Mary Goodwin.
16th October 1765
Reference Numbert17651016-21
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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536. (L.) Mary Goodwin was indicted for stealing three yards and a half of thread lace, value 10 s. the property of Elizabeth Deale , widow , October 9 . ++

Elizabeth Deale . I live in Ivy-lane, Newgate-street ; I keep a shop in the market , and sell butter and Buckinghamshire lace . The prisoner at the bar came into my shop last Wednesday, between three and four in the afternoon; she had a paper in her left hand. and something in it; she said, she wanted to buy some lace; I said, then I hope I shall serve you. I opened a box with, I believe, fifty pieces in it; she looked, and found fault with it. Said she, I have been buying a housewife, do you understand such things? I gave 9 s. for it; she took it out of a paper, and held it to me. I took it out of her hand, and said it is a great price, I should think it not worth quite so much: I began to be jealous of her, and thought she gave it into my hand, on purpose to amuse me: my bonnet was so low over my face, I could only see her hands at my lace. This piece of lace (holding the piece in question in her hand) was in a half-yard length; it was under, I believe, twenty other pieces: now and then she would give this piece a twirl up, and lay it down again. Then she said, what is the price of this? then talk about the housewife; I said, I do not think it is worth so much. O madam, said she, it is all needle-work, and gave it another tura up again. When she had doubled it up to her liking, which took up two or three minutes to do it, she clap'd it into her paper. Well, said I, here take your housewife; to my thinking, it is not worth above half a crown; she took and pop'd it upon the lace. I said, which lace will you please to have? said she, I think I will not buy any today, I see none that pleases my fancy; said I, they are very pretty. How do you sell your butter, said she? but let's see, I have butter enough till Saturday; I'll come another day for some butter; I think I'll come on Saturday, and all the time she kept drawing herself out of the shop. I said, but stay madam, you have not paid me for the lace you have in the paper: what lace, said she, you base woman? I said to my neighbour, pray Mrs. Martin, come to me; she did. I struggled with the prisoner; she clench'd her hand, and strove to get away: in the struggle we broke the glass of the housewife, and I at last wrench'd it out of her hand, and gave it to Mrs. Martin. I soon had a good many of my neighbours about me, and some of them fetched a constable. Then the prisoner call'd me a many bad names, and said I was very wicked. I said, how came my lace in your paper? she said, you wicked woman, I don't know. She at last begged I would not be cruel to her: I said, how do you mean? she said, not to swear false against her: I said, I shall tell the truth; if I am favourable to you, I shall be cruel to my neighbours.

Q. Did you know her before?

Deale. I have seen her in my shop two or three times within these two years.

Q. Did you ever sell her any thing?

Deale. I don't remember that I ever did; I never knew her name, or where she lived.

Q. What quantity is there of the lace?

Deale. Here is three yards and a half of it.

Q. from Prisoner. Whether you was asleep or awake, when I came into your shop?

Deale. I was not asleep, but she might very well think I was; I had put my apron over my head:

she came in and said, are you asleep? I said, no, I am not.

Sarah Martin . I saw the prisoner go into Mrs. Deale's shop; she said, where is my mistress? I saw Mrs. Deale shew her several pieces of lace, till I saw the prisoner get up and tastle the butter, and say it was very good; she came towards the door: then I heard Mrs. Deale say you have not paid for the lace you have got: she then called to me, and said, come and help me, here is an old thief: the prisoner's back was towards me; they tussled very much; Mrs. Deal took something from her, and gave it into my hand, and said, there, she has stole this piece of lace from me. The prisoner strove to get it from me, and said, she did not know how it came into the paper. It was this piece of lace.

Prisoner's Defence.

She call'd me D - d B - h, and came and tore the housewife out of my hand; I fell a crying, and said, pray don't break it, it cost me 6 s. 6 d. it is for a young woman going to Guernsey : then when I threatned she should pay for it, said she, when you come to the tribunal, Do you take me to be a brute. There was a young man pleaded with her, and said, I had not the looks of such a one as she charged me: I had a 5 s. 3 d. in my pocket, and lost it in the scustle: she struck me on the head; I said she should dearly pay for that blow: I make flowers for ladies hair.

Q. to Mrs. Martin. Did you hear this conversation?

Martin. There were no such words mentioned as the prisoner says; I was in the shop almost all the time: Mrs. Deale gave her a push, and not a blow; she does not use such language as the prisoner mentions.

For the Prisoner.

Richard Prosser . I am a carpenter, and live in Castle-street: the prisoner did lodge at my house about two years, and appeared very well dress; she told my wife she bought and sold old cloaths; I know she did deal in old cloaths.

Q. When did she quit your lodgings?

Prosser. She has quitted her lodgings about a year and a half come Christmas: after that, she lodged in King-street. I never knew any thing amiss of her; she paid me very honestly, and kept very good hours.

James Johnson . I am a master of languages, and have known her eleven years. My mother keeps a haberdasher's shop, in Stanhope-street, Clare-market : the prisoner had always free entrance in and out of the shop; she has a very honest character; I never knew to the contrary before this; we have had connection till within very lately.

Mr. Luallen. I have known her about 19 years; when I knew her first, she washed for two gentlemen in the temple: she washed for me three or four years, and several gentlemen that I recommended her to: I never knew her guilty of any thing amiss; she had a good character during the time I knew her.

Q. How long ago is it since she washed for you?

Luallen. It is about three months ago.

Mr. Dannoley. I live in Red-lion-street: I have traded with the prisoner, and never heard any ill of her before this.

Guilty . T .


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