Mary Randall, Theft > theft from a specified place, 11th September 1745.

304. + Mary Randall , of St. Mary, Whitechapel, was indicted for stealing a silver tankard,

val. 10 l. the property of Richard Cross , in his dwelling house , Sept. 2 .

Richard Cross . I keep the Sign of the Angel in Whitechapel . On Monday the 2d of Sept. the Prisoner came to my house about two o'Clock, and staid all the afternoon.

Q. Did you know her before?

Cross. Yes; she was my servant about two years and three months ago She said she had some friends to come to see her, and she called for a tankard of Beer, and would have it in a silver tankard.

Sarah Cross . The Prisoner was in my house that day from two o'Clock in the afternoon till eight in the evening, in the common publick room. There was George Fell , who servant to the brewhouse, and some of his fellow servants had been drinking there all the afternoon. I but just delivered the tankard into George Fell's hand, and went up stairs, and when I can known it was gone

Q. Was the Prisoner drinking with them?

Sarah Cross . They had been drinking from two o'clock till that time, and they asked her to drink with them.

Q. How long had you given the tankard to him before it was missing?

Sarah Cross . About five minutes; for all the rest of his company was gone.

Q. How came you to deliver the tankard into his hand just at that time?

Sarah Cross . I had been drinking with them, I went up stairs for something, and when I came down I missed the tankard; I desired George Fell to seek after her. He went to search after her, and found the tankard at a pawnbroker's in Hounsditch, he sent for me to come there, and I went and found her and the tankard there; and then she fell down upon her knees and asked my pardon.

George Fell . I am cooper to Mrs. Edwards's brewhouse. About 5 or 6 of us were at the Angel Tap -house , belonging to the brewhouse, all the afternoon; the Prisoner came in about two o'clock. Between three and four, says I, Mary, you are a fine servant to stay here all this afternoon (for she said she was a servant, and lived next door to Dr. Bamber .) She said she waited for the Bow coach. Some time after that I told her so again, and then she said all the family were in the country. I drank the last of our beer, and handed the tankard to Mary, the maid of the house; this was about 8 o'clock, and at that time the Prisoner said to Mary, the maid draw me a tankard of beer, and the maid of the house went to draw it in a pewter tankard, the Prisoner made reply, Why do you draw it in a pewter tankard? I and my fellow servants can drink out of a silver tankard as well as those men: the maid of the house said, a pewter tankard was as good as a silver one; the Prisoner said, she would have a silver tankard, and I saw the maid bring the silver tankard up full, and set it down upon a little table in the room, and the Prisoner took the tankard off the table, and said, she would go into the little room by the bar; and the maid of the house followed her the room, and came back to us. I said, Mary, there is a tankard of beer that she has had, which shall have to pay for, if you do not take care of it ; she went into the room the Prisoner went into , and said, Lord, Mr. Fell, there is no body there , and the candle is blown out; said I, what is the tankard? she said, I cannot tell; said I the candle and see; she took the candle and looked , and the tankard was gone, and no body there : presently Mrs. Cross came down, and she said to me, for God's sake go and look after the tankard; said I, what can I do? I cannot do any thing in it, but she desired I would. I knew the Prisoner used to go sometimes to a place where she had an acquaintance, and I intended to go there; but I thought as I went along, I would call at two or three pawnbrokers to try if I could hear any thing of it: I happened to go into a pawnbroker's in Houndsditch, and said, there was a silver tankard lost from the Angel in Whitechapel, and asked if they had seen such a tankard, marked R.C.S. the man seemed in a surprise; said I, you need not be in a surprise, for I have got the Prisoner, though I had not, but I said so, because I saw him in a surprise: said I, let me see the tankard, there's nothing at all in that; so he took the tankard out of a drawer from under the counter, and shewed it me: I said it was Mr. Cross's tankard: he said, the person that brought it to him was an honest girl, for he had known her a great while, and told me that I must look after the Prisoner: I said, as I had seen the tankard, I would not trouble myself about it, for they should find out the Prisoner; and in about an hour they found the Prisoner and brought her to the pawnbroker's shop.

John Smith . On the 2d of September about 8 o' clock, the Prisoner brought this tankard to my house; I had known her about seven or eight months, and she used to be a customer to us, and had a good character. She said she brought it from her sister, who keeps a public house in Skinner's Street, and wanted to borrow 8 l. upon it, to pay the brewer the next morning.

Q. Did she tell you whose tankard it was?

Smith. She said it was her sister's tankard; I said, I could not lend her so much upon it: she said, she had received 40 s. for her sister, and if I would lend her six guineas upon it, it would do, which I did, and in about ten minutes time a person came from Mr. Cross to inquire after it; I went to inquire after her, and found her; I sent to Mr. Cross's directly, and they came and owned the tankard.

Mr. Cross's servant maid deposed, that she brought the tankard to the Prisoner, and the Prisoner said she had some company to come, and went into the little room by the bar; that she went up stairs upon some occasion, and when she came down again, the Prisoner and the tankard were gone.

Prisoner. I gave the six guineas back to the pawnbroker.

The Jury found her guilty to the value of 39 s .

[Transportation. See summary.]


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