THOMAS WHITEFOOT.
21st April 1773
Reference Numbert17730421-4
VerdictGuilty
SentenceTransportation

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356. (M.) THOMAS WHITEFOOT was indicted for that he on the king's highway, on Anna Maria Clark , spinster , did make an assault, with intent the money and effects of the said Anna Maria Clark , to steal, against the statute , April 30 . *

Miss Anna Maria Clark. I was stopped in a carriage, on Tuesday se'ennight, about twelve o'clock at night; I believe it was in Wigmor-street, Cavendish-square ; the blinds of the coach were up; I heard a voice say. your money or I will kill you, but do not know how the coach was stopped; I never saw the person.

Q. Did he rob you?

Clark. No; he was prevented by my servant asking what was the matter; the coach door was open.

Q. Who opened the door?

Clark. The man that stopped the coach; he then spoke to my servant; I do not know what he said to him; he was taken about ten minutes after; my servant charged the watch with him.

Q. Was he on foot?

Clark. Yes.

William Wade . I am servant to Miss Clark; I was along with the coach when it was stopped in Wimpole-street; it was exactly twelve at night; I saw the Prisoner open the coach door, I am sure he is the man; I heard him demand the money of the lady; I did not hear him bid the coachman stop; the first I saw of him was his opening of the door; when he demanded the money I said hollow, hollow, what is the matter! he cocked a pistol at me and said I'll shoot you, I'll shoot you; I saw the pistol; I said, will you! and directly he endeavoured to shoot, but his pistol missed fire: then he run away; I got down and pursued him, and cried stop thief; he run down Wimpole-street, and turned into Wallbeck-street; the watchman stopped him, and asked if I was sure it was him, I said yes; he was standing by the side of a dunghill, in a stable yard; the pistol was found within a few yards of where he was taken; I saw him turn into Wallbeck-street, and am sure he is the man.

Isaac Nichols . I am a watchman; I watch in Bentick-street, which is about 200 yards from Wallbeck-street; I heard a cry of murder, and stop thief, as I was calling the hour of twelve o'clock; I went up immediately; this chairman, Weaver, had hold of him when I got up.

Sampson Hodghis. I am a watchman; I was in the public house; I heard the alarm of murder, and stop thief; Weaver and I, and several went out; we saw two men, one was in the road, seemingly in a pause whether he should turn on the left or right; I followed them to from the highway; he turned to the road that led into the Meuse; there were two men ing into the Meuse, the Prisoner and another with him; I found I got ground of them; when I found I was before them the prisoner dropt back directly, and I observed something upon the ground, which I imagined to be a pistol; the prisoner gave a short turn back, and my partner laid hold of him and I said which is him; the prisoner said that is him; I laid hold of the other man; he said he was running after him; we let him go; there were some other people came up; there was no watchman; the servant came up, and said that was the man; we took him into Wigmore-street, to the ladies in the coach; the servant said that was the man: this is the pistol I found (producing a small pocket pistol.)

Thomas Weaver . I was in the public house with the last witness; we went out together; he went out from Wigmore-street into Wallbeck-street, and he was taken at the top of Little Wallbeck-street, close by a dunghill.

Prisoner's Defence.

I am perfectly innocent of it; I have not had time to send for my witnesses; I am a silk dyer, I worked with one Mr. Cracknall, a silk dyer, in East Smithfield; I lodged in St. Martin's-le-grand, Newgate-street.

For the Prisoner.

William Briggs . I am a silk dyer: I have known him five or six years; I never knew him guilty of any thing indecent or ungenteel, or guilty of any thing that was bad; I worked with him some time; he always bore the best of characters.

Q. Was he out of business at that time?

Briggs. Yes; I met him several times, he told me he had very little work.

Guilty , T .


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