Old Bailey Proceedings.
13th May 1730
Reference Number: 17300513

ActionsCite this text | Print-friendly version | Report an error
Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
13th May 1730
Reference Numberf17300513-1

Related Material
THE PROCEEDINGS AT THE Sessions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, FOR THE City of LONDON, AND County of MIDDLESEX; ON

Wednesday the 13th, Thursday the 14th, and Friday the 15th of May, 1730, in the Third Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

Being the Fifth SESSIONS in the Mayoralty of the Right Honourable Sir RICHARD BROCAS , Knt. Lord Mayor of the City of LONDON, in the Year 1730.

No. V. for the said YEAR.

LONDON:

Printed for T. PAYNE, at the Crown in Ivy-Lane, near Pater-noster-Row. M.DCC.XXX.

(Price Six Pence.)

THE PROCEEDINGS AT THE Sessions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, for the CITY of LONDON; AND ON

The King's Commission of Goal-Delivery of Newgate, held at Justice-Hall in the Old-Bailey; for the CITY of London, and COUNTY of Middlesex.

On Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, being the 13th, 14th, and 15th of May 1730, in the Third Year of His MAJESTY's Reign,

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir RICHARD BROCAS , Knt. Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Honourable Mr. Justice Page , the Worshipful Mr. Serjeant Raly ; and others of His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and Goal-Delivery for the City of London, and Goal-Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and Country of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Bates .

Bethel Goodwin .

Hugh Dennis .

George Pinkney .

John Prichard .

John Bargeman .

Thomas Gregg .

William Basnet .

Thomas Crane .

Thomas Radley .

Thomas Cook .

Edward Nurden .

Middlesex Jury.

David Cooper .

Marmaduke Smith .

Samuel Warral .

George Calson .

John Payne .

Peter Burden .

James Guenin .

John Mitchel .

John Clark .

Michael Price .

Arthur Granger .

Cornelius Heath .

Elizabeth Smith.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-1
VerdictGuilty > pleaded guilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Elizabeth Smith , of St. Dionis Back-Church , was indicted for privately stealing a pair of Stockings, Value 3 s. in the Shop of Thomas Allen , and Richard Hargrave , the 4th of April last; to which Indictment she pleaded Guilty .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Richard Wise.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-2
VerdictGuilty > theft under 1s

Related Material

Richard Wise , of the Parish of Christ-Church , was indicted for feloniously stealing a pair of Shoes and Clogs, Value 10 d. the Goods of John Hannel , the 20th of April last; the Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d.

Robert Eaton.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-3
VerdictGuilty > theft under 1s
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Robert Eaton , of St. Giles Cripplegate , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Linen Gown, Value 20 s. the Property of Elizabeth Higgins , the 14th of December last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Gown was lost out of a Tub of Water in the Yard, but she did not know who stole it, till some considerable time after, as she was going along the Street, near Moorgate , she saw it upon the Back of Mary Francklin , that she laying Claim to the Gown, Mary Francklin said she bought the Gown of the Prisoner.

Mary Francklin depos'd, That she did buy the Gown of the Prisoner, giving him half a Guinea for it, who pretended he found it in Moorfields , and promised her to bear her harmless if any Body laid claim to it .

The Prisoner pleaded that he did find the Gown in Moorfields , but not proving it, the Jury found him Guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Rowland Friend.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-4
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Rowland Friend , of St. Botolph's Aldersgate , was indicted for feloniously stealing two

Bushels of Brass, a Bushel and a half of Wheaten Flower, and a Buthel and a half of Peas , the Goods of Thomas Wilson , the 23d of April last .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he keeps the Crose-Keys Inn in Barbicane , and that the Prisoner was employ'd as an Assistant to a Waggon which Inn'd there , and that having lost Goods from time to time when that Waggon was there, and not any other times, he suspected the Prisoner, and order'd his Servants to watch that Night in the Hay-loft.

Joseph Harding depos'd, That he being order'd to lie in the Hay-loft to watch , did, about Two o'Clock in the Morning, see the Prisoner come down into the Yard, go into the Stable, and let out the Dog, took out a Sack, and went up with it empty into the Bean loft, and came down with it full, and threw it into the Waggon; that there standing Sacks of Flower in the Yard, he saw him fill two Bags , and put them in the Waggon; and the like he did by the Peas which stood there in Sacks, first taking them out into his Hat, and then putting them into a Bag, and having thrown them into the Waggon likewise, went into the Stable to strike a light, but not being able to do it, went out of the Gate to get a Candle lighted by the Watch; that then they went down, and at his coming in apprehended him. This was likewise confirmed by John Worth .

The Prisoner having but little to say in his Defence, and the Fact being so plainly proved, the Jury found him Guilty of the Indictment.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Thomas Street, John Double.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-5
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Thomas Street and John Double , of St. Andrew's Holbourn , were indicted for burglariously breaking the House of John Airy , and entering in the Night-time, and stealing a Gown, a Stuff Gown, two Pair of Stays, a Wastecoat, two Pair of Breeches, and other Goods , the 19th of March last.

Anne Gilner depos'd, That the Goods were lost out of her Room about Eight or Nine o'Clock at Night, and that going into Rag-Fair, she saw a Woman offering the Sattin Gown to Sale, who said, she bought it of the Prisoners , who were at an Alehouse in Rag-Fair; but she not taking Care to secure the Woman, and to procure her to be an Evidence against the Prisoners, the Evidence against them being deficient, they were acquitted .

John Young.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-6
VerdictGuilty
SentenceDeath

Related Material

John Young , of the Parish of Hayes, in the County of Middlesex , was indicted for assaulting Thomas Stinton , in a Field, or open Place, near the Highway, putting him in Fear, and taking from him a Brown Mare , value 7 l. a Bridle, value 1 s. 6 d. as Saddle, value 12 s. three Broad Pieces of Gold, and 9 s. in Money , the 15th of February last .

Thomas Stinton depos'd, That as he was coming from Bristol towards London the 12th of February last, about six or seven Miles on this side Bristol he met with the Prisoner, who said he was going to Cirencester , and that he being also going thither, they said they should be glad of one another's Company; that they did not get to Cirencester that Night, but lodg'd at another Place, and came to Cirencester on the Friday; that the Prisoner then said he was going to Oxford, and he himself being going thither, said, he should be glad of his Company and lodg'd that Night at the White-Hart, between Cirencester and Oxford , and about Noon, on Saturday, they came to Oxford, and he (this Evidence) having an Acquaintance there, they staid that Afternoon; the Prisoner pretending to have been disappointed of Money, he there lent him a Crown, and that the next Morning they went from Oxford to Loud-Water , and there they lodg'd all Night; and he lent the Prisoner half a Crown more, and on Monday Morning they set out for London, and being come a little on this side Uxbridge, the Prisoner said he had an Acquaintance at Hounslow , where he could have what Money he pleased, and there he would pay him his Money; that the Prisoner turned off on the Right-hand of the Road near Hayes , and carried him to Botwel , and then the Way being very dirty, the Prisoner told him he would carry him a cleaner and better Way, and would have him ride cross some Lands over Hedges and Ditches; but coming where there was no Way, they being stopped by a River, he turned his Horse, and said, the Prisoner was either a Fool or a Knave to lead him where there was no visible Way; that he turning his Horse to go back , the Prisoner having a large Cane in

his Hand, struck him a violent Blow over his Head, which knock'd him off his Horse, and made the Blood flow out of his Mouth, &c. in abundance, so that he thought he should be strangled; that in a little time he recovering his Senses, he saw the Prisoner standing a little way off, and the two Mares Bridles ty'd together; that getting up on his Feet, the Prisoner came to him, and said, D - n you, give me your Money; that he then said to the Prisoner, is this the Kindness you show to your Friend? That he reply'd, give me your Money presently; that he answer'd him, I have not Strength, if you must have it, you must take it; that his Gloves were all over bloody; that the Prisoner came and searched him, took his Money and his Pocket Book, that he desir'd him not to take his Pocket Book; which would be of little Use to him, but of Detriment to him (the Prosecutor;) that he ask'd him if he would give him no Money to carry him Home? That the Prisoner said he would give him that should carry him Home presently, and firing a Pistol, shot him through the Neck, and clapping his Hand upon his Breast push'd him into a Ditch, saying to him, lie there; that he lay there, and when he had recover'd some strength, he got up but saw neither Prisoner nor Mares, and made shift to get to a House, and get some Help.

He added, That when they were at Loud-water , the Prisoner was talking of the Advantage of letting Blood in the Spring, and said, he used to let Blood sometimes, and show'd him a Case of Lancets, and that when the Prisoner was apprehended, and before Justice Hucks, he ask'd the Prisoner for those Lancets he show'd him at Loud-water , that the Prisoner did not deny his having them; but said he had them not about him, they were at Home in his Lodging.

George Hartwel depos'd, That the Prisoner and Prosecutor came together to his House at Oxford, and he being an Upholsterer had had Dealings with the Prosecutor, that he desir'd him to recommend them to an Inn, and he recommended them to an Inn in the Corn-Market; that the Prosecutor desir'd him to go with them to drink, and to persuade the Prisoner to stay all Night, who was for going towards London that Night; that he did go with them, and paid the Prosecutor two Broad Pieces.

Sarah Howard depos'd, That the Prisoner and Prosecutor came together to their House at Loud-water , and lay there the 16th of February, and that the Prosecutor did not care to lie both in the same Bed, but lay in two Beds in the same Room, and that the Prisoner sate up and smoak'd a Pipe after the Prosecutor was gone to Bed, and another in the Morning before he arose, and went away together.

The Prosecutor and other Evidences being ask'd if they were sure the Prisoner was the same Person, said, they were very positive that he was.

The Evidence being so plain against the Prisoner he no longer deny'd the Fact, but only alledg'd in extenuation of his Crime, that he knew nothing what became of the Mare, that indeed he did take away his Money, but did not design to shoot the Prosecutor; but having a Pistol in his Hand, and his Hand shaking, it chanc'd to go off, and deny'd that he used the Words which the Prosecutor had sworn, I will give you something shall carry you home presently; and that tho' he knew he was a dying Man, it was a great Satisfaction to him that he neither had committed, not design'd to commit Murder; and that he submitted to satisfie the Law with the more Pleasure. The Fact being so plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment. Death .

Anne Westwood.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-7
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Anne Westwood , alias Young , wife of John Young , (the Prisoner immediately preceeding) was indicted for feloniously stealing 90 Guineas, and 10 l. in Money, and a Satin Petticoat Value 30 s. the Money and Goods of Alice de Voe , also a Norwich Crape Petticoat, the Property of Hannah Brooks , in the Dwelling House of Alice de Voe , the 5th of May 1727 . The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was entertain'd by her as a Servant , she taking her in out of Charity, the Prisoner pretending she had been shipwrack'd coming from Ireland, and to have lost all she had. That she going to Church about half an Hour past 10 o'Clock, left the Prisoner at home to dress Dinner, and having dress'd Dinner, she gave her leave to go to Church in the Afternoon; she dress'd

herself and went out, but came home no more; that she having no Suspicion of her Dishonesty, was concern'd at her not coming home that Night, for fear some Mischief had befallen her, did not know of the Loss of her Money, &c. till the next Morning; that Mrs. Brooks spoke to her to examine if she had not been Robb'd; that going to her Closet, she found the Door had been open'd, a Case Knife (with which she suppos'd it to be done) lying on the Mantle-Tree, and her Money, &c. gone. That thereupon she put out an Advertisement, and having heard that she went for the Wife of John Young beforemention'd, she was afterwards apprehended, upon the Hearing of the taking of John Young .

Mrs. Brooks confirm'd the Evidence of Mrs de Voe, and swore, the Petticoat that she had lost, and was taken in the Prisoner's Possession, to be her Petticoat.

The Prisoner's Confession was read in Court, which in substance was, That she did live with Madam de Voe as a Servant, and that on the Sunday before-mention'd, her Husband John Young came to see her, and Mrs. Barker coming to her Mistress's House, she sent him up Stairs, and carried Mrs. Barker down Stairs that she might not see him, she passing with her Mistress for a Single Woman, and that while they were in the Kitchen, she heard the Street Door shut, by which she imagin'd he was gone out; that in the Afternoon, when she went out to go to Church, she went to see him, and he told her that he had open'd the Closet Door, gotten a great deal of Gold, and it was time for them to make off, and that they went to Bristol and staid there several Months, and that he had a great deal of Money.

The Prisoner being call'd upon to prove that she was at that time married to John Young , could not prove it.

Mary Barker depos'd, That she went that Day to Madam de Voe's House in the Forenoon, and finding the Prisoner late in preparing the Dinner, inquir'd if the Lady din'd abroad? That the Prisoner pretending she did not think it so late, did hasten the Dinner ; that the Time she went thither was about 12 o' Clock, and that she staid while the Ladies came Home, which was about One. Being ask'd if she saw any Body in the House besides the Prisoner, or heard the Street Door go? She reply'd, she did not hear any thing that should give her Reason to think that any body went out while she was there.

Edwa rd Season depos'd, That he knowing the Prisoner, and having heard that she had robbed the Prosecutor, and likewise heard that John Young was apprehended for a Robbery on the Highway, he went and inquired for her, and having found her, the Prisoner suspecting him, said to him, Dear Neddy, don't betray me, but say I am another Woman: That he thereupon got a Constable, and her Lodgings being search'd, the Petticoat which Madam Brooks claim'd as hers, was found in the Prisoners Lodgings. The Fact being prov'd to the Satisfaction of the Jury, they found the Prisoner guilty of the Indictment.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Charles Ditcher, John Wells.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-8
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Charles Ditcher and John Wells , of St. Giles's Cripplegate , were indicted for assaulting John Waller on the Highway, putting him in fear, and taking from him a Cloth Coat, and 7 s. in Money , the 21st of March last.

John Waller depos'd, That as he was passing along Hounsditch between 9 and 10 o'Clock at Night, on Saturday the 21st of March, the Prisoners, with one Tibbals came up, and Wells said, you are the honest Man that are going to hang Dalton, and took his Coat which he had upon his Arm, and Ditcher laid his Left Hand upon his Shoulder, and put his Right Hand in his Pocket, and took 7 s. from him; and Tibbals, the Person that is not taken, carried away the Coat; he added, that he lost his Wig also, but he could not tell who had that; that he afterwards seeing the Prisoners at the Anchor and Vine (an ill House) in Featherstone-street, he demanded his Coat, and they offer'd to make him Satisfaction for it, but he refused to take the Money they offer'd him till he had a Friend (meaning a Constable) came , and so they all got away that time; that he afterwards got the Prisoners apprehended in Moor-fields: He added, that Ditcher had his Coat on his Back at the very time he was upon his Trial in Court. The Prosecutor call'd John Paul the Constable, to be an Evidence of his taking them up, and that Ditcher had the Coat on, the Prosecutor claim'd, and that he said one time he had won it at Cards, and another time that he had bought it for eight Shillings

in Barbicane ; sometimes he said at one Shop, and sometimes at another. The Prisoners deny'd the Fact, and Ditcher call'd Henry Smith , who depos'd, That Ditcher had had that Coat 3 or 4 Months, and was at his House when he bought it: Wells produc'd Evidences who depos'd, That he was at home in his Lodging that Night that the Prosecutor charg'd the Prisoners with the Fact, at six o'Clock in the Evening, and went out no more that Night.

The Prisoners call'd several Persons to their Reputation, who gave them an honest Character, and also others who gave the Prosecutor but a very indifferent one.

George Ozenbrook depos'd, That he seeing the Prosecutor coming from Sir Richard Hopkins , and saying he was an Evidence against James Dalton , he reply'd, damn you, and I will rap your Life away too.

Mr. Twacher depos'd, That when the Prosecutor brought the Prisoners before his Master, he saying to him, you are a Person of a vile Character, he reply'd, damn you, if you look at me I'll swear Felony upon you. After a full hearing of the Matter, the Jury acquitted them.

Anne Thompson.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-9
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material

Anne Thompson , of Hampstead , was indicted for feloniously stealing 3 s. the Money of John Evans , the 10th of April last; but the Evidence against the Prisoner not being sufficient to satisfie the Jury, they acquitted her.

Lydea Deane.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-10
VerdictGuilty > theft under 5s
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Lydea Deane , of St. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for privately stealing a Cloth Coat and Wastecoat in the Shop of Lionel Chancey , the 18th of April last.

The Prosecutor depos'd, That standing at a Neighbour's Door opposite to his own, he observ'd the Prisoner to be in his Shop, and he suspecting her, seeing her go out of the Shop pursu'd and took her, and being apprehended, she let the Coat and Wastecoat fall, and begg'd for God sake that he would let her go, and she would never do the like again; the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 4 s. 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Susannah Hemmings.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-11
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

Susannah Hemmings , of St. Margaret's Westminster , was indicted for feloniously stealing 5 Silver Spoons , the Goods of Charles Cherriton , the 9th of this Instant May .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That he being inform'd the Prisoner had been seen to take something out of his Parlour Window, he sent his Servants after her, and they took her with the Spoons.

George Conium depos'd, That he pursu'd the Prisoner and brought her back, and that she had the Spoons in her Hand which was behind her, at a Pocket that was ty'd behind her. This Evidence was confirm'd by that of William Chamberlain .

Thomas Lydiat depos'd, That he seeing the Prisoner reaching into the Room, suspected her to have stolen something, and gave notice to the Prosecutor.

The Prisoner pleaded in her defence, That she found the Spoons under the Window upon the Ground; but the Jury not believing her, found her guilty of the Indictment.

[Transportation. See summary.]

William Ward.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-12
VerdictGuilty > theft under 1s
SentenceTransportation

Related Material

William Ward , of St. Botolph's Bishopsgate , was indicted for stealing 3 Brass Candlesticks, and other Brass Ware , the Goods of Joseph and Thomas Ballad , the 12th of this Instant May .

The Prosecutor depos'd, That the Prisoner was his Servant , and he having receiv'd Information by Letter, went and search'd, and found his Goods where the Prisoner sold them. The Fact being plainly prov'd, the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d.

[Transportation. See summary.]

John Weston, Thomas Jones.
13th May 1730
Reference Numbert17300513-13
VerdictNot Guilty

Related Material