HANNAH MALLANDINE.
26th February 1849
Reference Numbert18490226-736
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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736. HANNAH MALLANDINE , feloniously attempting to drown Mason Mallandine, with intent to murder him.

JOHN STODART . About four o'clock on 6th Feb. I was in a brick-field at Haggerstone, and saw the prisoner leading a boy of about seven years of age by the canal—she caught him under his arm-pits and threw him into the canal—the boy cried out, "Oh, mother!"—she was going to throw herself in, and I ran and prevented her—she had taken her shawl off and was taking her bonnet off when I stopped her—she was just at the edge of the canal—the water was about three feet deep where the boy was thrown in, but he got out into the centre—I got in and got him out—he was then in about five feet water—the prisoner said she was starving and had had nothing to eat since three o'clock the day before—she was crying—I do not think the boy spoke—he did not appear to be starving—he was a rosy-cheeked little fellow—he is here.

Cross-examined by MR. COOPER. Q. Did you notice her manner? A. No—she seemed to throw her shawl off in a wild manner—it was all done in a moment—a friend came up and took care of her, and I rescued the child—I took him to a public-house and she followed—she did not take any notice of the child then—I took the boy into the tap-room and stripped him—I did not take any further notice of her.

JOHN WILDING . I saw the prisoner walking by the side of the canal leading the boy by the hand—she came through a little gateway, then dragged hold of him and threw him into the water—she then took off her shawl, and was untying her bonnet and was going to jump in herself, when Stodart came and stopped her—he jumped in and got the boy out

Cross-examined. Q. Did she appear to be very wild and distracted? A. Yes, she was crying all the time—she seemed as if she knew what she was about—I accompanied Stodart to the public-house with her, and stayed there till she went to the station—she was crying all the time—she said nothing at all to the child the whole time, but stood quite quiet

HENRY BARHAM HEATH (policeman, N 428). I took the prisoner into custody—she was crying—I asked what she threw the child into the water for, she said it was through distress, that she and the child had been starving since the day before—on the way to the station she said, "If assistance had come five or ten minutes later she should not have been taken before the Magistrate."

Cross-examined. Q. Have you made inquiries about her since? A. No—she seemed very full of distress and anguish—I have not found out who she is, the workhouse authorities do that—the child has been there since.

MASON MALLANDINE . My name is Mason Mallandine. NOT GUILTY


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