pursuit? - A. I was not very well in health that night.

Q. Who sent for you to be a witness here today? - A. I was subpoenaed by that gentleman.(Pointing to the solicitor for the prisoner.)

Q. How came that gentleman to know where you lived? - A. That I cannot tell; Mr. Palmer gave the prisoner his address and mine, at the time.

FRANCIS PALMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a watch-maker, No. 21, Great George-street, Brick-lane, Spitalfields: I was in Tower-street when the prisoner was apprehended; Pinches was with me; he brought me home a pair of shoes; I mentioned that I had some business to do over the water in the King's Bench; he said he had some business over in the Borough, and if it was agreeable to me he would accompany me; as we came through Tower-street a man ran across the way from the court; to the best of my recollection the prisoner at the bar was coming the contrary way; he picked up the bundle and put it under his arm, and he turned short upon his heel and was directly laid hold of; the man let him go again, and he pursued after the man; that was a man considerably taller than the prisoner; and then the prisoner was stopped again; there were several people in Tower-street; the man that ran away went down Water-street; I told the people he was the wrong man, but I might as well have talked to a parcel of mad bulls; I heard somebody talk about giving him a night's lodging in the Compter, and I went to the Compter and made some enquiries, and left my address, and likewise Pinches's address.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you ever walk with your shoe-maker before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever walk into the Borough with him before? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. How often? - A.Never above three times; I have walked with him several times to the Plough in Fore-street, down from my own house.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. About six or seven months.

Q. How lately may he have made any shoes for you? - A. I suppose within these three months.

Q. How many pair has he ever made? - A. I believe two pair, and has mended several pair.

Q. He has not delivered you any shoes later than three months? - A. No.

Q. Was it before Christmas? - A. I cannot say.

Q. He has not delivered you any this year? - A. It may be on this side Christmas, I cannot pretend to say.

Q. It is three months, however, since he delivered you any shoes? - A. Yes.

Q. You were going to the King's Bench? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was Pinches going? - A. I do not know; he came to bring me a new pair of shoes that night.

Q.Was that three months ago? - A. It was on the 4th of February.

Q.Neither you nor Pinches ran after the man? - A. No.

The prisoner called eight other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

JOSEPH POUGHER.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-15
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceDeath

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258. JOSEPH POUGHER was indicted for that he, on the 20th of March , two pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good seven-shilling-piece; and a piece of false and counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good half-guinea; feloniously did put off to one Mary Mead , spinster, at a lower rate and value than the same, by their denomination, imported to be, that is to say, for four shillings in monies numbered .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

MARY MEAD sworn. - Mr. Alley. Q. Your name is Mary Mead? - A. Yes.

Q. How long is it since you were convicted of a felony yourself? - A. About six months.

Mr. Knapp objected to the question.

Mead. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I know the prisoner perfectly well: On the 20th of March last, I went to him in the Fleet-prison , by the direction of Mr. Powell, the agent to the Solicitor of the Mint; Clark and Lawrence went with me, I left them below and went up to the Coffee-gallery; I had in my pocket three half-crown pieces, and three marked shillings; the officers searched me before I went, they were marked by Mr. Clark, I had no other money but that; I then went up to Mr. Pougher's room, I knew him before, he was in bed when I first went in, there was a young lad there about the age of twelve, and an elderly man likewise; I asked Mr. Pougher whether he had any thing, meaning bad money; he said he had not; I asked him when he thought he should have any, and he answered, in the course of half an hour; I told him I was going as far as Shoe-lane, and I would call as I came back again; I came down stairs then, and returned back again in rather better than twenty minutes; Mr. Pougher was there, and

the old man, but not the boy; Pougher was then up; he asked me if I would have any thing to drink; I drank a glass with him; I then asked him whether he had any thing, and he said, yes; he asked me what I wanted; I said, some of each, some half-guineas and some seven-shilling-pieces; then he gave me a bit of paper with eight seven-shilling-pieces in it, out of the eight I took three, and then I gave the three marked shillings for them; then I asked him if he had any half-guineas, and he said he had a parcel in the room underneath him; he said, he expected them in every minute; very shortly after, I saw a man's hand put through the door, with a brown paper parcel in it; I staid in the room till the officers came up, which was in about fifteen minutes; Lawrence searched me, and took the three seven-shilling-pieces from me; the rest of the eight he put into the brown paper that the man's hand had given him, and he put them all next the sacking of the bed; I had the three seven-shilling-pieces in my pocket, and the other two, I had afterwards, with a half-guinea; the officers had five seven-shilling-pieces from him.

Court. Q. Was it not all one contract? - A. Yes.

Q. Made at the same time? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. The thing you first went for, was with respect to the seven-shilling-pieces? - A. Yes.

Q. That was completely at an end? - A. Yes, the money was paid.

Q. And then you entered into a fresh engagement for the half-guinea? - A. Yes; he gave me a half-guinea with a bit out of it, and said he had no more; and then I said, let me have two more seven-shilling-pieces; he then gave me five that I left, and out of the five I took two seven-shilling-pieces, that, with the half-guinea, came to four shillings, and I gave him two half-crown pieces; I asked him for a bit of paper, which he gave me; and then I wrapped them all up in it, and put it in my right-hand pocket, and then Mr. Lawrence came in directly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Where may you live now? - A.In Barbican.

Q. You do not mean to tell me seriously that you live there? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you live in Bridewell? - A. No.

Q.Perhaps you live in Bridewell at night? - A. No.

Q.Perhaps you live in Bridewell at night, and at Barbican in the day-time? - A. I do live in Bridewell.

Q. Are you not in Bridewell at night, and permitted to go at large in the day? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know you are upon your oath? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you know the consequences of committing perjury? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Are you not suffered to go about the town in the day for the purpose of detecting offenders? - A. No.

Q. For what purpose do you go about in the day? - A. Mr. Powell -

Q. The Solicitor of the Mint? - A. Yes.

Q. To hunt for prosecutions? - A. Yes; all coiners.

Q. Are you not every night in Bridewell, in custody, in consequence of a conviction for having uttered bad money? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you are suffered to go about in the day, instead of suffering the law? - A. Yes.

Q. How often have you been prosecuted yourself? - A. Once, no more.

Q. How often have you been in custody? - A. About twice.

Q. Have you ever been whipped for any offence? - A. No, I never was.

Q. When were you first applied to by Mr. Powell? - A. About three weeks ago.

Q. He got you liberty to go into the Fleet-prison? - A. Yes.

Q. He promised you, that if you prosecuted the prisoner, you should he liberated from all the enormities you have committed? - A. No.

Q. Were not you told you should be prosecuted? - A. No.

Q. What were you to get for going to prosecute the prisoner? - A.Nothing at all.

Q. I ask you, upon the oath you have taken, were you not permitted to go at large, with a promise that you should be yourself prosecuted if you could not convict him? - A. No, I was not.

Q.Were you not told that you should go at large? - A. No.

Q. Did you first apply to Mr. Powell, or he to you? - A. I applied to him.

Q. For what? - A. To take Mr. Pougher.

Q. Was it not for the purpose of saving yourself? - A. No.

Q. It was for the good of the public, I suppose? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. You have turned informer for the good of your country? - A. No; I was not an informer because I have done justice.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Addison? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a lady that keeps a shop where they sell medicines, in Fleet-market? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she not prosecute you? - A. No.

Q. Did you not buy some medicines there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not get change for a guinea? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she not charge you with ringing the changes upon her? - A. Yes; with changing half-a-guinea.

Q.How long ago was this? - A. About eight or nine months ago.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hilburton, a grocer, in Drury lane? - A. Yes.

Q.Has he charged you with ringing the changes upon him? - A. Yes, he has.

Q. Explain to the Jury what you mean by ringing the changes - it is taking a good half-guinea, and changing it for a bad one, is it not? - A. I did not do it.

Q. But that is what is called ringing the changes? - A. I do not know.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. Yes, I will.

Court. Q. Be cautious - do you mean to swear you do not know what ringing the changes are? - A. I have heard it, but I do not understand the meaning.

Mr. Alley. Q. How came you to answer my questions then, if you did not know what it meant? - A.Because you explained it to me.

Q. Do you mean to say you did not know it was imposing upon a person? - A. I did know it was imposing, but did not know it was ringing the changes.

Q. Did you know Elizabeth Else ? - A. Not by that name.

Q. Do you know a lady that lives in Fleet-street, a pocket-book maker? - A. Yes.

Q. Has she ever charged you with ringing the changes? - A. Yes.

Q. And you are permitted to go at large in the day, and at night locked up in prison? - A. Yes.

Q.There was an old man in the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he hear what passed? - A. No, I whispered to Mr. Pougher because he should not hear.

Q. That was your delicacy? - A. Yes, it was.

Court. Q. Did the old man see what was doing? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. You say they searched you? - A. Yes.

Q.Where did they search you? - A. All over.

Q. They did not put their fingers in your mouth for fear you should bite them? - A. No, they did not.

Q. Upon your oath, had you not a half-guinea and some seven-shilling-pieces in your mouth? - A. No.

Q.What have you a day for informing? - A. Not a farthing.

Q. How many other persons have you lodged informations against? - A.Nobody else.

Q.This was the first time you went into the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not tell me he was in bed? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say you went to his bed-side and whispered to him? - A. Yes.

Q. What time was it? - A. About one or two o'clock in the day.

Q. And the prisoner in bed? - A. Yes.

Q. The old man must have seen the transaction? - A. No, Mr. Pougher sent him out for a pint of porter; Mr. Pougher did not serve me in his presence, there was nobody in the room but himself and me.

Q. He treated you with a glass of something, what might it be? - A. It was gin.

JOHN CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am one of the Marshalmen of the City: On the 20th of March last, I searched the witness in the Fleet-prison, she had no money about her but three marked shillings that I gave her, and two half-crown pieces; she went up to Pougher's room, and came down again; she went up again in half an hour; I very soon after went up stairs after her, and found her in Pougher's room, and in his left-hand I found one of the marked shillings that I had given to her; on the table I found a half-crown, and a shilling, which was of my marking also; I was desired so to do by Mr. Powell.

THOMAS LAWRENCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. On Thursday the 20th of March, I went with Mead and Clark to the Fleet-prison; Clark searched her, and she had no money about her, but the marked money that he gave her; I went up into Pougher's room, and found in Mary Mead's right-hand pocket, a paper, containing five seven shilling pieces and a half-guinea, and a half-crown, loose in her pocket; a half-guinea with a piece out of it, and a half-crown loose in her pocket, which I had seen delivered to her. (Produces them.)

Mead. That is the money that I received from Pougher.

Lawrence. I searched the apartments, turned up the bed, and between the sacking and the bed, I found this brown paper, containing fifty-seven bad sixpences, seventeen shillings, and three seven shilling pieces in a little bit of paper; I asked Mead how she came by them, and she immediately pointed to the prisoner at the bar, and said, she had them of him; she told me she gave one shilling a-piece for the seven shilling pieces, and two shillings for the half-guinea; after we had made the search, a man came into the room, which I understood was a prisoner in the same room; I asked him, in the presence of the prisoner, which was his bed, he pointed to a bed at the bottom of the room, where there was a bureau-bedstead, he said it was his bed; that was not the bed that I found the money under.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you stay in the lodge while Mrs. Mead went up stairs? - A. Yes, I searched her.

Q. You searched her as delicately as you could? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not put your hands into her bosom? - A. No, I did not.(A monier of the mint deposed, that the money was all counterfeit.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY Death .

The Jury wished strongly to recommend the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy, because he had been tempted into the offence.

The prisoner being asked what he had to say, why he should not receive judgment to die according to law, prayed the benefit of his clergy on his knees. On the part of the Crown, a counterplea was put in, which was read.

The prisoner pleaded that he was not the man who had been before convicted. The Jury were then sworn to try whether he was the man or not.

CALEE-EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to the solicitor for the Mint. (Produces a copy of the record of the conviction of Joseph Pougher , in April 1798.) I received it from Mr. Shelton's office; it was a conviction for felony, in putting off counterfeit gold, at a lower rate than its denomination imported; I have examined it.

Court. Q.What counterfeit gold? - A.Two counterfeit half-guineas, to one Mary, the wife of Cornelius Richardson ; I was present when he was convicted in April Sessions, 1798.

Q. Upon looking at the prisoner at the bar, are you sure he was the person who was convicted at that time, of what is stated upon this record, putting off counterfeit gold? - A. I have not the least doubt of it.

Mr. Alley. Q. Is that paper signed by Mr. Shelton? - A. I do not think it is his hand-writing; I did not see it signed at all; I had it from Mr. Fitzpatrick.

Q. Is Mr. Fitzpatrick's name to it? - A.Not that I know of.

Mr. Alley objected that there was no evidence of its being a copy of the record.

The original record was then produced by Mr. Shelton.

Pawell. - Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When was that man tried? - A. In April 1798.

Q. How do you know that - do you mean to say you recollect it? - A.Perfectly well, I had known him before.

Q.Without having seen the record, and having an opportunity of refreshing your memory, could you have said, that that man was convicted in that April sessions? - A. I don't know that I should have recollected that it was April; I referred to the indictment which I myself drew.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Did you prosecute that man for the offence imputed by this record? - A. I did, I am sure he is the same man.

Q. Was a man of the name of Rogers a witness upon that trial? - A. He was.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the Police-officers, of Shadwell; I apprehended the prisoner upon a charge of felling counterfeit gold, he was tried for it in this Court, with a woman, who called herself his wife, and was convicted in April 1798; I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When were you applied to to become a witness to-day? - A.Last Sunday, Mr. Powell told me it might be necessary for me to attend.

Q. Mr. Powell then told you he was the man that had been convicted? - A. I have the day of apprehension in my book.

Q. Upon your oath, could you undertake to say what the day was, without having had reference to that book? - A. I was positive it was either April or May, but when I looked at my book, I knew it was April.

Q. But you were not, before that, certain whether it was April or May? - A. No.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury, on behalf of the defendant.

The Jury returned a verdict that the prisoner was the same man.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

JOESPH FITCHETT, WILLIAM WHITE.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-16
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Corporal > public whipping

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259. JOESPH FITCHETT and WILLIAM WHITE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , five pounds of hemp, value 4s. the property of William Neale .

WILLIAM NEALE sworn. - I am a rope-maker in the Hackney-road : Last Friday, I lost five pounds of hemp; I suspected the prisoners; they were taken in my warehouse with the hemp upon them; I saw some taken from each of them, they worked for me as hemp-dressers.

GEORGE STEWART sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Neale: I was sent up stairs in the warehouse to watch the prisoners; White was at work directly opposite where I was; I saw him take two parcels, two half-pounds, to the back part of the shop; but what he did with it I cannot say; I saw him go again to another part of the shop, he took up some undrest hemp, and took some drest hemp and put into his breeches; I did not see Fitchett take any thing; I went to my master and he was not at home, and I returned again till be was going away, and then I told him my master wanted him; the other prisoner and he were going out of the gate together; I sent for my master, and they were both searched at the watch-house; I saw two parcels of hemp taken from White, and two from Fitchert; it was concealed in their breeches.

SAMUEL HAPPER sworn. - Last Friday night I was sent for to take charge of the prisoners; I met them in Hackney-road, as they were coming along; I took them both to the watch-house; Lilywhite was with them; I asked them both if they had any thing about them; they both said they had not; I searched them, and found hemp in the breeches of both of them. (Produces it.)

- LILYWHITE sworn. - I am an officer: I was sent for by Mr. Neale; I went to his warehouse, where the prisoners were; (produces a quantity of hemp;) I took this from the coat-pockets of the two prisoners.

Neale. This is exactly the same fort of hemp they were working for me.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

White, GUILTY . (Aged 57.)

Fitchett, GUILTY. (Aged 26.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

MARY HAMILTON.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-17
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Corporal > private whipping

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260. MARY HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , a pewter quart pot, value 14d. the property of Sarah Norman .

THOMAS FLAXMAN sworn. - I am a chandler: Mrs. Norman keeps the Star and Garter, Sloane-square, Chelsea : On the 9th of March, between eight and nine in the morning, in consequence of information, I followed the prisoner, accused her with having stolen a pot, and took it out of her apron; she was then going down Sloane-street, towards Knightsbridge; she was about two hundred yards from Mrs. Norman's; I have had the pot ever since; (produces it;) she told me she was going to fell it at some broker's; that she was in want.

Mrs. Norman's niece deposed that the pot belonged to her aunt, Sarah Norman .

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 55.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

JAMES HAWKINS.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-18
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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261. JAMES HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , the carcass of a dead sheep, value 40s. the property of Samuel Johnson .

SAMUEL JOHNSON sworn. - I am a butcher in Oxford-market : I left my shop between six and seven in the afternoon, for about ten minutes; there were ten carcasses hanging up that had been killed; in the course of ten minutes after, I heard the cry of stop thief; I was standing by a neighbour's shop; I turned round and saw a carcass lying upon the ground, between my shop and my neighbour's; I looked, and it proved to be one of my carcases.

JOHN KIRBY sworn. - I am a butcher in Oxford-market; my shop joins to Mr. Johnson's shop: I just came down to light a candle; I turned round and saw the prisoner with the carcass; I said to him, what are you at; and he immediately threw it down at my feet; he ran away; I pursued him immediately into Oxford-road, and there we took him, and carried him back to Mr. Johnson's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you not lose sight of the person? - A. No, I did not.

Q. It was dark in the evening, was it not? - A. It was not dark.

Q. Did he not turn several turnings? - A. He turned round the corner of Market-street.

Q. Do you mean to say you did not lose sight of him while he turned the turning? - A. I did not; I was close to him all the way, till a man ran against him and knocked him down.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Confined eighteen months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

JOHN JONES, GEORGE COCKRAN.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-19
VerdictsNot Guilty > fault

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262. JOHN JONES and GEORGE COCKRAN were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , two iron bars, value 14d. the property of May King ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

It appearing in evidence that the iron bars were fixed to the dwelling-house, and not being so charged in the indictment they were ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

JOHN JONES, GEORGE COCKRAN.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-20
VerdictsNot Guilty

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263. JOHN JONES and GEORGE COCKRAN were again indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , six sacks, value 4s. the property of Richard Hodges and Mary Hodges ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

The Prosecutor not being able to identify the property, they were ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

JOHN JONES, GEORGE COCKRAN.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-21
VerdictsGuilty; Guilty
SentencesTransportation; Transportation

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264. JOHN JONES and GEORGE COCKRAN , were again indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March, four iron bars, value 2s. belonging to John Nicholson , and fixed to his dwelling-house ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN NICHOLSON sworn. - On the 3d of March, there were four iron bars stole from the back part of my house, they were fixed to the main beam of the house, in the area; they were wrenched off; I saw them on the 4th of March at Cockran's, Donaldson was with me; Jones told me he took them from the back part of my house, and sold them to Cockran.

Q. Did you say any thing to induce him to confess? - A. No; he said he forced them up with a large iron bar.

Q. Were there no threats, or promises, used, to induce him to confess? - A. No; as soon as he was taken he confessed it; I found the bars underneath the counter in Cockran's shop, among many other articles of iron bars and lead; Cockran owned that he bought the bars of the boy; I think he said he had given him a penny a pound for them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you think a little boy like that, or two or three little boys, could have forced up these bars? - A. I should think not; he said there were others with him.

Q. Little boys like himself? - A. Yes, some bigger and some less.

Q. Do you mean to say, that he said there were some bigger than himself? - A. No; there were fifteen of them.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he said there were fifteen? - A. No.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - In consequence of a search-warrant I went, on the 4th of March, along with Kendal, a constable, to search the house of Cockran, Mr. Nicholson was with us; among a parcel of leaden pipes, and iron, I found these four bars underneath the counter; as soon as I took them, and put them upon the counter, Jones said to Nicholson, directly, these are your bars; I took them to Bow-street, and Nicholson swore to them. (Produces the bars).

Nicholson. I took one of the bars off the same area, and took it to Bow-street, it was exactly the very same.

Q. Did you try the bars with the place from whence you supposed they were taken? - A. No; they were the same length, and the same size.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. There is a piece broke off of one of them; if you had gone and fitted that to the place, you would have been able to ascertain whether it came from your place or not? - A. Yes.

ISAAC KENDAL sworn. - I am constable of the night: I took this boy in charge, he was brought in by the patrol, or the watchman, I do not know which; there were no promises made him; he said there were fourteen or fifteen of them concerned; he mentioned several places where he had been taking iron from, I cannot say whether he mentioned Nicholson's or not; I went with him to Cockran's with Donaldson, Jones was present, and he said they had stole such and such iron from such a place, and such and such lead from such a place, and he pointed out this iron of Nicholson's; Cockran said, he had been in business but a little time, and it was an unfortunate circumstance, he hardly had been in that house three months.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Cockran is a shoemaker? - A. A boot-closer.

Q. This shop is kept by his wife? - A. I fancy it is.

Jones did not say any thing in his defence.

Cockran's defence. Jones brought the bars to me, and I asked him who he came from; he said his father had sent him with them; I asked him where he come from; he said from Round-court; then I weighed them, and paid him a penny a pound for them, and he went away; I knew nothing more of it till Donaldson came.

The prisoner, Jones, called one, and Cockran four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Jones, GUILTY . (Aged 11.)

Transported for seven years

Cockran, GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

ROBERT JOHNSON.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-22
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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265. ROBERT JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a pair of brass three barrelled pistols, value 30s. the property of Hector Essex .

HECTOR ESSEX sworn. - I deal in haberdashery, silver, and jewellery : On the 15th of March last, I lost a pair of brass three barrelled pistols, with bayonets, from my shop; on the 14th, in the evening, the prisoner called at my house, he told me he had seen a pair of three barrelled pistols in my window which he wished then to see, he was dressed in the habit of a naval officer; it was after dark, I believe somewhere about eight o'clock; he went away, saying he would call either on the morrow, which was Saturday, or the Monday; on the Saturday, a little before nine o'clock, between the three quarters and nine, in the evening, he called again; when he came in, I was busy with another person, I reached one of the pistols to him, I observed the door a jar and I pushed it to with my foot; he then said he wanted to look at the other; I reached down the other pistol, and put it down

on the counter, he had one then in his hand, and while I was opening the till to give another person two shillings, the prisoner opened the door, and ran away with the pistols; as to his person, I am certain of it, for he was nearly an hour with me the day before; as soon as I was robbed, I sent one man into the City, and another to the Westend of the town, to every shop where they were likely to be disposed of; on the Wednesday following, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, Mr. Windsor, of Whitechapel, sent for me; I went there, and saw this young man, whom I knew again immediately; they had stopped him, and the pistols were in the possession of the constable.

BENJAMIN CONSTABLE sworn. - I am a constable: On Wednesday night, the 19th of March, about ten o'clock in the evening, I was sent for from the watch-house to Mr. Windsor's, in Whitechapel High-street, I found the prisoner there; I stopped some time till Mr. Essex came, then Mr. Essex gave me charge of him; I received a pistol from Thomas French. (Produces the pistol).

THOMAS FRENCH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 19th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, as near as I can recollect, the prisoner at the bar came to our shop, and brought a three barrelled brass pistol to pledge, upon which he wanted a guinea and a half; he had but one pistol; I told him I had had information of a pair of pistols, of that description, being lost by Mr. Essex, in the Strand; I enquired of him how he came by them; he told me they were given to him by a friend of his then at sea, it was about a year and a half since he gave them to him; I told him I must detain him while I sent for Mr. Essex, who had lost the pistols; when Mr. Essex came, he claimed the pistol; he stopped voluntarily with me till Mr. Essex came; this is the same pistol.

Essex. I have not the least doubt that those are my pistols; the prisoner's person I am very positive of, but as to the pistols, there are so many made like one another, that I cannot positively swear to this; when I went with him to the watch-house, he complained of cold for want of his great coat and boots; I said, if he would let me know where his lodgings were, I would go with the constable for his great coat and boots, and perhaps I might see my other pistol; I went to the lodgings of a Mr. Cardon, No. 15, Fenchurch-buildings, and sent the coat and boots; I got some information about the other pistol; I got a search-warrant, and found the pistol in Mr. Cardon's room, with whom the prisoner lodged.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

JAMES PENNYMAN.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-23
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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266. JAMES PENNYMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , three quartern loaves of bread, value 4s. the property of Alexander Weddell .

JOHN FREELAN sworn. - I detected the prisoner last Saturday, taking the loaves, in Harley-street , at the corner of Weymouth-street; I knew him before; he took three quartern loaves out of the baker's basket, one at a time; the basket was standing on a barrow; he was coming away with two quartern loaves under one arm, and one under the other; I went up to him and took him by the collar; he had got about five or six houses off; he asked me what I meant; I told him, what I meant was to take him to the man that owned the basket; I took him to the master baker's, in Devonshire-street; the constable was sent for, and he was taken to Marlborough-street.

HENRY GREENHILL sworn. - I am servant to Alexander Weddell: I left my basket of bread in the middle of Upper Harley-street; the prisoner was brought to my master's shop; I had desired the last witness to watch the basket; the prisoner was taken to Marlborough-street; I had only three loaves of bread in my basket; (the bread produced;) I know the bread to be my master's, by his marks.

Prisoner's defence. I took them merely from distress; I thought I should have been tried at Hicks's Hall; I have no friends here.

GUILTY . (Aged 52.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

JOSEPH PIERSON.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-24
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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267. JOSEPH PIERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , two silver tea-spoons, value 3s. a glass decanter, value 1s. 6d. two glass salts, value 2s. a bason, value 6d. a towel, value 6d. two butter-boats, value 6d. and an ink-bottle, value 1d. the property of Thomas Hodges .

MARY HODGES sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Hodges; I keep the Burlington-arms, Old Burlington-street : The latter end of January I missed three silver tea-spoons, a decanter, a bason, salts, and different articles; I suspected the prisoner; he was a servant in the house, to gather pots, and wash bottles; I know nothing of the robbery.

THOMAS COPE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Brown, No. 2, Panton-street, Hay-market: On the 6th of February the prisoner came to Mr. Brown's, and pledged two tea-spoons for three shillings, in the name of Thomas Matthews ;(produces them;) he said he lived at No. 23, Whitcomb-street; he told me he had bought them second hand, and they were his own property; I had never seen him before.

Mrs. Hodges. These are my husband's spoons; I had a dozen of them.

Prisoner. Q.Were you not very much in liquor two nights running? - A. I was never in liquor in my life.

Prisoner. She said she always carried the spoons about her, and that she had lost them.

ROBERT TOWNSEND sworn. - I am a patrole belonging to Bow-street: I was called upon to take the prisoner into custody; I took him to Bow-street. GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

JOHN SMITH.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-25
VerdictGuilty
SentenceCorporal > private whipping

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268. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a cheese, value 2s. 6d. the property of Thomas Bell and Leonard Bell .

LEONARD BELL sworn. - I am a cheesemonger , in partnership with Thomas Bell; I live in Mint-street, in the Borough: this cheese, with others, was put into the cart to go to Canterbury; I put a mark upon them a day or two before.

RICHARD LEICESTER sworn. - I was unloading a cart at Chester-quay.

Q. That is in London? -

Bell. A. Yes, but the cheese was found in Middlesex.

Leicester. I heard the alarm that the cheese was gone; I pursued the man, but could not see him; I ran down Rosemary-lane, and met the prisoner coming up; I asked him if he had seen a man run that way, that was lame, with a cheese; I observed, at that time, that he was lame; he said he did not; he went to go away, and I said he must be the man; I asked him if he would tell me where it was; he said he could not; one Mr. Isaacs came up and told him to give the cheese up if he had the cheese, and if not he would send for a constable; he told Mr. Isaacs he would deliver the cheese up if they would not do any thing with him; I went with him to his lodgings in Rosemary-lane, and there we found the cheese; the prisoner said to a woman that was there, give the cheese up to them, and she did; Mr. Isaacs took the cheese to the Police-office.

MOSES ISAACS sworn. - On the 15th of March last I was going through Rosemary-lane; I heard an alarm that the last witness had lost a cheese out of his cart; I afterwards saw the prisoner and the witness in Rosemary-lane; he said he had not got the cheese; I thought he looked very suspicious, as if he wanted to get away; I told him it would be better for him to give it up; I went with him to Mrs. Keese's house, she is here; she was the person that delivered the cheese; she denied, at first, that she had the cheese; I told her she had better deliver it up, or I would get an officer and search the house; accordingly she spoke to a girl, and told her to bring it out of the back-room, which she did; the prisoner was present at the time; I then took him before the Magistrates at Lambeth-street.

MARY KEEFE sworn. - The prisoner knocked at my door; he had a cheese under his arm; and he asked me to weigh the cheese for him; I keep a rag-shop; I weighed the cheese for him, and he said, stop a bit; I did not see him when he went; but I missed him; and he left the cheese; then some people came, and demanded it; and upon my oath, I never denied having the cheese. (The cheese produced, and deposed to by Mr. Bell.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been at work at the water-side: I went up the gateway of Chesterquay to ease myself, and there was a cart coming up the gateway; I went to get out of the way of the cart, and there was some straw lying, and I happened to kick the cheese from under the straw; and I took it to Rosemary-lane: when the carman charged me with it, I said, if it is your's, come along with me, and you shall have it.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

OWEN COLLINS.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-26
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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269. OWEN COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , three leather boots, value 3s. the property of our Lord the King .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of William-Richard Baverley , Esq.

JOHN ELSEE sworn. - I was late a quarter-master of the Surry light-dragoons: I know nothing of the taking these goods.

WILLIAM PRIDDLE sworn. - I was in the Surry light-dragoons before they were disbanded; I was put in care of stores at Staines by Mr. Elsee: I saw the prisoner come about five o'clock last Monday morning, as near as I can tell; the stores were in an out-building; he came with a pitchfork, and pushed it through the hole in the door, and then he went in; he came out three different times, and took away a boot each time; there was one boot that had a scratch on it, and that he threw in again; he would not take that away; I did not speak to him at that time; I knew the man very well; I watched to see what he would do more. The property belonged to the King's stores; they had not been served out to any body; John Phillips was with me.

JOHN PHILLIPS sworn. - I was in the Surry light-dragoons; I saw the prisoner take up the

boots, one at a time, with a pitch-fork; I knew his person well.

Prisoner's defence. I saw three old boots lying at the door, and I thought they were belonging to the regiment that was disbanded; and I took them up till I could see some of the men.

Elsee. They were the King's property.

GUILTY (Aged 45.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

CHARLES YEOMANS, JOHN SMITH.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-27
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

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270. CHARLES YEOMANS and JOHN SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , four pair of sheets, value 3l. two cotton gowns, value 1l. 10s. a bolster, value 4s. two pillows, value 4s. 3d. a pair of blankets, value 1l. a bed-cover, value 7s. three tablecloths, value 2l. four shifts, value 10s. three muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 3s. a shawl, value 5s. a pocket-handkerchief, value 6d. a calico bed gown, value 2s. a dimily petticoat, value 3s. a calico petticoat, value 2s. a black calimanco petticoat, value 3s. two muslin aprons, value 2s. two waistcoats, value 5s. a yard of canvas, value 6d. a blue apron, value 1s. 6d. four stockings, value 6d. two towels, value 1s. a night-cap, value 6d. a silver-watch, value 4l. a tea-chest, value 2s. three tin cannisters, value 6d. and 4s. in monies, numbered, the property of Robert Winter , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS DUNCAN sworn. - I lodge at the Robin-hood and Little John, Charles-street, St. James's-square ; Robert Winter keeps the house; on the 17th of February, about dusk, I was in my own room, up one pair of stairs; I heard a noise at my room door, I heard a second noise, and then I went and opened the door, I perceived the two prisoners, each of them with a bundle upon their backs, one was lower down the stairs than the other; I saw the colour of their clothes, one said to the other, this is the way; I followed them down stairs, and called Mr. Winter, they were then going out at the door; Winter and I went in pursuit; I went up Charles-court, which is almost directly opposite our house, but I saw nothing of the prisoners there; I saw them both turn the corner of Charles-street, into St. Alban's-street; I went round, with an intention to interrupt them; I heard that the prisoner Yeomans was then taken; I cannot swear positively that he was one of the men that I saw upon the stairs; Yeomans had a brown coat, and the other a blue coat; about half an hour after that, I saw Smith; they were both drest the same as the two men that I saw coming down stairs; I saw the colour of their clothes very distinctly, when I opened my room door, and likewise when they got across the street.

ROBERT WINTER sworn. - I received an alarm from the last witness, on the 17th of February; upon coming to the door, Duncan was standing on the threshold, he desired me to follow those two men, pointing to the two prisoners at the bar; I pursued them immediately; they had each of them a large bundle upon their backs; I followed them till I got round the corner, into St. Alban's-street; I was then out of breath with running so fast, and immediately called stop thief; I was then within from twenty to thirty yards of the prisoners, they were, as near as I can recollect, six or seven yards apart; on calling out, stop thief, Smith, who had a blue coat on, turned his head round quite facing of me, and upon seeing me so near him, he threw down his bundle immediately; Yeomans turned round also to see from whence the noise proceeded; he carried his bundle five or six yards further, to the other side of the Strand; he threw it down in the kennel, just by the side of the pavement; he then ran as fast as Smith, towards Market-street, in going out of St. Alban's-street, I turned to the right; I pursued them a little further along Market-street; Yeomans, and another person, that ran with them, turned to the left hand, that was a person that I suspected of being an accomplice, he was in my house not half a minute, before Duncan gave the alarm; Smith turned to the right towards Market-lane; I pursued Yeomans into Norris-street, and there I recollected the goods, and I went back to look for them, about one hundred yards, and I found them where they had been thrown away; a soldier assisted me in carrying them; upon going up stairs, I found my own key in the room door, a back-room, up two pair of stairs; I found the room stripped of all the linen that was in it, and every thing, excepting the beds; a female servant had been the last person intrusted with the key; the next observation I made was, that one of the bureaus, there were three in the room, was broke open; I missed some new silver coin, to the value of four shillings, but I cannot say so many pieces; I then missed my watch off the window; I had laid it there when I got up, the key used to be kept in the bar; I can speak to the property when it is produced; as soon as I had secured the property, I came down stairs, and Duncan came in at the same time at the outer door; I was then informed that Yeomans was taken with my watch to St. Martin's watch-house; on coming there, Yeomans was sitting on a seat, I said, that is one of the men that had part of my property upon his back; there were a great number of other people there, eight or nine to the best of my recollection; I gave a

description of the maker's name and number, and a bruise in it; then the watch was shewn me, and I knew it to be mine; in about ten minutes after that, Smith was brought in, and I immediately said, that is the first man that threw down my bundle; I am very sure the two prisoners are the same men that I saw with my property.

Yeomans. Q.What coloured coat had I on? - A. I cannot take upon me to say the exact colour, it was a dark colour, something like a snuff colour.

Yeomans. Q. How was the person, you suppose to be the accomplice, drest? - A. I cannot say.

Q.You are positive to my being one of the persons that carried the bundle? - A. Yes, I am.

Jury. Q. Did you not say that he turned round and looked at you? - A. Yes; I saw his face at that time as plain as I see your's now; I was not then further than 30 yards from him, it was then nearly as light as it is now.

Q. Were the lamps lit? - A. No; I had never seen either of the prisoners before to my knowledge.

Q. Keeping a public-house, I suppose your outer door generally stands open? - A. Always.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn. - I live at No. 22, St. Alban's-street, with Messrs. Scott and Randall, apothecaries: On Monday the 17th of February, I think, a little after five, I am not quite certain; I saw two or three men on the other side of the way, in St. Alban's-street, two of them had bundles on their backs running fast; they were running from Charles-street; across St. Alban's-street, towards Market-street; I looked down the street, and saw somebody crying stop thief; a man ran first without a bundle, Yeomans ran next, and Smith a few yards after him; when they heard stop thief called, they each of them threw down their bundles about seven or eight yards distant from each other; they turned the corner, and ran towards Norris-street, Smith ran down Market-lane; I saw no one follow them, and therefore I followed Smith, calling stop thief, but no one ran after him but me; I pursued him round Pall-mall, and into the Hay-market; I then saw him reeling from one side of the pavement to the other, like a drunken man; I pursued, and called stop thief; as soon as he heard that call behind him, he looked round, and seeing me, he ran across the Hay-market, and down Little Suffolk-street; I pursued him, calling stop thief; a great many people were collected together, running after him; I pursued him down Great Suffolk-street, and there I lost sight of him, and did not see him again till he was in Mr. Amies's shop in Whitcomb-street; he was secured in Amies's shop.

Q. How long was it from the time you first saw him, till you saw him in Amies's shop? - A. Scarcely five minutes, for I ran as hard as I could; I can speak positively to the face of Smith; I cannot speak so distinctly to Yeomans', it was Smith that I followed; Smith had a blue coat on, with a velvet collar; the other had a brown coat on.

Q. Had he been reeling before he got into the Hay-market? - A. No; he ran as fast as any sober man could do.

Q.And that you are very positive was Smith? - A. Yes.

Prisoner Smith. How came you not to come to the second examination at Bow-street? - A. My master could not spare me from business; I was there at the first examination.

- AMIES sworn. - I keep a broker's shop, in Whitcomb-street: The prisoner, Smith, came into my shop about a quarter past five o'clock, he appeared very much agitated and frightened; I asked him who he was, and what he wanted; he gave me no answer; I asked him a second time what he wanted, and who he was, and then I seized him by the arm; at that moment two or three people came rushing into the shop, and Williams said, that is he, this is the man; there were a great number of people at the door, and several people asked him who he was, and he said he was a gentleman; and then he was taken out of my shop to the watch-house.

Smith. Q.Was I not very much in liquor? - A. He appeared very much agitated; I cannot tell whether it was from agitation or liquor, but he smelt of liquor certainly.

ROBERT RITCHIES sworn. - I am a watchman in St. Martin's parish: I was coming from the Hay-market, across St. James's Market, I heard a cry of stop thief; I looked up, and saw the prisoner, Yeomans, running; that is the man, (points to him); he was coming from the bottom of the Hay-market up James-street; I immediately pursued him, and about the middle of James-street, somebody crossing obstructed his running, and I immediately caught hold of him; when I had laid hold of him, I saw him throw away a watch; I saw the watch perfectly, he threw it into the middle of the street, near to the kennel, with his left-hand; the watch was picked up immediately, by some man who said, here is your watch, I cannot say who it was; the watch was brought to the watch-house by a person that is not here.

Q. Are you perfectly sure, that what the person threw from him was a watch? - A. Yes, perfectly.

Yeomans. Q. Did I not come up the east side of St. James's Market with you? - A. No; I never saw him till I got almost into James-street.

Yeomans. Q. Did you give the same account at Bow-street? - A. Yes, I did.

ROBERT ROSE sworn. - I am a constable: I saw

the prisoner, Yeomans, in custody of the last witness; it happened to be very near the watch-house, and I went up to see what was the matter, and he was then very refractory; I had very great difficulty to secure him and get him into the watch-house; in a very few minutes after we got into the watch house, a Mr. Brookes brought in the watch, and delivered it to me; I asked Mr. Brookes from whom he got it; the prisoner heard all that passed; he said, there was a great concourse of people, he could not tell who he received it from; in a few minutes after that, the prosecutor, Winter, came in; he said he had lost his watch, Smith was not there then, but he fixed upon Yeomans immediately; the watch-house was as full as it could hold, I suppose there were fifty there, and he pointed to Yeoman's, and said, that is the man; he told me the maker's name, and number of the watch, and I stepped on one side, and found it was as he described it. (Produces the watch).

Winter. This is my watch; Charles Heley , London, No. 1711; it is now without a glass, it was whole when it was in my room.

Rose. It had no glass when it was given to me.(The bundle produced).

Q.(To Winter.) Can you undertake to say, that every article in these two bundles came out of your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Among these various articles, what value do you set upon that property, independent of the watch? - A.The value I have set upon them is about ten pounds, but they are worth more than double that.

Yeomans's defence. On the evening of the robbery, I had been down to Pimlico to see a friend of mine, in Eaton-street, that keeps a baker's shop there; on my return home, crossing St. James's-square, I came up Charles-street, and getting towards St. Alban's-street I saw the watchman, and two or three people; somebody said, that is him in blue; and running along Norris-street, I crossed over the Hay-market, a considerable crowd of people were running, I crossed over into James-street, and crossing the bottom of Oxendon-street, a stout man, with an apron on like a butcher, caught hold of me by the handkerchief, and stopped me; says I, you are mistaken, my friend, and he let me go; I stood still, and presently after, this watchman, and two or three more people, came up and collared me.

Smith's defence. I have hardly any thing to say, I was fuddled; we neither of us expected our trials to come on so soon, and our friends are not here.

Yeomans, GUILTY Death . (Aged 28.)

Smith GUILTY Death. (Aged 28.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

THOMAS LONG.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-28
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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271. THOMAS LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , two deal boards, value 4s. the property of Joseph Aldridge , and Edward Aldridge .

RICHARD MORGAN sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Joseph and Edward Aldridge , timber-merchants , No. 127, Brick-lane, Spitalfields : I heard an alarm given, on the 3d of March, crying, a thief; I ran round from our door to Mr. Scarr's; I found the prisoner at the next door, up a chimney; I did not find the boards.

JAMES DOUGLAS sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Scarr: On the 3d of March, I was coming through our back yard, and I saw the prisoner's father, Robert Long, standing at the garden-gate; I went up stairs, and looked out at our stair-case-window, and in about a quarter of an hour I saw the prisoner get over into the timber-yard; he handed out a deal, and his father took it of him and laid it down in our garden; then Thomas Long , the prisoner, set another up an end against the pales, ready to take away; I then came down stairs and told my mistress; the prisoner and his father lived close by; the boards are here.

ANN SCARR sworn. - I live adjoining the timber-yard: The last witness gave me an alarm, and I went into our back garden, and saw the plank lying there, and I saw old Mr. Long there; I asked him what business he had there; he was in the position of stooping.

Q.(To Douglas.) What time was it? - A. About half past eight o'clock at night; there are a great many weavers about there, and from the light of them at work I could see them distinctly.

Morgan. I have seen the board, and I am sure it is Mr. Aldridge's property; there was my own hand-writing upon it, 1l. 12s. 10d.

Donglas. The board that was shewn to Morgan, was the same that I saw reared up.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

JOHN NICHOLSON.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-29
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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272. JOHN NICHOLSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , two pounds of black tea, value 10s. two pounds of green tea, value 12s. four pounds of moist sugar, value 2s. two pounds of lump sugar, value 1s. a stick of Spanish liquorice, value 1d. two quires of common paper, value 6d. twelve penny-pieces, two hundred and forty halfpence, and twenty-four farthings , the property of Henry Bloomfield .

HENRY ALLEN sworn. - I am a watchman in Whitechapel parish: On the Fast-day morning, I

was going my beat at two o'clock, Mr. Bloomfield's house is in Swan-street , I perceived a light in the shop through a hole in the shutters, and I asked if that was Mr. Bloomfield, or any of the family; then the light was put out immediately, and I heard a rustling in the shop; I then alarmed the family, Mr. Bloomfield himself came down; I went in, and found three parcels, there was one upon the counter, and the other two upon another counter, tied up in a paper; two of them were opened, one contained moist sugar, and the other tea; I then went for an officer, and returned with him to the house, the prisoner lodged in the house; we went up to his room, and I told him he was my prisoner, and he must get up and go with me, for robbing the house; he told me he would not get up for me till day-light; I brought the officer up stairs, and he made him get up; after he got up, we searched the bed, and found four parcels under the bed, between the bed and the sacking; and in the bed we found one parcel of teas, to the amount of pretty near a pound; the four parcels under the bed were two quires of small paper, and two pounds of lump-sugar.

BENJAMIN CONSTABLE sworn. - I am a constable; Allen, the watchman, fetched me to Mr. Bloomfield's house; I went there, and made the prisoner get up; I first asked him where his clothes were, he told me they were on the ground; I took up his coat, and being weighty, I put my hand into the pocket and found a quantity of penny-pieces, and halfpence, amounting to eleven shillings and five-pence halfpenny; and in his waistcoat-pocket I found a stick of Spanish liquorice, and a paper of pins; I took the bed off the bedstead, and next the sacking I found two brown paper bags of lump sugar, one parcel of moist sugar, and a parcel of tea; I then went to the other side of the bed, and I found a parcel of tea in a paper which the watchman had seen in the bed; I then went to the drawers, and found a parcel of halfpence and farthings, to the amount of upwards of two shillings. (Produces the property).

ANN BLOOMFIELD sworn. - I am the wife of Henry Bloomfield: I saw my husband shut up the shop that night; he locked it up; there are sliding shutters in grooves upon the counter; and there was a little place where he got in, between the window-shutters; a little place that we could not suppose a man could get in at; there were no paper parcels in the shop when we went to bed; we were alarmed between two and three o'clock; I got up and saw some parcels containing tea and sugar; it had been put up in parcels in the course of the night; I had left a great deal of copper in the till, I cannot tell to what amount; there was enough taken out for me to miss them; there were a quantity of penny-pieces among them, I cannot say how many; the bag that the sugar was in I made up myself; the prisoner had lodged in our house thirteen months, he is a journeyman tailor.

Q. Look at these articles, and see if you know any of them? - A. I have every reason to believe they are mine; these are the same kind of bags that I make up; I missed both green and black tea, the canisters were not so heavy as they were when I left them the night before.

Prisoner's defence. When I went up to go to bed I found the halfpence and the pins and the Spanish liquorice concealed in the closet; I immediately took it up, and put it in my pocket, with intention to enquire about it the next morning, but was prevented by being distubed by the watchman; as to the tea and sugar, I never saw it till the watchman came to disturb me. As for the halfpence that I had in the drawers, I had taken some time before; they are bad halfpence that were not current.

Constable. The place was big enough for me to have got in.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

LETITIA PURCELL.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-30
VerdictNot Guilty

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273. LETITIA PURCELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , twenty guineas, a Bank-note, value 20l. and two other Bank-notes, value 10l. the property of Aaron Pye , privily from his person .

AARON PYE sworn. - On the 20th of February I lost my property; I was at Peter Daniel's, the Black-bull, the lower part of New Gravel-lane, near to Wapping; I was in company there till twelve o'clock at night, with some captains of ships and ship-owners; I was coming out of the public-house; I went with the prisoner to an apartment that she took me to in Pratt's-buildings, where she said she lodged; I was a little in liquor; I staid there till two o'clock in the morning, when I was called out by two men; I can swear there were two, I am not sure whether there were not three; when I went in I had a twenty-pound note, two five-pound notes, and about twenty guineas in gold; but when these men turned me out, I had not got any money. I do not know who they were.

JOHN MILES sworn. - I am a watchman: I was going along a little after twelve o'clock, I met the prisoner and the prosecutor; we went into the Wheatsheaf, and he treated me with a glass of liquor, that is all I know.

JOHN FURNESS sworn. - I brought some goods

from Hoxton, that were bought with part of this money; there has been one note traced.

Q.(To Pye.) What was the number of the note that you lost? - A. No. 9615; it was a note for twenty pounds, dated 30th January, 1800; there was another note, 5711; that was another twenty-pound note which I think I shall get again, dated 27th January, 1800.

EDWARD LOADER sworn. - I am a broker: About the 20th of February two women came to my shop, I believe the prisoner to be one, but I cannot swear with certainly, I had never seen her before; the other woman, I believe, is a witness here; they came to buy some articles of chairs and bedsteads; I dealt with them to the amount of eight pounds, or guineas; for the payment of which I think it was the witness gave me a twenty-pound note; I sent out and got it changed at a neighbouring public-house; he is not here; he almost immediately paid it away to one of his brewers.

ANN HESLOP sworn. - The prisoner asked me to go with her of an errand, and I went with her, and she bought some goods.

Q. Can you describe the note? - A. No; I never had the note in my hand in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

JOHN BROWN.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-31
VerdictNot Guilty

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274. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a half-guinea, and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Edward Cogin .

EDWARD COGIN sworn. - I work on board ship , and alongside the shore: I met with the prisoner between Rochester and Gravesend; we came to Gravesend together, and staid there all night, till the tide answered to come to Billingsgate; we arrived at Billingsgate about two o'clock in the morning; I went to bed there between three and four, and the prisoner sat up all night in the kitchen; he said he had no money, and I paid a shilling for his passage to Billingsgate; I got up about eight in the morning, and he was sitting below in the tap-room; he told me he had sat there all night; I told him I wanted to go to good quarters, and he said he would take me to some with himself; he took me to a house in Rosemary-lane ; he told me it was the sign of the Plough, but I could find no such house afterwards; we met with a woman and two children before we got to the house, he said they were his wife and children; and there was some bread and cheese and beer called for in the house; I believe there were five or six pots of beer drank between him and me, and the woman and children: I put my hand in my pocket, and pulled a one-pound note out of my pocket, and there was half-a-guinea in gold in the note; it was then between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, we went in about eleven o'clock in the morning; I laid the note out of my hand upon the table, the note was cracked a little by the half-guinea; he asked me how I came to use the note that way; I said, what harm; and he took the note in his hand, with the half-guinea in it; says he, this note must be put to rights, or settled, I do not know which, on account of the crack; then he went off towards the door, and I followed him and made a demand of the note; give me my note, says I, and my half-guinea; I will not, says he; he went outside the door then; and I said he must; he took up his fist and struck me on the bridge of the nose, and the blood gushed out; he stunned me; I made an enquiry, and found he was gone down another street with my note and half-guinea; it was a Bank of England note; I received it on account of money that was due to me from the Chatham-chest; I received it from Mr. Cook, who keeps the Flushing, at Rochester-bridge.

Q. Should you know a Bank of England note from a country Bank-note? - A. Yes; I had three from him, I spent and laid out the other two; I received the half-guinea in change of one of them; went down to Chatham after him, by land, two days after; I did not find him there; I staid in Rochester two days; I came to town again, and got an information that he was in St. Giles's; I found him last Tuesday morning was a week, in Church-lane; when he robbed me, he had on a brown jacket; and when I saw him in St. Giles's he had that coat that he has on now; I knew him directly, in about a moment I believe.

Q. Do you think that you can with safety swear that that is the man that robbed you? - A. Yes, I think I can.

Q. Do you remember, in Rosemary-lane, stopping and speaking to any person, with the prisoner in company? - A. I remember, as we were going along, I stopped and spoke to Daniel Holland ; I had known him before; I asked him to come and take a draft of beer, and he would not.

Q. Had you any body else with you? - A. I do not recollect that I had.

Q. Were you sober then? - A.Sober enough to have my senses about me; I was a little elevated, but not to be hurt.

Q. What had you in the morning? - A.Three or four pots of purl and gin.

Q. You came with him from Rochester? - A. Yes.

Q. Then do you think you could mistake his person? - A. I think not.

Q. Did you observe that any accident had happened to his hand? - A. Yes, I observed that he had lost his left hand. When I saw him at St.

Giles's I asked him his name, and he said it was Brown; I said I knew it was; and then he denied ever having seen me at all; I asked him if he did not recollect me in the road between Rochester and Gravesend; he said, no; I asked him if he had not seen me in the boat; he said, no; says I, do not you remember seeing me in Rosemary-lane, and running away with a note and a half-guinea; and he said he had never seen me before; he told the man of the house that there was a man going to swear his life away; I have never found my property again.

DANIEL HOLLAND sworn. - I live in Rosemary-lane: Cogin was a ship-mate of mine for a few months in the year 1795; I met him and another person in Rosemary-lane, he asked me to go and drink with them.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. That is not the man; he was a man about five feet ten or eleven; the person that was with him took off his hat, and he was not like the prisoner; I had never seen him before I saw him at Bow-street; they were both very much in liquor, and I was sober; I am a salesman; they said they would call in the afternoon, and buy some clothes.

Q.Then you had no acquaintance with the prisoner? - A. None; I saw the man that was with Cogin again the same afternoon; I saw him go into the Clothes-exchange and buy some clothes; I saw him with a coat that he had bought, a dark-coloured coat.

Q. But who that strange man was, you cannot tell? - A. No; he had a full head of hair.*

*The prisoner was bald.

Q.(To Cogin.) Were you sober? - A. I was sober enough to know him at any rate.

Q. Are you sure you did not change your companion between Darkhouse-lane and Rosemary-lane? - A. No; if I wanted to part with him he did not intend to part with me; he was too fond of me. When this man was before Mr. Bond, he said he had never seen the crown of his head.

Q.(To Holland.) Did you say any thing before the Magistrate about his head? - A. No.

Q. Why did not you, if there was so much difference as you speak of? - A. I was not asked about it, and I forgot it.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the matter; I was not there; I know nothing at all of the man; I was in Salisbury at the time.

Holland. Last Thursday or Friday was a week Cogin came to me with a subpoena; and I said, if you say this is the man you were in company with, I must swear to it, and I do not like to go before a Justice; then he said I should have half the benefit if the man was hung; I made answer, no, I would sooner give you the money out of my pocket, than be taken before a Justice or a Jury, that I never was before in my life; he said, never mind, you shall have the benefit of it; you shall be well paid for your trouble; I told him I did not want any thing of the kind; then I went to Bow-street, and there I saw the prisoner at night about eight o'clock.

Q. Then you saw him without his hat? - A. Yes.

Q.And yet you did not take any notice to the Justice of the difference of the bald head? - A. No, I did not; I forgot it.

ARTHUR LEARY sworn. - I am a salesman in Rosemary-lane: On a day somewhere about the Fast-day, Cogin and another man came and shook hands with my man, the last witness; after he was gone away, I asked him what he had to do with that fellow; Cogin had lived servant with me formerly.

Q. Did you see who was in company with the prosecutor? - A. I saw him in company with a stout man, at about twenty yards distance, at a public-house door, the Blue-boar in Rosemary-lane; I saw them afterwards again; he was a very tall stout man; he was, I dare say, five feet eleven inches high; the prisoner at the bar is not the man that was in company with Cogin.

Cogin. I lived about sixteen months ago, with Mr. Leary; I was with him four days for one shilling a day, and he used me very well for that time.

Q. And you still persist in saying that the prisoner is the man? - A. I do.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

WILLIAM BROWN.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-32
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Corporal > private whipping

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275. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , two saddles, value 1l. 10s. and two bridles, value 10s. the property of James Taddy .

JAMES TADDY Sworn. - On Friday morning, the 14th of March, I was in the country; I received information from my servant, that my stables had been robbed; I ordered him to make all the enquiries he could; in consequence of which, I found one of my saddles about a few hours after, at the office in Worship-street, between five and six o'clock the same evening; I have not found the rest; the prisoner was a stranger to me.

JOHN WHITE sworn. - I am a stable-keeper, in Worship-street: On Wednesday the 13th of March, the prisoner came down my yard, brought a saddle with him, and asked for me, I was out; I came in, and the prisoner was standing at the gate; he told me he had got a saddle to sell, he asked me seven shillings for it; I asked him how he came by

it, he said, he had bought it of a groom, in Camomile-mews; I asked him whose groom it was, he told me he did not know; I asked him the groom's name, he said, Joe Britt , I told him that I knew him; I told him to call again to-morrow, I had no money in my pocket, and I would pay him for the saddle; he called next day at eleven o'clock, I had not an opportunity of going out, I desired he would call again at two o'clock; I went out, and was informed of Mr. Taddy's loss; I went to Mr. Taddy, and he was in the accompting-house; I got Ray, the officer, of Worship-street, in waiting, against he came at two o'clock; I shewed Ray the prisoner, and he took him into custody; I gave Ray the saddle, I am sure the saddle I delivered to Ray was the same that I had from the prisoner.

JOSEPH ADAMS sworn. - I am groom to Mr. Taddy, in Fenchurch-street ; I missed the property on Thursday the 13th of March, towards the evening, out of the stable in Fenchurch-street; I saw one of the saddles the next day, the 14th, in Mr. White's yard, Mr. White shewed it me; I saw it afterwards at Worship-street, it was the same saddle, it had been and old, heavy, travelling saddle of my master's, and on the left side there was a stirrup leather broke, and a flat stirrup; I have been acquainted with the saddle very near a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; he has been as a groom; he came to my stables on the 7th, I did not see him again till he was taken up; he wanted to know if I knew of any place as he wanted one, and I told him I did not.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street, (produces a saddle;) I received it from White, at his yard the same day; I went to the prisoner's lodgings, he gave me the direction himself, and I there found this key, which undoes the latch of his room door, and also Mr. Taddy's stable door.

Adams. I tried the stable door with this key, and it opened it; this is Mr. Taddy's saddle.

Prisoner's defence. I was going with another young man through Finsbury-square, and we met with Joseph Britt; I bought the saddle of him, I went to sell it to Mr. White, to make my money again. GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

ELIZABETH ALLEN.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-33
VerdictNot Guilty

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276. ELIZABETH, wife of JOHN ALLEN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a spencer, value 2s. a frock, value 4s. a a pair of stays, value 6d. two petticoats, value 3s. a shift, value 1s. a pair of stockings, value 6d. a pair of shoes, value 6d. a tippet, value 1s. a bonnet, value 2s. and a cap, value 6d. the property of Ann Margeson .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of James Margeson .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

HUGH HOLMES.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-34
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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277. HUGH HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , a man's hat, value 5s. the property of Ebenezer Clark .

EBENEZER CLARK sworn. - I live in Whitecross-place, Finsbury-square: On the 6th of March, having business at Guildhall , I was waiting in the lobby, leading to the Council-chamber, and while I was waiting, in conversation, I had pulled off my hat, and put it on a table, which stood in the lobby; by chance, turning my head round, I saw the prisoner at the bar take my hat from off the table, and immediately walked away with it; I followed him, and charged him with having my hat, he seemed much confused, and trembled; I told him, I believed his intention was to steal it; he then dropped my hat, and pulled his own from underneath his coat, where it was buttoned and crumpled up; I then gave him in charge to one of the marshalmen, it was the day of the election for under marshal; I was a candidate, and was waiting for that purpose; I am sure it was my hat.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the place, and laid my hat down upon the table, and happened to take up that gentleman's hat by mistake.

GUILTY (Aged 34.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

JAMES CAVANAUGH.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-35
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Corporal > public whipping

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278. JAMES CAVANAUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , seventy pounds weight of sugar, value 40s. the property of John Coope , the elder, John Coope , the younger, and Joseph Coope .

JOSEPH COOPE sworn. - I am a sugar refiner , in Whitechapel: I know nothing of the loss.

ELLIS WACKER sworn. - The prisoner was a labourer in the sugar house, he was house-keeper the night of the robbery, and it was his business to answer the bell at the gate; some person came to the gate and spoke to the prisoner, and then he gave him a bag out at the gate, and put it down by some dung; the man who took the prisoner brought him to me in the kitchen while he fetched the officer to take charge of him, his name is Wilpen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long have

you been employed in that house? - A. Twenty-five years.

Q. How long has the prisoner lived there? - A. Four months.

Q. The bag was not off the premises at the time you saw it? - A. No.

Court. Q. Is the sugar in your business usually kept in bags? - A. No.

JACOB WILPEN sworn. - I am a watchman at Mr. Coope's: On the 19th of March, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I heard somebody coming out of the sugar house; then I saw the prisoner set down the bag of sugar against a lamp in the yard; then I saw him cover it over with dung; after that, he went to the kitchen, and stopped there a little while, I cannot say how long, I suppose four or five minutes; then somebody rung the bell, and he came out of the kitchen and opened the gate; I do not know who it was, but they talked together for some time, I did not hear what they said; after this, the prisoner laid hold of the bag, and took it up from the ground; I then laid hold of the prisoner, and sent for an officer; the last witness took the bag, and delivered it to me, I have had it ever since; it is the same bag. (Produces it).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a German? - A. Yes.

Q. In general, it is Germans that are employed in sugar-houses? - A. Yes.

Q. How many are there in this sugar-house who are not Germans - are there more than two? - A. No.

Q.You did not like this innovation that Englishmen should be brought to work in the sugar-house? - A. I do not understand you.

Q. Did you never make any complaint that Englishmen should be employed in the sugar-house? - A. No.

Q.Nor any of your fellow-workmen? - A.No.

Q. You do not know who this bag belongs to? - A. No.

Coope. This is the same sort of sugar that we had in our sugar-house.

Wacker. After the prisoner was taken, I went into the sugar-house, and missed a quantity of sugar from one of the bins; after I had looked at the pans and seen them full, I saw the bins full, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and this was about half past eight.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it.

Q.(To Coope.) What are your partners' names? - A.John Coope, the elder, and John Coope , the younger.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

JANE LYALL.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-36
VerdictNot Guilty

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279. JANE LYALL was indicted for the wilful murder of her male bastard child .

She was charged with the like murder upon the Coroner's Inquisition.(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

CHARLES HEBERDEN sworn. - I am a surgeon, in Great Hamilton-street: I was sent for to examine the body of a dead infant; and from the most strict examination, it is not in my power to say the child was born alive; Mr. Jephson was with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

JOSEPH HEWITT.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-37
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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280. JOSEPH HEWITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a silver table-spoon, value 10s. the property of Nicholas-William Middleton .

NICHOLAS- WILLIAM MIDDLETON sworn. -I live in the Strand ; the prisoner lived with me as porter ; I am a pocket-book and pencil-maker : On Saturday evening, the 1st of March, a constable came to my house with two pieces of a silver spoon, which were my property; the constable has got them.

THOMAS WALKER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Parker, silversmith, in Fleet-street: The prisoner, on the 1st of March, brought a table-spoon in to sell; I inquired of him if it belonged to him, and he said, no, it did not, it belonged to his mother, and she lived at No. 39, in Shoe-lane; I sent down to inquire, but no such person lived there; then he said, a lady, dressed in black, gave it him at the corner of Shoe-lane; that he was to bring it to Mr. Parker's, in Fleet-street, and they would buy it of him; he pointed through the window to a lady in black, and said, that was her; I then sent for a constable, and had him taken into custody.

ALEXANDER AULD sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody, and found the property upon him,(producing it); I also found a small penknife upon him.

Mr. Middleton. This is my spoon; it not only has my mark upon it, but it has, by accident, passed through the fire, and therefore is the more remarkable; I cannot say when I had seen it before the prisoner was apprehended; the prisoner was in my service at that time, he had my knot with him.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

JAMES CATLING.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-38
VerdictNot Guilty

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281. JAMES CATLING was indicted for the

wilful murder of George Catling , his infant son of seven months old, by pouring aqua-fortis down its throat .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ELIZABETH LEE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No. 1, Shrewsbury-court, Whitecross-street ; I keep a little green-grocer's shop; the prisoner at the bar lived in the same house; In consequence of a conversation with his wife, I went up into his room on the 15th of February , and she staid below in my room; there was nobody in the room up stairs but the prisoner, he had one child, a boy about seven months old, its name was George Catling ; the child was lying in the cradle, dead, it was just dead when I went into the room; I had seen it alive in the course of that afternoon; the prisoner was sitting by the fire-side, crying; I asked him how the accident happened; he told me the child had been bad with the belly-ach, and his wife had told him to give it a little Dalby's carminitive, and instead of giving it the Dalby's carminitive, he had taken the aqua-fortis bottle, he had made a mistake; he had mixed it with water and sugar; that was the most that passed at that time, I was obliged to go down stairs again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Was not the prisoner a very affectionate father to this child? - A.Very much so, indeed; he was very fond of it.

JAMES RACKSTROW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was at work with the prisoner for Mr. Rice, an iron-founder.

Q. Did you take your beer with him on the Saturday, before this accident happened? - A. Yes, we had it at my master's shop; after he had received his wages, he went to a cupboard that was in the pantry, and took a phial out, and said, this is the way my money goes, with bl-d doctor's stuff.

Q. Was it a common phial? - A. I do not know what phial it was, I only saw it in his hand.

WILLIAM BALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am foreman at the shop where the prisoner used to work, Mr. Rice's, Whitecross-street, Cripplegate: On Sunday the 16th of February, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner at my master's shop-door, as I was going out to get shaved; he was crying, he had a bundle in his hand; I asked him, what was the matter; he said he had had an accident, his child was dead; I asked him how it came; he said he would tell me presently; he went up stairs to my lodgings in the foundery, we took a pint of beer up with us, and then he said, his wife persuaded him to make his escape; I told him, if he offered to make his escape, or run away, people would say he had done it wilfully; and being persuaded by me, he did not offer to go, he staid with me that day; then I said, I would go and try if I could not see his wife; I went to the place where they lodged, she was not at home, and I came and told him that she was not at home; he said he knew where she was gone to, and he went up the street with me towards his lodgings, and we met with her in Old-street, and all three came home to his lodgings together; she began to say what a sad accident it was, and she was in tears, and persuaded him to make his escape, in my presence, for she said she could not bear to see him any more in her sight; and the answer he made was, he should not make away with himself yet; he then left the room; I did not see the prisoner again, to speak to him, till the Tuesday evening following, the 18th; the Coroner's Inquest had sat that evening, I attended the Inquest, and after the verdict was given, I went, with one of the other men that works in our shop, to the prisoner's lodgings, his name is John Burbidge, he was not at the Coroner's Inquest; I called him by name, Jem; I will not be positive whether he answered the first time, or whether I called a second time, he was in bed, it might be then between ten and eleven o'clock; he raised himself up in the bed.

Q.Was that the same lodgings he had lived at before? - A. No, it was in a court in Golden-lane; he raised himself up in the bed, and I said, Jem, they have brought it in accidental; and he said, you are not a joking, are you; I put out my hand to him, says I, there is my hand, for truth; and to the best of my knowledge, he pulled out a book, whether from some part of the bed, or whether from his pocket, I cannot say, it was a prayer-book consisting of prayers, and he said, he had been reading of that in the evening; then he rose from the bed, and put on his things, and came with me and Burbidge away from that house to the end of Shrewsbury-court, where he formerly lived, and I went up to the door of his lodgings with him; I went into the lodgings, and he stopped at the door, his wife came out into the passage and spoke to me; after that, I gave the prisoner a shilling to get something to eat, he said he was in want, he then left me; he was gone, to the best of my knowledge, about half an hour; while he was gone, I had some conversation with his wife, his cousin, and his cousin's wife; and I saw Burbidge again before I saw the prisoner; I went to the prisoner at the Swan, in Whitecross-street, where he went to get his refreshment; I said to him, so, Jem, you have been and owned to it; I asked him how he came to own to it; did you do it, says I, for the purpose; he said, yes; I said, with what; he said, it was aqua-fortis; I asked him where he bought it; he said, at Macdonald's; and I said, no, you did not.

Q. Did you know the place he meant? - A.

Yes, perfectly well; it is a chemist's and druggist's; he said, yes he did, and I told him they denied it; then I asked him whether he asked for that stuff or no; he said, yes, he asked for two-pennyworth of aqua-fortis; I said, did not they say any thing to you about it; he said, no, he laid the two-pence down, and said, if you do not like them I will change them; then I asked him if that was the bottle that he took from our shop on Saturday evening, and he said, yes; then, says I, you thought of doing it he said, he had thought of that two or three months past; that is all that past, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did he appear at that time to be perfectly collected, and seem to have a recollection of what he was about? - A.Perfectly so.

Q. Did he appear to be at all in liquor at that time? - A. I did not see that he was at all intoxicated.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you ever seen him with this child? - A. Yes.

Q. He was always very fond of the child? - A. He seemed always remarkably fond of it.

Q. How long had he worked in this foundery with you? - A. Ever since the 15th of last July.

Q. He was a young man, very much liked among you, as a very worthy, civil, young wan? - A. Yes, a very civil young man, he always behaved very civil.

Q. He was not a sort of a person from whom you would have expected an act of cruelty or barbarity? - A. No, he was not, very far from it.

Q. You say, when you went to him, after the Coroner's Inquisition, he was at another lodging? - A. Yes.

Q. He was not concealed at all there? - A.From his wife.

Q. He and his wife had had some words, but you knew where he was? - A. No, I did not; only the man that got him the lodgings, Burbidge, I was informed by him where he was, and I went to him, thinking it would ease his mind.

JOHN BURBIDGE sworn. - I am a fellow-workman with the prisoner, at Mr. Rice's; I had my beer with him, on Saturday the 15th.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular that he did on the Saturday? - A. No; on the Sunday, I was informed of the accident, by Bell, the foreman; I then went to the prisoner's lodgings, but he was not at home, his wife was at home; I saw him in the afternoon of the Sunday, between four and five o'clock, or it might be sooner, I cannot say exactly; I saw him at the public-house, opposite the shop where we work.

Q.Was he at that time sober? - A. He appeared to me very sober, I did not see that he had been drinking any thing at all; when I went first into the tap-room, I did not see him till he spoke to me; he said, Jack, is that you? then I called him out of the box where he was sitting with some more men; he came and sat along with me, I said to him, for God's sake, Jem, what have you been doing at home; I said, Jem, were you drunk last night, or were you out of your mind; I then asked him what he had been about; then I asked him where he had got the stuff from, he told me, from Mr. Macdonald's; he said, he went there and asked for two pennyworth of aqua-fortis; I said to him, Jem, had you any thought of this? - Yes, he says, I have had it in my head a long time, but he did not think, he said, it would kill the child so soon; then I got up out of the box and left him; I had seen the child that morning, dead, it looked very much burnt, sadly burnt about the mouth, and on the left hand, I think, but I am not quite certain which hand; I left the box where he was sitting, I would not sit with him any longer; I staid in the house till about nine o'clock, in another box; about that time, he asked me if I would go with him to get him a lodging; I went with him, and got him a lodging; I left him at his lodgings in Golden-lane.

Q. Did you attend the Coroner's Inquest? - A. I was not before the Jury, but I was in the house; it was a public-house in Whitecross-street.

Q. As you were in the house, how happened it that you were not examined? - A. I cannot tell.

Q.Had you told any body of this conversation? - A. Yes, I had told Bell, and ever so many of my shop-mates.

Court. Q. And yet you did not offer to tell what you knew before the Coroner? - A. No, I did not; I saw the prisoner again on the Tuesday night after the verdict; Mr. Bell and I went after him, we found him in bed at his lodgings, in Golden-lane; either Mr. Bell, or else me, said, Jem, every thing is all right, and he could hardly believe it; and Bell offered his hand to him, as much as to say that it was the truth, and he made answer and said, thank God Almighty, for I have been here a praying, and I am very hungry; he had a book, but I cannot read, I do not know what book it was, he got up, and went along with Bell and me.

Q. Had he any money of his own, do you know? - A. I do not know; we then went to the end of Shrewsbury-court, and there I left him, very near his door, where he had formerly lived; I went to the house where my shop-mates were, opposite the shop where we work, that might be about ten o'clock at night; it was a public-house; I left that house, and I saw the prisoner again the same evening; I went with my shop-mates to the Swan, and there we found the prisoner; I asked

him, Jem, are not you glad that you got off in this manner, he said, yes; and I asked him then, whether he had an intention, or a thought to destroy the child, he said, yes, and then I left him, and went to another part of the house.

Q. Was Tuckey there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Tuckey come to fetch her husband home? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing more after that? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The conversation you had with him on the Sunday, you told Bell, before the Coroner's Jury sat? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell Bell of it on the Monday or the Tuesday morning? - A. I mentioned it on the Monday, but I do not know whether I told Bell of it on the Monday or not.

Q.But you told Bell of it before the Coroner's Jury sat? - A. Yes; I told all my shop-mates of it.

Mr. Gurney. (To Bell.) Q.Before the Coroner's Jury sat, had Burbidge told you that the prisoner said he had had it in his head a long time, but did not think it would kill the child so soon? - A. Not to my recollection; I do not remember that he told me of it till after the Jury had sat, when he told me of it at the Swan door.

Q. But before the Jury had sat, he did not mention it to you? - A. Not to my knowledge; he might have mentioned it in the shop, but not to my knowledge.

Court. (To Barbidge.) Q. You say, you told your shop-mates of it on the Monday? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you remember whether Bell was among those shop-mates to whom you mentioned it? - A. I cannot rightly say; I do not remember who was there.

Q.What makes you sure that you had told Bell before the Coroner's Jury sat? - A. I cannot rightly say that Bell was there, when I told of the conversation that I had had with the prisoner.

Q.Where were your shop-mates at that time? - A. In the shop.

Q. Do you remember telling Bell of it, on the Tuesday night? - A. Yes.

Q.Then it is most probable you had not told him before? - A. I do not rightly remember my telling him of it on the Monday.

ABRAHAM TUCKEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a brother workman with the prisoner; I went to the Swan public-house on the Tuesday night, after the Coroner's Jury had sat; Burbidge went with me, I believe it was somewhere about ten o'clock, we found the prisoner there, he was talking to Burbidge; I heard him say he gave it to the child on purpose, I did not hear him say what; my wife came in just afterwards to fetch me home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.How long have you worked with the prisoner? - A.Ever since about a week before Christmas.

Q. Had you ever seen him with his child? - A. Many times.

Q. Did you ever see a man more fond of a child than he was? - A. No, never.

Q. Was he not a very worthy humane man; I never saw any thing bad of him in my life.

Q. He is not a man from whom you would have expected any barbarity? - A. No.

MARY TUCKEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am the wife of the last witness; on the Tuesday evening, after the Coroner's Jury had sat, I went over to the Swan, to my husband, and the prisoner was there, talking to his shop-mates; I heard him say he gave a drop out of the spoon, and then a drop out of the bottle; it gave me such a turn, that I turned myself away, and heard no more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Had you ever seen him with this child? - A. Yes.

Q. He was a very affectionate father, was he not? - A. Yes, very fond of his child indeed.

Q. Did you think him a likely man to murder his child? - A. I do not think he did it on purpose.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer of Hatton-garden: The prisoner was brought to our office; the Magistrate had then left the office; I then took him to the Hat and Tun in Hatton-wall; he sat in the taproom some time, and I thought that was not the proper place to ask him any thing, I thought it was too public; we went backwards into the parlour with some more of his shop-mates with him.

Court. Q.Why were you to question him? - A. We thought he would tell us the facts that he had told the other men before.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.When you took him into the parlour, did you tell him he had better confess? - A. I believe some of his shop-mates did.

Q. Then you know nothing about the apprehension? - A. No.

THOMAS SOWDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a surgeon: In consequence of an application from the overseers of the parish, I went to see the body of a dead male child, in a court in Whitecross-street, on the morning of the day on which the Coroner's Inquest sat; the child appeared to be about six months old; the lips were discoloured; about the size of a small saucer upon its left breast, and about the size of a crown by the thumb, upon the back of the left hand; I then opened the body, but found that no part of the fluid which had stained the mouth and lips, and breast and hand, had got farther than the mouth; the appearances upon dissection proved the child to have been ailing; the liver was twice its natural

size, and must, even before the stomach was half full, have produced vomitings.

Q. Where you able to judge from your observations, what was the immediate cause of the child's death? - A. The fluid that had been put to the mouth I knew immediately was aqua-fortis; I then asked to examine the bottle that the fluid might have been in.

Q. If aqua-fortis got into the mouth of the child it might produce a suffocation from whence death might ensue? - A. I do believe it.

Q. And you believe the appearances upon the mouth of the child were the effect of aqua-fortis? - A. I do.

Q. Then are you inclined, upon the whole, to think that aqua-fortis put into the mouth of the child was the cause of the death? - A. I believe so, it appeared to me as if the child had lifted its hand up to its mouth to wipe off the aqua fortis; from the direction of the stain upon the hand, it appeared to me it had been done in that manner.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Look at those two bottles; is the one aqua-fortis and the other Dalby's carminative? - A.This appears to me to be what is called Dalby's carminative; but I am no farther acquainted with it than from its appearance.

Q. The colour of the one is not at all like the colour of the other? - A. In the appearance in which you now see them, they are not of the same colour; but the carminative will, I believe, upon standing, have a sediment at the bottom; and I believe the carminative itself will be of a brownish red.

Q. Even after it might have stood a considerable time, would it then have the appearance of aquafortis, as to colour? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I take it they would have both much the same appearance in the dark? - A. Of course.

Q. Supposing the two bottles had been of the same form, a person would not find out in the dark, the one from the other? - A. No.

Q. This supernatural swelling of the liver must have been of a dangerous tendency? - A. It must have produced other disorders.

Q. Are you able to state perfectly that the death of that child was owing to aqua-fortis? - A. I cannot perfectly state that; I would not presume to state that.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. From the appearance of the mouth, do you think aqua-fortis sufficient to produce early suffocation and death? - A. I think it is likely to produce suffocation.

Q. Did you see any natural causes, upon dissection, to which you could ascribe sudden death, independent of this aqua-fortis? - A.None.

Q. You did not open the head of the child? - A. I did not.

Q. The opening of the head might have enabled you to discover other causes, that you are now ignorant of? - A. It frequently has.

Q.Probably you have known instances of violent vomitings, producing suffocations, and ruptures of blood-vessels in the head? - A. Not suffocations; I have known instances of ruptures of blood-vessels in the head.

Court. Q. No part of the aqua-fortis had found its way down the throat? - A. No part.

Q. Did you observe that aqua-fortis had been used, before you were told any thing about it? - A. I had had no information whatever respecting it; but the moment I saw it, I knew it was aquafortis.

Q. Could that discolouration be occasioned by any thing else? - A. No; unless it was spirits of nitre.

Prisoner's defence. How the aqua-fortis came into the house I do not know; I did it accidentaily.(Mr. Miles proved that Shrewsbury-court was in the county of Middlesex.)

For the Prisoner.

JOSEPH MAYOW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at Chesham, in the county of Bucks, I have known the prisoner from his infancy.

Q. How old is he now? - A. He is turned of nineteen.

Q. What character for morality and humanity has he maintained during all his life? - A. I never saw any thing amiss of him from his cradle.

Q. Has he been a humane good lad, or otherwise? - A.Entirely so.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

WILLIAM SMITH, THOMAS BREWER, JAMES ENNIS.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-39
VerdictNot Guilty

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282. WILLIAM SMITH , THOMAS BREWER , and JAMES ENNIS were indicted for that they, in the King's highway, on the 26th of February , in and upon William Cumming did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 3l. a gilt watch-chain, value 6d. and a metal watch-key, value 2d. the property of the said William .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM CUMMING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am master of a ship in the Quebec trade: On the 26th of February, about a quarter or half past ten at night, I was in the parish of St. George's Middlesex; I had just stepped out of Dr. Morgan's shop in Ratcliff-highway ; he keeps a surgeon and apothecary's shop; when I was stopped by some persons that I took to be a press-gang; there were seven or eight of them: they asked me what I was, I told them a master of a ship; they told me I was no master of a ship, I was a mate; they asked me

for my affidavit, I told them I had not had one for nine years; they then told me they would take me away to the rendezvous; I called to Dr. Morgan's man, and told him to desire Dr. Morgan, when he went down, to send the ship's papers, as I had none in my pocket, for the purpose of satisfying them; they then took me away from the door, and when they had got me about ten yards from the door, they all got round me and hustled me; some held my hands, some took me by the collar, and listed me nearly off the ground with my hands up; I begged of them to let me walk myself, and I would go with them; they kept me in that way for the space of a minute, and then they all of them let go together, and I walked in the middle of them; and as soon as they let me go, I put my hand down and missed my watch; I did not miss it before; I told them they had robbed me; they d-'d me, and asked me if I was going to make robbers of them; I told them, no, they had done that themselves; then they all ran away, and I caught hold of the last man; a gentleman hearing the noise, came up and told me he would assist me; the man that I took I delivered to Wood, the watchman; we went on till we came to a watch-box, and there seeing the watchman, I charged him with this man, but he got away again; when we had walked the space of 200 yards, the pressgang, as I supposed, came up behind, and knocked the watchman down; they rescued the person in custody, and then they all ran away; then the watchman desired me to go down to the watch-house, which I did; I described the two persons that I saw between me and Dr. Morgan's light, when the young man brought the candle to the door; the prisoners Smith and Ennis are those two persons; they are the persons that laid hold of my arms at Dr. Morgan's door, and hustled me; I do not know any thing of the other prisoner; they were apprehended the next morning; I was with the officers when they were apprehended, about half past nine in the morning, not far distant from where they stopped me; they were just coming out of a public-house, and one man that was with them ran away.

Q. Are you sure before they hustled you, that you had your watch in your pocket? - A. Yes, I am well assured of it.

Q. How long before had you seen it? - A. Not ten minutes.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you miss your watch? - A. In a quarter of a minute.

Q. Are you sure that Smith and Ennis were two of these persons? - A. Yes, I am.

Cross-examined by Mr. Beville. Q.Did you ever see these men before? - A. I have seen their persons in the street.

Q.When was the last time you saw them before this happened? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you, at any time that you had seen them before, take any particular notice of them? - A. No, only when I see a press-gang it is natural to look at them.

Q. One press-gang is not like another then, I suppose? - A. No, no more than other men.

Q. Had you ever taken particular notice of the countenances of these men? - A. Yes, I am clear I had seen them before.

Q. Do you mean to say that you know the countenances of all the press-gangs you ever saw? - A. By no means; but I had seen these two before, and knew them again.

Q.Then you cannot tell us at what time you had seen them? - A. No.

Q. At what hour was this offence committed? - A. Almost half past ten.

Q. It was dark, was it not? - A. Yes, very dark.

Q.From what reason can you swear that these two men were the identical persons that robbed you? - A.When I saw them at Dr. Morgan's door with a candle at the door, I saw them between me and the candle, and am sure they are the same men.

Court. Q.What do you mean by their being between you and the candle? - A. So that the candle shone upon their faces.

JOHN COOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the Police-officers of Shadwell: I was with the prosecutor at the apprehension of those prisoners.

Q. In consequence of the information the prosecutor gave you, did you apprehend the prisoners? - A. Yes, he was in company with me and the other officers; he pointed out Ennis and Smith from five other men; I searched them, and found upon Smith, who was the master of the gang, a paper,(producing it;) he said he was authorised by Mr. Whiteway to press men; he stands upon Towerhill to get all the seamen he can.

Q. A crimp, I suppose? - A. Yes; I apprehended them, and took them before the Magistrates at Shadwell; and there the prosecutor swore positively to Ennis and Smith; he never had the least doubt about them; the watch has never been found.

JOHN WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was called to the assistance of the prosecutor: On Wednesday the 26th of February, about half past ten o'clock, I received in charge from him a stout man, apparently an Irishman, and he went with me a little way, and then he got from me.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, all of them; two I know particularly, Ennis and Brewer, I saw them in the street that

might; I was knocked down by three or four men, and the man that was delivered to me got away, but when I self upon the ground, I saw Ennis and Brewer run away; Ennis made a reply to his other comrades, come up this place, that was White's-yard; upon that I went to the watch-house and gave information; when the prosecutor gave me charge of the first man, I told him what gang they were, they used to go a pressing of a night.

Smith's defence. When I was before the Magistrate, he swore to me by my silk handkerchief, he did not know me any other way; I was at home in bed at the time the robbery was committed.

For Smith.

SARAH WILLOUGHBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. The prisoner at the bar lodges with me, and has done for some years; he was at home very soon after ten o'clock that night, and he was not out again that night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What day of the week was this? - A. On the Wednesday.

Q. Are you sure it was on the Wednesday? - A. Yes.

Q.What day of the month? - A. I believe the 26th.

Q. Of January? - A. I believe it was.

Q. You are pretty sure it was the 26th of January? - A. I think it was January; but I am very sure it was on a Wednesday.

Q. It was not in February, was it? - A. I think it was six weeks last Wednesday, as near as I can guess.

Q. He is out sometimes late at night? - A. Yes; according to what they are they are out late at night.

Q. What are they? - A. They belong to Dickenson the press-master, or something of that.

Q.They were out one night that week besides? - A. I dare say they were out every day.

Q. Can you tell my Lord what time they came home on Tuesday night? - A. No.

Q. Thursday night? - A. They were not at home all night on Thursday.

Q. Monday night? - A. I cannot say; but I am perfectly sure he was in on the Wednesday night.

Q. Did he come home by himself that night? - A. Yes.

Q.How soon after ten? - A. I cannot say particularly, because I had no clock; I think about a quarter past ten was as much as it was.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner since he has been in jail? - A. I saw him this morning.

Q. Had you any conversation with him? - A. Not many words.

Q. Did you talk about this robbery? - A. No.

Q. Nor about the day? - A.Not to-day.

Q. When was it that it was mentioned? - A. I cannot tell the day; I talked of it at home to my own mind.

Q. But who has talked to you to you about it's being Wednesday? - A. A great many of my neighbours.

Q. Name any of them? - A. Mrs. Cockburn.

Q. How came she to say any thing about the Wednesday? - A. I said it to her.

Q. Is Mrs. Cockburn here? - A. No.

Mr. Beville. Q. Then you are sure, on Wednesday six weeks, he was at home a little after ten? - A. I think it was Wednesday six weeks.

Court. Q. What time did you go to bed yourself? - A. Past eleven o'clock, I heard the watchman go.

The prisoner, Smith, called one other witness, who had known him seven years, and gave him a good character.

Ennis's defence. I was at the house of William Gilbert at the time.

For Ennis.

WILLIAM GILBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I met with the prisoner, Ennis, at the corner of Charles-street, on Wednesday night the 26th of February, about half past nine o'clock at the farthest, he went home with me, and continued with me till about half past ten, it might be rather less, or rather more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It was not more than half past ten? - A.No; I think not.

Q. Where is Charles-street? - A. Gravel-lane.

Q. That is near Rarcliff-highway, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q.What is he? - A. A sea-faring man, I believe.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a foundery-man, and he used to work at our shop, with me, since he came from sea.

Court. Q.How do you know it was the 26th of February? - A. The next morning I heard that he was taken.

SARAH GILBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. On Wednesday evening, the 26th of February, the prisoner came to our house with my husband, about ten o'clock.

Q. How long do you think he staid? - A. Upwards of half an hour.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did not he stay with you more than an hour? - A. I cannot say; he staid a good while.

Q. Had you no clock? - A. No.

Q. And you are so deaf you could not hear the watchman? - A. I did not that night.

Q. Have you been to Newgate since they have been in custody? - A. I have seen them, I saw them yesterday.

Q. Had you any conversation with them about Wednesday? - A. No.

Q.Was not the robbery a part of your conversation? - A. A few words.

Q. Was it not relative to Wednesday the 26th of February? - A. No.

Q. Your husband has sworn that he left your house about half after ten o'clock? - A. I told you he was there half an hour, or better.

Q. Where is your house? - A. In Anchor and Hope-alley, Old Gravel-lane.

Q. That is near Ratcliff-highway? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know know Dr. Morgan's house? - No.

Q. How soon could you get into Ratcliff-highway? - A.Some people walk faster than others; it might be a quarter of an hour, or some might take more.

Q. How long have you known Ennis? - A. Sixteen or seventeen years.

Q. What way of life has he been in? - A. He has worked in the foundery since he came from sea.

Q. Any thing else? - A. Yes, he belonged to the gang.

Q. Did he ever live pretty near where you are now - do you ever remember him living in that place behind the prisoner? - A. Not before this time.

Smith. Cook, the officer, was endeavouring to persuade the captain to swear we were the men; the captain was so drunk he could not stand.

Cook. It was no such thing, he was not the least disguised in liquor from the first moment to the least.

Mr. Beville. (To the Prosecutor.) Q.How long was it before you went to the door that you were hustled? - A. I was hustled after I had got to the door; I could not have sworn to them if it had not been for the candle at the door.

Q. You said you had seen these men before? - A. I had seen them in the street.

Q. Did you know their names before? - A. No; I knew that I had seen them in a press-gang.

All Three NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

WILLIAM DRACOTT.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-40
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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283. WILLIAM DRACOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , two pair of cotton stockings, value 8s. the property of James Daykin .

JAMES DAYKIN sworn. - I am a serjeant in the Guards , the prisoner at the bar was quartered along with me at the Catherine-wheel, in Little St. James's-street : On the 25th of March, about seven o'clock, I got up, and left the prisoner in bed; and upon returning to my quarters, about ten in the evening, I learned that the prisoner was in St. James's watch-house; I went into my bed-room, and found my knapsack open, and two pair of cotton stockings missing out of it; I had seen them that morning before I went out, I had taken a clean shirt out to put on the next morning I went to the prisoner in the watch-house, and challenged him with stealing the stockings, and he confessed it.

Q. Did you tell him he had better confess? - A. No, I did not; he said he was drunk, and had taken them out of my knapsack, and given them to one Franklin to pledge for him, and that he had pawned them for three shillings; upon that, I went down to Franklin's, who is a soldier in the same company, and he gave me the duplicate; he is not here, he is sick in the hospital; and on Friday the 28th, at Marlborough-street, the officer went down to the pawnbroker's, and he produced the stockings, they were produced at the Public-office; the pawnbroker has them.

- EDWARDS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Brown, No. 2, Panton-street: On the 25th of March, a person of the name of Franklin, came to me with two pair of stockings to pledge; I did not know him before, he was dressed in soldier's clothes, he asked four shillings upon them. (Produces the stockings).

Daykin. These stockings are my property, the two first letters of my name are wove in them; they were made for me in Derbyshire.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor when I took them.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

JOSEPH CHADWICK.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-41
VerdictGuilty > with recommendation
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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284. JOSEPH CHADWICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , an earthen jar, value 1d. one hundred and twenty-five penny-pieces, and nine halfpence , the property of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL sworn. - I keep the assembly-house at Kentish-town : On the 28th of February, in the evening, the prisoner came in, with another person, and asked for a pint of ale, and asked what time the stage went to London; I told him about seven o'clock, or a little after; he desired I would take care of two places, one for himself, and one for his friend; the coach came in a few minutes, and I sent the boy in to let them know; his friend gave the boy a shilling to take for the pint of ale, and a halfpennyworth of tobacco; the shilling was carried to the bar for change, my little girl was in the bar, they got on the stage, and in consequence of what my little girl told me, I ran and stopped the coach, it had got a very little way, the two men were upon the box with the coachman; I got up upon the box, and felt round the box, but

could not find the jar, and I returned home; after that, I followed the coach again to Tottenham-court-road; I missed the jar of penny-pieces, I had had it in my hand not two minutes before, there were ten shillings and five-pence in penny-pieces, and four-pence halfpenny in new halfpence; I came up with the coach in Tottenham-court-road, and stopped the coachman, he said, I am glad you are come, for here is your tobacco-box, he thought he had taken my tobacco-box, for he had heard it rattle; I then opened the prisoner's coat, and there was my jar and the copper, (produces it); I have no doubt but it is mine; the jar that I lost had such a mark as this, (pointing to a mark in the jar); and there was the same quantity of copper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.You had not counted it before it was taken away? - A. No, I had not.

Court. Q.Is it usual for publicans to keep their money in a jar? - A. No.

LEWIS WYBER sworn. - I drive the Kentish-town stage: On the 28th of February, the prisoner, and another man, got upon the coach-box to come to town, the prisoner sat between me and his companion; Mr. Hall holloaed out, and I stopped; he went away again, and afterwards overtook me in Tottenham-court-road; I heard something rattle, and I thought the prisoner had stolen Mr. Hall's tobacco-box; there was a hole in the road, and I drove into the hole, which threw us all off the box, I had nobody in the coach, and then I was confident he had got something with money in it; when Mr. Hall came up, he opened his coat, and took the jar from him.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which his Counsel thought it unnecessary to have read.

GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

WILLIAM BRIANT.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-42
VerdictGuilty
SentenceImprisonment > house of correction; Miscellaneous > fine

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285. WILLIAM BRIANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , five pounds of mutton, value 2s. 6d. the property of William Lane .

WILLIAM LANE sworn. - I am a butcher , I live in Well-street, Wellclose-square ; I have a latch to my half-door, I was in a room that looks into the shop: On Thursday the 20th of February, just as the candles were lit, I heard the bolt of the door go, and I looked through the window, and saw the prisoner go to the back part of the shop and take a shoulder of mutton, he took it with his left-hand, and put it under his right-arm, and walked out of the shop, I followed him immediately; about thirty yards up Well-street he turned round, saw me behind him, and dropped the shoulder of mutton, I was then about ten yards from him; I passed the shoulder of mutton and took hold of him; he did not run, he made a strong resistance, I had him down, and he begged I would let him get up, and he would go quietly; he walked a little farther with me, and then went upon his knees, and begged I would let him go; I told him I would not; we went as far as the sign of the Black Horse, in Well-street, I had hold of him all the time; when I got to the Black Horse, he insisted upon going in there, saying the man knew him; I went in, thinking I should get assistance there; when I got in, the landlord said, holloa, holloa, what is the matter; I told him the prisoner had robbed me of a shoulder of mutton; the landlord swore we were both thieves together, and made use of very horrible expressions, and if we did not get out he would kick us out; I left the man then, for I thought I should get ill used, and walked out at the fore-door; I staid there it might be four or five minutes, and then I went in again; the prisoner was not there then, and the landlord said he would punish me, and bring an action against me, for attempting to breed a riot in his house, and then I went to the Magistrate's; I saw nothing of the prisoner till the Monday following, when I saw him at the Police-office in Lambeth-street.

Q.Are you sure the prisoner is the same man that you carried into the Black Horse? - A. Yes, I had seen him several times; the shoulder of mutton was brought to the office.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street, Whitechapel: I took the prisoner into custody, in company with Griffiths, on Sunday the 23d of February, we took him out of bed in a lodging-house in Cable-street; Griffiths called him by his name, and asked him how he came to be guilty of such a mean action, as to steal a shoulder of mutton; he said he could not tell what possessed him to do it, it was not for want, for he had received some money but a few days before.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I was with Nowlan when I saw the prisoner, I knew him; I ordered him to get up, for we wanted him; I asked him how he could have such meanness as to steal a shoulder of mutton; I asked him if he did it from distress; he said, no, he did not, for he had received a sum of money a very short time before, and he had a good deal more to receive; he said, the prosecutor had followed him, took him by the collar, and took him into the Black Horse, and that, in consequence of a quarrel between the prosecutor and the landlord, he got out at the back part of the house into another street; I took him to the office, and the prosecutor swore he was the man; I have

known him some years, but I never knew any thing amiss of him before.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming up from the coast of Wapping, and the man laid hold of me; I knew nothing of it.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

JOHN OVERTON.
2nd April 1800
Reference Numbert18000402-43
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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286. JOHN OVERTON , alias LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a sheet, value 3s. two blankets, value 12s. a cotton counterpane, value 12s. and an apron, value 6d. the property of William Carter .

WILLIAM CARTER sworn. - I am a working jeweller and goldsmith , No. 13, Exeter-court, in the Strand ; I lodge on the second floor; I sent my wife out, I was finishing my dinner; I sat a few minutes, I thought I heard a noise, and went out, but saw nobody; I returned back to my dinner, I sat a few minutes more, and thought I heard the noise of a lock fly back; I went gently across the room, and saw the back room door a-jar, I rushed in, when the prisoner at the bar stood before me, in the back room; I took hold of him, and called him a thief, his hand was as close as could be to the bundle of bed-linen that laid tied up at the feet of the bed; I held him as strong as I could, but he dragged me into the passage, where I holloaed for assistance, but being too strong for me, I was obliged to let him go; he drew a knife, but whether it was open or shut I cannot tell, till he put it towards me; I let him go, and he ran down; I called stop thief, he was stopped at the door; he left the bundle behind him, it contained a sheet, two blankets, and a cotton counterpane, and an apron he dropped upon the stairs; the clothes had been left upon the bed, the bed was unmade; I saw them all on the bed, not twenty minutes before; he was a total stranger to me.

JAMES HUNT sworn. - I lodge in the same house; I heard the alarm, I ran down stairs, and saw the prisoner attempting to get out at the door; I collared him, and brought him back to the stairs, till the constable came.

JANE SIMPSON sworn. - I lodge in the first floor, and my door being open, I heard a noise up stairs; I saw the prisoner run down stairs, and heard Mr. Carter call, stop thief, I ran down stairs and called stop thief, and I saw the prisoner lift up a knife at the landlady, I do not know whether it was drawn or not, I was very much alarmed; he lifted up his hand, and swore by G-d he would knock the landlady down, if she did not let him out.

JANE LAVENDER sworn. - On the 15th of last month, I heard a noise up stairs, and presently the prisoner ran down stairs; I was sweeping the passage, and had no means of stopping him, but by shutting the street-door; he held up his hand, and swore by G-d he would knock me down; Mr. Hunt then came up, and he was secured. (The property was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I came to town from Blackwall; I went to see my sister, I understood she was gone to live at this house; I went up to enquire for her, and this man laid hold of me; I know nothing about the property.

GUILTY . (Aged 57.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.