Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 25 October 2014), June 1905, trial of SAMUEL BROMLEY (29) JEREMIAH BARRY (26) JOHN CAREY (29) (t19050626-546).

SAMUEL BROMLEY, JEREMIAH BARRY, JOHN CAREY, Violent Theft > robbery, 26th June 1905.

546. SAMUEL BROMLEY (29), JEREMIAH BARRY (26), JOHN CAREY (29) , Robbery with violence on Frederick William Maddocks, and stealing from him a part of a chain and other articles.

MR. GREENFIELD Prosecuted; MR. JENKINS Defended Barry and Carey.

FREDERICK WILLIAM MADDOCKS . I am a rate collector, of 33, Dublin Road, Forest Gate—about 12.55 p.m. on Saturday, May 27th, I was in Brook Street, Ratcliff; I had just finished collecting the rates for the day—I saw some men standing at the entrance of Blackpool Court as I came out of 135, Brook Street, and I was seized round my waist by a man whom I afterwards recognised as Bromley—he tried to throw me down—

he seized my pockets and covered my face with his arms; he got me back by my shoulders, and after a few seconds another man who was with him seized me by my throat and mouth—I am unable to identify the second man—he forced me on to the pavement and to break my fall I had to put my arm out and then I left my pocket uncovered—a third man, whom I identified as Barry, tore off a portion of my chain and sovereign purse and a seal pendant—I had a key chain with a bunch of keys at the end, and he pulled the key chain and tore away the keys, and took some loose silver that I had in my pocket—I had my eye-glasses broken and my mouth damaged; I had some false teeth which were forced out of position; I also lost a gold fountain pen, and the buttons were torn off my waistcoat and my shirt was torn—I was very much shaken by the fall—they carried off everything except a portion of the chain—they ran away—one or two people collected on the spot; the whole affair did not last more than a minute and a half—I pulled myself together and went into a barber's shop which I had previously left, and washed the blood from my face and put myself a bit tidy—I went with the policeman to the station and described as well as I could the men who had attacked me—I picked out Bromley and Barry the next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. JENKINS. This is a very rough neighbourhood—there were only four or five men; not more than that—a boy or two, a woman, and two men collected round—there was a van with a tilt to it which made a screen—I cannot recognise Carey as the one who took me by the throat—I cannot say that he did anything—I cannot say whether Barry and Carey came up to me when I went back to the barber's shop—the barber was so frightened that he shut the door, and a man whom I afterwards knew to be Barry knocked at it—I saw the man who knocked at the door, and he bore a great resemblance to Barry—I should not like to say it was not Barry—I cannot say what he came for—some body had a handkerchief which was offered to the barber; I cannot say who it was—my face was bleeding—I had just pulled myself together, and it all happened within a minute of the occurrence—there were three or four men outside, and one of them had a handkerchief—I asked the general question, "Is there anyone here who saw me robbed?"—I did not ask particularly the man with the handkerchief—I was in a condition to recognise nobody—I think a waistcoat button was handed to the barber—my recollection is that a child brought it into the shop.

Re-examined. I was very much flurried and upset; I could hardly speak, because my teeth had been forced into my gums, and I could not get them out.

ALBERT HELSON (Sergeant H.) At 9 p.m. on May 27th I arrested Carey and Bromley—I said they would be arrested for robbery with violence on the same afternoon, and stealing a portion of a gold chain, a seal, a fountain pen, and a pair of eye-glasses—Bromley said, "Of course you fix on me; if anything goes wrong you think I am in it"—Carey made no remark—they were taken to the station, and detained all night—the next morning the prosecutor picked out Bromley and Barry from fourteen other men with just a faint hesitation; he touched them very easily—they were charged—he did not pick out Carey.

WILLIAM MCCARTHY . I am a fishmonger in the employ of John Arnold, and reside at 146, Brook Street, Ratcliff—about 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 27th, I was outside my shop when I saw a gentleman lying flat on the ground with Carey, whom I know, holding his throat, and Barry holding his leg—after it was done Bromley came up and gave the barber a handkerchief to wipe the gentleman's face—I only Raw two men robbing the prosecutor—I did not see them take anything from his pocket, nor did I see Carey take anything with him—I did not see a bunch of keys—at the police station I picked out Carey and Barry from about a dozen men.

Cross-examined by MR. JENKINS. I did not say before the Magistrate that Carey took a bunch from the prosecutor's pockets—I remember accurately what took place—I remember now that I said before the Magistrate that he did take a bunch of keys away from him—I did not see the keys; I did not see all that took place—there were about four men present at the assault—I did not see any crowd at all—I did not follow any of those men; they walked up White Horse Street—they did not run away—I said before the Magistrate that Barry ran off; that is true—I understand what it is I am saying, and that I am an important witness—Carey ran off as well—the prosecutor went into the shop; I saw Barry outside—he and Carey both came back again, and Bromley went off—Barry and Carey said nothing to me—the barber shut the door—I did not hear the prosecutor say anything to Barry and Carey—I remember now he did say to them, "Has anyone seen me assaulted?"—I swear 1 heard that said—I did not see either of them do anything to help the prosecutor—I saw Barry produce a handkerchief for the purpose of helping the prosecutor—I did not say anything when the prosecutor asked if anybody had seen him assaulted; I did not like to—I was not frightened—I have heard people mention the prisoners' names—the policemen told me their names—I heard Barry and Carey's names at the Thames Police Court—I told the Magistrate I knew their faces, but not Carey's name; I knew Barry's name—I mean to say that I knew Carey's, but not Barry's name—I told the policeman something about the case—he asked me my name and address—he did not ask me whether it was Barry or Carey; he asked me whether 1 knew the men.

Re-examined. I know a man named Holland; he has been speaking to me about this case—I am not afraid of giving evidence—I am still with the fishmonger.

Cross-examined by Bromley. I saw you in Court after the robbery with some other men—I did not tell the Magistrate that I saw you standing at the corner when the robbery was being done.

HARRY WORSFOLD (Detective H.) I arrested Barry—he said nothing—on the way to the station he said, "I was just going to bail Carey out," and he produced his rent book—he made no answer to the charge.

WILLIAM CARIDLAND (Detective H.) About 9 p.m. on the Saturday evening, in company with another officer, 1 arrested Carey and Bromley—Bromley said, "Of course you always fix on me for anything that is done down here.

Cross-examined by MR. JENKINS. I am certain I was not present at the identification—I cannot say that 1 said before the Magistrate, "The prosecutor picked out Bromley and Barry, but not Carey"—I remember now that I was present, and I did tell the Magistrate that—the prosecutor hesitated slightly—he walked down the rank, and coming back he put his hand on Bromley, and then Barry—Carey was in the rank as well—there were about fourteen others.

ARTHUR HILLS . (247 H.) About 12.40 p.m. on May 27th I was in the neighbourhood of Blackpool Court when I saw Bromley, Carey, and Barry, and another man standing in Brook Street—when I approached them they walked towards the scene of the robbery—I then turned off from Brook Street into the Orchard—about 1.5 p.m. I saw Carey and Barry at the bottom of the Causeway—I then walked down to the scene of the robbery, not knowing it had been committed—I saw a crowd standing there—I enquired what was the matter, and somebody replied that Carey and Barry had been fighting—after I had been there three or four minutes the prosecutor came up and informed me that he had been robbed—I did not arrest the prisoners, nor did I see anything of the robbery.

Cross-examined by Bromley. I did not tell the Magistrate that I did not see you all that day.

Cross-examined by JENKINS. When I saw Barry and Carey five minutes after the robbery they were about sixty or eighty yards from the scene of it—I passed them—I should say there were fifty people there—I did not see McCarthy there—the prosecutor was coming down from White Horse Street towards the scene of the robbery—he was about ten yards away when I first saw him—I should not think McCarthy's shop was further than ten yards away—the boy did not come and say anything to me.

ALBERT CARVELL (233 H.) About 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 27th, I was at the top end of Stepney Causeway in Commercial Road, and then I walked down Brook Street; I was on point duty—when I got to the bottom of Stepney Causeway I saw Barry and Bromley standing at the corner of the Causeway, Brook Street end, about 1.10 p.m.—I walked about twice up and down the causeway, when I saw a strange man whom I do not know, and Bromley and Carey walking down the Causeway towards Brook Street end about 1.20 p.m.—I heard the strange man say to Bromley (I believe it was) rather loud, "This job is going to do us no good this afternoon"—Bromley replied, "Shut up, you b——fool; there is a copper over there listening. You will put him on us"—I knew nothing of the robbery then—I afterwards saw them in custody at the police station—I know Bromley and Carey, and I am sure it was they that I saw.

Cross-examined by Bromley. I said before the Magistrate that I saw you coming through Stepney Causeway with two men about 2 p.m.—Carey was with you—I have never spoken to you, to my knowledge, or to the other two prisoners.

Cross-examined by MR. JENKINS. I made a note of what I heard when I heard of the arrest some hours afterwards—it struck me at the time that these men had done something wrong—I applied the words to this

case when I heard of it—I spoke about it to the officers in charge of the case and they asked me to attend at the Police Court.

By the COURT. My note is, "I saw Bromley and Carey in company with another man walking down the Causeway towards Brook Street. The other man said to Bromley, 'Look here, this job is going to do us no good this afternoon.' Bromley replied, 'Shut up, you b—fool; there is a copper over there listening. You will put him on us.' "

Bromley's statement before the Magistrate: "I was knocking about outside Carrington's coal wharf all day till the men got paid. I was drinking in with Carrington's men till half-past 6. I was coming through Brook Street and met Carey, and was walking along when two detectives asked me to go to the station on suspicion."

Barry: "I want witnesses."

Carey: "I reserve my defence. I call witnesses now."

Barry, in his defence on oath, said that the scene of the robbery was where men congregated to be taken on to unload coal from the ships; that at 12.15 p.m. he was at the bottom of the Causeway with Carey, about eighty yards from where the robbery had occurred; that he and Carey saw a crowd of people; that they went up, and on his inquiring of the prosecutor what was the matter he said that he had been robbed; that seeing he was dusty he (Barry) offered him his handkerchief to wipe hit face, and gave the barber a waistcoat button which he found lying on the ground; that the prosecutor asked him and Carey whether they had seen him robbed, and that they said, "No"; that sometime afterwards he heard that Carey had been arrested, he concluded for drunkenness; and was going to bail him out when he was arrested; and that the prosecutor had picked him out because he recognised him as the man who had offered him the handkerchief.

Carey, in his defence on oath, said that what Barry had stated was true; that after the robbery he came up with him and saw the prosecutor outside the shop; and that McCarthy's evidence was false.

Evidence in Defence.

KARL GOLDSTEIN . I am a barber, of 135, Brook Street—I did not see anything of the robbery—the prosecutor came into the shop and told me that he had been robbed—his clothes were upset and dusty, and he bore traces of having been robbed—Barry and Carey came in, and one started cleaning him while the other produced a handkerchief—the prosecutor said to them, "I think some of you has been there in it, and they said, "No, sir; if we had seen it we would be too willing to assist you"—he said, "Did any of you see me robbed?"—the prosecutor never suggested that Barry and Carey did it—I have known the prosecutor for ten years—I am not unfriendly to him—soon after he had gone a policeman came—I did not give him Barry or Carey's name—I said they had been in the shop.

Cross-examined by MR. GREENFIELD I did not notice if the prosecutor had glasses on when he came in; I was too excited—I know Barry and Carey—I am not afraid of giving evidence—there was only him, the two prisoners, me and a girl in the shop—outside the shop it was crowded; I had to close the door.

ELIZABETH O'BRIEN . I am the wife of Patrick O'Brien, and live at No. 5 Blackpool Court—I remember the day of the robbery—the prosecutor came to the bottom of the court and called my little girl—I saw two big men knock him down—I never saw Barry and Carey, whom I know by eight, there at all—I am not related to them in any way—I ran up the court, screamed, and fainted.

Cross-examined. I said before the Magistrate that I saw no robbery, but I see the two men knock the prosecutor down—I know Holland as a neighbour—I am not living with him—I know Barry and Carey as walking up and down the neighbourhood—I do not know Bromley at all—I cannot say whether he was there or not—I never drink with the prisoners.

Re-examined. I live with my husband, and am the mother of five little children.

Bromley, in his defence, said that he had not seen Barry at all that day; and that he only met Carey when walking home with his (Bromley's) wife.

GUILTY .

Bromley then PLEADED GUILTY. to a conviction of felony at the Clerkenwell Sessions on May 13th, 1902; Barry to a conviction of felony at the Clerkenwell Sessions on April 1st. 1895; and Carey to a conviction of felony at the Thames Police Court on March 23rd, 1903. BROMLEY, against whom seventeen previous convictions were proved— Six years' penal servitude. BARRY against whom one previous conviction was proved— Judgment respited, so that his character when in the Army might be inquired into. CAREY, against whom a number of previous convictions were proved— Five years' penal servitude. They were stated to be the most desperate men in the neighbourhood.