SAMUEL EWINS, Violent Theft > robbery, 4th February 1850.

Reference Number: t18500204-484
Offence: Violent Theft > robbery
Verdict: Guilty > no_subcategory
Punishment: Transportation
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484. SAMUEL EWINS was indicted for a robbery, with violence, upon John Julien Wood, and stealing from his person, and against his will, 1 watch and chain, value 14l., 5 shillings, 10 pence, and 8 halfpence; his property.

MR. BALLANTINE conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN JULIEN WOOD . I live at Lewisham, with my father, who is a carpet-manufacturer, of Watling-street—I am fifteen years old. On the evening of 15th Jan. I was at the house of Mr. Wire, at Lewisham, and left there about ten minutes before seven o'clock—I had to pass the Hope public-house to go home; I was going to the Congregational School—I had to turn back to go there, and as I turned I saw the prisoner come out of the Hope—I am quite sure he is the person; I knew him before—I turned up Silver-street, which is at the side of the Hope, and the prisoner followed me—I turned, and asked him the way to the Congregational School, as I did not know it—he made an indistinct answer—I was then within a few yards of him—I walked

on, and he walked after me, rather closer than before—when we got to the end of the houses, I asked him why he was following me—he gave me an indistinct answer—we had then passed the houses, and he put his arm round my neck, and one of his legs between mine, and tripped me up—I fell on my back—he tore open my coat, which was buttoned, and took some shillings from my right-hand trowsers pocket—he took my watch, and the guard-chain attached to it, from my waistcoat pocket, and then ran away, leaving me only 4 1/2d.—I ran after him, and followed him to the top of Vicker's Hill—he there jumped through the hedge—I followed, and then lost sight of him—I then went back to the Hope, and told the landlady—I went to the station next morning, and there saw the prisoner, with others—I recognized him at once—I have no doubt about him—I had often seen him before—he was always about the village of Lewisham—my watch was worth about nine guineas, and the chain 5l.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not go back to the Hope, and say to five or six men there, were not they the men that went outside just now? A. No; I did not say I saw two of them outside, and if there had been a constable there I would have had either of them locked up.

Prisoner. He is not capable of taking care of himself; he is obliged to have a groom or somebody to lead him about; he is not in his right senses.

THOMAS RANSOM . I am pot-boy at the Hope, and know the prisoner—I remember his being at our house on 15th Jan., about six o'clock in the evening—he left just about seven—the prosecutor came in about ten minutes past, and complained of being robbed—the prisoner returned again in about three quarters of an hour.

Prisoner. Q. Did not Mr. Wood come into the tap-room, and ask whether they were not the two men outside? A. He came in, and asked whether either of them had been out.

GEORGE TAFFREY (policeman.) I received a description of the person who had robbed Mr. Wood about a quarter past nine o'clock, and, after making inquiries at the Hope, I took the prisoner at his house, in bed—I told him what it was for—he said he knew nothing about it—I found this frock at his lodging (produced)—I have had the place pointed put to me where Master Wood was knocked down—it is about 200 yards from the Hope, and in Lewisham parish.

THOMAS RANSOM re-examined. The prisoner had this frock on when he returned at eight o'clock—he had not it on at seven.

J. J. WOOD re-examined. The prisoner had not this frock on when he robbed me.

GUILTY . † Aged 21.— Transported for Ten Years.

Before Mr. Justice Talfourd.


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