SARAH SEYMOUR.
27th February 1837
Reference Numbert18370227-873
VerdictNot Guilty > unknown

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873. SARAH SEYMOUR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of February, 1 sovereign, and 2 shillings, the monies of Joseph Ancona, from his person.

JOSEPH ANCONA . I am a looker-over at Mrs. Davies's plantation, in Essex. On Sunday, the 19th of February, I was going out of the White Horse about half-past ten o'clock, and the prisoner, who I saw in the house, came up, and wished to go with me, which I refused—she followed me as far as the White Horse-yard, caught hold of me, put her band into my pocket, and took out a sovereign and two shillings—she had not time to get more—I had a large dog in my hand—I had not been with her half

a minute before she took it—I made a grab at her—she ran away, and got into the White Horse—I followed, and gave charge of her—she said she never saw me—I was quite sober.

Cross-examined by MR. DOANE. Q. Are you married? A. Yes—she did nothing to me before she put her hand into my pocket—I have not sworn that she pulled me about—I have no doubt that this is my cross to this deposition—it was read over to me—I was asked whether it was correct, and after that I put my cross to it—(the deposition being read, stated "She followed me to White Horse-yard, and then she began to pull me about.") Witness. She took hold of me, certainly—she could not catch hold of me without pulling me, but I did not allow her to pull me about—I should have resisted, but I had a dog in my hand—I did resist, but I could not help myself.

THOMAS WATSON . I live at the White Horse, at Ilford. I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner go out—I saw the prisoner and a man go out after the prosecutor came back again, and then I followed them out and saw her with a handkerchief twisted round her hand—she undid it from her hand, and passed something from it to the man, and she then drew herself back—I passed betwixt them—she came with the man to the public-house door—the man went into the public-house, and she went to her lodgings—I went to the lodgings with the patrol, and the prisoner came down stairs and said to the woman belonging to the house, "Underneath the bed, burn it"—I had seen Ancona show a piece of paper about three weeks before in the tap-room, and that was found underneath the prisoner's bed—this is the paper—some said it was copper-plate, some said it was not—there was a piece torn off the side—it was read in the tap-room thru weeks before—two half-crowns, one sixpence, and 4d. in halfpence, were found on the prisoner, and on the man two sovereigns, two half-crowns, and 4 1/4 d.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you see the prisoner come back in the first instance after she left the house with the prosecutor? A. No; but she did return to the house, and staid there some time—it was after that I saw the transaction about the handkerchief—she went out with another man—the prosecutor kept her there nearly an hour and a half, and then he thought no constable would come, and let her go—I followed her, and then saw this—the man Samuel Green is not here.

JAMES OTHEN . I was sent for to this public-house, and saw Ancona—I proceeded to the house of Mrs. Dawson where I was informed the prisoner was gone to lodge—I went up stairs with her to the room where the prisoner was—I searched her and found two half-crowns, one six pence, and 4d. in copper—in taking her to the public-house she said she hoped I would not take notice of that drunken fellow—on my return Wilson told me something, and I went to Mrs. Dawson's again—she gave me a paper, which on the following morning was identified by Ancona.

Cross-examined. Q. When she said, "That drunken fellow," did she mean the prosecutor? A. Yes—he was not drunk—I took it for granted it was him.

JOSEPH ANCONA re-examined. I know Mrs. Dawson—I have never visited her house—I saw this paper about five minutes before; I lost it out of the same pocket as I did my money.

MR. DOWN. Q. This purports to be the testimonials of a medical gentleman? A. Yes; it was sent from that doctor to my house about

Christmas—I cannot tell whether these papers were spread about the neighbourhood—it may be like another in print but not in marks—there are three little holes in it and a corner torn off.

JEMIMA DAWSON . The prisoner came to lodge with me on Sunday night—I found this paper under her bed.

NOT GUILTY .


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