CAROLINE JONES, Royal Offences > coining offences, 2nd April 1860.

332. CAROLINE JONES (37) Feloniously uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. ELLIS and SHARPE conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN FARMER . I produce a certificate—(Read: "Central Criminal Court; Caroline Jones, convicted January, 7th 1848, of uttering two counterfeil sovereigns.—Confined Eighteen Months")—the prisoner is the person—I was at that time in the police, and I had her in custody.

JOSEPH SMOUT . I am a butcher—On 13th March the prisoner came for 6d. worth of beef steaks—she gave me a counterfeit half-sovereign—I took it up and said, "This is a bad one"—she said, "I took it of a gentleman who deals with you, and he is very fond of your meat—his name is James; he lives at 44, St. James's-square, Tottenham-court-road"—I said, "There is no such place"—she said., "O, yes, there is"—she gave me a good shilling and said, "Take it out of this," and I did so—I did not give her the half-sovereign back; I sent for a constable and gave her in custody—I marked the half-sovereign because she scrupled about my sayiug it was a bad one, and I said, "Very well, I will send my little boy to have it tried"—I did so and he brought it back—it was bad—I had bent it between my finger and thumb before I gave it to the boy—I gave it to the policeman.

Prisoner. Q. Where did you take the half-sovereign? A. Into my parlour—I did not give it to any one—I did not give it to a gentleman in black—it was only in the custody of myself, my father, and the boy, but I

had marked it before—I had not lost sight of it before I bent it—I did not I say at the station to the inspector, "I think I can make a case of this now, as she gave me a shilling and a half-sovereign."

CALEB HOOKER (Policeman, G 125.) On 13th March I was sent for to I Mr. Smout's, aud received from him this half-sovereign—I took the prisoner in custody and told her the charge—she said she did not know it was bad—she was searched at the station and 1l. 16s. 1d. was found on her—she gave I her name Caroline Jones, and said she lived at No. 44, St. James's-square—there is no such place—she then said it was No. 44, St. James's-place, Tottenham-court-road—I went, and there is no such place to be found.

JOHN ANDREWS . I am a fruiterer of Guildford-street—on 13th March the prisoner came to my shop for 6d. worth of oranges—I served her I and she gave me a good sovereign—I gave her in change a half-sovereign and 9s. 6d. in silver—she began taking up the change and then she said, "O dear me, I don't want change now"—I put my hand to take the change back and I saw it was not the half-sovereign that I had given her—I said, "This is a bad one" and I put it on the counter and bent it—it bent very easily—I said to her, "If you don't give me my half-sovereign back I will give you in charge"—she said, "I have no other"—I said, "This is not a good one"—I called the lad and told him to fetch a policeman—when she saw that I was determined to have it she gave me my own half-sovereign back—I had bent the one she gave me and returned it to her—after paying me she walked out of the shop, and I followed her and watched her to Mr. Smout's.

Prisoner. The half-sovereign your gave me oat of your pocket was a little bent. Witness. No, it was not, that I can positively swear—I did not examine the one you gave me more than bending it.

WILLIAM WEBSTER . This half-sovereign is bad.

BENJAMIN BRIANT (Inspector, G). I took this charge.

Prisoner. The prosecutor said, "I can make a case of this; she gave me a shilling and a bad half-sovereign." Witness. No, nothing of the kind.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will have mercy on me on account of my poor dying husband and my helple 38 children. This shall be the last time I will ever commit a like offence; spare me this time from a severe sentence

GUILTY .**— Ten Years' Penal Servitude.


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