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<p>407.
<persName id="def1-407-18960518" type="defendantName">
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<interp inst="def1-407-18960518" type="age" value="46"/>
<interp inst="def1-407-18960518" type="surname" value="SEAMAN"/>
<interp inst="def1-407-18960518" type="given" value="WILLIAM"/>
<hi rend="largeCaps">WILLIAM SEAMAN</hi> (46)</persName> was indicted
<rs id="t18960518-407-offence-1" type="offenceDescription">
<interp inst="t18960518-407-offence-1" type="offenceCategory" value="kill"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-407-offence-1" type="offenceSubcategory" value="murder"/> for the wilful murder pf
<persName id="t18960518-name-24" type="victimName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-24" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-24" type="surname" value="LEVY"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-24" type="given" value="JOHN GOODMAN"/>
<join result="offenceVictim" targOrder="Y" targets="t18960518-407-offence-1 t18960518-name-24"/>John Goodman Levy</persName>.</rs> </p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">MESSRS. C. F. GILL</hi>
<hi rend="italic">and</hi>
<hi rend="smallCaps">HORACE AVORY</hi>
<hi rend="italic">Prosecuted.</hi> </p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">Ronald Ryley, Police Constable H</hi> 138,
<hi rend="italic">produced and proved plans of the premises in question.</hi> </p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-25" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-25" type="gender" value="female"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-25" type="surname" value="WEIDERMAN"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-25" type="given" value="ALICE"/>ALICE WEIDERMAN</persName> </hi>. I am the wife of Edward Weiderman, of 88, Over
<lb/>strand Mansions, Battersea Park—the deceased, Sarah Ann Gale, was my sister—at Easter last she was living as housekeeper to Mr. John Good
<lb/>man Levy, at 31, Turner Street—on Good Friday night, April 3rd, I had supper there with Mr. Levy and my sister—I left the house that night at twenty minutes to ten, leaving Mr. Levy and my sister there, no one else—thatwas the last time I saw either of them alive—on the Monday fol
<lb/>lowing I saw and identified her body at the inquest—I have since been shown a brooch, a gold watch, some earrings, a plated gold chain, an imitation diamond ring, and an imitation ruby and pearl ring; I identified those as articles my sister had in the house—I also identified a gold horse-shoe brooch which I had lent to my sister—I recognise these gold eye-glasses and this silver caddy spoon; it used to be in the kitchen—theprisoner is a stranger to me; I never saw him.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">Cross-examined by the Prisoner.</hi> My sister was a married woman—herhusband is not here; I don't know where he is.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-26" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-26" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-26" type="surname" value="BURLEY"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-26" type="given" value="CHARLES"/>CHARLES BURLEY</persName> </hi>. I am a dairyman, of 24, Turner Street, Mile End—Iknew Mrs. Gale, who lived at 31—I saw her on the Saturday morn
<lb/>ing, April 4th, the day after Good Friday, at a quarter-past seven—shewas opening the shutters on the ground floor—she was dressed—I spoke to her, and wished her "Good morning."</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-27" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-27" type="gender" value="female"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-27" type="surname" value="LAWTON"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-27" type="given" value="MARTHA"/>MARTHA LAWTON</persName> </hi>. I live at 35, Turner Street—the deceased, Mr. Levy, was my cousin—I had supper with him on the night of Good Friday, April 3rd—I left the house about twenty to ten, leaving him and Mrs. Gale there—I arranged to dine there next day, and about one next day I went to the house—I knocked at the door repeatedly, getting no answer I went next door, to 29, Mr. Shafer's—Mr. Shafer went into his back yard, and then came back and spoke to me—I then went out of the house, and found a policeman—as I went down Vardon Street, I saw the head of a man over the wall of Mr. Levy's house, the wall separating the yard from the street—a policeman came back with me—he went over Mr. Shafer's wall into Mr. Levy's premises—he went into the house; be opened the door, and instantly called to me to fetch a doctor—Mrs. Gale's sister was at supper with me, and Mr. Levy the night previous.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-28" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-28" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-28" type="surname" value="SHAFER"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-28" type="given" value="WILLIAM"/>WILLIAM SHAFER</persName> </hi>. I live at 29, Turner Street, Mile End. On Satur
<lb/>day, April 4th, I heard a knock at my door, and, on answering it, I saw Mrs. Law ton—from what she said to me, I went into my back yard, got a ladder, and looked over the wall of Mr. Levy's premises—I saw a man on the other side"; I only saw his head and shoulders; he had a cap one—I had never seen him before—I recognised him; it was the prisoner—I</p>
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<p>could not see what he was doing; he was stooping down, looking down—I shouted out to him, "What are you doing there?"—he hid himself—I just saw one eye come round the corner of the window—I called out again—I then got someone to watch in the yard, and went into the street round to Yardon Street, and a little while after I looked over the wall and saw the same man—I called out again, "What do you want?" and he went down again—at this time two policemen came on the scene—I took them through my house, and I got over the wall into Mr. Levy's premises—the policemen opened the front door, and I went in—I went downstairs to the corridor, where I had seen the man's head, and in one of the closets at the end of the corridor I saw the body of old Mr. Levy, at least his head—after that I remained at the front door for a little time—thepolice went upstairs—I did not see or feel the body to know whether it was alive or dead—after some time the prisoner was brought into the house unconscious; he was the same man I had seen looking over the wall.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">Cross-examined.</hi> After I had seen you the second time you went into the house.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-29" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-29" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-29" type="surname" value="ATKHCSON"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-29" type="given" value="WALTER"/>WALTER ATKHCSON</persName> </hi> (231
<hi rend="italic">H.</hi>) On Saturday, April 4th, about ten minutes past one in the day, I was called to 31, Turner Street—Police Constable Hammond arrived shortly after—we both got over Mr. Shafer's wall into Mr. Levy's premises—we went through the door into the corridor, and then to the water-closet at the end—in one of the water-closets I found the body of Mr. Levy, lying on the floor in a crouched position, on his side, his legs uppermost—he appeared to me to be dead—there was a quantity of blood on the floor, and extending to just outside the door in the corridor—I then went into the house—I found the street-door closed, just on the spring latch—I let Mr. Shafer in at the front door—I got over the wall at the back, let him in at the door, and then shut it again—Iafterwards went upstairs, and searched the house—in the top floor front bedroom I found the body of Mrs. Gale lying by the floor, near the door, on the door side of the bed—she appeared to be dead—I saw that her throat was cut—I had already seen that Mr. Levy's throat was cut; his head was almost severed from his body—Mrs. Gale was dressed—the room was in great disorder; boxes broken open, dresses strewed about the place; the contents of the drawers were strewn all over the place—I then went back immediately to the station to report.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">Cross-examined.</hi> I found no blood-stain in the back room—I found Mrs. Gale in the front room—there was a quantity of blood in her room—there were no blood-stains on the bed in the back room—at the Police-court you made a remark about a hole in the ceiling—I cannot say that I thoroughly examined the place then—I have not seen the place since—thedoor of the front room faces you as you go upstairs—the body was on the left of the bed, between you and the bed.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-30" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-30" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-30" type="surname" value="RICHARDSON"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-30" type="given" value="HENRY"/>HENRY RICHARDSON</persName> </hi> (442
<hi rend="italic">H</hi>). On Saturday, April 4th, I was in plain clothes, on duty in Commercial Road, with another constable—I heard something with regard to Turner Street, and at once went to the house, No. 31—on the roof I saw something, which appeared to be the form of a man moving about—I thereupon went into the house, and went up to the top floor, and into the front room, where I saw the body of the deceased woman—on looking round I saw a hole in the ceiling—I took</p>
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<p>off my coat and belt—I got on the bed, and climbed through the hole—I then had to crawl about underneath the tiles—while there I heard some
<lb/>one moving outside on the roof—there was not sufficient room for me to stand upright—I crept along until I found a hole in the tiles—I then saw the prisoner on the roof—he was just about to jump from the parapet—I called out to Wensley, who had gone into the house with me, "Look out, he is about to jump," or "about to go"—he then jumped over the parapet into Vardon Street; that was from the roof, a height of from thirty to forty feet—I came out on to the roof, and looked over the parapet—I saw that Wensley had got down, and had got the man—I then searched the roof, and found this hammer in two pieces, as it is now—there were marks of plaster on it—close to the hammer I found 1s. 4 1/2d. in money and this sovereign purse—I afterwards searched the roof again with Wensley—I then saw another hole leading to the ceiling of the back bedroom—that was a hole through the tiles, apparently made from the outside—there were also some bricks loosened or taken out of the chim
<lb/>ney—that was not done from the outside—it was between the tiles and the ceiling of the front room—that hole was not sufficiently large to enable anyone to get into the chimney.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">Cross-examined.</hi> I had just got my head through the roof when I saw you—you did not see me.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-31" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-31" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-31" type="surname" value="WENSLEY"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-31" type="given" value="FREDERICK"/>FREDERICK WENSLEY</persName> </hi> (
<hi rend="italic">Detective H</hi>). I went to the house with the last witness, and went upstairs with, him—I saw him get through the hole in the ceiling; I went up after him—I was in the room below, about to go up, when Richardson called out to me—I can't remember his exact words; it was to the effect that someone was there—in consequence of what he called out, I at once ran down into the street, and I saw the prisoner come through the air, and fall among the lot of people; there was a very large crowd there—with other officers, I picked him up and carried him back into the house; he Was then insensible—I then went up, and made a further search in the house—between the ceiling and the tiles I found this brown cloth cap, with a woman's hat-pin attached to it—in the top back bedroom I found this knife; I found fresh blood-stains on it, and this chisel, and a light brown overcoat.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-32" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-32" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-32" type="surname" value="BACCHUS"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-32" type="given" value="ERNEST"/>ERNEST BACCHUS</persName> </hi> (359
<hi rend="italic">H</hi>.) On Saturday, April 4th, about half-past one, I went to 31, Turner Street, and, looking up, I saw somebody ap
<lb/>parently crouching on the roof—I afterwards saw the prisoner jump from the parapet—I went up to him as he fell in the crowd—as he fell, there dropped from his pockets this gold neck-chain—I did not see a pair of gold eye-glasses—with assistance, I took him into the house—a shilling and threepence was given to me as having fallen from his pocket—in the house the sergeant took a number of things from his pocket; I did not see what they were—I afterwards assisted him to the hospital, and re
<lb/>mained there with him till ten that night—I was there again with him next day, the 5th of April; he was then conscious—about four in the afternoon I was giving him some milk to drink, and said, "That will do you good"—he replied," Oh, don't trouble much about that; I could go to the scaffold, and swing for what I have done, without fear; I know what is in front of me, and I can face it; if a man takes life, he must suffer for it; I don't value my life a bit; I have made my bed, I must lie on it"—on April 7th I was there again; about eight that morning, I was</p>
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<p>could not see what he was doing; he was stooping down, looking down—I shouted out to him, "What are you doing there?"—he hid himself—I just saw one eye come round the corner of the window—I called out again—I then got someone to watch in the yard, and went into the street round to Vardon Street, and a little while after I looked over the wall and saw the same man—I called out again, "What do you want?" and he went down again—at this time two policemen came on the scene—I took them through my house, and I got over the wall into Mr. Levy's premises—the policemen opened the front door, and I went in—I went downstairs to the corridor, where I had seen the man's head, and in one of the closets at the end of the corridor I saw the body of old Mr. Levy, at least his head—after that I remained at the front door for a little time—the police went upstairs—I did not see or feel the body to know whether it was alive or dead—after some time the prisoner was brought into the house unconscious; he was the same man I had seen looking over the wall.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">Cross-examined.</hi> After I had seen you the second time you went into the house.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-33" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-33" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-33" type="surname" value="ATKINSON"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-33" type="given" value="WALTER"/>WALTER ATKINSON</persName> </hi> (231
<hi rend="italic">H</hi>). On Saturday, April 4th, about ten minutes past one in the day, I was called to 31, Turner Street—Police Constable Hammond arrived shortly after—we both got over Mr. Shafer's wall into Mr. Levy's premises—we went through the door into the corridor, and then to the water-closet at the end—in one of the water-closets I found the body of Mr. Levy, lying on the floor in a crouched position, on his side, his legs uppermost—he appeared to me to be dead—there was a quantity of blood on the floor, and extending to just outside the door in the corridor—I then went into the house—I found the street-door closed, just on the spring latch—I let Mr. Shafer in at the front door—I got over the wall at the back, let him in at the door, and then shut it again—I afterwards went upstairs, and searched the house—in the top floor front bedroom I found the body of Mrs. Gale lying by the floor, near the door, on the door side of the bed—she appeared to be dead—I saw that her throat was cut—I had already seen that Mr. Levy's throat was cut; his head was almost severed from his body—Mrs. Gale was dressed—the room was in great disorder; boxes broken open, dresses strewed about the place; the contents of the drawers were strewn all over the place—I then went back immediately to the station to report.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">Cross-examined.</hi> I found no blood-stain in the back room—I found Mrs. Gale in the front room—there was a quantity of blood in her room—there were no blood-stains on the bed in the back room—at the Police-court you made a remark about a hole in the ceiling—I cannot say that I thoroughly examined the place then—I have not seen the place since—the door of the front room faces you as you go upstairs—the body was on the left of the bed, between you and the bed.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-34" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-34" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-34" type="surname" value="RICHARDSON"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-34" type="given" value="HENRY"/>HENRY RICHARDSON</persName> </hi> (442
<hi rend="italic">H</hi>). On Saturday, April 4th, I was in plain clothes, on duty in Commercial Road, with another constable—I heard something with regard to Turner Street, and at once went to the house, No. 31—on the roof I saw something, which appeared to be the form of a man moving about—I thereupon went into the house, and went up to the top floor, and into the front room, where I saw the body of the deceased woman—on looking round I saw a hole in the ceiling—I took</p>
<xptr type="pageFacsimile" doc="189605180011"/>
<p>off my coat and belt—I got on the bed, and climbed through the hole—I then had to crawl about underneath the tiles—while there I heard some
<lb/>one moving outside on the roof—there was not sufficient room for me to stand upright—I crept along until I found a hole in the tiles—I then saw the prisoner on the roof—he was just about to jump from the parapet—I called out to Wensley, who had gone into the house with me, "Look out, he is about to jump," or "about to go"—he then jumped over the parapet into Vardon Street; that was from the roof, a height of from thirty to forty feet—I came out on to the roof, and looked over—the parapet—I saw that Wensley had got down, and had got the man—I then searched the roof, and found this hammer in two pieces, as it is now—there were marks of plaster on it—close to the hammer I found ls. 4 1/2d. in money and this sovereign purse—I afterwards searched the roof again with Wensley—I then saw another hole leading to the ceiling of the back bedroom—that was a hole through the tiles, apparently made from the outside—there were also some bricks loosened or taken out of the chim
<lb/>ney—that was not done from the outside—it was between the tiles and the ceiling of the front room—that hole was not sufficiently large to enable anyone to get into the chimney.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">Cross-examined.</hi> I had just got my head through the roof when I saw you—you did not see me.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-35" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-35" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-35" type="surname" value="WENSLEY"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-35" type="given" value="FREDERICK"/>FREDERICK WENSLEY</persName> </hi> (
<hi rend="italic">Detective H</hi>). I went to the house with the last witness, and went upstairs with him—I saw him get through the hole in the ceiling; I went up after him—I was in the room below, about to go up, when Richardson called out to me—I can't remember his exact words; it was to the effect that someone was there—in consequence of what he called out, I at once ran down into the street, and I saw the prisoner come through the air, and fall among the lot of people; there was a very large crowd there—with other officers, I picked him up and carried him back into the house; he Was then insensible—I then went up, and made a further search in the house—between the ceiling and the tiles I found this brown cloth cap, with a woman's hat-pin attached to it—in the top back bedroom I found this knife; I found fresh blood-stains on it, and this chisel, and a light brown overcoat.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-36" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-36" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-36" type="surname" value="BACCHUS"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-36" type="given" value="ERNEST"/>ERNEST BACCHUS</persName> </hi> (359
<hi rend="italic">H</hi>). On Saturday, April 4th, about half-past one, I went to 31, Turner Street, and, looking up, I saw somebody ap
<lb/>parently crouching on the roof—I afterwards saw the prisoner jump from the parapet—I went up to him as he fell in the crowd—as he fell, there dropped from his pockets this gold neck-chain—I did not see a pair of gold eye-glasses—with assistance, I took him into the house—a shilling and threepence was given to me as having fallen from his pocket—in the house the sergeant took a number of things from his pocket; I did not see what they were—I afterwards assisted him to the hospital, and re
<lb/>mained there with him till ten that night—I was there again with him next day, the 5th of April; he was then conscious—about four in the afternoon I was giving him some milk to drink, and said, "That will do you good"—he replied, "Oh, don't trouble much about that; I could go to the scaffold, and swing for what I have done, without fear; I know what is in front of me, and I can face it; if a man takes life, he must suffer for it; I don't value my life a bit; I have made my bed, I must lie on it"—on April 7th I was there again; about eight that morning, I was</p>
<xptr type="pageFacsimile" doc="189605180012"/>
<p>assisting in washing the prisoner, when he said, "Never mind washing anything else, as I shan't be here long; I don't value my life; I want to die as soon as I can; I don't want to hide anything, and I shan't try to do it; I have been prompted to do this, but have been prevented thou
<lb/>sands of times; I know the old man has been the cause of all my trouble, and I would like to kill myself now; I am sick of my life."</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-37" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-37" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-37" type="surname" value="BRYAN"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-37" type="given" value="GEORGE"/>GEORGE BRYAN</persName> </hi> (176
<hi rend="italic">H</hi>). On April 10th I was in charge of the prisoner, while he was at the hospital—at half-past five that morning the prisoner woke me up, and said, "I suppose that old b—of a Levy is buried by this time"—I said I did not know—he said, "I am glad I done for the old b—and the woman; she must have been sleeping in the old man's bed; although she was undressed at the time, I killed her—I have been a good many times for the money, £70, and the old b—always made some excuse or other about it, and I made up my mind to do for him; I am not afraid of being hanged; I shan't be like some of them"—on April 11th I was again in charge of him, and about half-past five he said something to me; I wrote down what he said by his bed—he said, "I have had to put up with a lot from old Levy; he hns owed me £70, and each time I have asked him for it he has put me off"—he also said, "I could easily have got away, if I had liked, when I had done the job"—Elliott, another constable, was there at the time; I was afterwards present when Elliott wrote down a statement which the prisoner made.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">Cross-examined.</hi> Elliott and I used to sit there and read—we did not make bets—there was no blood in Gale's room—the statement I have read I got from you; you saw me writing it—you had no words with me and Elliott, no more than you asked me to let you have an evening paper, and I refused—you said, "Neither you nor your superintendent could prevent my having it if I liked; I have a right to have a newspaper"—you did not have a bet upon it with me.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-38" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-38" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-38" type="surname" value="ELLIOTT"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-38" type="given" value="WILLIAM"/>WILLIAM ELLIOTT</persName> </hi> (140
<hi rend="italic">H</hi>). On the morning of April 12th I was in charge of the prisoner at the hospital—I took down a statement which he made there—this is it. (
<hi rend="italic">Reading:</hi> "I have been a frequent visitor in Turner Street, where the job was done, and if the—old Jew had given me the £70 he owed me, the job would never have happened. You don't know half what there has been between old Levy and me; nobody else knows now, and I will keep it to myself; you don't know what I have had to put up with from the two b—s; but this finishes the lot. That morning I knocked at the door, old Levy himself opened it, and I walked in. He said the girl was upstairs. I then went upstairs, and found her in her own bedroom; she had just got her dress on, and leaning over her own bed, which appeared to me not to have been slept in. She always slept with old Levy. When she saw me, she shouted and began struggling, but I soon stopped her kicking. I then came downstairs, and soon put the old Jew's lights out. After the job was finished I heard someone keep knocking at the door. I stood behind the door, considering whether to let them in or not. If I had opened the door I would have soon floored them, so as they would not have walked out of that house again alive; they would have been carried out stiff with the others. I then got on the roof from the inside, and saw my only chance was to dive down off the roof head first, and if it had not been for someone breaking my fall, I should not have been lying</p>
<xptr type="pageFacsimile" doc="189605180013"/>
<p>in here. But, there it is; everyone has to die some time; I know I am going to get hung, and would not care if it was now, for I am tired of my life.")</p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">Cross-examined.</hi> We did not sit down and have a talk, and make it up together—you wanted the paper to see about the Muswell Hill murder.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
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<interp inst="t18960518-name-39" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-39" type="surname" value="MATTHEWS"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-39" type="given" value="GEORGE"/>GEORGE MATTHEWS</persName> </hi> (270
<hi rend="italic">H</hi>). I assisted in carrying the prisoner from the street into the parlour—I saw fall from his pocket a pair of gold eye-glasses, a seal, a two-shilling piece, and a shilling in silver—after that he remained unconscious for a considerable time, and was seen by the divisional surgeon.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-40" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-40" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-40" type="surname" value="DREW"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-40" type="given" value="HENRY"/>HENRY DREW</persName> </hi> (
<hi rend="italic">Inspector H</hi>). I went to 31, Turner Street, about two o'clock, and saw the prisoner there lying unconscious in the back room—therewas blood on his coat and trousers—I found on him a lady's gold watch, a gold diamond and turquoise pin, a watch-chain, a gilt half-crown brooch, a pair of gilt threepenny piece earrings, another imitation gold ring set with rubies and pearls, two cigars, a plated caddy spoon, a wed
<lb/>ding ring, a single-stone diamond ring, a piece of wash-leather thereon, 10s. 6d. in silver and a penny, the works of a watch, an old purse, a pocket knife, an old comb, and a brass stud—after a time he was taken to the hospital, and on the morning of the 6th I had his clothes and examined them—I saw marks of blood on the left side, and sleeve of the jacket, and a few grey hairs; there was blood on the right leg of the trousers towards the back, and on the side, and on the left knee, and a quantity of blood on the left cuff of the shirt—on the 6th of April I asked the prisoner his name and address—he said, "I shan't tell you"; I said, "Where do you live?"—he replied, "I refuse to tell you; you will find that out."</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-41" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-41" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-41" type="surname" value="MYERS"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-41" type="given" value="JACOB"/>JACOB MYERS</persName> </hi>. I was a step-son of the deceased man—he was crippled in both hands—I saw him on April 2nd—in consequence of a telegram I went to his house on April 4th—this gold chain belonged to my mother; my step-father used to wear it—this wedding ring belonged to my mother—mystep-father used to wear this single-stone diamond ring, which has wash-leather round it, because it was too large for him—I have seen him wear this diamond and opal pin, and a pair of eye-glasses similar to these—Mrs. Gale used to wear this brown cap when she cleaned the steps.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-42" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-42" type="gender" value="female"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-42" type="surname" value="BOWATER"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-42" type="given" value="REBECCA"/>REBECCA BOWATER</persName> </hi>. I live at Millwall, and am the wife of Christopher Bowater—the prisoner lodged at our house up to April 4th, in the namo of William Saunders—I last saw him in the house late on the Friday evening; next morning, when I came down at eight o'clock, he had gone out—on April 7th I was taken to the London Hospital to see him—Mr. Smith, the surgeon, was present—I asked the prisoner, Was it possible he had done such a terrible crime?—he said, "I did do it"—I asked him what his motive was for doing such a thing; and he said, "Revenge"—I asked him "What revenge could you have against that poor old gentleman?"—he said, "He did me the greatest injustice that one man can do another"—I said, "Why? was that woman your wife?"—he said, "No, she was no man's wife"—the police then stopped me from talking further to him, and would not allow me to ask him any more questions.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-43" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-43" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-43" type="surname" value="BOWATER"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-43" type="given" value="JESSE JOSEPH"/>JESSE JOSEPH BOWATER</persName> </hi>. I am son of the last witness, and live with her—theprisoner slept in my room—on April 4th I saw the prisoner; he went out between eight and nine a.m.—this knife and hammer belong to me—the hammer was kept in the coke-box to break coke; and the knife was kept with</p>
<xptr type="pageFacsimile" doc="189605180014"/>
<p>the other knives in the kitchen-table drawer—this chisel is my father's, and was kept in the house, too.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-44" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-44" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-44" type="surname" value="SMITH"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-44" type="given" value="LEWIS ALBERT"/>LEWIS ALBERT SMITH</persName> </hi>. I am house-surgeon at the London Hospital—Iwas present when the prisoner had some conversation with Mrs. Bowater; at that time he was perfectly sensible.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-45" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-45" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-45" type="surname" value="MCCOMBIE"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-45" type="given" value="DUNCAN ALEXANDER"/>DUNCAN ALEXANDER McCOMBIE</persName> </hi>. I am a surgeon, practising in the Commercial Road—on April 4th, at 1.40 p.m., I was called to 31, Turner Street, by the police, and was taken to the basement—I saw the dead body of Levy in the w.c.—the body was quite warm—I thought he had probably been dead from fifteen to twenty minutes at the outside—there was a large semi-circular wound in the throat; it would probably have caused death—it might appear to a lay person as having nearly cut off the head, but it was not so actually; the wound severed the wind-pipe and gullet, and one of the large arteries on the left side was divided—I saw there were a great many injuries to the head and scalp—next day I made a
<hi rend="italic">post-mortem</hi> examination—the lower margin of the wound in the throat was about eight inches, from end to end—I should say its direction was from right to left; it was much deeper at one side than the other; very likely such a knife as this could have caused it—some of the wounds on the scalp were contused, some were cleaner cut; they could have been produced by some blunt instrument: the door being burst open might have caused some—there were, perhaps, a dozen altogether, varying in sizfc from three-quarters of an inch to two inches, on different parts of the head—most of them appeared to have been produced by some instru
<lb/>ment—onthe side of the head was a large lacerated wound, down to and exposing the bone, and another smaller one just at the outer side—there was an incised wound just over the left eyebrow, leading down to a com
<lb/>pound fracture of the nasal bones—there was a partial fracture of the bones of the forehead—two ribs on the right side and four on the left side were fractured—considerable force must have been used to cause those injuries—the wound in the throat would be quite sufficient to cause death—a man could not live with such a wound; death would have ensued instantaneously.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-46" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-46" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-46" type="surname" value="MICHAEL"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-46" type="given" value="GUSTAV"/>GUSTAV MICHAEL</persName> </hi>. M.B. I practise in the Commercial Road—I was called to 31, Turner Street on April 4th, and arrived there a little after two p.m.—I examined the body of Mrs. Gale, which was lying in the front bedroom, top floor—
<hi rend="italic">rigor mortis</hi> was just commencing—she had been dead, I judged, at least two hours; it is impossible to state accurately—I saw she had injuries to her head, and that her throat was cut—the injuries to her head were most apparent—I made a
<hi rend="italic">post-mortem</hi> examina
<lb/>tion the next day; I found several injuries to the head, just such as might have been produced by this hammer—the cutting of the throat may have been done by this knife.</p>
<p>
<hi rend="smallCaps">
<persName id="t18960518-name-47" type="witnessName">
<interp inst="t18960518-name-47" type="gender" value="male"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-47" type="surname" value="WHITE"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-name-47" type="given" value="STEPHEN"/>STEPHEN WHITE</persName> </hi> (
<hi rend="italic">Inspector H</hi>). On May 1st, on the prisoner's dis
<lb/>charge from the hospital, I told him I was a police officer, and that I should take him into custody upon a charge of wilfully causing the deaths of Annie Sarah Gale and John Goodman Levy, at 31, Turner Street, on April 4th, and also for stealing a quantity of jewellery at the same time and place—he said, "Yes; very well"—at the Police-station, when the charge was read to him, he said, "Yes."</p>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">The Prisoner, when asked whether he had anything to say in his defence,</hi> </p>
<xptr type="pageFacsimile" doc="189605180015"/>
<p>
<hi rend="italic">stated that he had nothing to say about the case, but that he desired to com
<lb/>plain about a statement in a newspaper to the effect that he had previously been charged with an attempt to murder, and assault and theft, and that that statement was false.</hi> </p>
<p>
<rs id="t18960518-407-verdict-1" type="verdictDescription">
<interp inst="t18960518-407-verdict-1" type="verdictCategory" value="guilty"/>
<interp inst="t18960518-407-verdict-1" type="verdictSubcategory" value=""/>
<hi rend="smallCaps">GUILTY</hi> </rs>.—
<hi rend="italic">
<rs id="t18960518-407-punishment-2" type="punishmentDescription">
<interp inst="t18960518-407-punishment-2" type="punishmentCategory" value="death"/>
<join result="defendantPunishment" targOrder="Y" targets="def1-407-18960518 t18960518-407-punishment-2"/>
<hi rend="largeCaps">DEATH</hi> </rs>.</hi> </p> </div1></div0>
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