MARY THORPE, Theft > theft from a specified place, 30th April 1794.

Reference Number: t17940430-16
Offence: Theft > theft from a specified place
Verdict: Guilty > with recommendation
Punishment: Death
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244. MARY THORPE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , a gold watch, value 6l. another watch, value 2l. four silver tea spoons, value 6s. a gold ring, value 5s. a mourning ring, value 5s. a tea caddy, value 6s. a silk cloak with black lace, value 3l. a muslin dimity gown, value 1l. a worked muslin gown, value 1l. two cotton gowns, value 10s. astuff petticoat, value 3s. a white marseilles petticoat, value 10s. two dimity petticoats, value 10s. a muslin petticoat, value 10s. three muslin aprons, value 2l. two linen aprons, value 4s. a dimity bed gown, value 5s. five linen shifts, value 10s. a cloth cloak, value 5s. a silk cloak, value 5s. six linen handkerchiefs, value 4s. a silk handkerchief, value 2s. six muslin handkerchiefs, value 1l. a muslin shawl, value 10s. half a muslin shawl, value 4s. two shawl handkerchiefs value 4s. six yards of muslin, value 1l. a linen table cloth, value 5s. a wax bead necklace, value 6d. two muslin frocks, value 10s. and two pair of womens linen gloves, value 1s. the goods of John Cook in his dwelling house .

JOHN COOK sworn.

I live at Twickenham , I am a brewer , the prisoner was my servant , she was with me only three days.

Q. Had you a character with her? - No, there we were deficient.

Q. When was it this happened? - On the 26th of March last we did not hear her so soon in the morning as usual, either I or my wife, and we waited some time and heard nothing of her, and after some short interval of about twenty minutes, her mistress went into her room hearing no answer to the bell, and found she was gone, and her box and a great deal of property missing. On Sunday week I went down to King's Langley, in Hertfordshire, in consequence of a letter having been seen in her box, dated from that piece. I found that she had been down there in a post chaise on the Saturday,

subsequent to the robbery, and I traced her back to Watford, she there took another post chaise and came to the Green Man at Islington; but I should tell your lordship first, that I saw the boy at Watford that drove her, and he told me that there was part of the property left at the Green Man at Islington, which I have got here and can swear to some part of it.

Q. Was the prisoner at the Green Man when you found the property? - No, she had been gone some days; the property was brought forward by the landlord and landlady of the house, the landlord's name, I believe, is James Thomas.

JANE COOKE sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. On the 26th of March I understand this woman quitted your service, did you then miss your property? - Yes.

Q. Was the property that you missed from any one particular place, or from different rooms in your house? - From different places.

EDWARD MILES sworn.

The prisoner took a place at our coach office for Kingston, from Kingston to London, she booked the place on the 26th of March in the evening, outside, she came up by the coach on the 27th of March, she came to the Angel, the back of St. Clement's.

Q. Had she the bundle with her then? - I did not see the large bundle, that she did not carry, but she had a small bundle then in a small silk handkerchief; and she went back with me to Stones End to know if the bundle was come by the other coach. She went with me on the box to the Stones End, to the Horse Shoe, where she found it was come to the Cross Keys, in Gracechurch-street; but I bought a watch of her in the day time. left her at the Horse Shoe.

Q. Where did you buy that watch? - Between the hours of one and two on the 27th.

Q. Where was it you bought it? - At the Crooked Billet, the corner of Wych-street, I went with her from the Angel Inn to there, it was only across the way.

Q. How did it happen, had you had any talk about that watch? - She had something of a twist about her finger, and I asked her about it, and she said she was at play the night before, and had broke her ring, and she pulled her housewife out of her pocket to shew me a ring, and she could not find it; but she found a mourning ring, which she said was her grandmother's; she then opened her bundle and took out a tea caddy, she then took out two watches, one was a plain gold one, and the other was a green studded case watch. I asked her if she would sell the plain gold watch? she said, I should have it if I chose; I asked her what I should give her for it? I told her I did not know the value of such a thing, but I would give her what she pleased for it; she said it was a very old watch, much battered and bruised, and it was her grandfather's; but if I had it cleaned it would go well, and I should have it for my own price. I said if she would I would give her three guineas for it; she said I should have it. and I bought it of her.

Q. Did you know it was gold then? - I did not. I took it to the Angel Inn, and shewed it to one of our clerks, and he said it was not worth more than fifteen shillings, but afterwards it was shewn to a watch maker, and he said the outside case was worth two guineas; we went then to Stones End, in the Borough.

JAMES THOMAS sworn.

The prisoner came to my house and was there the biggest part of the week; I

keep the Green Man, at Paddington. Mr. Cooke made a mistake in saying I slington. She came to me the latter end of March, the day I cannot say, it was on a Saturday, and she came away the Saturday following; she said she had been in search of her brother, and her money ran short, and she wished to leave a few things that she had got, and desired to have a guinea and a half on them, and she would send for the things in a day or two.

Q. Had she any bundles with her at that time? - Yes, I cannot say to more than one, and that I can hardly say, only I see the porter have it on his back when she went out of the house, she left a piece of muslin, a blue sattin cloak, with black lace, and a check apron she gave my servant, and a mourning ring.

Q. Was the muslin not made up, or was it in a gown? - Not made up.

WILLIAM WALE sworn.

I was sent for last Thursday, about seven o'clock in the afternoon, to take the prisoner up, I went to the Horse Shoe, at Stones End.

Q. Had she any thing with her at that time? - Yes, I took these things from her back, and two rings from her finger; here is a black silk cloak, a pair of leather gloves, and a half shawl, and some other things, a muslin half shawl, here are three in all found, and only one owned.

Mrs. Cooke. These are my things, my cloak, I made it myself, I know the muslin also

Mills. This is the watch I bought of the prisoner, I know it by the number,(811.)

Q. How long had you had it in your custod? - From Thursday to Saturday night about eight o'clock, when I went and left it at Union Hall, with the magistrate.

Wale. I bring it here.

Mrs. Cooke. This is my husband's watch? - I know it to be his.

Mr. Cooke. This is my watch, I know it very well, I had it about eight years, I prosecuted two guards about the same watch, robbing me on the highway. I broke the pendant the night before the robbery, in consequence I did not take it up stairs that night as I used to do, but I left it on the chimney-piece. It cost me nine guineas, I bought it as second hand; I suppose it is worth now six or seven guineas, the cloak cost about four pounds, the muslin cost three shillings and six-pence a yard, the rings are worth three pounds.

Prisoner. I have got nothing to say.

GUILTY. Death . (Aged 19.)

Recommended by the Jury .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.


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