JOSEPH KNIGHT.
27th February 1788
Reference Numbert17880227-109
VerdictNot Guilty

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249. JOSEPH KNIGHT was indicted, for that he, on the 22d of April , upon David Llewellin , John Gliddon , and Richard Shallcross , officers of excise, then being on shore, in the due execution of their office, in seizing for our Lord the King, ten gallons of brandy, which were then liable to be seized by the said David Llewellin , John Gliddon , and William Shallcross , did unlawfully make an assault, and did unlawfully hinder, oppose, and obstruct the aforesaid officers, in the due execution of their duty .

Mr. Garrow opened the indictment, and Mr. Solicitor General the case.

DAVID LLEWELLIN sworn.

(Examined by Mr. Silvester.)

What are you? - A supervisor in the excise.

What are Gliddon and Shallcross? - Officers of excise; on the the 22d of April last I had an information of a quantity of smuggled goods that were to be run at a place called Roche; in consequence of this information, Mr. Gliddon, Shallcross, I, and two soldiers, a serjeant and a corporal, who were recruiting at the town, went about eight miles on the road past Roche.

What o'clock was this? - Between the hours of eleven and twelve at night; we met with a party of smugglers.

Court. Where were you going? - To intercept them at the Indian Queen, where they were to cross the road; but we met them at the eight-mile-stone, as near as I can recollect; we met a gang of them; there might be eight, ten, twelve, or fifteen, I cannot tell; Gliddon was rather before us, and they beat him.

Mr. Sylvester. How forward was Gliddon before you? - From ten to twenty yards.

Did you see them attack Gliddon? - Yes, and they came up to me; I asked them what they carried, and they said, who are you? or clear the road, or something to that purpose.

The remainder of this Trial, in the next Part, which will be published in a few Days.

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
27th February 1788
Reference Numbert17880227-109

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THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 27th of FEBRUARY, 1788, and the following Days;

Being the THIRD SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honourable John Burnell , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY E. HODGSON, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND; And Published by Authority.

NUMBER III. PART VII.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXVIII.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of Joseph Knight .

Mr. Silvester to David Llewellyn . What did they carry? - Ankers of liquor upon the horses; when we attacked them, and insisted upon knowing what they carried, some of them said, off! off! and immediately quitted their horses; two or three of them passed me on horseback, with each of them two ankers under them, particularly the prisoner at the bar; they would not get off their horses; they stood in a party off the road; they had engaged some of my officers before; I came up to the prisoner, and a little scuffle ensued between he and I; I insisted upon his stopping his horse, but he would not; I rode side by side with him, close to him, for twenty yards, or more.

Had you during that time, an opportunity of observing his person? - Yes, I have not the least doubt of his person.

Was it light enough to speak with certainty? - Quite sufficient.

Have you any doubt? - None at all; I had an opportunity, about nine days or a fortnight afterwards, to call at his house; I had cut him with my cutlass in the arm, and when I saw him at his house, his arm was in a sling, and he looked very sour at me; I had before seen the prisoner, and knew his person, but the reason of my going to the house was, because I did not know his name; I went to see if the man that I knew by sight, was the prisoner by name; we had drove three horses that they had quitted with ankers of liquors upon them, before us; Mr. Gliddon came up, and the smugglers followed us, beating us with large bludgeons, till my arms and back were quite black, and so were the officers that were with me; they called out after us a cant word,

"Ooro;" swearing, that they would lose their lives, before they would lose their goods; we went on till the road was firm; for where we attacked them first, there were tin works, and it was dangerous to turn a horse out of the road; when I came to that part of the road which I knew, I turned my horse upon the common; I told them, now my lads, I will shew you some sport; they turned back, and said, let them go and be d - n'd to them.

What liquor was upon the horses? - Brandy, rum, and gin.

How do you know? - I got it home and tasted it; I got three horses and six ankers.

Did you perceive any blow from any particular person? - Yes; I had a blow from the prisoner with a stick upon my arm, but not so hard as from the others.

Was your horse wounded? - Yes; something run through his cheek, an edge-tool; there was another horse that was shot, and had the mark of a bayonet, or some instrument, I cannot tell what, run into his buttock, as they tell me; I do not swear to that.

Nor you did not see the horse shot? - I cannot say I did.

(Cross-examined by Mr. Lens.)

What time of night was it? - Eleven or twelve, or thereabouts.

What sort of night was it? - Tolerable; neither very light, nor very dark; but it was light enough for me to see a man and horse at the distance of three or four hundred yards; I saw a man and horse at that distance, which I believed to be a smuggler, out upon the spy.

What reason have you to suppose that horse was at so great a distance? - He stopped, and we rode up to him, I believe about two or three hundred yards.

Did you know the prisoner before? - Yes; I had surveyed several places where I had seen him.

Then what was the occasion of your going to his house when he looked so sourly at you? - I went to convince myself that it was the same man I saw upon the ankers.

Be kind enough to to tell us what you mean by looking sourly? - I went in, and said, how do you do, and he said, what is that to you.

You say they followed you, beating you with bludgeons five or six feet long? - Yes.

Do you know what you say? - Yes; they could not have reached me very well, without being that length; you may give them what term you please, but they had sticks of that length.

How long was it after this transaction that you charged the prisoner with being concerned in this business? - It might be nine days or a fortnight.

Did you ask him how he came wounded? - I told him I was very sorry to find he had been engaged in the practice of smuggling, on account of his family.

Mr. Solicitor General. Are you perfectly sure that the prisoner is the man; be quite sure? - I am perfectly sure; I have not the least doubt.

Had they any permit with their liquors? - No; none at all.

JOHN GLIDDON sworn.

Examined by Mr. Fielding.

I am an officer of excise; I was with Mr. Llewellyn, on the 22d of April last, between nine and ten o'clock, I called Mr. Shallcross, and a corporal and serjeant of marines.

Is Mr. Shallcross an officer of excise? - Yes, we all went about seven or eight miles; about eleven o'clock we were OR Gauce Moor.

Was it light or dark? - It could not be very light, because it was a new moon, but it was so light that I could see the colour of a man's clothes; I saw a man at the distance of ten yards with a white jacket on.

What happened? - I rode foremost; I passed one or two horses loaded with ankers; then I called out to them, and said, halloo, gentlemen, what do you carry here? immediately a man cried out, all off! all off! then I saw two of them talking together; one of them said to the other, lend me your stick, if I don't do for him, I'll be d - n'd; I attempted a blow at them with a stick I had in my hand, but the stick flew out of my hand; I received blows from them, before I struck either of them, and I do not know that I struck either of them at last; I had received a

great many blows; my horse was killed under me, he was shot in the rump, and likewise stabbed near the same place; we drove on three loaded horses before us, and they kept following us and beating us; they said, they would sooner lose their lives than their goods; I believe we rode on a mile, and they followed us, beating us, and huzzaing; by-and-by we began to huzza as well as them; they then said, d - n them, let them go, it is of no use to follow them any further.

Have you any recollection of the prisoner? - Yes; but I cannot swear to him.

Mr. Lens. You do not profess to have so good a sight as the last witness; you say, that at the distance of ten yards you could discover a man with a white jacket on? - Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
27th February 1788
Reference Numbert17880227-109

Related Material

ActionsCite this text | Print-friendly version | Report an error

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 27th of FEBRUARY, 1788, and the following Days;

Being the THIRD SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honourable John Burnell , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY E. HODGSON, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND; And Published by Authority.

NUMBER III. PART VII.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXVIII.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.


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