James Hartley, Theft > grand larceny, 28th June 1758.

Reference Number: t17580628-31
Offence: Theft > grand larceny
Verdict: Not Guilty
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250. (M.) James Hartley was indicted for stealing one silver pint mug, value 36 s. the property of Hugh Owen , June 6 . ||

Hugh Owen . I keep a publick-house in Denmark-court in the Strand . I lost a silver print mug the beginning of this month. I can't say from what part of the house it was taken.

Q. What have you to say against the prisoner at the bar?

Owen. I can't say he took it, the other witnesses will give a farther account. I can't say I recollect seeing him in my house.

Thomas Forshall . I am a pawnbroker, and live in St. Martin's-lane; the prisoner at the bar came with a mug to me to pawn; on the 6th of this instant, between six and seven in the evening, he was very much in liquor, he asked two guineas upon it. I asked him if it was his own, he gave me no answer. I stopp'd him and the mug. I saw on the mug the Thistle and Crown; so I went to Mr. Owen's and asked him if he had lost a mug, he said he had, (produced in court and deposed to.)

Prisoner's defence.

I do not remember a little of the matter, I was so much in liquor. I have been an officer in the army, and served last in North America in the Torbay in 1756, and have been out of the service since June 1756.

For the prisoner.

William Marsellas . I live in the Strand, I have known the prisoner at the bar about two years, he is a married man, he and his wife did lodge at my house about four months.

Q. What is his general character?

Marsellas. I never heard any thing ill of his character, he is the last person I should have suspected of committing such a thing as this.

Ewan Morgan. I have known him twelve months, he came and took lodgings at my house in Drury-lane.

Q. What are you?

Morgan. I deal in charcole, sea-cole, and all sorts of cole; he lodged with me about half a year, and behaved very well, he has a good character by every body that knew him.

George Lawson . He once lodged at my house, he always behaved much like a gentleman, regular and sober.

Manna Brown. I am a cork-cutter, and live in the Strand; I have known him between four and five months, he came to lodge with me the beginning of February last, he behaved always much like a gentleman, honest in every respect; I never heard any thing amiss of him in my life.

Thomas Allen . I am a cabinet-maker, and have known the prisoner upwards of twelve months: he behaved well to every body, as far as ever I heard; I have lent him money, he always paid me very honestly, if he had wanted a hundred pounds I would have obliged him.

James Morris . I live at the Queen's head, Duke's-court, near Bow-street, I have known him half a year.

Q. What is his general character?

Morris. His character is exceeding good, he is a good natur'd gentleman, and always behaved as such.

Thomas Carmichael . I have known the prisoner better than two years, he is a gentleman of good character, respected by many gentlemen; I am amaz'd they are not here.

Acquitted .


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