TRUEMAN WOOD.
30th November 1814
Reference Numbert18141130-66
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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66. TRUEMAN WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , twenty-four pounds weight of paper, value 6 s. and twenty-one pounds weight of tea, value 3 l. the goods of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

THOMAS EDWARDS . I am an officer. On the 27th of October, I met an old woman in the Commercial-road, I stopped her, and searched her; I found upon her concealed under her petticoats in a little bag a small quantity of tea, and some India paper, and in consequence of what the woman said, I went to No. 3, Trafalgar-square, Stepney, to the house of Trueman Wood, the prisoner; Walter Griffiths and Walker was with me when I went there, and up stairs in a chest in the bed-room, I found this jar of tea, and on the top of the chest of drawers, I found these two jars of tea; I found nineteen pounds weight of tea in different parcels; in the same room, I found the paper now produced, it is what I call India paper, and in a pigeon-hole were these two caddies with tea in them, and in this tea-chest which was locked up was one jar of tea, and wrapped up in this bag was one hundred pounds in notes, four guineas in gold, and in the drawer there were different bags with silver.

Q. Was Wood then at home - A. He was not; he came home at half past six; upon his coming home, I stated what I found. He knocked at the door; we opened the door to him. I told him it was our duty to search him; we searched him, and found upon him paper of the same description as the other. He told us to take the tea and the paper, and say nothing about it. We told him it was our duty to take him before the magistrate. He said, cannot you take the money and the tea, and say nothing about it; he said, if it comes to the Company's cars it will be the ruin of me, and in going along in the coach, I asked him where he got it; he said, he bought it of a man in the Commercial-road, about five months ago, he bought it by the lump, he gave two-pounds for it, in the street, he said, he bought it in the day time; he should know the man again if he was to see him. When he was before the magistrate, he said, the paper was his perquisites, that he was allowed it by the East India Company, he stated to the magistrate that he got the tea as before.

JOHN WALTER GRIFFITHS . I have heard Edwards examined; his account his correct. The prisoner said for God's sake take all the money you have seen, and the tea; for if it comes to the Company's ears it will be the ruin of me.

THOMAS WALKER . I was on duty with Edwards. I found two jars of tea, and a tea-chest; they had got tea in them.

JOHN JONES . I am an elder in the East India warehouse.

Q. Is that the sort of paper used by the East India Company - A. It is.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. A labourer, in Haydon-square warehouse; at that time his wages was nineteen shillings and sixpence a week, from seven till three in the afternoon. This paper is kept in the warehouse: the paper is demaged.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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