ANN FLYNN, MARY ANN HAMLET.
2nd February 1835
Reference Numbert18350202-551
VerdictGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentenceTransportation; Transportation

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551. ANN FLYNN and MARY ANN HAMLET were indicted for that they, on the 20th of January, feloniously, knowingly, and without lawful excuse, had in their possession a mould, upon which was impressed the figure and apparent resemblance of one of the sides, to wit, the obverst side of a shilling.—2nd COUNT, stating it to be impressed with the reverse side.

The HON. MR. SCARLETT and MR. ELLIS conducted the Prosecution.

RICHARD TRIPP (policeman T 161.) On Tuesday, the 20th of January, in consequence of information which I received about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I proceeded to Pearl-court, Church-street, St. Giles, with Matthews and Denton, my brother constables—there are two rooms in the house, one at the bottom, and one at the top—I found the outer door open—I proceeded up stairs, and found the room door closed—I put my shoulder against it, and forced it open—I found a chair had been placed behind it to keep it close—I did not notice, but I have no doubt it was on the latch—it required the weight of my body to get it open—I saw the two prisoners standing close to the fire-place—there was a large, clear coke fire—my attention was then called away by a dog attacking me from under the bed—I beat it off with my staff—I turned round then,

and my brother officers had secured the prisoners—Flynn said, "What do you want here? what is it you want?"—I told her she knew what we wanted as well as I did myself—she replied, "Thank God, you have not seen us do any thing; you cannot hang us"—I commenced searching, and while I was searching, Hamlet said, "Thank God, you cannot hang us; you saw us doing nothing"—I searched on the hearth, near the fender, and found a mould—it was closed—I took it up, and found it was warm—I opened it, and found a base shilling in it, quite hot, having been recently coined—I gave the mould to Matthews, with the shilling in it, in the state I found it—on searching further in the ashes, I picked up four more base shillings and two iron spoons—on the hearth were some bits of metal, apparently recently melted—I gave them to Matthews—on the shelf I found a paper bag of plaster of Paris—I gave that to Matthews—I told the prisoners to prepare themselves to go with me—Hamlet said, "Am I to go? I have done nothing"—Flynn replied, "You know you must go—and all that is found in the room"—I then left Denton in charge of the room—Matthews and I took the prisoners to Bow-street—I returned in about a quarter of an hour by myself, and found Denton still there—on searching more minutely on the hearth of the fire-place, I found a small file, which I produce—Denton found a shilling on the coke, within the fire-grate, on the fire—it was on a piece of coke on the top of the fire which was not burnt—we left the room, and gave the shilling to Matthews at Bow-street—I saw nothing of Flynn's husband—he has been transported—her two children were in the room, one is about eight, and the other about four years old.

Flynn. There is neither latch, bolt, nor lock to the door. Witness. I thought it was on the latch; but I cannot gay whether there was a latch—there was a clear coke fire.

BENJAMIN WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I accompanied Tripp and Denton. If entered the room close behind Tripp—he was assailed by a large white-dog on entering the room—while he was beating it off, I secured Flynn, and Denton the other prisoner—I was by the side of Tripp, and saw him find the mould and other things, which I produce—he put them into my hand as he picked them up—here is a mould with a shilling in it—both the mould and shilling were hot—I saw him find three other shillings inside the fire-place, within the fender—here are some pieces of metal which he gave me, but I did not see him find them—I produce a bag of plaster of Paris which he found on the mantel-piece, and another shilling, which he afterwards gave me—I produce two iron spoons, which I saw him find inside the fire-place.

JOHN DENTON . I am a policeman. I have been present, and heard what the witnesses have stated—I confirm their evidence—I saw the whole transaction—I remained in the room—while Matthews was absent I found a shilling on a piece of unbornt coke in the back of the gate—there was a large coke fire.

JOHN FIELD . I am Inspector to the Mint, and have been so twenty-years. This is a plaster of Paris mould—it has the impression of both the obverse and reverse sides of a shilling—the impressions are quite perfect—there is a shilling in the mould now—here is the get which fills the channel to the mould—it is attached to the shilling—it fits the mould—it was cast in this mould clearly—the mould and shilling correspond in all respects—the shilling has the impression of the obverse and reverse sides—the mould has been used for some time, apparently; for it is cracked, and the appear-ances

of the cracks are on the shilling—these spoons appear to have been used to melt metal—one spoon fits the mouth of the mould exactly—it is pinched up in a peculiar way to fit it—the other five shillings have been all cast in that mould, I have not a doubt—these pieces of metal appear to have been spilt from the mould—a coke fire would answer the purpose of coining—it is Britannia metal, which is a mixture of tin and antimony—here is a bag of plaster of Paris—a file is necessary to remove the surplus metal round the edge of the shilling—I find here every thing necessary for the purpose.

(Flynn put in a written defence, stating that she occupied the room with another woman—that she had gone out just before the officers arrived, during which time the articles must have been placed there by some person.)

Hamlet's Defence. I happened to be in the room when the officers came up.

FLYNN— GUILTY . Aged 26.— Transported for Life.

HAMLET— GUILTY . Aged 20.— Transported for Seven Years.

Before Mr. Justice Patteson.


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