WILLIAM SLATER, JOHN SLATER, THOMAS SLATER.
17th August 1846
Reference Numbert18460817-1518
VerdictsGuilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
SentencesTransportation

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1518. WILLIAM SLATER was again indicted for embezzling and stealing a security for the payment of 51l. 19s., the property of George Keene and others, his masters; JOHN SLATER and THOMAS SLATER for (feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen.

MESSRS. CLARKSON and DOANE conducted the Prosecution.

FRANCIS TEBBUTT . I am a wholesale draper, and carry on business in Wood-street, Cheapside, in partnership with George Keene and another. William Slater had been in our employ about a year and a half—we had very considerable confidence in him—he was occasionally sent out to receive money to a considerable amount—he was sent, on the 10th of July, to receive 51l. 19s. from Mr. Clayton—it was his duty to account for the money he received on his return—it was customary to give him a pocket-book with the name of our firm on it, to put bank notes and cash in—he did not return—I did not see him till he was taken on the following day.

WILLIAM CLAYTON . I am a linen-draper, and live in Whitechapel-road. I am a customer at the house of Keene and Co.—on the 10th of July William Slater called on me—I gave him for his masters a check for 51l. 19s. on the London and Westminster Bank, and crossed it to Barclay and Co., who I knew were the bankers of Messrs. Keene and Co.—I took this memorandum from William Slater.

GEORGE EDWARD RADFORD . I am cashier to the firm of Keene and Co. I gave instruction to William Slater on the 10th of July to go and receive certain amounts of money owing to the firm—amongst others, I gave him the name of Mr. Clayton, from whom he was to receive 51l. 19s.—he had a pocket-book, with the name of the firm written on the inside—he did not come back again—inquiries were made, and he was taken the following evening—he was brought to the warehouse, and was charged with this offence in my presence—he said he had been robbed of it, but he did not know by whom—he was asked where his brothers were—he said they were in situations; one was in Lawrence-lane, or Ironmonger-lane; he did not know the house, but it was four or five doors from Cheapside; and the other was in bedford-place, or bedford-street—he made no further statement till I saw him at the Mansion-house—I believe I first spoke to him—I said, "Well, William, I should think by this time you begin to be ashamed of your conduct"—he began to cry; and a conversation ensued, in which he said that the statement he had made about the loss of the money was false, and he had committed the robbery at the instigation of his brothers; that they had from time to time required him to supply them with goods from the warehouse, to procure money—he said he had given over to the parties who had instigated him the pocket-book containing his collection, and, amongst others, the check for 51l. 19.—I had seen one of the other prisoners before near my master's premises.

GEORGE RUSSELL (City police-constable, No. 34.) On the 13th of July, in consequence of information, I went to trace out the prisoners John Slater and Thomas Slater—I went to the house of Mr. Faulkner, No. 108, Old Street-road—I there found Hannah Flannagan—I produce this book, which I found at the lodgings—I was present at the Mansion-house when the parties were examined—and before they were examined I took out this pocket-book, and John Slater said, in the presence of Thomas Slater, "That is my book"—I had before told them the sum they were alleged to have received—in the course of conversation John Slater said, in the presence of Thomas, that they had thrown the check and pocket-book into the Lea, at Hughes's ferry—he described the spot to me, between two willows—Thomas Slater heard all that was said—he did not say anything—I went with Thomas Slater and another officer to find the spot—Thomas went exactly to the spot pointed out by John—he said it was there, in very deep water, close to the edge, and the pocket-book was wrapped up, and tied round with a stone—he said that was

where it was, and that was the exact place described by John—Thomas said the name of the firm was on the pocket-book—I did not Uneaten him, or say anything to induce him to make that statement (There were other indictments against the prisoners)

WILLIAM SLATER— GUILTY . Aged 15.

JOHN SLATER— GUILTY . Aged 18.

THOMAS SLATER— GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported fir Seven Year.


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