ANDREW CRAWFORD.
26th June 1793
Reference Numbert17930626-35
VerdictNot Guilty

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520. ANDREW CRAWFORD was indicted for stealing on the 14th of June , one black gelding, value 9 l. the goods of Richard Matthews .

RICHARD MATTHEWS sworn.

I am a master poulterer by trade; I live at Clapham; I turned my gelding out on Friday the 7th of June on Clapham common , between nine and ten; I missed him on the 8th, the morning following, about nine o'clock; I saw it again in Smithfield, on Friday the 14th of June near five o'clock in the afternoon, in the possession of Mr. Allen.

Q. What are the marks? - He had a sand crack in one of his hind feet, I think it is the near side, it was a black gelding, two white spots on the left side; I had had him about six months.

Q. For what purpose did you use him for? - For running in the cart, and riding about occasionally, and to go to market.

Q. Are you perfectly sure it was your gelding that you saw in Smithfield? - I am.

Mr. Knowlys. How late on Friday did you see him on Clapham common? - I saw him in the afternoon to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did you see him later than the afternoon on the Common? - No.

Q. You have none of your servants here? - I keep no servants.

Q. How early on Saturday morning did you look after him? - I missed him on Saturday morning about nine o'clock.

Q. Was it late on Friday you saw him? was it six or seven o'clock? - No, not so late as that, between the hours of one and five.

Q. Had you drank your tea that afternoon? - I very seldom drink any tea.

Q. Did not you happen to know this Crawford? - I did not.

Q. You did not know he was a jobber of horses? - I learned so in Smithfield.

Q. Clapham common is not a great distance from town? - Not above four miles.

WILLIAM ALLEN sworn.

I am a butcher. This Andrew Crawford , the prisoner, brought the horse to my door to sell, in Whitechapel-road side, on Thursday the 13th of June, to the best of my remembrance, he asked me seven Guineas for it; I told him it was too much money; and he told me that it belonged to a man and that he wanted to part from it sadly, he did not know what to do with it; with that I told him to go to the man, and if he could buy it for me for four guineas, I would give him half a crown for himself; with that I suppose he was gone as much as an hour, or an hour and a half, to the best of my remembrance, with that he came back, and told me I might have the horse at that price that was bid; with that I found the horse very lame; after I had it, I thought the horse would not suit me, being so lame, I took it to Smithfield on Friday, when Mr. Matthews owned it; the horse was detained up against one of the rails, and somebody came up to me, and said that my horse was stopped, that it was stole; I ran up immediately and said, if he would swear it was his horse, before a magistrate, he should have it; with that I desired the horse to be put up at livery; and Mr. Matthews and his friends went to the Bull and Butcher, in Smithfield, while I went to Whitechapel and took this Andrew Crawford going into his own door.

Q. At the time he sold you the horse was he known to you, or was he a stranger? - I knew him very well by being about.

Q. Did you know where to find him? - did not know justly at the time, but I was directed when I went after him from one Mr. Meads, the Red Lyon. I asked him how he came by the horse? he told me, as I said before, that he had it to sell for a man; I asked him what the man was? he told me that he was something of a travelling drover, or something of that kind, to the best of my remembrance; with that we went to Smithfield, and there several gentlemen questioned him there, and there they told him if he could not make no better story then that, they thought bad would come of it.

Mr. Knowlys. This horse was sold to you in broad day-light? - It was.

Q. You knew him perfectly well by eye-sight? - Yes.

Q. You knew that he was a horse-jobber? - Yes.

Q. In your judgment, was it worth more than what you gave for it? - I had it at Smithfield, and there I was bid four guineas for it.

Q. You live in the neighbourhood where the man resides? - Yes.

Q. Therefore if he had stole the horse he could not have come to a worse neighbourhood to conceal it? - That is what I have said all along.

Q. He told you at the first time, long before there was any suspicion, that the horse was not his, but he sold it for another man? - Yes.

Q. He twice exposed himself to your view in the business? - He did, he left the horse along with me sometime, and I told him that I bought it for another young man, and he did not like it, and so I took it for myself; he wished me to put the horse in the stable the first time he came, till he came back.

Q. Be so good as to look at this bill? - I have seen it; they were distributed by the prisoner's wife in Smithfield.

Q. Now I would ask you, Mr. Allen, supposing you had a stolen horse in your possession, could you take better steps than this man has taken? - I took all the pains I could to find the man that he said he bought the horse of, one John Jones , I went up to the old George, in Oxford-road, to one John Jones , the man answered the description in every thing, and we found him, and brought him, and he had an hearing before Alderman Curtis, he was discharged; they denied one another; Crawford charged one John Jones as the person who had given him the horse to sell, but before the magistrate John Jones denied that he knew him, and this man Crawford, denied that he knew Jones; this was on Saturday morning when they had their hearing; John Jones was taken into custody on Friday night, and it was late on Friday night when we took this John Jones into custody. I appeared before Alderman Curtis on Saturday, and then this man said that was not the John Jones he meant, it was another John Jones . The prisoner's wife delivered hand bills about last Friday, it was the Friday after the horse was stole that the hand bills were given about.

Q. Do you know Edward Mitchell ? - I cannot say I do. (The hand bill read by the clerk of the court.)

Court to Allen. I think you said that you went after this John Jones according to the direction of the prisoner? - Yes, I did.

Q. Then if I understand your evidence right, the horse was sold to you on Thursday se'n-night after it was stole? - It was, and the next day I was at the market with it.

LAZARUS JACOBS sworn.

I am a constable. On Friday the 14th of June, I was in Smithfield market, I heard of a horse being stolen; I went to the public house, in Smithfield, and when I came there the prisoner was backward, and I took him into charge at Mr. Allen's desire, for stealing a horse, a black gelding. The prisoner told me of a man John Jones , at the sign of the George, in Oxford-road, that he had it of, he said if I went there I should find him. I went there, and asked the publican if one Jones was within?

Q. What did he describe John Jones to be? - In the horselery way. I took the man out of his bed at ten o'clock at night; I brought the man to the compter; the prisoner and the man had a hearing the next day before Alderman Curtis; the prisoner said he did not know any thing of that man; then Jones was discharged.

Mr. Knowlys. The prisoner still persevered that it was a John Jones from whom he had the horse, but that that John Jones was not the man? - Exactly so.

Prisoner. I had the horse to sell for this John Jones .

The remainder of this Trial, in the third part, will be published in a few days.

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
26th June 1793
Reference Numbert17930626-35

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THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 26th of June, 1793, and the following Days;

Being the SIXTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VI. PART III.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

[PRICE ONE SHILLING and FOUR-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of ANDREW CRAWFORD .

EDWARD MITCHELL sworn.

I am in the service of Mr. Watson and Wayley, in the Minories, in the wine way. The prisoner lodged at my house, he has been about nine weeks a lodger with me.

Q. Did he lodge with you to the very day that he was taken up on this charge? - He did; and his wife and family are now there at present; I live in New Castle-street, Whitechapel.

Q. Do you know how he used to get his living? - I cannot say; I am always out from morning to night; I know nothing of him only as a lodger.

Q. Do you recollect the day on which he was taken up? - On Friday the 11th, as near as I can guess.

Q. Do you know where he was on the Friday proceeding that Friday? - He was at home in his apartments between nine and ten.

Q. What time did you come from work? - Between seven and eight; I always leave work at that time.

Q. How long had you been at home before you saw the prisoner on that evening? - I had been out about an hour; he had been out and came in again; he went out, and came in again about half after nine, as near as I can guess; between seven and eight I first saw him at my house and he went out for about an hour, as near as I can guess, and then he came home, and went to bed; at ten o'clock I went to bed; I went to his room and asked if all were in bed? and then I went to bed; he slept level with the ground.

Q. Who fastened the door of your house? - I did myself; it was fastened with a double lock and two bolts; I left the key in the door; the room that I sleep in is close by the door.

Q. At the time you fastened the door was the prisoner in his room or not? - He was in his room, for I bid him good night, and likewise his wife.

Q. Who got up first in the morning? - I did.

Q. Did you lock him in his own room? - I had no business to do that; he fastened his own door.

Q. How did you find the door when you got up in the morning? - I found it safe as when I left it at night.

Q. At what time in the morning was it you got up? - About a quarter before seven, as near as I can guess; I found the door locked and bolted the same way precisely as I left it.

Court. How do you know it was between seven and eight you saw him on that Friday? - I always leave work at seven o'clock, and when I leave work I go home.

Q. How came you to recollect you saw him on Friday more than any other day? - Because being in his appartment.

Q. How do you know it was that day? - By his being taken up the week following, I asked him what he owed for rent? and wrote out a receipt for him.

Q. When was he taken up? - The 14th I believe.

Q. How did you know the day by the rent? - It was agreed with him to pay me so much a week for the room, and I asked him for the money on the 7th of this month.

Q. How came you here to day? - I told him I would come, to mention the time that he was within. I heard he was in trouble; he has a wife and four children; they are lodgers with me now, and she is big with another.

Q. How many miles might it be from your house to Clapham? - Four miles and a half.

JOHN THOMAS sworn.

I live in Fore-street, Cripplegate; I am a shoemaker, I know Crawford, I have worked for him this four or five years.

Q. Will you tell us what you know about the affair of the horse for which the man was taken up? - There was a relation of mine who wanted to buy a horse, I applied to Mr. Crawford as a horse-dealer for one about three weeks ago; I believe it was a Thursday, I am not quite positive.

Q. Do you know how long before he was taken up? - That I cannot tell, to the best of my knowledge it was a Thursday, I believe three weeks to day, but I am not certain. A relation wanted to buy a horse, I applied to Mr. Crawford, he told me that he thought he had got a horse that would suit him; I met him afterwards at the time appointed, just at the Adam and Eve, Tottenham-court-road, with my acquaintance; my acquaintance said he should like to see how the horse would go; the prisoner had the horse there; while this was going forward a person came up to the prisoner at the bar, and said, that he wanted to sell a horse.

Q. At the time this person mentioned he wanted to sell a horse, do you recollect whether that person was on a horse? - He was, and it was a black one I believe, but I am not much conversant in horses. The prisoner said that he had a horse of his own to sell, and therefore he declined buying of it. The man I did not know, but they seemed to know each other, then the man said I wish you would sell this horse for me, then the prisoner said, what money do you expect for it; he said, he should expect five guineas for the horse, but says he, if you cannot get that, sell it for what you can get for it; the prisoner took the horse from the man and the man went away.

Q. How many years have you known this man? - About four years.

Q. From the length of time you have known him what character has he borne as to honesty? - He always paid me very honest, I never heard any thing till this happened.

Court. You say this was three weeks ago? - It was, to the best of my knowledge on a Thursday.

Q. Then that is about the 6th of June? - It was the beginning of this month.

Q. How do you get your livelihood? - By shoe making.

Q. Are you a master or a journeyman? - I have been a master for many years.

Q. Cannot you ascertain the time better? - No, I cannot, I believe it was on a Thursday, but I cannot say better than that.

Court to Prosecutor. I think you said that it was of a Friday morning that you turned him out? - Yes, and I saw him again on Friday afternoon, but I cannot tell exactly what time of the afternoon.

Court to Thomas. How long have you lived in Fore-street? - About seven years, and have kept the house as long.

Q. Who is your next door neighbour? - Mr. Walker, the Green Dragon is on one side; I live in three Mariner-court; Bodel a cheesemonger, lives on the other side.

Q. When you saw this man come on the horse and ask the prisoner at the bar to sell the horse for him, did you hear nothing about where he was to meet him to pay him the money? - No, no such a thing passed in my hearing.

JOHN LEE sworn.

I keep the ride in the Spread Eagle-inn, in Whitechapel; I have known the prisoner for this five or six years, he is a very honest man, I have trusted him with score pounds, and hundreds I may say, he gets his living commonly by jobbing and buying of horses, and when he was low he would work in the stable; I have employed him myself.

Court to Thomas. Did the prisoner and the man that came up to him on the black horse, appear to know each other? - They did, they appeared to know each other very well.

The prisoner called three other witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Old Bailey Proceedings front matter.
26th June 1793
Reference Numbert17930626-35

Related Material

ActionsCite this text | Print-friendly version | Report an error

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 26th of June, 1793, and the following Days;

Being the SIXTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VI. PART III.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

[PRICE ONE SHILLING and FOUR-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.


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