CHARLES FLYNN.
19th September 1864
Reference Numbert18640919-848
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment > penal servitude

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848. CHARLES FLYNN (21) , Unlawfully having counterfeit coin in his possession, with intent to utter it.

MR. COLERIDGE conducted the Prosecution, and Ma COOPER the Defence.

JAMES BRANNAN . I was formerly police-inspector of the G division—I am now employed by the Mint, and hold an appointment under the Home Office—on 6th August, I went to Cromer-street, Gray's-inn-road, with Inspector Young, and watched No. 83 with him—he was in one place and I was in another—I saw the prisoner come out about 6, and pointed him out to Young, who was in uniform—we both seized him, and I said, "Charley, you are suspected of having counterfeit coin in your possession; what have you about you?"—he said, "Nothing"—Young put his hand in the prisoner's pocket and took out a parcel, which he handed to me—it was partly in two parcels; a little one wrapped in a large one—I saw the coin—Young handed It to me, and I showed it to the prisoner, and said that it was bad—he made no reply—he said that he had no fixed home—I said, "Yes, you have; you live at 83, in this street; I have had you under observation some time"—the packet contained six crowns, a half-crown and a florin—I took him to No. 83—Young searched the first floor in my presence, but nothing was found—I took him to the station, and charged him with having the coins with intent to circulate them—he said, "How can you tell what is at the bottom of my heart? you do not know whether I knew they were counterfeit or not. You would transport me if you could; you tried your hardest last Session."—I said, "Never mind, we will not discuss that matter now"—I do not know Charley Wyatt—I was not with him in a shoemaker's shop before I took the prisoner—I was there with Inspector Young, and have the shoemaker here to prove it.

Cross-examined. Q. I understand that you gave evidence against the prisoner last Session, and that he was acquitted? A. Yes—when I found

nothing in the room I did not say, "This is heart-breaking"—I said that it was heart-rending for his parents.

EDWARD YOUNG (Police-inspector, L). On the evening of 16th August, I accompanied Brannan to 83, Cromer-street—I saw the prisoner come out—Brannan pointed him out to me, and we went over together and seized him—I took from his trousers-pocket these packets, and handed them to Brannan—one was partly broken, and I saw the edges of coins—I heard Brannan say that it was heart-breaking to see him in that deplorable state, as he knew his relations—I found nothing.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you find a good half-crown in the paper? A. Yes.

WILLIAM WEBSTER . Here is a bad florin, a bad half-crown, and six bad crowns, five of which are from one mould.

Witness for the defence.

SARAH WEYBRIDGE . I lived at 83, Cromer-street, but have removed—I am single, and have lived with the prisoner—on 16th August, before he went out, a young man named Charles, who had been in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to our place, gave him a parcel wrapped in a news-paper—I could not see what was in it—he said, "Hold them for me for a few minutes," or words to that effect—he went out first and the prisoner followed him, and soon afterwards the policemen came in.

Cross-examined by MR. COLERIDGE. Q. What is Charley? A. A fishmonger, I believe—I do not know whether his name is Wyatt—I never went to his house—the prisoner is a shoemaker, and works at home—he has mended children's boots for a friend of mine at 38, Upper Rosoman-street, where I now live.

COURT. Q. At what time in the day did you see Charles? A. About a quarter to 6—I cannot say to a minute, as there was no clock in the room.

COURT to EDWARD YOUNG. Q. How long were you watching? A. An hour and half—I did not see a man named Charley go in, but I was at a different place to Brannan; I joined him afterwards—I could see the door for about ten minutes before the prisoner left.

COURT to JAMES BRANNAN. Could you see the door of No. 83 the whole time you were watching? A. Yes—I saw people go in, as the back parlour is a chandler's shop; but no one connected with the prisoner, as far as I know.

GUILTY . **— Five Years' Penal Servitude.


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