SARAH HARCOURT, FRANCES JACKSON, MARY CAYHILL.
20th April 1803
Reference Numbert18030420-42
VerdictGuilty > lesser offence
SentenceTransportation

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356. SARAH HARCOURT , FRANCES JACKSON , and MARY CAYHILL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of March , twenty-three yards and three quarters of cotton, value 2l. 17s. 8d. the property of Bartholomew Coombe , privately in his shop .

BARTHOLOMEW COOMBE sworn. - I am a linen-draper , No. 74, Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street : On the 22d of March, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came in to look at some print for a child's frock; they conversed together while they were in the shop, and Harcourt looked at the print; I don't know which asked for it, but one of them asked to look at some printed cotton for a child's frock; they fixed on the pattern, and Harcourt paid four shillings for two yards of it; I delivered the print to her, and they left the shop together; about four or five minutes after a neighbour came into my shop, and asked if I had been robbed; I could not tell, but on his information I went into my parlour adjoining the shop, to see whether I could see the prisoners, I could not; I took my hat, and ran towards Finsbury-square; about fourteen or fifteen doors off there is an alley, where I saw the three prisoners in close conversation; I went to them, and desired them to return to my shop; they seemed in confusion, but as soon as they separated I picked up my property, being seventeen yards and three quarters of printed cotton in one piece, and six yards in another; Harcourt went into the Ship public-house, where I took her; in about two minutes Cayhill went into Sun-street, I stopped her just by the passage; and Jackson went towards Bishopsgate-street, a neighbour took her, and they were all brought to my house; I have no doubt they are the women who took the print, which cost me about 2l. 17s. I had no suspicion of their robbing me.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you a partner? - A. No; my wife sometimes serves in the shop when I am out, and was in the shop at the time, but is not here to day. I have no shopman.

- OWEN sworn. - I am a butcher, and saw the prisoners turn down a gateway opposite my door, No. 6, Sun-street, in great confusion; I suspected them, and went to Coombe's, and told him which way they went; he followed them, and took them; I did not see them drop any thing.

SARAH OWEN sworn. - I was in my husband's shop, and saw three women come out of Mr. Coombe's in a great hurry, go down a gateway, and stop, but I saw no further; I cannot say whether the prisoners are the women.

ROBERT SAPWELL sworn. - I am an officer, and took charge of the prisoners, and produce the cotton, which was delivered to me by Mr. Coombe.(The cotton produced and identified by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner Harcourt's defence. I went into the shop to buy a piece of cotton to make a frock for Jackson's child; the prosecutor's wife served us, and I never saw the property till he came up, and took us with it under his arm.

Jackson's defence. I went with Mrs. Harcourt

to buy the frock, never thinking of any thing happening, and never saw the cotton till I saw it under the prosecutor's arm.

Caybill said the same.

Harcourt, GUILTY, aged 19.

Jackson, GUILTY, aged 28,

Cayhill, GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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