ROBERT DRUCE, THOMAS TOWNSEND.
11th May 1863
Reference Numbert18630511-686
VerdictGuilty > unknown
SentenceImprisonment

Related Material

ActionsCite this text | Print-friendly version | Report an error
Navigation< Previous text (trial account) | Next text (trial account) >

686. ROBERT DRUCE (30), and THOMAS TOWNSEND (33) Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. COOKS and CRAWFORD conducted the Prosecution.

JAMES WEST . I keep the Albemarle Arms in South Audley-street—on 21st April, I saw my niece serve Townsend, and in his presence she showed me a bad half-crown which she had taken from him and bent—I asked him if he had got any more—he said, "No"—I asked him where he got it—he said, "At the steam-boat at London Bridge"—he said he had no other money—I then gave him the half-crown back, and he went away without drinking the beer he had asked for—I suggested to a Mr. Godfrey who was in the bar, to follow him, and he did so.

HENRY GODFREY . I am a reporter—on 21st April I was at the Albemarle Arms, and saw Townsend leave the house—I followed him—he walked up and down South Audley-street for about ten minutes—I never lost sight of him—he then went into Hyde-park, and was there joined by Druce—they sat down together about a quarter of an hour, and then went across the head of the Serpentine and out at Park-place by the barracks—I went out at Albert-gate, and there met McLeod, 18 B——I made a communication to him, and we both watched the prisoners—they went into the Brompton-road for some distance, and then separated—Townsend went direct across the road to a baker's shop—I followed into the shop, and he was in the act of receiving a half-crown back from the young woman—I heard him say he did not know it was bad—I said he must have known it, because he tried to pass one in South Audley-street—he made no answer—McLeod took him in custody and received the half-crown.

MARY FLETCHER . I serve in Mr. Jobbin's, a baker's shop in Brompton—on 21st April Townsend came in and asked either for a penny bun or two halfpenny loaves, I can't say which, and gave me a bad half—crown—I told him it was bad—what the last witness has stated is correct—I gave the half-crown to the policeman.

Townsend. Q. You did not hand me the half-crown back? A. I was going to, and the policeman came in.

DANIEL MCLBOD (Policeman, B 18). My attention was called to the two prisoners by Mr. Godfrey, and we followed them to the Brompton road—I spoke to 274 B, and gave him some instructions—I took Townsend in the baker's shop and received this half-crown (produced)—at that time I saw Druce and the other policeman standing together—Mr. Godfrey beckoned me to the shop-door—I looked at Druce at that time, and noticed he was hastening his pace, and going between a run and a good walk towards Lloyd's-place—I went there next morning, and on searching I found one bad half-crown and two bad florins, and a workman there picked up another bad florin and handed it to me—a very low fence separatee Lloyd's-place from where the money was—when we took the prisoners to the station they said they were strangers to each other—we found 2d. on Druce, and 2 1/2 d. on Townsend in a bundle which he had.

RICHARD NEWTON (Policeman, B 274). Druce was pointed out to me by the last witness—I followed him, and saw him go down Lloyd's-place, lost sight of him for a few seconds, and then saw him again coming from underneath the wood fence—there is no thoroughfare—he was obliged to come back—I heard Townsend say at the station that the half-crown which he offered to the man at the public-house was the same which he tendered at the baker's shop.

WILLIAM WEBSTER . These coins are all bad.

The prisoners' statements before the magistrate were here read as follows:—townsend says—"I had not the park, and asked him for a pipe of tobacco. I had nothing to do, so I walked to Brompton with him, and am happy to find that I am made richer than I really was." Druce says—"I have nothing to say."

Druce's Defence. I was coming across Hyde-park, and Townsend came up and asked me the way to Knightabridge. I told him I was going that way, and we went together. I saw him go into the baker's shop, and they took me because I was in his company. I know nothing of this man:

Townsends Defence. I know nothing of this man, neither does he know anything about me.

GUILTY . (See next case).

TOWNSEND— Confined Nine Months.


View as XML