Old Bailey Proceedings.
4th December 1724
Reference Number: 17241204

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Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
4th December 1724
Reference Numberf17241204-1

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THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery, FOR THE CITY of LONDON, and COUNTY of MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, in the OLD-BAILEY, During the MAYORALTY of the Rt. Honble Sir George Mertins, Knight, LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

In the 11th Year of His MAJESTY's Reign.

1725.

LONDON:

Printed for George James , in Little Britain.

THE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, AND

Oyer and Terminer, and Jail-Delivery of Newgate, held for the CITY of London, and COUNTRY of Middlesex, at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily,

On Friday, Saturday, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, being the 4th, 5th, 7th, 8th, and 9th of December, in the Eleventh Year of his MAJESTY's Reign.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir GEORGE MERTTINS , Knt. Lord Mayor of the City of London, the Right Honourable the Lord Chief Justice King, Mr. Justice Dormer, Mr. Baron Page , John Raby Esq; Sergeant at Law, and several of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the City of London and Country of Middlesex.

The JURORS were as followeth:

The London Jury

Thomas Dawson ,

Isaac Howsell ,

William Lawrence ,

John Henchman ,

Philip Green ,

Robert Hall ,

William Rose ,

Robert Coleman ,

John Allen ,

Thomas Middleton ,

George Markham ,

Stephen Chidwick .

The Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Wyton ,

John Walker ,

John Stringer ,

Jonathan Catlin ,

Richard Mills ,

Edward Percival ,

Elisha Impey ,

William Carpenter ,

Francis Whitemarsh ,

John Hossack ,

Walter Bury ,

Joseph Smith .

The Proceedings were as follows, viz.

John Rider.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-1
VerdictGuilty > theft under 1s
SentenceTransportation

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John Rider , alias Regar , of S. Dunstan's in the East , was indicted for feloniously stealing fifty six Pound of Butter, value 25 s. the Goods of Rich. Spearing , on the 23d of November last. It appear'd, that sixty Firkins of Butter were landed near the Custom-House Key , for the Prosecutor; one of them was between Three and Four in the Morning taken from thence by the Prisoner, who was stopt with it under the Custom-House Gate by Philip Harrison , (a Tide-waiter.) Harison had but just eased the Prisoner of his Burden, when Peacock (a Watchman on the Keys) came up and claim'd a Share of the Seizure; for both he and Harrison at first imagined the Prisoner to be a Smugler; but finding their Mistake, they carry'd him to the Watch-house, and the next Day he was committed to Newgate by Sir Francis Forbes . The Prisoner in his Defence said, that he found the Butter upon the Keys, about Four in the Morning and added, (to make his Innocence more visible) that a Carman's Boy saw him take it away. The Jury found him guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Amy Burrows.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-2
VerdictGuilty > theft under 1s
SentenceTransportation

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Amy Burrows , of S. Andrew's, Holborn , was indicted for privately stealing out of the Shop of Mary Toothaker , 12 Yards of Scarlet Ribbon, value 6s. on the 30th of October last. Mary Toothaker deposed, that the Prisoner and two more came into her Shop, next the Cross-Keys Tavern in Holborn , to buy a Cross-Knot; at which time she saw the Prisoner take the Goods in the Indictment, and go away; but having no body to take care of her Shop, she did not pursue her, for fear the others in the mean time should rob her of something more valuable: But two Weeks after, she saw the Prisoner again, and causing her to be apprehended, she confess'd she had pawn'd them for 2s. at a Chandler's Shop in Plumb-Tree Court in Holborn; at which Place the Goods were found. Guilty to the Value of 10d. Transportation .

Benjamin Baker.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-3
VerdictGuilty > theft under 5s
SentenceTransportation

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Benjamin, alias William Baker , of S. Mary Colechurch , was indicted for privately stealing a Hat, value 10 s. the Goods of Robert Pead ; and a Hat, value 5s. the Goods of Edward Vergow , out of the Shop of the said Robert Pead . It appear'd that the Prisoner came into the Shop of the Prosecutor, (an Apothecary ) and ask'd for a Halfpennyworth of Spanish Liquorish. Vergow, the Prosecutor's Servant, who was in the Back-Shop, came out and told him, they did not use to sell such small Quantities; with which Answer the Prisoner went away, and Vergow immediately missing his Master's Hat, and his own, (both which before hung on the Pegs in the Shop) he pursued the Prisoner. His Master's Hat, with four more, he found in a Basket which the Prisoner had on his Shoulder, and his own Hat under the Prisoner's great Coat. The Prisoner, to excuse himself, said, that he had bought the Hats but just before, and call'd John Baker to his Reputation, who deposed, that he was a Gardener at the Old Rose in Marybone, had known the Prisoner 20 Years, and had often employ'd him in his Business, but never knew him guilty of any Dishonesty. But the Fact being plainly proved upon the Prisoner, and his Defence being frivolous, the Jury found him guilty to the Value of 4s. 10d. Transportation .

Sarah Hughs.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-4
VerdictGuilty > theft under 1s
SentenceTransportation

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Sarah Hughs , of S. Sepulchre's , was indicted for feloniously stealing six Pewter Plates, value 6s. and other Things , the Goods of John Medley . It appeared that the Prisoner was a Chair-woman to the Prosecutor, and made use of an Opportunity of carrying away the Plates; but offering them to Sale, she was stopt, and upon Examination confest the Fact before the Justice. Guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Dorothy Thompson.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-5
VerdictGuilty > theft under 1s
SentenceTransportation

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Dorothy Thompson , was indicted for feloniously stealing a Linnen Sheet, value 7s. and several Diaper Clouts, value 2s. the Goods of Samuel Walter , on the 14th of November last. Barbara George deposed, that being a Nurse at Mr. Walter's, a Druggist , in Cheapside , where the Prisoner was a Servant , she often missed some of the Child's Clouts in washing, but could never think what became of them, till one day she happened to find the Maid's Petticoat, which was made of the same Clouts that before had been missing. And upon

further Search, found a Gown of her's that was lined with part of the Prosecutor's Sheet. The Prisoner confessed the Fact before Sir John Fryer , and said that she threw the remaining part of the Sheet down the Vault, to prevent a Discovery, having dream'd that her Mistress had found out what she had done. But this she deny'd at the Bar, and said that that Gown was lined with two of her own Aprons, and that she had the Petticoat before she came to the Prosecutor's Service. Her Confession was read in Court, and the Jury found her guilty to the Value of 10 d. Transportation .

Edward Templeman.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-6
VerdictNot Guilty

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Edward Templeman , of S. Ann's near Aldersgate , was indicted for privately stealing from the Person of Robert Ray, a Silk Handkerchief, value 1s. the Goods of Robert Ray . And also for privately stealing 4 more Handkerchiefs, the Goods of Persons unknown. Robert Ray deposed, that coming out of S. Ann's Church on Sunday Night, he miss'd his Handkerchief, went back to see if he had not left it in his Seat; and returning to the Door, he saw Mrs. Smith holding the Prisoner, and heard her say that he was a Pickpocket. Upon which he was taken into the Vestry and search'd. Four Handkerchiefs were found upon him, and two lying at the Vestry-Door, one of which at last proved to be the Prosecutor's. Mrs. Smith depos'd, that seeing the Prisoner's Hand in her Cousin D. Humphries's Pocket, she clapt her Hand upon his, held him fast, and cried out, a Pickpocket, till the Beadle came and carried him into the Vestry. But there being no positive Proof that the Prisoner was the Person that dropt the Prosecutor's Handkerchief at the Vestry-Door; and no body owning any of the Handkerchiefs that were found upon him, the Jury acquitted him.

Peter Crisp.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-7
VerdictNot Guilty

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Peter Crisp , of S. Ann's, Blackfryers , was indicted for breaking and entring the House of Matth.ew Bond , and taking from thence 16 s. the Money of Matthew Bond, on the 20th of October last, in the Night Time . Matthew Bond being dry in the Night, he got up about Two o'Clock, and found all the Doors fast; he returned to Bed, and rising again about 7, found that his Shop Door and his Till were broke open, and the Money taken out. He called to Mr. Collier, and told him he was robbed, and it must be done by somebody in the House. Collier answered, I wish it is not Peter, for be went down to the Vault about Six this Morning They examined Peter, (the Prisoner): He deny'd it strongly at first, but afterwards said, if they would make the Matter up, he would pay them whatever they had lost, by so much a Week. Mr. Collier depos'd, that he was a Looking Glass Polisher, lodged in Mr. Bond's House, where the Prisoner work'd Journey-work with him. That on the Night mentioned in the Indictment, the Prisoner having quarrel'd with his Wife, he got Leave to lie for one Night in Mr.Bond's Garret, with another Servant of Mr.Collier's. About 4 in the Morning, the Prisoner and his Bedfellow got up to work, and about 6 the Prisoner said he was griped, and must go to the Vault. He went down, staid near a quarter of an Hour, and coming up again, told his Master Collier that he had found Mr. Bond's Shop Door open, but that he had shut it again. The Evidence not fixing the Fact on the Prisoner, and he bringing some Witnesses to his Reputation, the Jury acquitted him.

Mary Noon.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-8
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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Mary Noon , of S. Dunstan's in the West , was indicted for privately stealing from the Person of Tho. Burgess two Guineas and Half a Crown , on the 28th of November last. Tho. Burgess depos'd, that as he was going by S. Dunstan's Church in Fleetstreet , being indifferently drunk, the Prisoner and another Woman ran full against him, held him fast, and pickt his Pocket in half a Minute. He call'd to the Watch; upon which three or four Men came up, beat him, and threw him down; but the Mob gathering, and the Watch appearing, the Men and one of the Women that assaulted him ran away; but the Prisoner was secur'd, and carry'd to the Watch house. The Fact was plainly proved upon her: But the Indictment being laid for privately stealing, and this appearing to be an open Assault, the Jury found her guilty of the Felony only . Transportation .

Ann Simpson.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-9
VerdictNot Guilty

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Ann Simpson , of Edgworth , was indicted for stealing out of the House of George Montague 18 Guineas, the Money of George Montague, and half a Yard of Sattin value 12 d. the Goods of Richard Brasier , on the 3d of November last. Jane Montague deposed, that on the 26th of October she put 80 Guineas into a Cup, and lock'd it in her Father's Cupboard, which was in his Bed-Chamber. That her Father, in the beginning of November, just before he went to Dunstable Fair, sent her up to fetch him some Money; at which time she miss'd 13 Guineas, but did not tell her Father for fear of Anger, nor her Sister till her Father was gone. When her father return'd, he gave her some Money to lay up, and then she miss'd 5 Gunieas more, of which she told her Sister. They then searched the Cupboard, and found that a Board on the top of it had been loosen'd and taken up. Their Father died. They examined all the Servants; but no body was more suspected than the Prisoner, because the Prosecutor being a Higler , was two or three Days in a Week at Country Fairs and Markets, and always left the Care of the House to the Prisoner, and the other Servants never used to go into her Father's Room; nor did they know that any Money was kept there. Mary Montague deposed to the same Effect, and added, that in searching the Prisoner's Trunk, they found the half Yard of Sattin mentioned in the Indictment, which she produced in Court. Elizabeth Brasier deposed, that having bought a Piece of Sattin for a Suit, she left it at her Father Montagne's, to the Charge of the Prisoner; and fetching it away again when she went home to Bedford, and there sending for her Mantua-maker, they found it was half a Yard of Shorter than when she bought it. That the half Yard that was afterwards found in the Prisoner's Trunk was exactly of the same kind, Stripe and Colour. The Prisoner in her Defence said, that none of the Rooms in the House were kept lockt; that people were frequently coming in, and the other Servants often going up and down Stairs, and might know as well as the where the Money was kept. That she was busy a Washing when the Money was lost, and could not observe every body that came in and out. That the Sattin was given her two Years ago; and that her Masters Daughters had several times bought new Cloths without his Knowledge; and that he had often complain'd of it, and said, he was at more Charges now than when his Wife was alive. The Jury acquitted her.

Richard Thompson.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-10
VerdictsNot Guilty; Guilty; Not Guilty > no prosecutor
SentencesMiscellaneous > fine

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Richard Thompson , alias Blackbeard, alias Evans of Thistleworth , was indicted for feloniously stealing a She Ass, value 5 l. a Ram 5s. and a tame Deer value 40 s. the Property of John Mead Esq ; on the 8th of August last.

He was a second time indicted for a Misdemeanor in breaking into an enclosed Ground of John Mead Esq; and killing two Fallow Deer, value 20s. on the 27th of October last. Mr. Mead depos'd, that the Deer were lost out of his Ground at the Times mention'd in the Indictment; and he was soon after inform'd, that the Prisoner was one of the Persons that stole them. Robert Brown of Brentford depos'd, that the Prisoner told him, that in August last he and Tho James laid a Toil (or Snare) to catch Deer in Mr. Mead's Park. The first that was caught in it was a She Ass, the next a Ram, and the third a tame Deer. They set the Ass and Ram at liberty, but took the Deer away, and sold it for 23s. to Richard Beck , a Porter in Aldersgate street, who frequently bought Venison that was stolen. That on the 27th of October last, about 9 at Night, the Prisoner, this Evidence, and Tho. James, met at the King's-Head at Eling, and from thence went together to Mr.Mead's Park, and stole away a white Doe and a Fawn, which they brought to Smalbury-Green, and there this Evidence left the Prisoner. Robert Misselbrook , a Butcher, deposed, that in last August, falling into Discourse with the Prisoner about Deer-stealing, the Prisoner told him that he had taken one of Mr. Mead's tame Deer, which he caught in a Toil. Mrs. Goodneighbour at the Two Cocks in Thistleworth, deposed, that the Night Mr.Mead's tame Deer was lost, the Prisoner came to her House with a Toil in a Basket. The Prisoner in his Defence acknowledg'd the killing of the two wild Deer in October, but deny'd

that he was concern'd in taking the same Deer in August, any farther than that he knew the Persons that took it, because they had asked him to go with them; but he refused them. The Jury acquitted him of the first Indictment, but found him guilty of the other. Fined .

He was a 3d time indicted for stealing a black Gelding Value 5 l. the Goods of Ralph Farr , on the 1st of Oct. last. But Farr not appearing, he was acquitted .

Constance Hales, Elizabeth Nelson.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-11
VerdictGuilty > theft under 1s; Not Guilty

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Constance Hales , and Elizabeth Nelson , alias Dixon , the Wife of John Dixon , were indicted for feloniously stealing a Silk Gown, value 10 s. a quilted Petticoat value 18 s. and a Dragget Coat and Wastecoat value 12 s. the Goods of James Mosely , on the 16th of November last. James Mosely depos'd, that he lives in Well-close-Square ; that the Prisoners were his Lodgers, and that about Four in the Morning another of his Lodgers cry'd out Thieves. He got up, ran down into the Yard, and there found his Wastecoat upon the Wall; and afterwards going into his Closet, he miss'd the other Goods in the Indictment, and suppos'd them to be stolen by some body belonging to the House. Soon after Mrs. Shepherd, (another of his Lodgers) inform'd him that his Goods were pawn'd at Mrs Goodfellow's in King-Street, Wapping; and if he would apprehend James Goodwin and the two Prisoners, he might know more of the Matter. He thereupon apprehended Goodwin, (who pass'd for Hales's Husband) and had him committed to New-Prison; but being set out upon Bail, he ran away. Jane Goodfellow depos'd, that Hales, in Company with Nelson, brought the Goods to her House, and pawn'd them for 12 s. 6 d. The Prisoner Hales in her Defence said, that Goodwin was her Country man, and coming to visit her, Mrs. Mosely told him, (as it was common for her to tell any Man that came to her other Lodgers) if he would pay for the Lodging, he should lie with her (the Prisoner) all Night; but she refus'd, and told her Landlady, that she had a Husband at Sea, and would not defile his Bed for the World. Goodwin soon after went away, and then Mrs. Shepherd call'd the Prisoner, and said, Take your Landlady Mosely aside, and give her a Dram; and in the mean time I'll carry off her Box with the Rings in it: But she would not consent to it. However Shepherd brought out a Bundle of Cloaths: She desired Shepherd to carry them back to the Place she had them from; but instead of that, Shepherd gave them to her Sister, who carry'd them out to Goodwin, from whom the Prisoner Nelson took them, carry'd them to pawn at Mrs. Goodfellow's, and received the Money herself. Nelson in her Defence said, that she accidentally met Hales with a Bundle of Cloaths: Hales desired her to go with her to Goodfellow's, which she did, and there Hales pawn'd the Goods, and took the Money herself. The Jury found Hales guilty to the Value of 10 d. but the Evidence not reaching Nelson, she was acquitted .

William Hicks, Robert Archer.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-12
VerdictNot Guilty; Guilty > theft under 5s
SentenceTransportation

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William Hicks and Robert Archer , of S. Andrew's Holborn , were indicted for privately stealing, in the Shop of Tho. Parks, 36 Iron Hinges, value 35 s. and five Locks, value 5s. the Goods of Robert Parks , on the 24th of November last. Tho. Parks depos'd, that he keeps a Smith's Shop in Leather-Lane , and that the Prisoner Hicks was his Journeyman , and was intimate with Archer the other Journeyman, who was Prisoner to Daniel Carpenter , a Carpenter. That missing the Goods, he suspected the Prisoners, and upon Enquiry, found that Hicks, in Company with Archer, had sold the Goods mentioned in the Indictment to Mr. Carpenter and Mr. Panta. The Evidence not being sufficient against Archer, he was acquitted ; but Hicks was found guilty to the Value of 4s. 10 d. Transportation .

John Randal.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-13
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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John Randal , was indicted for privately stealing from William Woodroff a Handkerchief value 10d. on the 24th of October last. It appear'd, that as the Prosecutor was coming out of the Playhouse in Drury-Lane , the Prisoner ran against him, and took the Handkerchief out of his Pocket. Mr.Shrimpton saw him commit the Fact, seiz'd him, and he being searched, 4 other Handkerchiefs were found upon him. Guilty . Transportation .

Elizabeth Morris.
4th December 1724
Reference Numbert17241204-14
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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Elizabeth Morris , alias Mary Tipping , of S. Giles's in the Fields , was indicted for feloniously stealing three Smocks value 10 s. the Goods of John Penny , on the 17th of November last. John Penny, Constable , depos'd, that between One and Two in the Morning, the Prisoner was brought to him at the Watch-house, with a Bundle and a Box, and said that her Husband had beat her, and taken another Woman to Bed, and so she catch'd up those Things to secure them at a Friend's House. He bid her send for somebody to her Reputation, which she did, and two Women came and gave her the Character of an honest Woman, and that they believed the Goods were her own. However, he carry'd her and her two Friends before the Justice, who finding nothing proved against her, discharged her. They then went to drink together, and afterwards came to his House, where she sent for three Quarts of Twopenny to treat him and her two Friends. While they were drinking, he was call'd out, and at his Return found her at Dinner with his Wife. Mrs. Penny deposed, that after her Husband was gone, a Neighbour came in, who having some Knowledge of the Prisoner, fell into Discourse with her; but in a little time the Prisoner appear'd to be very drunk, and tumbled out of the Chair; she rais'd her again, carried her up Stairs, laid her upon the Bed, and very considerately set a Chamber-Pot by her, for fear she might have Occasion to make Water. This done, she left her, and in about half an Hour after, thinking she heard her rising, went up to see how she did, and found her kneeling on the Bed, with the Chamber-Pot betwixt her Legs. She seem'd to be a little recover'd, and upon Persuasion came down to Dinner, and after Dinner went away. Next day this Evidence miss'd her Linnen, and suspecting the Prisoner, enquired after her of the Neighbour that accidentally met with her the day b