CATHERINE HANNAGAN, Royal Offences > coining offences, 18th September 1811.

800. CATHERINE HANNAGAN was indicted for that she, on the 22d of August , one piece of false and counterfeit money made to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence, as and for a good sixpence unlawfully did utter to William Osborne , she well knowing it to be false and counterfeit, and that she at the same time of uttering it, had in her custody and possession, one other piece of false and counterfeit money made to the likeness and similitude of a goods sixpence, she well knowing the same last piece of false and counterfeit money to be false and counterfeited .

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I live at the Turk's-head, Aldgate High-street .

Q. Do you remember a woman of the name of Williams and a woman of the name of Stevens coming to your house on the 22d of August last - A. I do, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, Sarah Stevens came for a quartern of gin, it came to fourpence, she offered me a sixpence; I told her it was a bad one, I kept the sixpence and gave it Kennersley, the officer. Williams came up at the same time and offered another sixpence o pay for the same gin. I told her that was a bad one also, I would have them taken up for smashers. They told me they took it of a woman that sat in the passage of my public-house; I sent for an officer. Tremer the officer came, and the woman slipped off the bench, I saw her hand go from her bosom, as if she was parting with something, I held the candle under the bench, there I saw a little bag, with four sixpences of the same shake, with some shot. I sent her over to the watchhouse. I afterwards looked in the same place were I found the bag; I found a shilling. The canvas bag was warm, as if it had been in some person's bosom.

SARAH STEVENS . Q. On that day did you go with Hannah Williams and the prisoner to Mr. Osbornes - A. I know nothing of the prisoner, she was sitting in the house about half past eleven o'clock, I went into that public house with Williams. I had a pot of porter, was paid penny-peices for that; the prisoner was sitting in the passage, I never saw her before I went with the porter to Hannah williams. The prisoner asked me to give her a drink of beer. I did so, she then said for my good nature she would give the some money to fetch a quartern of gin, she put her hand in her bosom and gave me a sixpence out of the bag, I went to the bar for a quartern of gin, I gave him that same sixpence that I received of the prisoner for a quarter of gin; I had no other, nothing but a few penny-pieces. Mr. Osborne objected to it, and kept it. Hannah Williams followed me up to the bar directly, and told me to make half a pint of it. Mr. Osborne stopped her with it. The prisoner sent for a pint of beer before that with a bad sixpence, he stopped that sixpence. I told Mr. Osborne that I and Hannah Williams received them sixpences of the woman in the passage; I am positive that the sixpence I paid came from the prisoner.

Q.What is Williams - A. an engine winster, she lives in Rose-lane, Spital-fields, I have known her three years, she was in the house before I came.

Q. Was she talking with the prisoner when you came in - A. Not as I know of, no further than she fetched the prisoner a pint of beer before.

HANNAH WILLIAMS . I am a single woman, I live in Rose-lane, I am an engine winster.

Q. You remember going to Mr. Osborne's public-house on the 22d of August - A. Yes, I went there about a quarter after eleven; the prisoner came in soon after, she sat down on a bench in the passage, I had never seen her before, she asked me fetch her half a pint of beer; I said I would; she gave me a sixpence out of a little bag that was in her bosom, and when I was going she said, make it a pint, I went and got a pint of beer, and gave Mr. Osborne the sixpence; I had no other, only five farthings, for which I had half a pint of beer; she then sent Sarah Stevens with a sixpence for a quartern of gin, and sent me after her to make it half a pint, with another sixpence; Mr. Osborne said he would have us both taken up for Smashers. I said, when he stopped Stevens's sixpence, look at mine; and I waited at the bar until the officer came.

THOMAS TREMER . I am a constable. When I went into Mr. Osborne's he said he had taken two bad sixpence; he pointed out the prisoner to me, she was sitting on the ground, I lifted her up by the arm, and Mr. Osborne picked up a canvas bag. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You assist the Solicitor of the Mint - A. Yes.

Q. Look at these two sixpences - A. They are both counterfeit, they are not worth a farthing; they are merely washed; this shilling and sixpence they are counterfeits, and the four sixpences in the bag they are counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been but two months out of my own country, and have been out of bed five weeks with this baby; I was put to bed on the road, I was coming to my husband. I sold my shift the last thing for a shilling; I changed that shilling I got two pennyworth of shop, and a pennyworth of bread; I had only then a sixpence and three penny-pieces in my pocket; I was going to Gravesend to my husband. Coming along the road I met with this woman, she said if I was to go to St. Giles's I might find some of my country people who would give me a lodging; she said come along with me; I was fatigued and weak, I could not walk. It was twelve o'clock, she took me to this public-house, she said, we can rest here and have part of a pint of beer; I sat down, this woman went for the pint of beer, I gave her sixpence; the other woman said, had we nor better have a drop of gin; I said, I do not mind. I was taken in custody, and by the Lord God I am in custody for holding.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and at the Expiration of that time to find Sureties for Two Years to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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