Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 02 September 2014), December 1901 (t19011216).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th December 1901.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT

Sessions Paper.

DIMSDALE, MAYOR.

SECOND SESSION, HELD DECEMBER 16th, 1901.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY

JAMES DROVER BARNETT

AND

ALEXANDER BUCKLER,

Short-hand Writers to the Court,

ROLLS CHAMBERS, No. 89, CHANCERY LANE.

LONDON:

STEVENS AND SONS, LIMITED. 119, CHANCERY LANE.

Law Booksellers and Publishers.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the King's Commission of

OYER AND TERMINER AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX AND THE PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT,

Held on Monday, December 16th, 1901, and following days,

Before the Right Hon. SIR JOSEPH COCKFIELD DIMSDALE, Knt., M.P., ALDERMAN, LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Hon. Sir JOHN CHARLES BIGHAM, Knt., one of the Justices of His Majesty's High Court; Sir JOHN WHITTAKER ELLIS, Bart.; Sir DAVID EVANS , K.C.M.G.; and Lieut.-Col. Sir HORATIO DAVIES , K.C.M.G., M.P., Aldermen of the said City; Sir FORREST FULTON, Knt., K.C., Recorder of the said City; Sir JAMES THOMPSON RITCHIE, Knt,; Geo. WYATT TRUSCOTT, Esq.; and HENRY GEORGE SMALLMAN, Esq.; other of the Aldermen of the said City; ALBERT FREDERICK BOSANQUET, Esq., K.C., Common Serjeant of the said City; and LUMLEY SMITH, Esq., K.C., Judge of the City of London Court, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

JOHN CHARLES BELL , Esq., Alderman.

HORACE BROOKS MARSHALL, Esq., M.A., J.P.

Sheriffs.

JOSEPH DAVID LANGTON, Esq.

FRANCIS ROBERT MIDDLETON PHILLIPS, Esq.

Under-Sheriffs.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

DIMSDALE, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—two stars (**) that they have been more than once in custody—a dagger (†) that they are known to be the associates of bad characters—the figures after the name in the indictment, denote the prisoner's age.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday and Tuesday, December 16th and 17th, 1901.

Before Mr. Recorder.

54. SARAH AVEY (20), CHARLES GRIMME (23), and HENRY GRIMME (19) , Stealing eight chests of tea, the property of Macnamara & Co. Ltd.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted, and MR. PURCELL Defended C. & H. GRIMME.

WILLIAM SNELL . I am a carman, employed by Macnamara & Co., carriers, of 12, Castle Street—on November 21st I received instructions to take a van with one horse to the Commercial Warehouse—I went there and collected four chests of tea, Nos. 449 to 452—I afterwards went to Trinity Warehouse and collected four more, Nos. 968 to 971, value about £40—I took my van with the eight chests to the Metropolitan Warehouse in the Minories—I went inside, leaving my van outside—I had no boy with me—when I came out the van had gone—I told the police, and the same evening I went to Leman Street Police Station and saw the van and the eight chests—the horse had white marks on its front.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. I arrived at the Metropolitan Warehouse about 12.30 midday—I was inside the warehouse about five minutes—there were other vans drawn up near where I left mine, some of them had van boys—the nearest to mine was tail to tail with mine—that van had a van boy—I did not know him—I have not seen him since—it was a Midland Railway van—the drivers of the vans near mine were round the corner.

WILLIAM FOX . I am employed at the Trinity Warehouse, Tewer Hill—on November 21st Snell came with a van to get some tea—four chests were loaded on his van, Nos. 968 to 971.

JACOB YANTHAM . I live with my mother at 41, Langdale Street—on November 21st I was at my shop in Samuel Street, which is about twenty yards from our house—my mother called me—I went to my house—I found the dresser broken—I saw Henry Grimme driving away in a van with one horse—I saw some boxes in the van—I do not know what was in them—

there was no one with him—I stopped him and said, "Look at the damage you have done to my mother"—he said, "I could not help it, I will pay her"—I said, "Well, come home and pay her"—he said, "I will call the governor"—he left me with the horse and ran away, and did not come back—I gave the van to the police—I saw Henry about a week afterwards at Leman Street Police Station with a lot of other people—I picked him out—I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. When I saw the van it was on its way from Langdale Street to Samuel Street—I keep a fishmonger's shop—when I came out of our house the van was about twenty yards off, and I ran after it—I had never seen Henry before—several other witnesses were at the station when I went there.

Re-examined. I did not see anybody else pick Henry out before I identified him.

ALEXANDER GEORGE . I am a carman of 311, Western Road, Bermondsey—I was in the vicinity of Wapping on November 21st with my cart, going to the Metropolitan Tea Warehouse—two chaps got on to my trolly—Charles is one of them—they jumped off at the Minories Police Station—I did not know him—he did not ask me to give him a lift—I asked him for a match—I saw his face—it was about 12.20 p.m. when he jumped off—I went into a public house to get some refreshment, and I afterwards saw Charles driving Macnamara's van, an open van with one horse with a white face—that was about 12.35—about a week afterwards I picked him out from a number of others at Leman Street Police Station—there was another man in the cart with him—I am not sure about him—he was like Charles.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. I did not see Yantham at the station—no other witnesses were at the station when I went there—I was there about 8 p.m.—I first picked out Charles and then another man—I drew up my van outside a coffee shop at the side of the Metropolitan Warehouse—there were a lot of other vans and boys there—Macnamara's van was coming up the hill—I saw the men's faces after they got off my trolly, as they passed me and then turned round a corner—when I saw them in the van with the tea they were in St. John's Street—I was standing still and they drove past—I picked out a man whom the police had brought in from the street—I did not see a Midland Railway van boy at the station.

Re-examined. The men did not ask my permission to get on to my trolly—I did not like to tell them to get off, because they seemed a little bit boozy, and I thought they might cause a row.

KATE YANTHAM (Interpreted). I live at 41, Langdale Street, and occupy the ground floor—Avey occupies the first floor front room—she is married—I do not know what her husband is—on November 21st, about 1 p.m., I was sitting in the kitchen—I heard a noise in the passage—my dresser, which is in the kitchen, began to shake—I went into the passage, and saw two men dragging a box; one of them was Henry Grimme—I said to him in Yiddish, "Why do you drag such heavy things, and knock down my dresser?"—they were with the female prisoner, who can speak Yiddish—I asked them to pay me the damage—a jug had been broken, the damage amounts to £1—they attacked me violently in the passage—I went for a policeman—I did not go up to the room—I saw a van

outside—I told Avey that if they did not pay the damage, I would call for my son, who would go for a policeman—when they saw I was going for a policeman they went away—I afterwards identified Henry at the station.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. I am sure I picked Henry out at the station—I cannot remember if the van at the door had one or two horses—I saw two men in the house—I saw one man leave the house; and one was sitting in the van—only one went with the van, the other stopped in the house—he was not there when my son came home.

ROLAND THORNHILL (Police Sergeant, H). On November 21st, about 2 p.m., I went to 41, Langdale Street, with other officers—I found the front door open—I saw Avey sweeping the stairs down, and among some rubbish I noticed some loose tea—I said, "We are making inquiries respecting some stolen tea which we have reason to believe is in this house"—she is English—she said, "I do not know anything about it"—I followed her upstairs to the first floor front room, where I saw two chests of tea standing behind the door, one having been broken from a fall in the passage—they have been identified by Mr. Fox—I said to Avey, "How do you account for these?"—she said the room was occupied by her brother and his wife—I said, "How do you account for these?"—she said, "Two men have just brought them up here; my brother is not in this as he is at work on a moving job, I wish I was too, then I should not have been in this mess"—I saw no one else there—I took her into custody, and took charge of the tea—she was taken to the station, and charged with being concerned with others in stealing eight chests of tea value £40, the property of Messrs. Macnamara—she said "I did not know anything about it until the men came up with the tea; I have seen one of the men talking to my brother in the house once before"—I was at the station when George picked out Charles—I had received a description of a man from George—before he picked him out he had not seen anybody else do so—nobody pointed him out to George—the furniture in Avey's room was packed up—the chairs had been placed on the couch, which had been pulled up near the window, and the other pieces of furniture had been laid on top of the bed; it had evidently been cleared away to make room for the chests—there would have been room to put the other six chests as well.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. George gave me a description of two men—he was brought to the station about mid-day—he was not brought there at 8 p.m.—the carman who lost the van was there too—the two Yanthams were there, and a Midland Railway van boy—the boy failed to identify anybody then—there were other persons there but not for the purposes of identification—George also picked out a man who was brought in from the street.

JOHN GILL (Sergeant, H). I arrested Charles Grimme at 6 a.m. on November 28th at 12, Sheridan Street, Shadwell—he was in the front room with two others—I told him we were police officers, and were going to take him to the station for stealing eight chests of tea from a van on November 21st—he did not say anything then—his father came into the room—I told him what it was—Charles said to his father "That was on Thursday, I can prove where I was on that day"—Henry was there at the time, another officer took him.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. A nephew was taken from the house too—I do not know his name—they were put up for identification about 3 p.m.—Jacob Yantham picked out Henry—I do not think he picked out anybody else—Mrs. Yantham did not pick out anybody—George picked out Charles—a number of other witnesses in other cases were called to see the men.

CHARLES SMITH (Detective Officer, H). I went to the Grimme's house with Gill, and took Henry into custody—I charged him with being concerned with others in stealing a horse and van, and eight chests of tea on November 21st—he said, "What time did it occur"—I said that I could not tell him—he was taken to the station and charged—he did not say anything.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. He was put up for identification about 3 p.m.—there were two paradings of the prisoners for purposes of identification—I was there on both occasions—at 3 o'clock the two Yanthams were shown in and the Midland Railway boy Scott.

THOMAS DIVALL (Police Inspector, H). I was in charge of the station when the prisoners were paraded for identification, the usual course was adopted.

WILLIAM SNELL (Re-examined by MR. PURCELL). When I found my van was gone, the Midland Railway van boy told me he should know the men again—he said two men came round the corner and holloaed out "Macnamara"; they got no answer, and they got in and drove away; and then he said I was in the coffee shop and they said they had got fresh orders for Macnamara.

Charles Grimme, in his defence, on oath, said that on November 21st he was at work on the Steamship "Illavo" in the West India Dock as a stevedore from 6.30 a.m. till 10 p.m., except from 12 till 1, which is the dinner hour, when he went to the Manchester Road which is about five minutes' walk from the dock.

Henry Grimme, in his defence, on oath, said that he went out to look for work about 7.30 a.m. at the London docks, and he waited at Bellamy's Wharf till 12 a.m. and then went home to dinner, which was about an hour's walk from the wharf, and he got home about 12.50 and stayed there till 2.30 when he went out.

Avey, in her defence, on oath, said that her brother and his wife lived in the room with her, and about two o'clock when she was in her room on November 21st a van drove up to the street door with two men in it, one of them brought the chests up to her room, and she got up and said "What is that," he said "It is nothing to do with you, mind your own business," that he was very drunk, that she told the landlady she had better go and fetch her son, that she did not know the prisoners, and that they were not the men who came with the tea.

Witnesses for the Defence.

WALTER CLARE . I live at 98, High Street, Poplar, and am a stevedore—I was working on the "Illovo" in a gang, we began working on her about November 17th or 18th, Charles was working in the gang, we were loading the ship—we finished about the 24th—it was the same gang all the time—on November 21st we began working at 7 a.m.—Charles was working in the gang that day, we worked till 12

o'clock, we went back at 1 p.m.—I saw Charles at 12.45 outside the dock gates ready to go in—we worked till 3, when the rain knocked us off—Charles nickname is "Ginger."

Cross-examined. I have only known him a few weeks—there is no ganger who books the men in when they come back to work, the foreman knows the men he employs, there are only ten men in a gang—if a man did not return after dinner they would take on another man, nothing would show it, but he would draw his money before dinner and the other man who would be taken on would draw his money in the afternoon—the foreman would be the man to pay the prisoner, I do not think he is here.

Re-examined. The foreman's name is Flynn—I come here today because I remember where Charles was on November 21st.

HENRY ALBERT FAIRY . I live at 46, West Brockfield Road, Shadwell, and am a stevedore—I worked on the "Illavo," and was a member of the gang in which Clare was working—Charles was my mate—we were on the "Illovo" on November 21st, the prisoner was on shore slinging the irons—we started work at 7 a.m. and worked till 12, we went back at 1 and worked till 3, when the rain stopped us—Thornhill came and asked me if I would come here and I said I would—I saw the ganger Flynn with the detectives last Wednesday—I heard no conversation between them.

Cross-examined. I remember that Thursday, November 21st, because it was my Missus' washing day—I had never seen the prisoner before that job.

MARY ANN GRIMME . I live at 12, Sheridan Street, St. George's, and am the mother of the two prisoners—I remember the policeman coming to my house on November 28th, and taking my boys and my nephew, who is not like them, he is 23 years old—Henry went out about 7.30 a.m. on November 21st and came back about 12.50—he stayed in till 2.30 and then went out, and came in again about 5—when he came home at 1 o'clock he was perfectly sober.

Cross-examined. He was in the habit of going out at 7 and returning at 1—I do not know where he went—I do not know Avey or her brother.

GUILTY .— The Jury recommended AVEY to mercy. CHARLES* and HENRY GRIMME † then PLEADED GUILTY to convictions of felony at this Court on November 19th, 1900. AVEY— Six months' hard labour; CHARLES, Five years' penal servitude;

HENRY— Three years' penal servitude.

55. LILY HOMEWOOD PLEADED GUILTY to forging and uttering a request for the withdrawal of money from the Post Office Savings' Bank, also to forging a receipt for £1, with intent to defraud. She received a good character. Judgment respited.

(56) FREDERICK GEORGE JENNINGS BRAY (25) , to stealing, whilst employed under the Post Office, a post letter containing postal orders for 15s. and 10s. the property of the Postmaster-General. He received a good character Six months' in the second division. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

(57) EDMUND FITZGERALD , to stealing, whilst employed under the Post Office, six letters containing postal orders for 10s., 3s. 6d., 17s., 15s., 15s., and 2s. the property of the Postmaster-General. Eighteen months' hard labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

(58) GEORGE ROBERTS , to stealing a scarf pin from the person of William Godfrey, having been convicted of felony at the North London Sessions on December 7th, 1897. Ten other convictions were proved against him. Three years' penal servitude. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

(59) EDWARD CONNELL(29) , to stealing £3 13s. 6d., the monies of George Flatman, having been convicted at Epsom on April 26th, 1900. Three other convictions were proved against him. Twenty months' hard labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

(60) OSCAR LETULE , to forging and uttering an endorsement to a postal order for £6 13s. 4d. with intent to defraud. Fifteen months' hard labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

(61) JOSSLYN ROBERT AUGUSTUS RILEY (28) , to stealing two cheques for £5 each, with intent to defraud, having been convicted of felony at the Sussex Assizes on February 16th, 1901. Three other convictions were proved against him . Eighteen months' hard labour. —And [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

(62) CHARLES JEWELL , to stealing eleven lamp stands and a case, the property of the London and North Western Railway Company; also to stealing a bicycle the property of George Thomas Weeks, having been convicted of felony at Winchester on November 8th, 1887. Two other convictions were proved against him. Eighteen months' hard labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

63. KATHERINE CROWLEY (39), and JESSIE SMITH (27) , Robbery with violence on George Harmsworth, and stealing from him a purse and £1 12s. 2d.

MR. TUDOR Prosecuted.

WILLIAM SIME (263 H). About 12.30 a.m. on November 23rd I was in Brick Lane, Shoreditch—I saw the two prisoners walking along Brick Lane opposite Thrall Street, one on each side of the prosecutor—Crowley threw her arm round the prosecutor's neck, and struck him a blow on his face which knocked him down—he was under the influence of drink—Smith knelt down by him, and pulled something out of his pocket—I ran across, and took this purse (Produced) in my hand—I was in plain clothes—the prosecutor indentified it—there were some coppers in it and 5d. outside it—I told Smith I was a police officer—she said "Oh it is all right, he is my old man"—the prosecutor said "No, I am not, she has got my purse with all my wages"—I took them to the station—on the way Smith tried to throw this other purse (Produced) away—there was 2s. in it and three pawn tickets for women's wearing apparel—it does not belong to the prosecutor—at the station Smith was so violent that she had to be held down while she was searched, 2s. and some coppers were found on her in addition to what was found in the purse.

Cross-examined by Smith. The prosecutor had not got his purse with £1 in it in his pocket at the station—I had it in my hand all the way to the station.

GEORGE CORNISH (377 H). I was with Simes on November 23rd—I saw the prosecutor with the prisoners who were on each side of him arm in arm—opposite Thrall Street Crowley threw her left arm round his neck and made his ear bleed—they fell to the ground, and Smith put her hand into his trouser's pocket and took this purse out of it—I went up to them

and said to Crowley "I am a police officer"—she said, "That is all right, I have only just come along and have not had time to touch him"—at the station she said, "You know I have not got the purse."

Cross-examined by Crowley. You struck the prosecutor behind his right ear.

Cross-examined by Smith. The prosecutor had not got a purse in his pocket at the station with £1 in it—Sime had this purse in his hand.

GEORGE HARMSWORTH . I am a coachman of 208, Valance Road, Bethnal Green—on November 23rd I was walking through Brick Lane—the two prisoners accosted me, and one struck me behind the left ear, and one took my purse from my trouser's pocket (Produced)—I had no other purse on me—this one had £1 and four half crowns in it—I was not drunk—I had had a few glasses of drink

Cross-examined by Crowley. You struck me—I had not been drinking with you.

Cross-examined by Smith. I did not give you any money.

Crowley's defence.—I never struck the man any more than I struck you, Sir.

Smith's defence. The money is the money the man gave me.

GUILTY .—CROWLEY † then PLEADED GUILTY to a conviction of felony at the Thames Police Court on September 21st, 1901, and two other convictions were proved against her. Eighteen months' hard labour; SMITH— Twelve months' hard labour

64. ELIZABETH ANN TATHAM BARKER (30) , Forging and uttering a receipt for £3 with intent to defraud.

MR. BIRON and MR. PERCIVAL CLARK Prosecuted.

FLORENCE FLEETWOOD TAYLOR . I live at 28, Kensington Park Gardens—last September I was living with the prisoner at 406, Clapham Road—I am a depositor in the Post Office Savings' Bank, and had a Savings' Bank Book—I have not got it, now—I do not know where it is—it was described as "Hillhead, Glasgow, 2600A"—I last saw it in September last at 406, Clapham Road—I was going away and I thought it would be better under lock and key, and I gave it to the prisoner to put into her safe—I gave her instructions to send it up in October for the interest to be made up, the date of the anniversary of the date when the account began—in October I asked the prisoner if the book had been sent up to the post office for the interest to be made up—she replied that it had been sent to the post office—I was still living with her then—I have not withdrawn any money since I put the book into her care in September—I have not seen the book since—I have not received any money from the prisoner—I never gave her any authority to withdraw any money for me—the signature "Florence Fleetwood Taylor" on this notice of withdrawal, dated October 4th, for £5 is not mine, and was not written with my sanction—the signature on this receipt (Produced) for £5 dated October 4th is not in my writing—this notice of withdrawal for £3 dated October 8th, is not in my writing or written with my authority—this receipt for that £3 is not in my writing, and is not signed with my authority—I think it bears a very strong

resemblance to the prisoner's writing—I sent an application to the post office for my book, and I had a reply from them—I also entrusted to the prisoner the top of a dividend warrant—the warrant was cashed but I gave her the head of it—I continued to live with the prisoner till October 25th, when I was told that certain letters addressed to me had not been delivered to me—they were given to me torn up—on October 26th I left the prisoner.

GEORGE TROT . I am an assistant to the sub-postmaster at the South Kensington post office—on September 4th, the prisoner came in and filled up a notice for the withdrawal of money—it was to be paid by telegraph, and she gave me some money to pay for the telegram—I afterwards went to Bow Street and picked out the prisoner.

NORA KATE CONNELL . I am counter clerk at the Sloane Square Branch Post Office—I was on duty there on October 4th—the prisoner came in and said she had telegraphed to the post office for £5—she produced a deposit book "Hillhead, Glasgow, 2600A"—I looked to see if I had the authority, and I then produced the receipt for the money which I asked the prisoner to sign—she did so in my presence—I compared her signature with the signature in the book—I was not satisfied with it, and I told her she must bring further particulars as to her identity, and she said she would give me proof of her identity—Miss Reader, the supervisor, was in the post-office, and I showed her the receipt—the prisoner went out and returned after about half an hour, and brought a witness with her—she said the lady knew her—I said to the lady did she know her, and she said yes she did—I do not think any name was mentioned—the prisoner signed a receipt form in the presence of the witness, and I got the witness to write her name on the back—this is it "Agnes Wright, 120, Bedford Road, Clapham"—the prisoner also brought a dividend warrant, some letters, and a receipt for some books, all in the name of Miss Taylor—I did not ask the witness if she knew the prisoner as Florence Fleetwood Taylor—I remember the prisoner coming on October 8th—she filled up a notice of withdrawal for £3 in the name of Miss Taylor—I paid her the money as I had paid her the money on the former occasion—she came again on the 23rd, and I paid her 8s.—there was a notice of withdrawal on this occasion also—I saw her on three occasions, and I have no doubt about her—when I next saw her she was at Bow Street.

AGNES WRIGHT . I know the prisoner as carrying on a registry office—I have only known her since the third week in September—I went to see her for her to book me for a situation—I went and saw her again in October—when I was leaving she said "Which way are you going,"—I said "To Grover Road"—she said "I am going to the post office I might as well go with you"—we went to the post office in Sloane Square, she went in; I stood outside—she beckoned me in two or three minutes after she had gone in—when I got in, the young woman at the post office put a paper before me, and the prisoner said "Put your name at the bottom"—she said she wanted it for her dividends.—I believed her, and I thought there was no harm putting my name there.

ELLEN AGNES READER . I am supervisor at the Sloane Square Post Office—on October 4th Miss Connell spoke to me—I went into the office and saw the prisoner—I saw Miss Connell pay her £5—I next saw her at the police station, when I picked her out from seven women.

FLORENCE GEORGE . I am a clerk in the post office at Sloane Square—on October 4th I remember the prisoner coming in and being attended to by Miss Connell—I have no doubt about her—I saw Miss Counell hand her £5—I identified her at Bow Street.

JOHN COMPTON . I am a clerk in the employment of the General Post Office—I received instructions in this matter about the first week in November—on November 13th I saw the prisoner at her house at Knightsbridge—I told her I was in the post office, and that I had been making inquiries about some fraudulent withdrawings from Miss Taylor's account, and I cautioned her, she said "Thank you"—I told her the book had been in her possession, and that the money had been withdrawn on three occasions from the Sloane Square Post Office—I said "Do you know anything about it"—she said she knew nothing about it—I said "Will you write the signature appearing on the forged receipts"—she wrote that signature on this piece of paper—I compared the writing of the paper and the writing on the document, and I said "There is a strong resemblance between these signatures, will you come with me to see if you can be identified"—we went up to New Scotland Yard—I took Miss Connell down, and she picked her out in a minute—I gave her into custody.

By the COURT. There is no doubt that the writing on this piece of paper and the writing on the forged receipt are the same.

MATTHEW TOWER . I am a detective in the General Post Office—I arrested the prisoner on November 13th—I charged her with forging a request for the payment of £3, and also for forging a receipt for the same—she made no reply to the charge—I took her to New Scotland Yard, and placed her with eight other women, she was identified by Miss Connell.

GUILTY .—She then PLEADED GUILTY to a conviction of felony at Clerkenwell on August 22nd, 1900. Twelve months' hard labour.

NEW COURT.—Monday, December 16th, 1901.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

65. RICHARD MEAD, Robbery with violence on George Weller, and stealing a handkerchief and 30s., his property.

MR. GEE Prosecuted.

GEORGE WELLER . I live at 5, Grange Walk, Bermondsey—on November 30th I was in Brick Lane—I cannot speak much English—the prisoner and two others came up, and the prisoner took hold of me by my tie—I am certain he is the man—they took 30s. from me and a silk handkerchief, value 7s. 6d.—the other chap took the money, it was in my trousers pocket—I caught the prisoner and held him tight—I called "Police," and never let go of him till a policeman came, and gave him in custody—he heard me tell the policeman the charge, but made no reply.

HARRY BAKER (8 H). I was on duty near Brick Lane, and saw three men cross the road and make a rush for some one on the pavement—I saw all three struggling with the man—I did not see the prosecutor till I got close to him—he was then struggling with the prisoner—he said,

"They have got my money," in the prisoner's hearing; he said nothing—the other two ran down the street—I took the prisoner to the station, but found nothing on him—he was charged but made no reply.

By the COURT. When I got up, the prosecutor was holding the prisoner by his coat, who was struggling to get away—I saw two men going away—the prisoner was there when it began and ended—none of the property has been recovered.

Cross-examined. There may have been five or six of them, but I only saw three.

The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate: "I do not know anything about the man—I was standing watching him; he came and caught hold of me—I was only discharged from the Army three weeks ago.

HARRY BAKER (Re-examined). I only saw two men and the prisoner—it is not possible that the prosecutor turned round, and took the wrong man—I knew the prisoner well.

GUILTY .—He then PLEADED GUILTY to a conviction on August 10th at the North London Police Court, and two other convictions was proved against him. Twelve months' hard labour.

66. JOHN WILLIAM CAIN (22) , Feloniously wounding Emma Biggs, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm.

EMMA BIGGS . I am the wife of Joseph Biggs of 74, Tufton Street, Westminster—the prisoner has lodged there, for the last two years—he is no relation of ours—on October 18th I had been out, and came home with my daughter about 10.40, and as soon as I got to the kitchen door the prisoner said, "Will you take your things off?"—I said certainly not, my servant will do all—he ran to the fireplace, seized the poker—struck me on my face and knocked me down and said, "Now I will cut your b—throat"; he seized a knife—I put up my hand to save my throat, and he cut me across my hand with one of these knives (Produced). I believe it was the little one—he ran to the next room and said, "Oh, I have been and cut Mrs. Biggs throat this time"—I was taken to an hospital—I had done nothing to provoke the prisoner, I have been a mother to him.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. I deny any improprieties with you—I have been married 20 years, and have got sons and daughters—I was not with you in a public house that evening.

AMY STEVENS . I am a servant to Mrs. Biggs—I was at home, when she came home from her daughter's on this night about 11 o'clock—the prisoner spoke to her—she said, "Wait till I have taken my things off"—he got over the table and struck her a violent blow with a poker—she fell, and he ran and got this knife from the table (A carving knife) and said, "I will cut your b—throat"—I did not watch him—I turned my head, I was very frightened—the prisoner went next door and said, "Oh, Mr. Stephens, I have cut the Mistress's throat"—I found this little knife in the ashes with blood-stains on it, on the following Tuesday and wrapped it up—I do not know how it became blood-stained—I did not actually see him use a knife.

ALFRED REGINALD ROCHE . I am house physician at Westminster Hospital—on November 19th, about I a.m., Mrs. Bigg came there with a

cut on the knuckles of her right hand, which had severed the tendons; she also had a blow under her right eye—the wound on her hand might have been caused by this knife, and that on her face by a poker—she was in the hospital one night, but she has to come every day to get it dressed.

WILLIAM SMITH (137 A). On November 18th, about 8.45 p.m., I was on duty in Victoria Street, and saw Mrs. Biggs and the prisoner three or four minutes' walk from Tufton Street; she said "I want to give this man in charge for wounding my hand, and striking me with a poker"—he said, "For God's sake, Em, what are you going to do to me, I will give anything if you will withdraw the charge"—I arrested him—the poker and a knife were given to me the same night, and the other knife by Amy Stevens the next day.

The prisoner called

THOMAS CAIN . I am the prisoner's brother—this woman lodged with us—she is a prostitute—there is a Mr. Biggs—on the night of November 18th, the prisoner and Mrs. Biggs were drinking together at the Fleece in Marshman Street, and they were drunk—she made him throw up a respectable place where he was working, and not only that, but she stabbed me with a knife and with a glass, though not on that occasion.

GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. Eighteen months' hard labour.

67. WILLIAM GEORGE BRADLEY (20) PLEADED GUILTY to two Indictments for feloniously forging and uttering two orders for the delivery of goods with intent to defraud. He received a good character, and the prosecutor promised to take him back into his employ, believing him to be the dupe of another man. Discharged on recognizances.

(68) FREDERICK WILLIAM LAURENCE (27) , to unlawfully obtaining by false pretences £5 and £20 from Francis Henry Bovill, and attempting to obtain £17 from Arthur Edward Corner, with intent to defraud, having been converted in the name of Simms at Newington on March 20th, 1899. Seven other convictions were proved against him. Fifteen months' hard labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

(69) LYONEL JOHN SMYTH (23) , to unlawfully obtaining 12s., 3s. 6d., and £2 13s., by false pretences, also to forging and uttering an order for £6, also an order for £10, also another order for £10, with intent to defraud, having been convicted of felony at Aston, in Warwickshire, in 1899. Other convictions were proved against him . Five years' penal servitude. — [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

(70) And JERRY MALONEY (19) , to stealing a purse and £1 17s. 6d., the property of Beatrice Rowland, from her person. Twelve months' hard labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

NEW COURT.—Tuesday, December 17th, 1901.

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

71. ALFRED HAYES (42), PLEADED GUILTY to burglary in the dwelling house of Isaac Samuel, and stealing a brooch and other articles and £8 in money, also to being found by night with housebreaking implements in his possession. Five years' penal servitude.

72. JOHN CARROLL (36) , Stealing six cheques, the property of Newton, Chambers & Co.

MR. RANDOLPH Prosecuted, and MR. PURCELL Defended.

JAMES CHALLEN MILLER . I am manager to Newton, Chambers & Co. of Gray's Inn Road—their premises have a letter box opening on to the street—on November 18th I missed certain letters which I knew to have come to hand, and on the 19th I examined the letter box and found a sticky, adhesive substance on the flap and also inside—I communicated with the police—I drew this cheque for £l (Produced), and sent it to a man named Morris—I never got it back through the post office—this other cheque for £7 7s. 6d. is in favour of my company from Dredge—it did not come in the ordinary course—this cheque for £4 4s. by Tollett & Wentworth did not arrive, nor did the letter relating to it; nor did this cheque for £3 12s., with a memorandum and statement of account—nor did this account of J. S. Percival ever reach me.

Cross-examined. This cheque in favour of Mr. Morris was originally crossed—that has been obliterated very cleverly, but you can see it if you look for it—a cashier would probably pass it.

ISABEL DREDGE . I am the wife of Frederick Dredge, the proprietor of the Saracen's Head, Snow Hill—on November 15th I gave the "Boots" this cheque for £7 7s. 6d. to post—it never came back—I afterwards received an intimation from Newton, Chambers & Co.

MARK WESTMORE . On November 15th I was "Boots" at the Saracen's Head, and Mrs. Dredge gave me some letters to post, including one to Messrs. Chambers—I posted them.

HARRY FREETH . I am clerk to Messrs. Tollett & Wentworth, solicitors—this cheque for £4 4s. is drawn by them, and this is the statement of account—I placed them in an envelope on November 15th, addressed to Newton & Chambers and posted them—I never had them back.

HENRY HASWELL . I am clerk to Garsford, Gray & Co., merchants of London Wall—this cheque for £3 12s. was drawn by them to Newton, Chambers & Co.—I enclosed it on November 16th with this statement of account in an envelope and posted it—it did not come back.

MARIA LOUISA FOSKE . I am in the employ of the General Post Office, and have to deal with letters that are re-directed—on November 15th I dealt with a letter to Parolles of Upper Holloway—I have seen this cheque for £1 before but it is different, it was crossed with two lines and "& Co."—I enclosed it in a cover, and addressed it to Messrs. Newton—I have never had it back.

HARRY GARRARD (Policeman, E). I examined this letter box on November 16th—it was covered with a lot of sticky stuff which was also inside—Thursday and Friday nights, November 15th and 16th, were very foggy.

ROBERT SCOTT (200 C). On November 23rd the prisoner was in my custody at Shaftesbury Avenue—he was very violent and threw me down—he tried to put his right hand in his left jacket pocket—he got a small piece of paper out and threw it away—we got him to Vine Street station, and I found in his jacket pocket four cheques, four invoices, and one memo.

—they were in the same pocket as he took the paper from—it was a small piece of writing paper—I handed it to Inspector Grey.

Cross-examined. I first saw him outside a public house in Shaftesbury Avenue about 8.35—I was called as he wanted to fight a man in the saloon bar—we were called twice to the same public house—he was put out by the manager—they do not usually put out men who are sober—he went back and they put him out again—there was a large crowd—it took four of us to take him to the station.

JOHN MCPHERSON (Police Sergeant, C). I received Exhibits 2 to 10 from Inspector Grey—I showed them to the prisoner and said, "Can you account for these cheques and invoices found in your possession last night?"—he said, "I was in Leicester Square and a man gave them to me to mind, they were wrapped in a piece of paper: we had been drinking together for three hours: I do not know the man, but if I saw him I should know him"—I took a note of the conversation at the time—he was charged at Vine Street with drunkenness, discharged, and re-arrested for unlawful possession.

Cross-examined. He said, "A man gave them to me, and asked me to mind them for an hour or two."

ALBERT PEDDER (Police Sergeant, E). I received Exhibits 2 to 10—after his discharge I re-arrested the prisoner for stealing letters from a letter box—he said, "That cannot be, as a man gave them to me."

GUILTY of receiving .—He then PLEADED GUILTY to a conviction at Clerkenwell on January 17th, 1899, in the name of John Powell. Four other convictions were proved against him, and he had been twice sentenced to five years' penal servitude. Five years' penal servitude.

73. ROBERT BELL SALISBURY (46) , Forging and uttering the endorsement to an order for £5, with intent to defraud.

MR. HUTTON and MR. FORDHAM Prosecuted.

WILLIAM ALBERT BARNES . I am a flour importer of Dunster House, Mark Lane—I have been about forty years in the trade—the prisoner was introduced to me in September by Mr. Richards on the Corn Exchange—he said he had a very good connection among broken—I engaged him as traveller at a salary and half of any extras—he was decidedly not a partner—he used to come to the office in the afternoon, and give me the orders and cheques which I entered in the morning—he used to bring me the cheques and I paid them into my bank, Lloyd & Co.—I have no account at any other bank—that went on fairly satisfactory till November 20th, when I received a visit from a customer, Miss Hopkins, and on the next day the prisoner told me that he had received a cheque for £31 from Mr. Visostky, that he had paid it into an account of his own at the Royal British Bank, and forged my signature on the back—he had no right whatever to sign my name—he said "I admit I have been wrong, but I will make it right"—I told him that the matter was out of my hands entirely as I had consulted my solicitor. This (Produced) is Mr. Visostky's cheque—it is endorsed "Barnes & Co." in the prisoner's writing—it was not paid in by him to me.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. I have been in business with other firms—at the time you were introduced Barnes & Co. did not exist, but I have been on the Corn Exchange 40 years—I may have written to you, sending you a sample of flour to sell—the first negotiation was for some

Russian flour, but it fell through—the only time I wrote to customers was when I requested them not to pay you any money—mention was made to Buss & Co. of you being my traveller—I had got some Russian rye to sell, and it was agreed between us that we should divide the profits, but the transaction fell through, and sometime afterwards there was some talk of American flour—we did not agree to work on the same basis and to divide the profits after paying the cartage: our agreement was a verbal one, nothing was put into writing—we only made a division of profits on the Russian flour because it was business entirely introduced by me—Thomas and Short failed about a week after I left them—I cannot recollect the date—I did not purchase customer's flour while I was with them, I consulted Mr. Short about it—I did not make a contract which I knew would not be fulfilled—you suggested other customers, but Mr. Short would not deal with them—I did not do business with any bakers till you came—you came to introduce the baker's trade—I never knew you to write memoranda or post-cards, and put "Barnes & Co." without putting "Per R.B.S."; I should have protested at once—you brought an order for flour from Mr. Near, of Copley Street, and I received a post-card asking me to send and take it away—a Sheriffs officer was called at the baker's shop, but, I was not there—you were to receive 60 per cent. over a certain amount, but there was no agreement to divide profits. (The prisoner pointed out several accounts in the ledger which he contended showed that he was a partner, but which the witness denied).

By the COURT. When I found this cheque paid in, I found in what name the account was kept—it was not kept in the name of Barnes & Co.

Re-examined—these payments in the ledger of £1 10s. were paid to the prisoner on account of his commission—there is about £5 6s. 6d. on this page—he always led me to believe that he had plenty of time, and that this business was taken up to fill up his spare time—we should have had a settlement at Christmas, and I should have deducted the amounts which he had received—he brought me no money—I think he has received about £1 more than was due to him—about £4 was due to him, and he has had £5—I took the lease in my own name, and arranged it all—this (Produced) is the memorandum.

WILLIAM VISOSTKY . I am a wholesale tea and coffee dealer—I have done business with Mr. Barnes—I used to pay his account to the prisoner—the cheques were to go to him—I gave the prisoner this cheque for £31 to go to Mr. Barnes on Nov. 19th on the business of the 18th—I dated it the 19th—I was at the Royal British Bank on the 18th, and had a conversation with the manager and saw this cheque—I knew the writing on the back as the prisoner's—I stopped the payment of it because I had drawn it for Mr. Barnes—I afterwards went to Mr. Barnes—the cheque would have been paid if I had not stopped it—the prisoner did not give me a receipt for it, he said that Mr. Barnes would send a receipt, and I had a letter from Mr. Barnes in the evening which did not mention the cheque, so I went to the bank in the morning—the cheques which I have given him have come back through Lloyd's.

Cross-examined. You said that Mr. Barnes would send me a receipt with a fresh order for flour—I remember the Copley Street case—I

received a letter from Mr. Barnes—There was a Sheriff's officer in possession, and the order was for the man to give the flour up—It was Mr. Barnes' order—you came to me for payment before the account was due and said "Well, date the cheque on"—we did not leave together and go to the bank together—you did not tell me you were going to open an account in your own name with it.

By the COURT. I went there on the 18th and told them not to honour the cheque till they heard from me, and as I did not got a receipt from Mr. Barnes I stopped it next day.

Re-examined. The prisoner wanted me to give £10 to settle in full, I mean that he offered to settle the account of £67 for £10, and he would give a receipt in full.

By the prisoner. I swore that you told me to give £10 to settle the £60 account.

HENRY CONNOR . I am manager of the Royal British Bank, Commercial Street—the prisoner opened an account there on Nov. 18th by paying in three cheques, one for £31 Mr. Visostky's, one for £5 5s. and one for £9 2s. 6d—Mr. Visostky stopped his cheque on Nov. 19th—he came shortly after the prisioner paid the cheques in—I showed him his cheque—the £9 2s. 6d, cheque was to "bearer"—it was not stopped, but it had been stopped once before—the prisoner had no account there previously.

Cross-examined. Two or three days afterwards I called and returned the £31 to you—on Friday the 22nd you said that you were going to fetch the prosecutor to withdraw the stoppage—you left it with the cashier, not with me—I never saw you again.

By the COURT. The prisoner opened the account on the 18th about 3 p.m., and signed the name of R. B. Salisbury, and he put "Barnes & Co., of Mark Lane" against it, stating that he was a partner—it would not have been accepted otherwise without inquiries.

WILLIAM MILLER (Detective Sergeant). On December 6th I went to Mr Barnes' office at 3.30 with Amos, another detective, and saw the prisoner—I said I was making inquiries respecting a cheque for £31 which he had paid in, that I should take him into custody, and that he would be charged with forging the endorsement to it—he said, "I don't see how you can call it forgery, as I put 'R. B. Salisbury & Co.,' it can't be so as I am the 'Co.' "—I said to Mr Barnes, "Is he a partner in this firm," he said, "No, certainly not." He was charged at the station and said, "I am the 'Co.' "

The prisoner, in his defence, stated that it was arranged between them that they should divide the profits after deducting the expenses, and that nothing was said about his being a traveller; he proposed to Mr. Barnes to open another account, who said, "You had better open it in your own name;" that the only reason he had ever opened the account at the Royal British Bank was that the cheque might be cleared there; that he had no felonious intention in signing "Barnes & Co., R. B. Salisbury," and never got any benefit from it.

Russian flour, but it fell through—the only time I wrote to customers was when I requested them not to pay you any money—mention was made to Buss & Co. of you being my traveller—I had got some Russian rye to sell, and it was agreed between us that we should divide the profits, but the transaction fell through, and sometime afterwards there was some talk of American flour—we did not agree to work on the same basis and to divide the profits after paying the cartage: our agreement was a verbal one, nothing was put into writing—we only made a division of profits on the Russian flour because it was business entirely introduced by me—Thomas and Short failed about a week after I left them—I cannot recollect the date—I did not purchase customer's flour while I was with them, I consulted Mr. Short about it—I did not make a contract which I knew would not be fulfilled—you suggested other customers, but Mr. Short would not deal with them—I did not do business with any bakers till you came—you came to introduce the baker's trade—I never knew you to write memoranda or post-cards, and put "Barnes & Co." without putting "Per R.B.S."; I should have protested at once—you brought an order for flour from Mr. Near, of Copley Street, and I received a post-card asking me to send and take it away—a Sheriffs officer was called at the baker's shop, but, I was not there—you were to receive 60 per cent. over a certain amount, but there was no agreement to divide profits. (The prisoner pointed out several accounts in the ledger which he contended showed that he was a partner, but which the witness denied).

By the COURT. When I found this cheque paid in, I found in what name the account was kept—it was not kept in the name of Barnes & Co.

Re-examined—these payments in the ledger of £1 10s. were paid to the prisoner on account of his commission—there is about £5 6s. 6d. on this page—he always led me to believe that he had plenty of time, and that this business was taken up to fill up his spare time—we should have had a settlement at Christmas, and I should have deducted the amounts which he had received—he brought me no money—I think he has received about £1 more than was due to him—about £4 was due to him, and he has had £5—I took the lease in my own name, and arranged it all—this (Produced) is the memorandum.

WILLIAM VISOSTKY . I am a wholesale tea and coffee dealer—I have done business with Mr. Barnes—I used to pay his account to the prisoner—the cheques were to go to him—I gave the prisoner this cheque for £31 to go to Mr. Barnes on Nov. 19th on the business of the 18th—I dated it the 19th—I was at the Royal British Bank on the 18th, and had a conversation with the manager and saw this cheque—I knew the writing on the back as the prisoner's—I stopped the payment of it because I had drawn it for Mr. Barnes—I afterwards went to Mr. Barnes—the cheque would have been paid if I had not stopped it—the prisoner did not give me a receipt for it, he said that Mr. Barnes would send a receipt, and I had a letter from Mr. Barnes in the evening which did not mention the cheque, so I went to the bank in the morning—the cheques which I have given him have come back through Lloyd's.

Cross-examined. You said that Mr. Barnes would send me a receipt with a fresh order for flour—I remember the Copley Street case—I

received a letter from Mr. Barnes—There was a Sheriff's officer in possession, and the order was for the man to give the flour up—It was Mr. Barnes' order—you came to me for payment before the account was due and said "Well, date the cheque on"—we did not leave together and go to the bank together—you did not tell me you were going to open an account in your own name with it.

By the COURT. I went there on the 18th and told them not to honour the cheque till they heard from me, and as I did not get a receipt from Mr. Barnes I stopped it next day.

Re-examined. The prisoner wanted me to give £10 to settle in full, I mean that he offered to settle the account of £67 for £10, and he would give a receipt in full.

By the prisoner. I swore that you told me to give £10 to settle the £60 account.

HENRY CONNOR . I am manager of the Royal British Bank, Commercial Street—the prisoner opened an account there on Nov. 18th by paying in three cheques, one for £31 Mr. Visostky's, one for £5 5s. and one for £9 2s. 6d—Mr. Visostky stopped his cheque on Nov. 19th—he came shortly after the prisioner paid the cheques in—I showed him his cheque—the £9 2s. 6d, cheque was to "bearer"—it was not stopped, but it had been stopped once before—the prisoner had no account there previously.

Cross-examined. Two or three days afterwards I called and returned the £31 to you—on Friday the 22nd you said that you were going to fetch the prosecutor to withdraw the stoppage—you left it with the cashier, not with me—I never saw you again.

By the COURT. The prisoner opened the account on the 18th about 3 p.m., and signed the name of R. B. Salisbury, and he put "Barnes & Co., of Mark Lane" against it, stating that he was a partner—it would not have been accepted otherwise without inquiries.

WILLIAM MILLER (Detective Sergeant). On December 6th I went to Mr Barnes' office at 3.30 with Amos, another detective, and saw the prisoner—I said I was making inquiries respecting a cheque for £31 which he had paid in, that I should take him into custody, and that he would be charged with forging the endorsement to it—he said, "I don't see how you can call it forgery, as I put 'R. B. Salisbury & Co.,' it can't be so as I am the 'Co.' "—I said to Mr Barnes, "Is he a partner in this firm," he said, "No, certainly not." He was charged at the station and said, "I am the 'Co.' "

The prisoner, in his defence, stated that it was arranged between them that they should divide the profits after deducting the expenses, and that nothing was said about his being a traveller; he proposed to Mr. Barnes to open another account, who said, "You had better open it in your own name;" that the only reason he had ever opened the account at the Royal British Bank was that the cheque might be cleared there; that he had no felonious intention in signing "Barnes & Co., R. B. Salisbury," and never got any benefit from it.

GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy by the jury—He then PLEADED GUILTY to a conviction at this Court in December, 1892, of obtaining goods by false pretences, when he was sentenced to ten years' penal servitude; he still had welve months to serve of his previous sentence. Twelve months' hard labour after the expiration of his former sentence.

74. JAMES BRENNAN (27) Unlawfully endeavouring to procure the commission of an act of gross indecency. Second Count; for an indecent assault. MR. HUTTON for the prosecution offered no evidence on the First Count.

—NOT GUILTY. The prisoner then PLEADED GUILTY to the Second Count.

His brother undertook to be responsible for him. Discharged on recognizance.

THIRD COURT.—Tuesday, December 17th, 1901.

Before Mr. Commissioner L. Smith, K.C.

75. EDWARD SHARP (27), PLEADED GUILTY to stealing three jackets, the property of the London and North Western Railway Co ., also to assaulting and beating George Stanford to resist his lawful apprehension. Several previous convictions were proved against him. Six months' hard labour.

(76) CHARLES WHITWORTH ELLIS , to stealing a box of cigars and other articles, the property of Slaters' Limited, also to stealing a watch value £2, the property of Nellie Piper. Several previous convictions were proved against him. Six months' hard labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

—And

(77) HENRY WARTLEY (31) , to forging and uttering a cheque for £5 12s., with intent to defraud, also in embezzling £1 8s. and £5 12s. 9d., the moneys of Solomon Goldstein, his master. Five months' hard labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

78. RICHARD CHARLES GRATTON (24) , feloniously forging and uttering three receipts for £2 15s., £4 17s. 6d., and £3 12s. 6d., with intent to defraud.

MR. ROUTH Prosecuted.

RENE EMMANUEL BARTHELEMY . I am a professor of music of 118 and 120, Charing Cross Road—I came over to London in August of this year to start a school—I went to live at 20, Bloomsbury Street, where the prisoner was living—I became friendly with him—I told him my business, and he said that he could assist me; that he was a jeweller, and that his father had a house in Berkeley Square; that he had stock in his shop at the corner of Gracechurch Street, and other shops elsewhere, and that he was a detective—I asked for his advice—he brought me a power of attorney, dated November 5, 1901, which I signed—I was negotiating about taking No. 118, Charing Cross Road, and I gave him directions to carry out that with Messrs. Salmony & Co.—I had great confidence in him—he bought some furniture from them for me—on October 31st he brought me a receipt for £2 15s. for the furniture, and I paid him that amount—I believed he had paid it, and that it was a proper receipt from Messrs. Salmony—I told him I wanted a brass plate for the door, and he ordered it—on November 16th he told me he had paid £4 17s. 6d. for it, producing a receipt, and on the strength of that I paid him—on November 11th I directed him to get a page-boy's suit of clothes, for which he represented that he had paid £3 12s. 6d., and produced a receipt, which I paid, believing it to be bona fide—I also

paid him £21 odd for timber doors, paper hangings, etc., for which he produced receipts—all these receipts are in his writing.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. All the receipts were not given to me on the same day—the money was paid in notes and gold—when I gave evidence at Great Marlborough Street I said what I considered to be the truth, and I am now saying what I consider to be the truth—the receipts were presented to me on different days, and were paid separately as coming from the various shops—you said that they came from the cashier, whom you knew, in that form, because he could get a discount, and that when you got a proper receipt he could not get the discount—you were paid £24 for your services, for which I produce the receipt.

Re-examined. Roughly, I think I lost through the prisoner between £50 and £60.

MINNIE ADA CHAPPLE . I am a typewriter at Messrs. Salmony & Co.'s, Limited, of 4, New Compton Street—they were formerly at 118, Charing Cross Road—there were negotiations between them and the prosecutor on his taking their premises for some of the furniture there, and the prisoner called at the office and paid £1 12s. for some chain and a table—I gave the receipt now produced; it is on the ordinary printed form of the firm—I never gave him the bill produced for £2 12s. 6d., and it is not in my writing nor is it my receipt.

RONALD ETON BULLS . I am in the employment of Messrs. Nash & Hull, of 87, New Oxford Street, Sign makers—on November 8th the prisoner called, and ordered a brass door-plate, price £3 8s. 6d.—he paid £1; he then ordered a smaller plate, costing 13s.—the invoice and receipt for £1 are the firm's—this bill for £4 17s. 6d. has nothing to do with my firm, and is not genuine.

Cross-examined. I told Mr. Barthelemy the price would be 3 guineas, and an additional line of engraving was added for which we charged 5s. 6d.

WILLIAM PRUDEN . I am in the employment of Messrs. Baker & Son, Clothiers, of 271, High Holborn—on November the 18th, prisoner called and gave an order for a page-boy's livery, price £2 7s. 6d.—he paid £1 on account on November 20th—the suit was taken by a messenger to 118, Charing Cross Road on November 28th—the messenger brought the suit back, not receiving the balance due—my firm sent it a second time when the balance was paid—the receipt produced was not given by my firm—the suit was £2 7s. 6d. not £3 12s. 6d. as it appears on that bill—there is nobody of the name of Scarsbrook in my firm's employment.

Cross-examined. You ordered a cap at the same time as the suit, in another department—you may have asked about a frock coat connected with the suit, I did not show you any pattern—the price was £2 7s. 6d. without a frock coat.

Re-examined. He paid for the cap, which was sent to Charing Cross Road.

ARCHER CLARK (Detective Sergeant, C). On November 25th I went with Detective Bruton to 20, Bloomsbury Street, where I saw the prisoner—I told him we were police officers, and were going to arrest him on a charge of forging and uttering receipts for the payment of money

and obtaining various sums from Mr. Barthelemy—he said, "Oh, all right"—I showed him the receipt signed "H. Salmony" for the table and chairs £2 15s. and said "This is not a proper receipt, the one given you was for £1 12s. and written on a printed form of Messrs. Salmony & Co.; this is the one," referring to the one which I produced—I said there were other charges of obtaining £3 17s., in respect of a brass plate from Messrs. Nash and Hull, also £1 3s., in regard to a boy's suit, obtained from Messrs. Baker & Co.—he said, "Oh, all right"—on the following day I went into his room at 20, Bloomsbury Street, where I arrested him, and found in a desk on the second floor the genuine Salmony's receipt—on the evening I arrested him, I went to 118, Charing Cross Road and found one of the rooms locked—I took the key from the prisoner, and opened the room—I found the exhibits produced 4, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13, and a power of attorney in a table drawer—they are the genuine receipts.

Cross-examined. I arrested you about 11—you were then in the hall—ultimately I went into a room, where I repeated the charge, as you asked me to do so, in front of a lady who was in the room—I asked whose room it was, you said it was occupied by a lady who was undressed—I said I should have to enter the room—I did not produce any receipts in the room, having shown them to you previously in the hall I did not think it necessary—the charge was signed by Mr. Barthelemy about 2.30 next morning—I had been to Charing Cross Road, where I found £4—I did not find any of the receipts made out by the prisoner, they were in Mr. Barthelemy's possession—he gave them to me the same evening—he told me they had been given to him by the prisoner for money paid by him—I found no money on the prisoner—he did not ask me in the hall where I obtained the receipts from, and said nothing with regard to them—he did not say "I do not understand it at all, I will go with you and see"—he simply said "Oh, all right," and treated it in a very off-hand manner.

GUILTY .— Twelve months' hard labour.

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, December 18th, 19th,

and 20th, 1901.

Before Mr. Justice Bigham.

79. FRANK DUTTON JACKSON (35), alias THEODORE HOROS , Rape on Daisy Pollex Adams , and EDITHA LOLETA JACKSON (47), alias LAURA HOROS (47), with aiding and abetting in the commission of that felony.

The SOLICITOR GENERAL, MR. SUTTON, MR. MATTHEWS, MR. BODKIN and

MR. STEPHENSON Prosecuted.

GUILTY .—FRANK, Fifteen years' penal servitude; EDITHA, Seven years' penal servitude. The Grand Jury and the Court complimented Inspector Kane on the conduct of the case.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, December 18th, 1901.

Before Mr. Recorder.

80. BAREND MACHIEL WINKEL PLEADED GUILTY to obtaining an order for 60 barrels of oil from F. W. Parry, an order of 50 barrels ofoil from the Kerosene Co., and to incurring a debt and liability for £70 to the said Kerosene Co. by false pretences. To enter into recognizances to come up for judgment. —And

(81) JOHN HURLEY (22) to unlawfully wounding Lucy Salter. Nine months' hard labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

For the case of GORDON FLETCHER HEWITT tried this day, see Surrey Cases.

NEW COURT.—Thursday and Friday, December 19th and 20th.

Before Mr Recorder.

82. MARIE GRIEVE (30) PLEADED GUILTY to feloniously sending a letter to Charles Ansell demanding money with menaces.

MR. HUTTON, or the prisoner, stated that she would be sent out of the country after her release. fEighteen months' hard labour.

83. ALBERT BRIMSON (21) , Carnally knowing Emma Turner, aged 11 years.

MR. HUTTON prosecuted. GUILTY .— Seven years' penal servitude.

84. WILLIAM LEVENS and EDWARD WILLIAM REED, Feloniously demanding money from John Stanton with menaces.

MR. CHARLES MATHEWS and MR. FULTON Prosecuted. MR. BIRON appeared for LEVENS, and MR. RANDOLPH and MR. STEWART for REED.

JOHN STANTON . I live at 18, Clovelly Street, Homerton, and am a turf commission agent—I have known the prisoners a little over two years on turf transactions, and I have also lent them money—on October 23rd I saw Levens at his house at 16, Gainsborough Road, Hackney Wick—he came to the door, I said "Is there any business"—he said, "You have been intimate with my wife"—he used the word "intimate"—I asked him what he meant—he said that I had had connection with his wife—I said "I have not, I wish to be confronted with your wife"—he called her down, and I said to Mrs. Levens "Your husband has accused me of having connection with you, is there any truth in it?"—she said "No, he wants money"—Levens heard that, and said "I want £10 or I will go and tell your wife"—I walked out of the house making no reply, and he followed me and said, "I won't be hard on you, I will take £20"—I said I would not give him 20 pence, and went away—he called at my house the next day alone, and said "What do you intend to do"—I said "What do you mean"—He said "If you don't give me £20 I will make a scene"—I said "What you accuse me of is utterly false, I will not give you a penny, and if you come again I will take proceedings against you"—He went away—I made a communication to Detective Crutchett next day, the 25th, and on Saturday, the 26th, a knock came to the door, and my clerk opened it—Levens was there—I was in the office, my clerk called me, I went to the door and Levens said "I have come to square the matter, I want £20 or I will knock it out of you"—he was alone—I made no answer, and he went away—on the 28th I saw him outside my gate with his wife, and the prisoner Reed and his wife—they knocked, my wife opened the door, and called me down—I went down—Levens was at the door, and the other three were outside the gate—Levens said "Give me

the money," I said "No, certainly not, you will get nothing out of me"—my wife was there but nothing was said about her—I had told her about his previous visits—he took me by my neck and pulled me off the door-step, inside the passage—there is a little passage about four feet from the door—he hit me on my face with his fist, and I fell—I got up and pushed him up again—we got outside the gate into the middle of the road—he then kicked me in the pit of my stomach and in my groin—I fell, and when I was down Reed came and hit me with this stick (Produced) behind my ear—he was carrying the stick in his hand; there is lead at the bottom of it—my brother-in-law, Matthew Fitzpatrick, came out and pulled him off me—I was on the ground at the time—Fitzpatrick got the stick—Reed struck me twice—this was about 7.45 p.m., it was quite dark—I only had my trousers and stockings and shirt on, I was changing my clothes when Levens knocked—I have been very deaf since Reed struck me behind my ear—I have suffered great pain, and am under the doctor still—when Levens came to the door on the 28th he asked me to close the door, so that my wife should not hear—I said "My wife knows all."

Cross-examined by MR. BIRON. I am a commission agent on the turf, and do a little betting—I have no other occupation—after the interview of October 23rd when the suggestion was made about my conduct with Mrs. Levens, I never went to the prisoner's house again—I was determined to have nothing more to do with him, but he came to my house on the 24th and 26th—up to the time Mrs. Levens came down on the 23rd, nothing had been said about money—I said to her "Your husband accuses me and you of having connection, is there any truth in it"—she said "No, he wants money"—what I said at the police Court was "I called on October 22nd and saw Levens, etc. I asked him to fetch her face to face;" that is true—I was there on the 22nd, but I wasn't accused till the Wednesday—there was no accusation against me on the Tuesday—the accusation was made on the Wednesday—the wife did not say, in her husband's presence, that I had been guilty of impropriety with her, nor did I say "Is not it a matter which can be arranged by money," nor did Levens say "I don't want your dirty money, I will find out all about it, and, unless you have got some explanation of this, I shall bring the matter into Court."—I saw him at my house on the 24th—he did not ask me again whether this had taken place—he came again on the 26th alone, but his wife followed after him—she did not in his presence and in the presence of Fitzpatrick repeat the charge, she was outside the gate; she did not come up—I did not tell her on the occasion that she was lying, nor did I say "Well, go away, and come again on Monday"—Mrs. Reed was also present—I did not expect them to come on Monday—Fitzpatrick came almost every night—my father was there, he was on a holiday from the north of England—I was not at the door when Levens came, I was upstairs, and I heard my wife talking to somebody—I did not hear Levens say to her "If he is innocent, then let him say so before you and my wife"—I went down when my wife called me—I did not assault him on his repeating the charge—I did not get hold of him till he hit me—he asked me to close the door so that my wife should not hear, when I went down I asked him what he wanted—the first act of

assault was his getting hold of me, and pulling me off the door-step into the middle of the road—I did not seize hold of him, nor did we both struggle till we fell—Fitzpatrick and my father did not then come out—Mrs. Levens and Mrs. Reed were outside the gate—I deny that there ever was any impropriety between me and Mrs. Levens, I never behaved improperly to her.

Cross-examined by MR. RANDOLPH. Reed was only present on the last occasion the 26th—there was not some question of Mrs. Reed being called,' nor did Reed say "Go and call her"—I do not suggest that they both attacked me at the same time—Fitzpatrick did not attack Reed—I was on the ground when Fitzpatrick was fighting with Reed, and Levens was on the top of me, and Reed came and hit me behind the neck—I went my usual round next day to collect slips, and I went to the Court in the early morning to get a warrant.

Re-examined. I passed Levens' house on the following day—there was somebody with me—Levens asked me to go in—I said, "No, I will not, after what I was accused of yesterday."

JOHN NORRIS . I am a coal porter, of 17, Fore Street, Stratford—I know Levens and his wife—I saw them together at their door on October 24th—Mr. Stanton was with me—we passed along the road, and Levens and his wife called him over, and he said "After what you have accused me of yesterday, I shall not come"—we then walked away.

Cross-examined by MR. BIRON. I have not given evidence before—I remember the date, because as we walked along Mr. Stanton said "You know what I have been accused of"—I heard Mrs. Levens say "Come over here," and he refused to go.

Re-examined. Levens is a fellow-workman of mine at the same yard—that is the reason I was not called before.

EDWARD FRIEND . I live at 42, Coopersdale Road, Homerton, and am Mr. Stanton's clerk—I know Levens now—I remember his calling on October 26th, between 7.30 and 8 p.m., at Mr. Stanton's house—a knock came to the door—I opened it, and saw Levens there alone—he asked for Mr. Stanton, and I went and told him—Mr. Stanton came to the door, and asked him what he wanted—he said he had come to square the matter—Mr. Stanton said "You cannot get anything off of me"—Levens said "I will have £20, or I shall knock it out of you"—I said to Mr. Stanton "You had better come in and shut the door"—which he did.

Cross-examined by MR. BIRON. This was on Saturday night—I did not hear Levens say "I have come for an explanation"—Mrs. Levens did not come and say that he had been guilty of some impropriety—there was a woman outside the gate, but I do not know who—Mr. Stanton did not say "Come again on Monday"—I have been Mr. Stanton's clerk two years.

Cross-examined by MR. RANDOLPH. I cannot say whether there was another female at the gate.

AGNES STANTON . I am the prosecutor's wife, and live with him at 18, Crockett Road—on October 28th, about 8.30 p.m., Levels called and asked for Mr. Stanton—I opened the door and said "What do you want him for"—he said "You know nothing about it, there is something between him and my wife"—I said "I know all about it"—I told Mr. Stanton—he had told me what had passed on the previous occasion, and

he came down, and Levens said "Are you going to give me the money"—my husband said "No, certainly not"—Levens pulled him off the door-step and he fell—he got up and Levens knocked him down outside the gate, and kicked him when he was on the ground two or three times before he got up—I called my brother Mathew Fitzpatrick, who pulled I evens off my husband, and Reed came up and struck my husband on the back of his head with this stick—Fitzpatrick took this stick away from Reed—we then went to the police station.

Cross-examined by MR. BIRON. Levens did not say on the 28th "If your husband is innocent, let him say so before my wife"—I do not think anybody went to where Levens was in the road—when my husband came down, he did not at once rush on Levens and push him off the gate—I have said "They struggled to the gate"—they then fell on the path—it is not bricks—Stanton's father was in the house, but he did not come out—he is an old man—Fitzpatrick lives in lodgings, and comes to see me in the evenings—it was quite a surprise to him.

Cross-examined by MR. RANDOLPH. I went up before Reed hit my husband—Reed was there all the time—I should naturally take more notice of Levens at the door than of Reed at the gate.

Re-examined. I should not be likely to talk to Fitzpatrick about an accusation of this kind.

MATHEW FITZPATRICK . I am a journeyman, of 142, Valance Road, Homerton, and am the prosecutor's brother-in-law—I visit him and his wife nightly—I was there on October 28th—there was a knock at the door—my sister opened it, and there were some very rough words—Mr. Stanton came downstairs, and my sister called me—I went out and found Stanton on the ground, face downwards, and Levens over him in a stooping position punching him with his fists—I got hold of Levens and pulled him up—I had got him partly up, and Reed came from behind and hit Stanton across the neck with his stick once—I left him and ran after Reed; he fell, and I got the stick from him—there were some ladies there, I did not know them—they were Mrs. Levens and Reed's wife—I took the stick indoors.

Cross-examined by MR. BIRON. I did not see what was going on till I was called—I did not hear that there was a little trouble between Levens and Stanton; it was a complete surprise to me.

Cross-examined by MR. RANDOLPH. I said at police station that Reed hit him on the neck while I was dealing with Levens—that was the first I saw of Reed; he fell in the struggle—I took the stick from his hand, not from his pocket—I saw him use it—he had it tied round his wrist with a string—I come from Cork—I do not believe I was ever in a row in my life—I may have hit Reed.

Re-examined. If I hit him it was simply in the struggle to get possession of the stick.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am a French polisher of 16, Hodges Road, South Hackney—I was hop picking this summer with the prisoner Reed's mother and his two brothers—I was with them all the time; they returned on September 28th.

EDWARD FRIEND LANTON , M.R.C.S. I live at 169, High Street, Homerton—on October 28th the prosecutor came to see me about 9.25 p.m.

—there was a severe contusion on the back of his left ear and another on the muscles at the back of his neck—this stick may have caused those injuries—he complained of his thigh, and I found an abrasion of the skin of his right ham, another at the lower part of his abdomen, and he suffered from general shock—he is still under my care—the deafness which he suffers from would arise from a blow behind his ear—there was more swelling the next day.

Cross-examined by MR. BIRON. It would not be correct to say that he was so deaf that he could only understand by movements of the lips—the mark on his hip might be caused by a fall—the swelling on his groin could hardly be caused in a struggle, and one man falling with his knee on the other; it was most likely caused by a violent blow, and not by his falling on the ground.

Cross-examined by MR. RANDOLPH. I do not think the contusion at the back of his left ear could be caused by a blow on the pavement—a fist would never cause it—falling on the edge of a tub might do it.

Re-examined. It is my impression that the injuries to the lower part of his body were caused by kicks.

HENRY HOLLOWAY (Police Inspector, J). On October 28th, about 7.45 p.m., the prisoner Levens came and complained of being assaulted by Stanton striking him on his jaw and forehead outside 18, Clovelly Street—I found no marks of violence on him, but I applied to the Magistrate for a summons for the alleged assault—I asked him why he went to the prosecutor's house—he said, "He was having to do with my wife, I found it out; I went round to accuse him of it, he struck me when he opened the door"—I referred him to the Magistrate, and he was arrested at the Court—on the same night, Levens, Reed, Mrs. Stanton, and Fitzpatrick came to the station—Stanton was not there—Mrs. Stanton said to Levens, "You struck my husband with a stick"—he denied it—I told her to send her husband to the North London Police Court for a summons for assault.

Cross-examined by MR. BIRON. There was a row with a betting man in the case—it was Levens who made the first charge; he arrived first at the station, and asked to see the inspector, and after that Mrs. Stanton came and said that he had struck her husband with a stick—we never act in cases of assault unless there are marks of violence, or police evidence, the usual course is to go before a Magistrate—I believe Levens attended the Court in the morning.

ALFRED CRUTCHETT (Detective Sergeant, J). On October 29th, I took Levens on a warrant for assault only; he made no reply—on the same night I took Reed on a warrant, which I read to him—he said, "When there are three or four on to one, and they are kicking, you must do something"—he had no injuries whatever on him—I had received a complaint from the prosecutor on Friday evening, October 25th—Mr. Young applied for a warrant; the Magistrate granted one for assault, and said that he would see what course he would take as to the demanding money.

Cross-examined by MR. BIRON. The original warrant was for assault only, the case came on the same morning, and I arrested Levens in Court—a sworn information was gone into, and I gave evidence of arrest; he was remanded, and the next day the case was gone into—Levens went

into the witness-box after the warrant was granted, and the Magistrate told him to take a seat at the back of the Court—if he was making an application he would be last.

— YOUNG. I am a solicitor—on the morning of October 29th, Mr. Stanton consulted me, and I prepared an information, setting forth the facts, including the assault, and that Levens had made this accusation; also a warrant for demanding money by menaces or by force—Mr. Fordham was the Magistrate, he granted a warrant for assault; the caption was altered afterwards.

Levens, in his defence, stated on oath, that on Tuesday after her return from hopping, his mother-in-law made a communication to him about his wife, and on the same day he saw Stanton, and said, "Jack, I have got a suspicion of you and my wife," upon which Stanton struck him on his chest and said, "There is nothing between me and her" and that money was not mentioned then, but the next day he said again, "I have still got a suspicion on you, Jack," and that Stanton said, "Is the affair a matter of money if it is so, you can have £10 or £20," and he, Levens, said, "I don't want your money, I will give you a b—y good hiding," but never asked him for a halfpenny; that on the next Saturday he went to Stanton's house with his wife and Heed; that there were some beastly words, and Stanton pushed his wife, and called her a lying bitch; and that Miss Jones was at the gate; that on the 20th he went again, and Stanton struck him on the forehead with his fist, and they struggled to the road, and he got kicked on his hip when he was on the ground, and Stanton punched the top of his head with his fist, and two men held him by the back of his neck, and his wife and Miss Jones picked him up, but he never saw Reed then at all, and that when he got into the witness box at the Police Court, to ask for a summons against Stanton he was told to stand down and was arrested, not having a solicitor then.

Reed, in his defence, stated on oath, that he was with Mr. and Mrs. Levens and stopped at the gate, while Levens went to the door and said to Stanton "I have come to face it out with you in front of your wife"—that Mrs. Levens made a charge against Stanton which he denied, and pushed her and called her a "b—y lying bitch," and Levens said "All right I will see you on Monday" and left, and that he had no idea that Levens was going to demand money from Stanton, and had not the smallest idea of assisting him in doing so; that they went again on the Monday with Mrs. Levens, and he afterwards saw Levens on the ground and three men on top of him, one of whom, Fitzpatrick, attacked him (Reed), and took from his (Reed's) pocket a stick which he carried for protection, but that he did not strike Stanton with it, and had no idea of demanding money from Stanton, and that Fitzpatrick kicked him.

Evidence for the Defence.

TERESA LEVENS . I am the prisoner's wife—Stanton was in the habit of visiting at our house—he was there in September when my husband was away—on October 25th I made a communication to my mother-in-law, and next day I was present when she spoke to my husband about it—Stanton called that day, and I heard my husband say, "You have had to do with my wife;" Stanton denied it—he came again the next day, and I was called down to the room where they were, but I did not

say, "It is all false, all he wants is money," referring to my husband—I have never said anything about making money out of these matters—he offered my husband £10 or £20 for my brother's papers—he did not say what it was for, he said, "Do you want any money?" my husband said, "No, Jack"—I did not say, "Come over here," when they were in the street—Reed is my brother-in-law; he carries a stick when he goes to Poplar—he works all day, and the only time he has to look after his dogs is at night—on the Saturday I went with my husband and Mary Jones and Mr. Reed to see Mr. Stanton; we did not go to demand money—my husband had spoken to me after Stanton denied it—he questioned me with a view of finding out whether the statement was true—it was his idea that I went with him, that he might find out on which side the truth lay—he said, "I have come to face this out," and made a statement to Stanton about what he suggested had taken place—Stanton denied it, and shoved me; my husband said, "Don't shove her, I will see you on Monday night—I went there on Monday the 28th; Mary Jones was there, and I remained with her opposite the house—Reed was with my husband—I heard a child cry, and went towards the house and saw Stanton on top of my husband—he said to me, "I will kill you," and put his fist in my face—my husband went to the station and made a complaint.

Cross-examined. I made a communication to my mother on October 21st—I have always been quite clear that it was the 21st—I am afraid I must have said, "I made no complaint till my mother came from the country the first week in October"—I told her then, and she told my husband the next day, Tuesday—it was the first week in October—I saw Mr. Stanton on the 23rd, I did not say, "It is money he wants"—my husband said that he would have it out before he went into Court—Reed was there on the 26th; my husband asked him to go—he had this stick with him; he usually carries it—he was there on the 28th on his way to Poplar—Poplar is in the opposite direction—my attention was attracted by a baby crying on the 28th, but Reed retched me afterwards—Reed comes home about 8.30, and then goes out on his dog fancying business—he lives with us—I do not know what time he came home—he goes out at 5 am.; not with the stick.

Re-examined. I am not good at dates—it was on October 22nd that my mother spoke to me, Tuesday.

MARY JONES . I live at 40, Victoria Road, Hackney Wick—I have known Levens and Reed all my life—I was with them on Saturday, October 26th, when they went to Mr. Stanton's house—I saw Levens and his wife talking to Stanton at the door—he never pushed Mrs. Stanton or called her a b——lying bitch—Levens said "Good-night, I will see you on Monday night"—I do not know whether that was said quite friendly—on the Monday I was walking out with Mr. Reed, and we went there with Mrs. Levens—I heard her scream, and saw Mr. Levens in the road—I heard Stanton say "I will kill you."

Cross-examined. I keep company with Reed—I was going to Poplar with him that night on dog business—it is rather a dangerous neighbourhood—I have never been attacked—on the 28th, when I went up I saw Stanton on top of Levens, just getting off him—he was not the only

man on him, I saw two; one was going away—I do not know whether he had been on him—Levens was on his face and hands and two on top of him, and when he got up he said "You coward, I will kill you."

The prisoners received good characters. GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy by the Jury. LEVENS— Nine months hard labour; REED— Six months' hard labour.

FOURTH COURT. December 19th, 1901.

Before Mr. Commissioner L. Smith, K.C.

85. WILLIAM BOYNTON PLEADED GUILTY to unlawfully obtaining £4 7s. 10d. from John Taylor, and another by false pretences and a cheque for £5 from Benjamin Albert Woodyard. (See Vol. 134, page 893).

86. DOUGLAS COLEMAN (otherwise ROSS , otherwise GILL ) (44), WILLIAM RUSSELL (40), and GEORGE KIMPTON (57) , Forging and uttering a cheque for £9 with intent to defraud.

MR. MUIR and MR. BOYD Prosecuted, and MR. EDMONDSON Defended

Kimpton.

WILLIAM BOYNTON . I am a portmanteau maker, and am acquainted with the leather trade—I am undergoing eighteen months imprisonment at Pentonville Prison—I pleaded guilty to uttering four cheques, one to Mr. Chance of Smith's Stores, Kew Bridge, for £8 10s.; one to Mr Davies, of St. Margaret's for £9; one to Mr. Holloway, of St. Margaret's, for £12 4s., and one to Mr. Sanders, butcher of St. Margaret's for £12.—I have known Russell about 12 months, Kimpton about 12 months, and Coleman from about the beginning of June this year, by the name of Dr. Ross—the four of us were frequently together from about the beginning of June—we usually met at the Hop Poles public house, Hammersmith—we met there on June 25th the day before I went to St. Margaret's and an arrangement was made that I should go and ask for Mrs. Gregory's accounts as she was going to pay them—I was to bring the accounts back to Russell, he told me where to go—on June 26th I met Coleman, Russell, and Kimpton—Ross and Kimpton waited behind at a public house—Russell pointed out three shops Davies', Holloway's and Sander's—I got the accounts and gave them to Russell who pinned cheques on them and told me to pay them—Ross and Kimpton were present—I got receipts and £23 odd change—I drove back to Richmond in a cab to the Cobwebs public house where we all four met—we went to another public house so that there should be no tracing the cab—as far as I know the money was divided equally, and we then parted—Russell tore up the receipts—the change was in gold and silver and one £5 Bank of England note—soon after we met at the Hop Poles and I went with a cheque to Mr.Woodyard's, a leather merchant—Russell and I went in with the cheque—Russell paid the cheque, received the change and I chose the leather—the change was divided in a public house close by, I got my share, but I do not remember the amount—I remember going to a Mr. Taylor with a cheque—Russell and I only were concerned with the cheque—Kimpton knows nothing about it—Russell changed the cheque and received the change and I chose the leather.—I remember going to Smith's Stores, at Kew Bridge—the first time I was sent by Russell alone, but they did not change the cheque—on the second day I

gave an order which was written out by Russell and received the change, Ross was not there, but Russell and Kimpton were—it was agreed that Ross should take Russell's share to him—I had my share; I do not know whether Kimpton had his—we all four frequently used the Ship public house at Hammersmith—there is a skittle alley there—I knew the Duke of Sussex, Hammersmith Broadway—I have been very seldom there, and I never used the house with the other three prisoners.

Cross-examined. This is my second term of imprisonment—I had a, month two years ago—I communicated with the authorities after I understood that Russell had made a statement—Kempton knew nothing of our visit to Mrs. Gregory's at St. Margaret's—I cannot swear that Kimpton had any of that money—I handed it to Russell, but I did not see him give any to Kimpton—with regard to Smith's Stores, I do not say that Kimpton or Ross knew what was going on—Russell called me on one side—I got about £5 17s.—I handed over to Ross, Russell's share—I got half.

Cross-examined by Coleman. Russell gave me the names of Mrs. Gregory's tradesmen—I never saw Ross take any of the proceeds of this cheque—Ross never gave me a cheque, and I have never seen him write or endorse one.

Re-examined. I was arrested on September 8th and tried at the October Sessions—I remember writing a letter to Sergeant West before being sent for trial—I made a statement to Detective Denny on September 20th, after I had sent the letter and signed it—Russell promised me something for cashing the cheque and paying the accounts, but did not say how much.

WILLIAM RUSSELL . I have pleaded guilty to the uttering charged in this indictment; also to a previous conviction—I have known Kimpton from 6 to 8 years—I knew him as a builder—I have known Boynton about 6 years when I was in business in Shepherd's Bush—in May last I began to know Ross personally as Coleman, and also as Captain Gill—I lent Mrs. Gregory £10 last June 12 months, for which she gave a promissory note for £15—A man named Henry told me Mrs. Gregory was about to move from 16, Netherton Road, St. Margaret's, and that she wanted to sell her home—I told Coleman, and he said he would buy it or could do with some of it—I took him to Henry's house at Twickenham, and Henry took him to Mrs. Gregory—Ross told me to introduce him as Captain Gill—Ross agreed to buy £10 worth of her furniture—he told me to go down to get my money as the things were going—Ross asked Mrs. Gregory about her tradespeople, and she mentioned the named of Davies, Halloway, Sanders and Lenick—nothing was said in my presence about pawn tickets—on June 25th, after that interview, we met at a public house in Hammersmith, I think it was the Ship, we generally met there or at the Hop Poles—Ross, Kimpton, and Boynton were present—it was arranged then that we should go to St. Margaret's and do it on Mrs. Gregory's tradespeople—Ross proposed how it was to be done—Kimpton said he had got some cheques—next day, I think it was, we went to the Cobweb at Richmond—it was arranged that Boynton should get off the bus at the Crown, and come on to the

King's Head Twickenham—Ross told him who the tradespeople were—it was arranged that we should wait at the King's Head for Boynton—Boynton handed the bills to Ross, who pinned the cheques to them, and made a note of the amounts on a piece of paper, and told him to meet at the Cobweb at Richmond—we all went there—Boynton came back in a cab, and the cabman came in with Boynton, which annoyed Ross—Ross said, "What the b—hell do you want to come n with the cabman for, you know they are coppers"—he said "come on out of this," and we all went to another public house, by the fire station there—Boynton handed him the total amount of the money—he reckoned how much it was each—Boynton said the cabman was 4s., and we all had £5 12s. or £5 13s. each—I remember the transaction with a cheque at Smith's Stores, Kew Bridge, and Kimpton bringing me half a sovereign—I knew they were going to do it on Smith; it was proposed the day before—I think Kimpton produced the cheque—it was arranged that if Kimpton and Ross found the cheques, Boynton and I were to go in with them—the first cheque I had anything to do with was with regard to Woodyard—I met Kimpton and Boynton at Hammersmith—they said they were going up to London, that they knew of a leather shop—Boynton was a trunk maker, and knew Woodyard's system—it was arranged that if I would fill a cheque in, Boynton would go in with it—that was the proposal at Hammersmith Station—I went with them, and when we got to the shop Coleman, Kimpton, and Boynton and myself went to the Museum public house—Boynton was going out without me; he said "You might as well come with me"—I said "No, I have filled the cheque in, and that is bad enough"—I asked whether the cheque was stolen—he said No, it was all right—Kimpton told me that—I said "It is quite bad enough to do the likes of this, but I will have nothing to do with things stolen"—this is the cheque (Produced)—it has "Frederick West" on the back—when we went into Woodyard's Boynton gave the order, and I said I was West—I do not know any person named West connected with this cheque system—we got a cheque for £5, and 8s. 6d. in cash from Mr. Woodyard—this is Mr. Woodyard's cheque—I was identified and picked out as the man who got the £5, by Mr. Frost of the public house opposite Woodyard's, when at the police court, but it was Boynton, and Boynton told the Magistrate so—Boynton handed the proceeds to the Doctor, and we had £1 8s. each—I had my share of the cheque we passed on Taylor, a leather merchant, at Norland Road, Notting Dale, for £8 10s.—Kimpton,' Ross, Boynton and myself were present at the arrangement we made to do it on Taylor—Boynton and I went into Taylor's—Boynton gave the name and the order for the goods, and I received the balance, which I handed to the Doctor at the Duke of Edinburgh or the Duke of Cambridge near Uxbridge Station—Ross divided it—we bought leather at the shop—I knew a man called Alf. Sutton through Dr. Ross—he was a buyer—I think he is now convicted of buying stolen property—the Doctor asked Boynton and me to get a chepue book in the City Road—Ross gave us the name of Alf. Sutton, some number in Lever Street, City Road—he told us it was a sweet stuff shop, and said we were to ask Alf. Sutton if he had a cheque book, and if he had we were to bring it away with us—if Sutton had not one we were to ask him to try to get one—we

could not get one—I told Ross, and he said it was a bad job, but he would find one—I left London about the middle of September to go to Bexhill to work at a laundry—a young woman named Louisa Price was with me—she had been in service with Mrs. Gregory 12 months before—she was introduced to Mrs. Gregory by a man named Cooper—at Bexhill, we were living in the name of Mr. and Mrs. Watson—I never got a letter from Kimpton containing a P.O.O.—he said he had written one, and that it had been returned to him—I think that was on account of one of the ironers where I was employed having a relative named Watson, who opened the letter, by all accounts—the cheque passed to Davies by Boynton at St. Margaret's, for £9 is not mine—the back of it is endorsed by Ross—Ross asked me for the promissory note, took it to the window and traced the name there—he said "Have you never seen signatures took, that is the b—way to take signatures?"—he traced it on a piece of paper and then on to the cheque through the window—they were all done at the same time in the same way—the first was Davies, the second was Holloway, the next Sanders—the names on the cheques are all fictitious—the cheque for £8 10s. payable to F. West and endorsed "F. West" is in my writing, including, the signature—I wrote the Smith Stores cheque—Kimpton gave me 10s. out of that, but afterwards I saw from the papers that they got £5 17s.—Woodyard's cheque £9 10s. is not in my writing, but it is my endorsement—Kimpton brought it ready filled in—the cheque for £8 10s. passed on Taylor is not my writing, except at the back—that was filled up ready—they both came from Kimpton.

Cross-examined by MR. EDMUNDSON. I regret ever having anything to do with this case—I am simply speaking the truth—I have suffered four months for assault and nine months for stealing, but never for fraud or forgery—I have made a statement to the police since I have been a prisoner—I saw Boss take the promissory note, place it against the window and trace the signature—I cannot say which of the three signatures, "M. L. Gregory," "M. L. Gregory," or "Maggie L. Gregory" was the tracing—I got the cheques from Kimpton when we went to Richmond—I have known Kimpton and Boynton six years—if Boynton says I have only known him twelve months he is mistaken—when I visited the Twickenham tradesmen, Boss and Kimpton went with me, and Boynton came on to us—I am married—I took a young woman with me to the sea-side—she is in trouble now—I have left my wife for good—Boynton had his instructions from Boss to ascertain from the Twickenham tradesmen what Mrs. Gregory owed them—Ross divided the money—I asked Kimpton to sell some pawn tickets for me.

Cross-examined by Coleman. I saw Boss trace the cheques from the promissory note—one he wrote on the table—I did not make a statement at Bow Street that I wrote the body of the cheques.

Re-examined. I wrote a letter from Holloway Gaol to Inspector Denny—Woodyard's cheque for £9 10s. is not mine, Kimpton brought it ready filled in—I think the man at the Hop Poles filled it in.

Kimpton here PLEADED GUILTY .

MAGGIE LOUISA PEARSON . I am single—I lived for sixteen years with a Mr. Gregory and I am known as Mrs. Gregory—In 1900 and 1901 I was living at 16, Netherton Road, St. Margaret's—In April, 1901, Mr. Gregory died—I had some furniture in my house at that

time—In June, 1900, I borrowed £10 from Russell on a promissory note for £15, which I was paying off by instalments—by June, 1901, I had paid it all off except £2 15s.—a young woman named Louisa Coleman was in my service—she was introduced as Russell's cousin—she was with me about six weeks; she knew the people I was dealing with—I was leaving my house on June 29th—I had a visit from Mr. Henry about paying Russell's debt, and I asked him to find a purchaser for some of my furniture—after that I had a visit from the prisoner Ross—he proposed to buy some of it and, pay for it by cheque—I had, I think, three visits from Ross—he mentioned Russell's name the second or third time he called—he advised me to see Russell about Russell's debt—at that time I had been served with a summons for £9—Ross said that I should not find Russell hard—I saw Russell the same day—Captain Gill, that is Ross, was present part of the time—I agreed to pay Russell £1 a month—I do not know what was done about the summons—Russell said he would not appear—nothing was said by Gill about the tradesmen—Russell asked me about them—Gill offered to buy my pawn tickets, but I did not accept his offer—they were in my trunk—when Russell was talking about the tradespeople to whom I owed money he said "Do the lot"—I cannot remember whether Gill was there or not—I did not give anybody instructions what to do with the furniture, I thought it was going to be warehoused—Little, from Richmond, was going to take it away—Russell asked me if I had any one to move it, and I said "No," and left the matter to him—part of it was taken away, and I never saw it again—I heard afterwards that judgment had been given against me in the County Court, but I had no notice of that or of the sale—I went once to Arragon Road, where I supposed the furniture was moved to, but it was gone—I never lived there—I had no notice of the assignment of my debt to Russell being made to Ross—I know nothing about the three cheques produced—they are not my endorsements.

Cross-examined by Coleman. I never saw Ross before he offered to purchase my furniture—very likely he offered me £60 for it—it was more than £10—I considered the offer a fair one, and eventually got it from a local tradesman—I sold part for £60—the portion of the furniture Russell had I never saw again—I do not know that Ross had any opportunity of knowing who my tradesmen were, because they did not know him—the signatures on the cheques are not like mine or like the signature I put on the promissory note—I usually sign my name "Maggie"—I do not suggest that Ross had any portion of the furniture that Russell removed, or that he had anything to do with the moving of it—the pawn tickets I wished to sell were for a suite of furniture, a piano, and some jewellery—I do not know that the contract note was found upon Russell when he was apprehended.

EVAN DAVIES . I am a draper of 1, Broadbury Street, St. Margaret's, Twickenham—on June 26th, about 11 o'clock, Boynton brought an account of Mrs. Gregory's, of 16, Netherton Road—he said he would be back between 2 and 3 o'clock to pay it in full—he came back on the same day, and paid a cheque for £9, drawn by H. West, endorsed "Maggie L. Gregory"—the account came to £2 6s. 3d., and I gave him the change, £6 13s. 8d.—I paid the cheque into my account, and it was

returned because it was not properly endorsed—I subsequently took it to Mrs. Gregory, then to Putney, where the bank refused to pay.

Cross-examined by Coleman. I had never seen you before.

KATHLEEN WIFE . I am book-keeper to Mr. Sanders, a butcher of 26, Crown Road, St. Margaret's—Mrs. Gregory was a customer—on June 26th Boynton came for her account—I gave it to him—in the afternoon of the same day he gave me a cheque for £14, payable to Mrs. M. L. Gregory, drawn by J. Stone, and endorsed "M. L. Gregory," which I recognise—I gave him £7 5s. 9d. change—the cheque was subsequently paid into Mr. Sanders' account and returned marked "No account"

Cross-examined by Coleman. I never saw you before seeing you at Bow Street Police Court.

GEORGE JOHN HOLLOWAY . I am a butcher of 7, Crown Parade, Richmond Road, Twickenham—Mrs. Gregory was a customer of mine—on June 26th a man called for her account—it was given to him—he came back later in the day, and presented a cheque for £12 4s. in payment]—I gave him £9 18s. 5d. change—it is drawn to the order of M. L. Gregory, endorsed "M. L. Gregory," and is drawn by D. North—I took it to Twickenham Police Station—a neighbour obliged me by cashing it, but it was dishonoured.

BENJAMIN ALFRED WOOD YARD, Senior. I live at 206, Shaftesbury Avenue, and am a leather-seller—on July 4th two men called to select some leather—Boynton is one of them—I showed him some leather, and he selected some, and told me to send it to a place in Goswell Road—the amount of the goods was about £4 1s. 6d., and he gave me a cheque for £9 10s. drawn by G. Bell to the order of F. West, endorsed "Frederick West," on the Putney Branch of the London and County Bank—I handed him 8s. 6d. cash and a cheque for £5 upon the Birkbeck Bank, which I signed B. A Woodyard, instead of J. A. Woodyard, which is my usual signature, because I was suspicious that their cheque was not a good one—I sent my son to the London and County Bank and had a report from them, and on account of enquiries at Goswell Road I did not send the goods—I passed the cheque to somebody else, was summoned for the amount in the County Court, and had to pay.

Cross-examined by Coleman. I never saw you before seeing you at Bow Street Police Court.

PERCY ALFRED FROST . I am the proprietor of the Oporto Stores, Endell Street—on July 4th some one came into my house and handed me a cheque for £5—I believe Russell is the man—he asked me to change it for W. Woodyard as there was not time to get to the Bank—it was about 3 minutes to 4—I said that Woodyard was no customer of mine, but as a neighbour I would oblige him—ultimately the cheque was dishonoured, but I obtained the amount of it through the County Court.

Cross-examined by Coleman. I have never seen you before.

GEORGK SILCOCK . I am assistant to my father, the licensee of the Star and Garter public house, Putney—on June 5th I was in the bar counting the bronze money—there were three men in the bar, but I do not recognise the prisoners—after counting 15s. worth I put it with a cheque book and some papers in a brown leather bag under the counter in the saloon bar—the cheque book was my father's on the London and

County Bank, Putney Branch—I left the bar, and when I returned the three men were gone—some time afterwards my father came home and the bag was gone—it could be got by anyone leaning over the counter.

Cross-examined by Coleman. I have never seen you in the house, and I have no reason to suggest that you stole that book.

ALBERT JOHN BUCK . I am cashier at the London and County Bank, Putney Branch—the cheques £9, £12 4s., £12, and £9 10s. came from Mr. Silcock's book, which was issued on the 30th April last—we have no accounts in the names of the drawers of the cheques.

EDWARD CHANCE . I am clerk to A. Smith & Co., who have stores at Kew Bridge—on July 22nd, a man ordered goods value £2 12s. 11d., and next day Boynton presented a cheque for £8 10s., drawn by James Clark to the order of F. West, and endorsed "F. West."—he gave me a card, on which was "Frederick West & Co., Contractors and Furniture Removers, 316, New Cross Road, S.E.,"—I called there to verify it, and not finding any firm of that name, we did not send the goods—I presented the cheque at the bank, where they said it was useless.

Cross-examined by Coleman. I never saw you before seeing you at Bow Street Police Station.

FREDERICK FARRELL . I assist John Taylor, a leather merchant of 14, Norland Road, Nottingdale—on July 11th two men came in—Boynton was one, and I believe Kimpton was the other, but I am not sure—Boynton asked for some leather and other things, value £4 2s. 2d.—he said he had opened a shop in the Hackney Road—he tendered a cheque for £8 10s., on the London and South Western Bank, drawn by W. Wilson to the order of J. Thompson, endorsed "J. Thompson"—the goods were sent the next day, but as the boy could not find the address, they were brought back.

Cross-examined by Coleman. I have never seen you before,—I do not suggest that you were one of the people who came in with the cheque.

GUY STRUTTON —I am cashier to Mr. Taylor of Norland Street—on July 11th, I received a cheque for £8 10s. 6d. on account of £4 2s. 3d., and gave £4 7s. 10d. in change.

FREDERICK LANGFORD . I am keeper of the Kensington Park Hotel, Ladbrook Grove—on October 4th, 1900, when writing out cheques in my dining room, two cheque books were stolen—the cheque for £8 10s. in Smith's Stores case, and for £8 10s. in Taylor's case are both from one of the stolen books—I was called into the bar for a few minutes, and while I was gone somebody slipped into the room and took the books—I did not see them—I gave notice to the bank—I have seen Kimpton, Russell and Ross in my bar as casual customers.

Cross-examined by Coleman. My dining room is on the first floor over the bar—customers could go upstairs into the billiard room, which is opposite the dining room—the door of the dining room is usually kept locked, but it was not on this occasion—I think I was called down on some trivial matter by Kimpton.

CHARLES CRANFORTH . I am a clerk at the Notting Hill Branch of the London and South Western Bank—Mr. Langford is a customer there—the two cheques produced were issued to him in a book of 50 cheques—we have had a lot of others presented and dishonoured.

ALFRED BINGLOW . I manage the Ship Public House, Bridge Street, Hammersmith, on behalf of my brother, who is the licensee—I have been in the house since April, Russell, Kimpton and Boynton frequented the house, coming together—They addressed Coleman as "Dr."

— BROWN (Police Sergeant M). I am stationed at Notting Dale—I know Russell, Coleman, Kimpton, and Boynton—I have seen them frequently together at Shepherd's Bush and Hammersmith—I saw them in the Duke of Sussex, Hammersmith Broadway, on June 17th this year.

WILIAM BISHOP . I am the bailiff attached to Brentford County Court—I have a default summons issued from that Court on June 19th, by William Russell, laundryman at Twickenham, against Maggie L. Gregory for £9 4s. and 12s. costs, £9 16s—I know Russell—I have an affidavit sworn by him on July 1st, that on June 21st he duly served Maggie Gregory with the summons annexed—I have also a warrant of execution of the same date, which I executed, and the goods were sold—notice was given to Mrs. Gregory—I got notice of an assignment, dated July 5th, between William Russell and W. George Coleman, assigning the debt of £11 2s. due from Mrs. Gregory.

THOMAS HENRY GURRIN . I am an expert in writing, of many years' experience. I have been supplied with a letter written by D. Coleman, dated December 5th, 1901, three cheques called the St. Margaret's cheques, and two cheques, one with "F. West" upon it, admittedly written by Russell. To the best of my belief the three pink cheques are in one writing, back and front—I see nothing sufficient to show that the letter is in the same writing—it is in a fluent hand.

Cross-examined by Coleman. In one sense all the endorsements are alike; they are to my belief written by the same hand but they are not the same three signatures—one is "Maggie" and two others "M. L,"—it is impossible that those three endorsements were traced from one document—all the three signatures are very laboured and show shakiness—they are not in any one's natural hand—I do not see any indication that they were traced—If they were traced from one signature I should expect to find them identical—the capital "M's" are not all alike.

JOHN PALFREY (Police Sergeant). A letter which was sent to Mr. Marsham, the committing magistrate, was sent to me, and submitted to Mr. Gurrin—that letter is undoubtedly in Coleman'a writing, which I have seen.

WILLIAM GOFF (Detective Sergeant). I arrested Ross and charged him with forging and uttering the St Margaret's cheques—he made no reply.

Cross-examined by Coleman. I arrested you on that charge on the statements made by two of the prisoners—other enquiries had been made—we had good reason to charge you.

GUILTY .—COLEMAN and RUSSELL then both PLEADED GUILTY to former convictions of felony—BOYNTON also PLEADED GUILTY to uttering a cheque for £7 10s., also to obtaining £2 8s. and £3 3s. by false pretences.— Four years' penal servitude— Sixteen months' hard labour; RUSSELL and KIMPTON— Eighteen months' hard labour.

THIRD COURT.—Wednesday, Thursday & Friday, December 18th, 19th & 20th, and

NEW COURT.—Saturday, December 21st, 1901.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

87. MARY ELLEN DYTER (22) , Unlawfully endeavouring to conceal the birth of her child.

MR. DUCKWORTH Prosecuted, and MR. MORRIS Defended.

NOT GUILTY .

88. CONRAD BLASCHKE (22) and MATTHIAS HAUTEN (18), OTTO BRAUM (25), SAUL MULLER (20), FRANZ PETERS (19), WILLIAM WALD (26), CHARLES YATES (29), AUGUST SALVESKIE (25), WAX REBORK (27), LUDWIG WEINER (50), WILLIE WEINER (22), ADOLPH WEINER (18), and BERTHA WEINER (51) , Burglary in the dwelling-house of Athelstan Dangerfield, and stealing a cruet stand, two table cloths and other articles, his property. MULLERand PETERS PLEADED GUILTY .

MESSRS. CHAS. MATHEWS, ARTHUR GILL, CAMPBELL and JENKINS

Prosecuted.

MR. WATT appeared for LUDWIG and WILLIE WEINER; MR. DOHERTY and MR. ARNOLD for ADOLPH WEINER; MR. HOPKINS for BERTHA WEINER; MR. MORRIS for the other prisoners.

The evidence was interpreted to the prisoners.

MARY LEMMER . I am cook to Mr. Dangerfield of 234, Willesden Lane—I locked the house up about 10.10 p.m. on October 29th—the next morning I went down at 6.45 and found the kitchen ransacked and all the doors opon—a man was sitting there, who ran out as I entered—on the table in the morning room was a saw and some wax matches—the inside front hall door had been forced open, I think with a sardine tin opener—the scullery window was open—there were marks as if it had been forced—judging by the appearance of the rooms it must have taken.two or three hours to do what was done—these two table cloths were kept in the kitchen drawer—they are like those lost.

ATHELSTAN DANOERFIELD . I live at 234, Willesden Lane—I am an accountant—a little before 7 a.m. my cook spoke to me—I went down stairs, and found the house had been broken open and a number of things taken—some are here—I can identify a pair of cycling stockings, three pairs of socks, a black felt hat, a dagger in case, two pairs of scissors in a case, a waistcoat, an umbrella, 8 odd socks, a coat, a cruet stand, one dozen large and small knives, two overcoats and a sugar basin, a milk jug, a pair of sugar tongs and a tobacco box, all silver—the value of the things taken is about £100—the goods recovered are worth £60 or £70—no damage was done in the morning room, but things were taken from it and from the dining and drawing rooms—the thieves had got in by the scullery window—a side door was open—it must have taken them hours to do all this—the wine cellar had been broken open, and the secretaire attempted to be forced—the hinges were loosened and some nails partly drawn out.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. I can identify all the articles produced except the two table cloths—one door had been opened from the inside—the outside door appeared to have been opened by a jemmy, not by a sardine opener.

Cross-examined by MR. WATT.My father had this cruet as long as I can remember—the knives are ordinary table knives like those I had—the sugar basin and milk jug are part of a set recently purchased—I saw them at Leman Street Police Station about two weeks after I missed them.

Cross-examined by MR. DOHERTY. This tobacco box is mine—I know it as I know my own watch.

JACOB GREENBERG . I keep the house 13, Ship Alley—Bertha Weiner has lived there since four months ago—she had two rooms on the ground floor at 8s. a week.

Cross-examined by MR. HOPKINS. She paid her rent regularly every Monday—I never saw anything wrong with her.

MARKS GOLDBERG . I am a tailor, of 106, Cannon Street Road—I am the landlord of 5, Albert Street, Shadwell—when I bought the property, three years ago next March, Bertha Weiner was on the premises—she remained my tenant of the house of four rooms and a kitchen at 17s. a week—the rent was 15s. and I put it up to 17s.—she remained my tenant till she was arrested.

Cross-examined by MR. HOPKINS. I received the rents from my collector—I have never heard of her being charged before.

FREDERICK WHENSLEY (Detective H). In consequence of information I had received about three months prior to October 31st, I went on that morning shortly before six o'clock with Divall and Stevens to 5, Albert Street—having gained access, I went into the front room of the ground floor—I found Blaschke, Hauten and Peters in bed—I said to them "We are police officers, and we are going to arrest you on suspicion of being concerned with others in committing burglaries in and around London during the past three months"—neither of them made any reply—I then went into the back room on the same floor where I found Wald in bed with a woman—I told him the same as I had told the other three—he made no reply—I then went to the first floor front room, where I found Yates in bed with a woman—I repeated the charge to him—he made no reply—I then went into the top back room, and I there found in bed Braum, Salveskie and Muller—I repeated the charge to them—I left them in charge of other officers, and they were all subsequently taken to Leman Street Police Station—I then went with Divall to 13, Ship Alley, St. George's-in-the-East, which is about a mile from Albert Street—having obtained access, I went into the front room on the ground floor where I found Rebork and Bertha Weiner in bed—I repeated the charge to Rebork—he made no reply—I told Bertha Weiner that she would be arrested on suspicion of having received the property from these men knowing it to have been stolen—she replied "You have got to prove that I knew it was stolen"—they were taken to Leman Street Police Station—on arriving there Yates said to me "I never stole the things, it is not my game, if you had come yesterday you would have found a lot of stuff: hey were frightened at seeing you about there, and took a lot of it away:

they asked me to pawn a suit of clothes for them, which I did, one of the officers found the ticket on me, the worst of it is I told the pawnbroker that they belonged to me; all the men you have got here went out together about nine o'clock in the night last Monday week; they came home early on Tuesday morning, and brought the clothes and some silver and nickel plated stuff with them; they told me that they broke into a house somewhere off the Edgeware Road"—about 12.30 p.m. the same day I went to 51, Tredegar Square, Bow, about a mile and a half off—I saw Ludwig, Adolph, and Willie Weiner detained by other officers—I said to them "You will be charged with being concerned with Bertha Weiner in receiving the proceeds of burglaries and housebreaking during the past three months"—neither made reply—I took Willie to Leman Street Police Station—on the way he said to me "About three months ago Mrs. Weiner, who lives at 13, Ship Alley, and is my aunt, sent me down some plated stuff which she said she bad got from her lodgers at No. 5, Albert Street; I bought the articles, and she afterwards introduced me to the men, and I have had several deals with them; when they got anything they used to send for me, and I used to go to No. 5, Albert Street and buy it; my aunt was always there, and I thought it was all right; a lot of the plated and silver stuff had initials on, and it was unsaleable, so I had to get the initials taken out; you will find two forks, two jam spoons, two salt spoons, and a large spoon at Mr. Swifts, a jeweller in Percival Street, Clerkenwell Road; I have had the initials taken out and replated"—on my arrival at the station, all the prisoners being present except Ludwig and Adolph, Willie said, pointing to Muller, Yates and Blaschke "These are three of the men I bought the stuff from"—nine of the prisoners were then charged with breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mr. Dangerfield, 234, Willesden Lane, and stealing property to the value of £100, and the four Weiners were charged with receiving that property well knowing it to be stolen—neither made reply.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. I spoke in English—the prisoners speak it imperfectly, but I am satisfied they understood me—the Magistrate asked them if they spoke English, and they said "No," and they wrote their names in English for me on a paper, which I have torn up—Yates is English—I did not tell Yates if he would give me information "about those fellows" I would let him off—that is absurd, as I had no authority to do so—his statement was purely voluntary—I asked him no question—I took my note immediately afterwards—the statement was made about 9.30—I never left the station during the statement. I had seen Braum in and out of 5, Albert Street, about three months before his arrest, since about last July—he may have gone to Antwerp and back in the mean while—I also saw him in and out of 13, Ship Alley several times in those months—I had seen Blaschke in and out of 5, Albert Street about two months before his arrest—I have learnt that he lived for about three weeks prior to his arrest at 4, North East Passage, a common lodging house—I have also seen him at Ship Alley, and with the nine men charged with burglary—all with the exception of the Weiners—I know Rebork has been twice to sea—he was discharged from his ship on December

4th—I have his discharges—I know the German Club at 254, Princes Square—I know Rebork belonged to a Bicycle Club in October—he was at sea from March 6th to September 4th—since then I have seen him in Ship Alley with Mrs. Weiner, and with the other prisoners at Albert Street—I kept observation on 5, Albert Street about three months on and off prior to the prisoners' arrest—and women were frequently in that house—one Dumon I knew as Friedel, and the other as Newmann—I did not know Dumon as Max—I do not know whether they lived there.

Cross-examined by MR. WATT. Willie made his statement in the cab on the way to the station—he was talking practically the whole of the way—I made my note at the station—I asked him no question—I have only written the substance of what he said—in consequence of what Willie said someone went to Swifts', and got the articles he referred to.

Cross-examined by MR. DOHERTY. Adolph and the other two Weiners were detained in the front room at 51, Tredegar Square when I went there.

Cross-examined by MR. HOPKINS. A girl opened the outer door at 13, Ship Alley—I put my shoulder against an inner door and in it went—there I found Weiner and Rebork—no one opened the door and shut it before the girl let me in, they would not have had the opportunity—there were several beds in the house.

SUSANNAH DANGERFIELD (Re-examined). One of these is a table cloth the other is a serviette—they are mine.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. I say they are mine because they are mine—they are not English, they are French—the pattern may be common in France but not in England, and serviettes are only made large like that in France—the serviette is marked with a sort of "D"—the table cloth is not marked—the "D" is not a laundry mark, but my own mark—I have different initials on my linen—there may be an "F," which is for a family name.

CHARLIE SMITH (Detective H). On October 31st about 9.30 a.m. I went with Sergeant Allam to 51, Tredegar Square—a van was outside being loaded with furniture—I said to Ludwig, Adolph, and Willie Weiner who were in the passage together "We are police officers, and have reason to believe you have stolen property in your possession, the proceeds of burglaries"—Ludwig said, "I have got nothing, only what is my own"—Willie said "I do not know what you mean"—Adolph said "You have made a mistake"—they all spoke in English—I said we should search the place—I took a hamper out of the van—Adolph said that was his—I took possession of another hamper and a large box in the front room—Willie said "They belong to me"—I took possession of this leather bag which was in the passage—Ludwig said "That bag is mine"—in the first hamper I found this tobacco-jar, which Mr. Dangerfield has identified—in the second hamper I found the cruet stand and 6 large and 6 small knives, which are here—in the big box I found these two overcoats—in the bag were the sugar basin, milk jug and sugar-tongs and puff box produced—the things were put separate as they came from each hamper or box—we labelled them afterwards—I said "How do you account for the possession of all this property?"—Adolph said "I bought the things from my brother Willie "—Willie said "I bought them from some man who came to the door, I forget how much I gave for them"—I asked if he took a

receipt—he said "No, I forgot to ask for one"—Ludwig said "They are my wedding presents, and were given me on my wedding about twelve months ago"—we kept the prisoners in one room—Inspector Divall arrived, and they were taken into custody—I found this mug and the serviette ring in Adolph Weiner's basket, and the tea pot, sugar basin, and milk jug in Adolph's, and in the bag owned by Ludwig the six fish knives and forks, the fish slice and fork, and the salad spoon and fork—Mr. Durrell has identified them—in Willie Weiner's box in the front room I found the trowel and cup produced—I found this kettle and stand, and tea pot, and the 6 fish knives and forks in the basket belonging to Adolph Weiner and the basin and fruit dish, and the fish slice and fork, in case, in Ludwig's bag.

Cross-examined by MR. WATT. The Inspector came about 12.30, and later on Whensley and Gill came—we took possession of other property than what is here—the prisoners were moving things out of the house, and the things were in confusion—Willie did not say that he had bought the things from a German lady, nor that he got some from Round, of Sheffield—I took rough notes in this book, and afterwards copied them in this other book the next day—Willie did not give me a list of things and where he bought them—we ascertained that the van was going to 194, Westborne Grove—I did not know that till at the Police Court it was mentioned that he had paid a quarter's rent—some of the things are the subject of other charges, and others are not identified—I am sure this is Ludwig's bag—I never saw another inside it—there were other things in the bag—this trowel was a little more doubled up when I found it—I opened it at the time to see what was inside it—I saw the writing on it afterwards—the hampers were tied down.

Cross-examined by MR. ARNOLD. Adolph said the hamper was his property—I did not see a smaller box—other things were in it.

Cross-examined by MR. DOHERTY. I swear that Adolph claimed all the property in the hamper—it was opened in his presence—I took some brass rings from the hamper—he did not mention them in particular, but said of the hamper, "That is my property"—he did not refer to one thing more than the other—I have heard that some officer went to Liverpool Street cloakroom and took possession of some of Adolph's property.

ALFRED GOULD (Sergeant H). On October 31st I went with Sergeant Thornhill to 5, Albert Street about 6 a.m.—in the front room I found 8 odd socks and an umbrella, and in the back room I found a coat claimed by Mr. Dangerfield—in a cupboard in the front room I found this cold chisel in this coat, and on a shelf in the back room these four small spoons—the coat and spoons are owned by Mr. Durrell—Wald occupied the room—these rooms are on the ground floors I found these two dessert spoons in the front room on the ground floor, and over a shelf in the back room this seal and this Magistrate's badge, also this photograph of Wald wearing the badge.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. I know a German lodging-house in Leman Street—Wald did not say anything about it.

THOMAS DIVALL (Police Inspector H). I have had charge of this case—on October 31st I went with other officers to 13, Ship Alley—Wbensley

was with me—I knocked at the door, which was answered by a girl—we pushed open an inner door leading to a front room where Rebork and Mrs. Weiner were in bed—I said, "We are police officers," and to Mrs. Weiner, "Do you rent No. 5, Albert Street, Shadwell?"—she said, "Yes"—I said, "I have caused eight men to be arrested there for committing burglaries in London"—she said, "They have brought a lot of things to me, I do not know where they did get them"—I directed Rebork to get up—shortly afterwards she said, "I do not know nothing"—I assisted in taking her to the police station—subsequently I went with Inspector Stevens to 51, Tredegar Square, Bow, where I saw the three male Weiners in charge of two police officers, and a large quantity of plate in the front room—I gave instructions to other officers, and took Adolph Weiner into custody—on the way to the station in the cab he said, "I did not steal it, I bought it and went with my brother to sell it"—I produce a list which I made of the names, addresses, and occupations of the prisoners—I examined Mr. Dangerfield's house, and found an entry had been effected by climbing a wall about 8 feet high from some waste land, there were marks on the wall, and an oak fence about 7 feet high, and through the scullery window which had been shut but not fastened, and crossing the kitchen to the door which leads into the front part of the kitchen, pulling away the beading on the kitchen door-post—the lock had been forced, and an indentation made in the brickwork nearly two inches deep—this chisel fitted into it exactly—this inside door led into the front of the house—considerable violence must have been used.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. There were no marks outside the scullery window—the marks on the inner doorpost and the wall could not have been done by a sardine opener.

Cross-examined by MR. ARNOLD. I made notes in my diary immediately on my arrival at the station—I did not ask Adolph any questions. Cross-examined by Mr. Hopkins. This is the book I took my notes in—Bertha said she would not dress while I was there, and I said I was not going to leave the house—she did dress—I was in the house nearly an hour—she said "I know nothing," as if she meant "You won't get anything out of me."

JOHN GILL (Police Sergeant, H). On October 31st I went to 5, Albert Street with other officers about 6 a.m.—in the top back room I found Muller and two others in bed—Muller dressed there, and at the station he had on these bicycle stockings of Mr. Dangerfield's—later on, I went to 13, Ship Alley—I searched the front room on the ground floor—it was used as a bedroom—it had a bed in it—I found these two tablecloths, which were identified by Mr. Dangerfield—I found a purse containing sixteen pawn-tickets in the front room, where Rebork and Bertha Weiner were found—Bertha said, "Some of those tickets belong to me, and some to my lodgers at 5, Albert Street,"—among them was this ticket for an overcoat, jacket and vest, pawned at Dicker's by John Yates on October 24th—at Dicker's I found these things which belonged to Mr. Durrell—in the same room at Ship Alley I found the sugar sifter on the mantel shelf, also belonging to Mr. Durrell—Rebork said, "That is mine, I bought it with a lot of other things from Mrs. Weiner's lodgers in Albert Street,"—the pawn-ticket relating to

Mr. Durrell's property also related to Mr. Maddock's overcoat—this hat was identified by Maddocks while Blaschke was wearing it at the Police Court on the second occasion—I found this pipe at 13, Ship Alley in the front room, used as a bedroom, on the mantel shelf—Bertha Weiner and Max Rebork were present—Rebork said, "That is mine,"—I also found this music box—these marine glasses were on a small table in a corner of the front room, ground floor, at 13, Ship Alley—Rebork and Bertha Weiner were present—Bertha Weiner said, "That is mine, I have had it for years,"—Rebork said of the marine glasses, "That is my property, I am a seaman."

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. I have seen Rebork about at different times in company with the other prisoners, except the Weiner's, during three months—I know the German Club at 54, Princes Square—the pawn-ticket for the overcoat, jacket, and vest, was not found on Yates, but in the room where I found Rebork and Bertha Weiner—Mr. Durrell was taken to Dicker's by another officer—Rebork spoke in broken English—this is my note of it, which I made probably an hour afterwards at the station—he was talking in German to Bertha Weiner, part of the time he was speaking to me—Yates is mistaken if he informed Whensley that Mr. Maddocks' hat was found on him.

Cross-examined by MR. HOPKINS. Bertha Weiner did not say any of the tickets did not belong to her—I had seen Hauten in company with the other eight prisoners frequently—all the people I found in Albert Street I have seen in and out there frequently for about six weeks before the arrest.

JOHN ALLAM (Police Sergeant, S). On October 31st I searched Salveskie at the police station—he was wearing this pair of dark socks—in his trouser's pocket I found this leather cigar case—they are Mr Dangerfield's.

THOMAS ROSE (Detective, H). In the front room at 5, Albert Street, I found, on October 31, Yates in bed with a woman—in the corner I found this basket which has been identified by Mr. Dangerfield—In the back room I found Muller, Salveskie, and Braum in bed—they got up and dressed—Braum was putting on a pair of socks—I made him take them off, and they have been identified by Mr. Dangerfield—on a shelf in the left hand corner I found this black hard felt hat, the dagger in a case, and a pair of scissors in a case—they are here and have been identified—I found these two silver spoons in the front room on the first floor, and in the back room these coins in another box and this black felt hat [Mr. Durrell's]—the back room was occupied by Braum, Salveskie and Muller; in it I found this tea-cloth, and this cream-jug—in the front room, top floor, I found this champagne bottle as it is, with the cork in it.

ROLAND THORNELL (Police Sergeant, H). On October 31, I went to 5, Albert Street—in the front parlour I found Peters, Blaschke and Hauten—Peters was putting on a pair of these socks when I noticed some marks on them, and told him to take them off—one had on it the letter "A" the other the letter "D"—the initials were partly obliterated—they have been identified by Mr. Dangerfield as his property.

FREDERICK STEVENS (Detective, H). I received Blaschke in custody on October 31st—on the way to the station he said "Me no thief; they

are all thieves: I have only been with them three months; I only went with them twice, once to Willesden, and once to Wanstead; I did not get into the house, I only carried the stuff."

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. I made my note of what Blaschke said immediately I got to the station—he made the statement in broken English—"stuff" was the word he used—he broke out in German, and called to the other prisoners in German, as we were going to the station, one man to each prisoner—there were eight of them in the house—the hat he was wearing has since been identified by a gentleman from Willesden or Wanstead.

HENRY DURRELL . I am a timber merchant of Barking Side, Essex—the river Roding divides it from Wanstead—on October 21st I went to bed at 10.30 p.m.—the house was all secure—on 22nd I came down before 6—I found the lower part of the house in confusion—things were strewed about and scattered—some were gone—umbrellas were broken and their tops taken—the conservatory door had been forced open, and a pane taken out of the French casement door—a pane of glass 20 inches square was gone, and pieces were inside the room—the morning, dining, drawing-rooms and kitchen were entered—I missed property worth £150—among the articles were these produced: a morning coat, 4 small spoons, 2 other spoons, a paper knife, and a quantity of coins, a hat, a waistcoat, a sugar sifter, a tea-pot, a sugar basin, a milk-jug, 6 fish-knives and forks, a fish slice and fork, a salad spoon and fork, and silver mug, 8 serviette or napkin rings, a butter knife, 2 jam spoons and a salt spoon, a gravy spoon, 3 pickle forks, 12 desert spoons, 9 tea-spoons, 4 table-spoons, 8 small forks, 3 large forks, a pair of sugar tongs, a brass photograph frame and this jacket and coat from the pawnbrokers—they are all mine—this mug has the inscription partly erased—it was given to my daughter by her grandfather—they are all silver except the teapot, milk-jug and sugar basin—the inscription on the serviette rings is still there.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. I said before the Magistrate that I identified the waistcoat and that it was worn by Wald—I said it was Braum, but I did not know the name—I meant the same man—that man [Wald]—I did not say on a third occasion that another man was wearing it.

Cross-examined by MR. WATT. The teapot, sugar-basin, and milk-jug are nickel, I know the teapot by the pattern—I lost the articles produced—I believe they are mine—some of the silver articles were presented to me—I have had them about 18 years—I have not seen another pattern like them, with the fern leaf inside—a "D" has been rubbed off—there are scratches where it was—they were made to my order.

Re-examined. The maker's name, "John Round, Sheffield," is on all the silver, or "J. R."—I have the invoice of this set, and I believe there are 37 pieces out of 73—the thieves left a fork and spoon behind which I have handed to the police—they show the "D" on them—I bought the whole tea service from one man at the same time, from George Frederick Smith, of Ely Place—we used them every day—on some the "D" has been scratched off by a novice, on others it has been professionally done.

BENJAMIN LEESON (Detective, H). On October 31st I took charge of Wald—on the way to the station he said "I would not get into people's houses, only they told me I would make lots of money like them"—he was then wearing the waistcoat, afterwards identified by Mr. Durrell as his.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. I afterwards, at the station, entered Wald's statement down in my book—it was made in broken English—he used the expression, "lots of money like them"—he referred to the prisoners from Albert Street—he made the statement voluntarily—he is mistaken if he says another constable took him.

WILLIAM ROWE . I am assistant to Mr. Dicker, pawnbroker, 300, Commercial Road East—this ticket was issued by me on October 24th, and refers to the overcoat, jacket and vest produced—the jacket and vest are Mr. Durrell's, but Mr. Maddocks claims the overcoat—I was asked for 12s., but advanced 6s.—I asked the person if they were his own and he said they were—he gave the name and address of John Yates, 5, Albert Street.

THOMAS SWIFT . I am an electro-plater and gilder of Oak Hall Gardens, Hornsey—Willie and Adolph came together to me with some watch cases to plate—we did some cases, and they asked if we polished silver—I said "Yes"—they brought spoons to be polished, and I did them, and they took them away—they subsequently brought eight pieces to polish, which a constable about October 29th took away—I recognise two jam spoons, three pickle forks, butter knife, gravy spoon and a salt spoon, all silver.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. They gave me no address, only the name—Willie did all the business—we are generally asked to take the initals out of plate—it was a ready money transaction.

Cross-examined by MR. ARNOLD. The transactions before this was as to 19 watch cases—I mentioned that at the Police Court I only knew them as Weiner—both the Weiners brought the articles—they were put on the counter—I could not say whether the initials were taken out—that is done in the ordinary way.

Re-examined. The articles were left, about October 24th, and taken away on October 27th or 29th or 31st—they were put in the safe.

WOOLF MYERS . I live at 7, Park Lane, Stoke Newington—I am manager to Mr. Freeman, jeweller, of 26, Clerkenwell Road—about October 28th, Willie and Adolph Weiner called to buy some watches—we had dealt with them—they asked if we would buy some silver spoons and forks—I said we would look at them—they brought about 36 pieces: 4 table spoons, 12 desert spoons, sugar tongs, 9 tea spoons, and 10 desert forks—I asked if they were all right—Willie said yes—he asked 2s. 10d. an ounce, we bought them at 2s. 7d.—this is the bill—we sold goods for £12 9s. and he paid £5 9s., the difference—the name Hymens in the bill is an error of the clerk—the articles are in the same condition as when we bought them.

Cross-examined by MR. WATT. I knew Willie Weiner as an auctioneer who sells watches and various kinds of jewellery—I know John Round, of Sheffield, as a large manufacturer—at certain times they sell at reduced, prices.

Cross-examined by MR. ARNOLD. Adolph was present, but I only dealt with Willie—I never had any transaction with Adolph—they had no discussion on the silver, simply as to the price of the watches.

EMILE HARTMAN . I am the wife of Albert Hartman, landlord of the Royal Crown public house, St. George's in the East—I know Mrs. Weiner as a customer—on October 23rd, between 2 and 3 p.m., she asked me to mind a parcel for a day or two, as Max, whom I knew as a customer, would sell the goods and she would get no money—I put the parcel on one side for her to call for it, but heard that a lot of them had been locked up for burglary—I gave it up to Sergeant Thornell—it was opened in my presence—I saw this picture frame, this sofa cushion and yellow silk piano cover and table cloth, also this butter dish and cover.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. I knew Rebork as Max—I do not know Max Dumont.

Cross-examined by MR. HOPKINS. I have known Mrs. Weiner two years—I have not seen anything wrong with her in any way—the parcel was tied up—the police sergeant opened it—there was a cushion like this and there was no other, so it must be the one.

SIDNEY MADDOCKS . I am a clerk—I live At 8, Oak Hall Road, Wanstead—on October 21st I fastened up my house about 10.45 to 11.15 p.m.—in the night I heard a match struck—I came down in the morning between 7.30 and 7.45—first I noticed the hall stand had been stripped of umbrellas and coats—I found the gas alight in the kitchen, the back door open, and the window over the sink in the scullery broken and unfastened—it had been secured by a button—that leads from the garden to the scullery—the back door was open wide—it had been fastened the day before—I identify as my property the table cover, piano cover, tea spoon, cushion, overcoat and hat produced—I saw the overcoat at Dicker's, a pawnbroker in the Commercial Road—the hat I saw on Blaschke at Arbour Street Police Yard, it has had the lining taken out, upon which my initals were in ink, and the maker's name, Towley, of Fenchurch Street—other things were taken besides those which are here.

SIR HUGH GILZEAN REID I live at Dorris Hill House, Willesden—the silver mug and part of a trowel produced are mine—the trowel was a presentation on laying a foundation stone—I saw them last on the Sunday before my house was entered, on October 29th—about 4 a.m. the burglars were escaping from the house when I missed these and other things—I found in the drawing room, on chairs and upon the dining room table, many valuable articles, ready to be removed from the house, when the invaders were disturbed—this trowel was with others much larger, and in its proper condition, but when it was brought by the police it was broken and bent as it is now.

THOMAS WILLIAM TOPE . I am butler to Ernest Frederick George Hatch, of Beachwood House, West Heath, Hampstead—I shut up the house on July 31st—when I came down in the. morning I found the dining room had been disarranged and the bars taken away from the larder window—I missed property to the value of about £400, amongst it some tea cloths—this is one of them—I know it by my master's initals in the corner.

COLONEL CARRE FULTON . I reside at 19, Emmanuel Avenue, Acton—on October 18th Mrs. Fulton and I went to our bedroom about 9.30—the doors being all locked and perfectly secure—about 6.30 a.m. the cook came up and told us a burglary had taken place—I missed plate and jewellery, value about £60—a few things have been recovered which I have identified, namely, a cream jug, kettle and stand, teapot, sugar basin, fruit dish, two dessert spoons and a seal with my coat of arms—I next saw them at the police station—I picked them out from other articles—the thieves took away my medals.

JOHN PARSONS . I live at Brent Lodge, Hanwell—Mr. Sharpe, my son-in-law, lives with me—on October 7th I saw my house fastened up about 11 p.m.—it was broken into before the morning—Mr. Sharpe's study was broken into.

BERTHA MUNFORD . I am housemaid, employed by Mr. Montagu Sharpe and Mr. Parsons at Brent Lodge, Hanwell—on October 12th I went into Mr. Sharpe's study—I missed this badge and two pairs of candlesticks, a silver ink-stand, and two silver stops of gum bottles—I had been away for a day or two.

ARTHUR FREDERICK STURDEE . I am a commission agent at 47, Kidbrook Road, Blackheath—my house was securely fastened on the night of October 25th—I was called at 6.30 a.m., and found the house had been broken into—I missed several silver and plated articles to the value of about £50, also some wine—some had been drunk on the premises, and some had been taken away—there were two brands, Duc de Montebello and Doyan—this is a half bottle—large bottles were also taken—this pipe was sent me from the Pan-American Exhibition.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. The champagne bottle and cork produced is similar to what I had.

WILLIAM JAMES DROWN . I live at 4, Emslie Gardens, Ilford, Essex—on August 22nd I fastened up my house—early on August 3rd I discovered it had been broken into—I missed this fish slice and fork in case, six knives and forks, a butter dish and cover—these are all mine.

Cross-examined by MR. WATT. The fish slice and fork are electroplated—there is a copperplate "D" on both—also the maker's name "Atkin Brothers."

LUCY MILLAR . I live at Warwick Dean, Ealing Common—my house was broken into on the early morning of August 30th—I missed a good many things, including this music box.

GEORGE PHILLIPS . I live at Londerry, Chingford Hall, Chingford—my house was broken into early on October 6th—among the property I missed was this pair of marine glasses.

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. These glasses have been in my possession twenty years—I identify them by their general appearance, and by the damage—they are slightly bent on one side from having fallen on the deck—that accident might happen to any—it did to mine.

THOMAS KING (175 S). I was present when Rebork was arrested—while dressing he said in German, which I understand well, "I do not know anything about these affairs; these men from 5, Albert Street bring all sorts of things here which the old one buys, but I do not know where they get them from, or what she does with them; now and again

she gives me a shilling out of the things; there are eight of them lodging there, and they all come here with stuff"—I went to Leman Street Police Station and took the charge against Hauten, Braum, Muller, Peters, Wald, and Salveskie—I took down their conversation together in German—Hauten said, "I am sorry I did not put my own jacket and vest on, I have left my socks and boots behind, and hope they won't find out whose they are"—Braum said, "Did not you take the name out of the socks?"—Hanten said "No"—Peters said "I did"—I took these statements down in the waiting room where they were, and when they made a long statement I went out and put it down—Wald said, "What a lucky thing Max fetched all those things away the night before last, if they had found all that what a job it would have been"—Rebork was outside, as I had spoken to him in German—Yates said, "I think the old woman will hold her tongue for her own sake; anyhow neither of us have sold her anything, you understand that, don't you? I hope they won't find the other stuff in the hole under the table, and the lot under the stone: I say, Hauten, they will see the holes in the doors where you have practised with your drills "Hauten said" Yes, we left them behind, and I suppose they have found them." Salveskie said, "Look here, it is no good talking, we must deny everything, and hold our tongues." Muller said, "I expect they will find the music box at the old woman's, and the marine glasses." Hauten said, "Let me see, the yellow silk handkerchief, the two table cloths, and the umbrellas all come from the same place, so as it stands they have only one case against us." Muller said, "I wonder whether they will find me out at Holloway? When I was there before I gave the name of Richard Dreseer. I expect there will be someone there who will recognise us." Braum said, "Oh well, my liberty has not lasted long, I have only been out three or four months" Peters said, "I am curious to know whether they will arrest Salveskie." Yates said, "What do they know about me?" Hanten said, "Quite enough, for they have no doubt kept observation on us, and have seen us go there drinking"—Yates said, "I do not think the old woman has much about her place; I dare say Max has taken most of it round to Smith." Salveskie said, "Smith may call at Albert Street to-day, and he will find himself collared by one of the blue ones. Muller said, "Don't you worry, he knows about this affair long before now. There, you see, they will both get off, and we shall have to do time." Braum said, "If they ask me how long I have been here I shall tell them I have only just returned from South America."

Cross-examined by MR. MORRIS. This was on October 31st—the prisoners were then strangers to me—I am a good German scholar—I am sure there is no mistake in the statements, and that I have not confused one prisoner with another—I asked the prisoners no questions.

The prisoners statements before the Magistrate: Hauten says—"I can prove I was in Germany till three months ago." Wald says—"I am innocent." Salveskie says—"I bought the staff I gave to Yates." Rebork says—"The evidence is false. Bertha Weiner says—"I had two gentlemen staying in my house. One of them had a box he left, I never knew the things were stolen."

Willie Weiner, in his defence, on oath, said that he bought the goods found at Tredegar Square in the course of his business, some of them from a young lady who called on him five or six times and said she had come from his aunt, and some from a Mr. Durmon, a German, but the teapot and the coffee-pot had been in his possession nine or ten months, and a great deal of his property was taken away by the police which had not been produced. (He received a good character.) Ludwig Weiner, in his defence, on oath, said that he was an auctioneer and dealt in these goods, but that some of them were his wedding presents a year ago, and all he claimed was his own except what had been packed with his things for the purpose of removal to 194, Westborne Grove, where he intended with his new wife to set up a boarding-house, as his health was not good enough to enable him to continue to travel. Adolph Weiner, in his defence, on oath, said that he was a Dutch auctioneer; that he had no connection in business with Willie Weiner; that he only went to Tredegar Square occasionally; that he had never been to 13, Ship Alley; that he only went to 5, Albert Street about once a year; that he did not know anybody living there; that he did not know any of the prisoners except his father, his aunt, and his brother; that he had never bought any goods from Bertha Weiner, that he had never bought any of the stolen property produced; that he had had no dealings with Mr. Swift, and that he had only been there once with his brother; that when he was arrested he was simply bringing goods down from the various rooms to place them in handy positions for moving; that he did not claim anything as his except what was taken out of his wooden box; that he had two hampers and a box at Liverpool Street Railway Station cloak room; that there was a bag in one of the hampers which was his, and that he had never been charged before with any crime.

ALFRED GOULD (Re-examined). The front room at 5, Albert Street was on the ground floor—I found the eight odd socks, the umbrella, and a cold chisel there, the room was occupied by Blaschke, and Hauten, and Peters—In the back room, where I found Mr. Dangerfield's coat, I found Wald sleeping alone—I went to Liverpool Street Railway Station on November 3rd with two cloak room tickets—I got from there a hamper with one ticket, and a hamper and a wooden case with the other ticket—I did not get a bag, but there was a bag in one of the hampers—the wooden case contained two naptha stands, and lamps, and other articles. This (Produced) is not the bag I found in the hamper, this one was found at Tredegar Square—all the property has been labelled, I did not do it, but I remember putting that bag on a four-wheeled cab when we brought Ludwig Weiner and his wife to Leman Street Police Station.

Cross-examined by MR. WATT. The bag I found at Liverpool 'Street station was similar to that one, I cannot say if it was labelled, but the hampers were—I did not notice if the Liverpool Street mark was on this bag.

Blaschke, in his defence, on oath, said that he lived at 4, North East Passage, Kingsland; that he slept at 5, Albert Street on October 25th and 26th; that he did not know anything about the eight odd socks; that he did not know they were there because he did not live there; that he bought the hat he was wearing from Mr. Mullens in Leman Street about five days before his arrest, and that he did not know anything of the dessert spoons and coat found in the room.

Salveskie, in his defence, on oath, said that he put the stockings on by mistake when he was arrested, as he was in such a hurry, but that he did not know whose they were; that he had the cigar case from Peters; that he did not know anything about the things found in the room, and that at the station he did not say "Smith may call at Albert Street to-day, and he will find himself collared by one of the blue ones."

Rebork, in his defence, on oath, said that he was a seaman, and was discharged from his ship on Sept. 8th, and was paid £17 wages; that he went to 5, Albert Street, where he had lodged before; that the table cloth identified by Mrs. Dangerfield did not belong to him; that he did not tell Gill that he had bought it from Mrs. Weiner's lodgers, or that the broken pipe and some marine glasses were his; and that he did not say to the constable, "There are eight of themliving there, they all come here for stuff."

GUILTY .

The police stated that the prisoners were a most dangerous and clever gang of burglars; that many places had been broken into by them; that they were connected with some of the worst characters in London; that the Weiners had received about £1,000 worth of property, and only £150 worth had been recovered.—BLASCHKE, HAUTEN, BRAUM, MULLER, PETERS, WALD, YATES, SALVESKIE, REBORK, LUDWIG, and WILLIE WEINER— Five years' penal servitude each; ADOLPH WEINER— Twelve months' hard labour; BERTHA WEINER— Seven years' penal servitude. The COURT highly commended the police for being instrumental in breaking up this dangerous gang of burglars.

FOURTH COURT.—Friday, December 20th, 1901.

Before Mr. Commissioner R. L. Smith, K.C.

89. HEINRICH BRANDT (36) , Feloniously receiving two rolls of canvas, value £18 10s., 12 1/2 yards of satin and other articles, value £2 18s. 8 1/2 d., the goods of W. N. P. Keeble & Co., well knowing then to have been stolen.

MR. KERSHAW Prosecuted, and MR. ROUTH Defended.

ALBERT EDWARD JOHN HARRIS . I am now undergoing three months' imprisonment for stealing the goods of my master—on March 1st I entered the employment of Messrs. Keeble & Co. the prosecutors, as warehouseman—I am twenty-four—part of my duty was to give out goods to the makers up—Brandt is a maker up—sometime in June he said if I could get some goods out on which money could be made I should go shares in the profits—he said I was to send the goods by his man Nathan—this was on the prosecutors premises—nobody else was present—I frequently took goods out and gave them to Nathan—I believe his name is Nathan Samuel, but sometimes the prisoner took the goods himself—the goods were generally taken between 1 and 2 o'clock—that was not the ordinary time for makers up to call—I did not enter the goods in the book—the book produced is kept in duplicate, one is kept by Messrs. Keeble, and the other by the person who receives the articles—on December 2nd I was taken into custody—some satin and some canvas went out on that day, also some astracan, heliotrope silk, linenette, and Italian cloth—they were taken on the prisoner's barrow by Nathan

Samuel—I gave them to him I should say between 1 and 2—I did not enter them in the book as I ought to have done—I identified the goods after I was given into custody, and I subsequently pleaded guilty and was sentenced to three months—I volunteered to give evidence before I was sentenced—on December 2nd there were no goods due to the prisoner—all the goods that went out then were stolen.

Cross-examined. The prisoner was employed by the prosecutors to make up material sent to him—he has made up as many as 400 garments a week, certainly between 200 and 400—the articles made up were satins and silks, and a great deal of canvas was required—I do not know that he has been working for my late employers for three years—you have only my evidence as to his endeavouring to get me to pilfer the goods of my employers—first I got a sovereign a time, but at the end of the time I was taking £3 a week on the average—my salary was 25s. a week—he paid me my share in a public house—there may have been other people in the public house but not necessarily in the same bar—there is nobody here as far as I know who saw money pass between us—there is nothing but my bare word for it—Samuel has brought me money and therefore must have been privy to this transaction—upon my first statement Samuel was arrested and charged with Brandt, but he was discharged by the Alderman—the prisoner had a large shipping order on November 27th, and I gave him some part of the material to execute the order—we had run short of canvas, and he required more than I handed him—about December 2nd or 3rd Samuel called, being pressed, he said, for canvas—part of the order was delivered on December 2nd—on two occasions I have given Samuel goods without dockets when I have been in a hurry, and he has come back for them—he had a docket for the canvas when he had the costumes out.

Re-examined. Samuel did not come back for a docket on November 22nd—he had the docket when he had the goods out.

By the COURT. The docket was torn out of a book, and there was a counterfoil to show that the goods were had.

ALBERT WILLIAM EDDY . I am a commercial traveller in the employment of Mr. Barham, who trades as Keeble & Co., at Cross Keys Square—Harris was employed there as giver out—it was his business to hand material to the prisoner to make up—the prisoner has been associated with the firm 3 to 3 1/2 years as a maker up—I produce the giving out book from Harris' department which contains items given out—it is not usual for the makers up to come between 12 and 2, the dinner hours—on December 2nd, in consequence of instructions, I took up a position opposite to watch what came out of our premises between 12.30 and 2—punctually at 12.30 Samuel came up with a barrow—Harris came in at 2 minutes past I—after taking off his coat he came out to the warehouse door, looked about the Court and went into the warehouse again—he beckoned to Samuel, and after some consultation he went into the warehouse—Samuels came out again and covered the barrow with a large covering and put another cover on that—Harris came to the door looking round as before—while Samuel held up the top cover Harris handed in a bundle of cloth, several other bundles following; and lastly a large piece of what we call white canvas from 53 to 54 yards—I told Detective Sergeant Hallam what I had seen—I followed the barrow to 19, Greenfield Street, Brandt's

house—I did not see what happened when the barrow reached the door as I was waiting up the street—Brandt saw me, and came up to speak to me—Hallam said he was a detective of police—the canvas had been taken into Brandt's house and cut—the inspector asked me to identify the stuff on the barrow, which I did—on December 2nd there is no entry whatever of the goods being given out—on November 27th I was in the same position, and I saw goods taken out in the same way—I cannot say what the goods were, but I saw two pieces of canvas, black and white, put under the covering—there were some goods that Brandt had to make up—Harris and Samuel put them on the top of the covering—I did not follow the barrow then, but told Hallam what I had seen—there is no entry in the giving out book of two rolls of canvas on November 27th—there were some goods to be delivered that day and they are entered—the two rolls of canvas I had seen in the warehouse before behind the counter where Harris used to stand.

Cross-examined. Some articles were docketed out to the prisoner on November 27th—he had a large order to make up—he had orders from day to day, and has made up as many as 400 costumes a week—I was watching from a window opposite.

JOHN BAIRD . I am a traveller in Messrs. Keebles' employ—between 1 and 2 I was with Eddy in a building opposite our warehouse, and saw some stuff taken away by Samuel—Harris seemed excited—I thought his general behaviour extraordinary—I was not there on November 27th.

NATHAN SAMUEL . I am a porter, and was employed by the prisoner in November and December last—I live at 204, Commercial Road East—on December 2nd I went with a barrow to Keebles' to take some costumes about 12.30, Harris said he had some work for me, he put a parcel on the barrow, and told me to go ho✗e and come later on for the docket—when I got to Brandt's house, the canvas was taken off the barrow before the police came up—Brandt came out and asked me what I had brought, and asked for the docket; the police came up and I was taken into custody, charged with stealing the goods, but the charge was dismissed—on November 27th I went to Keebles for some goods—I was there about 10 a.m.

Cross-examined. I was constantly going to Keebles with articles made up, and fetching goods to make up—Harris gave the work out—I have never taken any money from Brandt to him—I know that Brandt's people were pressing for canvas, and I was told to hurry up to get it—Harris put the goods on the barrow—at least, on two other occasions, Brandt has sent me back for the docket—I did not know the contents of the parcels, but I knew the canvas was there—I took the things in the ordinary way of business—Brandt's people were waiting for the canvas—Brandt did not see the parcels until the police opened them.

FRANK HALLAM (Police Sergeant). On December 2nd I was in Cross Keys Square, Little Brittain with Loakes and Nash—in consequence of a communication from Keebles' I was watching the premises about 1.30—I knew Eddy and Baird were concealed opposite—I saw Samuel come up with the barrow—I did not notice Harris—the barrow was taken away—Eddy and I followed with the two officers—it was wheeled to Brandt's, 19, Greenfield Street, Commercial Road—I saw the prisoner come out and speak to Samuel—Brandt took a parcel up and gave it to Samuel, who

took it into the house—I said to Brandt, "What is the meaning of these things being on your barrow"—He said "I do not know whether I have to make them up or not until I see the bill"—I said "Where is the bill"—he said, "I have not got it, Samuel has not brought one"—I said, "Produce those goods and the parcel you have taken inside"—we went inside, and he produced them—I said to Samuel, in Brandt's presence, "where is the bill you have for the goods"—he said "I have not brought one, Mr. Harris did not give me one, I have brought them here, I have only done what I was told"—I asked Brandt if he received any canvas on November 27th—he said, "I am not sure, I think I received a yard and a half"—I searched the premises, but only found the property mentioned—I asked for any books or papers showing what he received from Keebles' and he produced this book—I then took Brandt and Samuel into custody and conveyed them to Snow Hill Police Station.

Cross-examined. No stolen property was found on the premises more than I have said—I believe the prisoner has been 18 years in this country—I know nothing against him.

JOHN LOAKES (City Police Constable). On December 2nd, I was watching Keebles' premises, also on November 27th, when Samuel came with the barrow between 1 and 2—he had some goods placed on the barrow, after waiting a little time I followed him to Greenfield Street—before he got to the door Brandt beckoned to him to hurry up—he took two parcels off, and Samuel took them inside—he then took another parcel, which I knew to be canvas, and took it in.

The prisoner, in his defence, stated upon oath, that he never made overtures to Harris to steal goods, or paid him for doing so, or gave Samuels money for him, and that he did not receive any canvas on the 27th, but his people were waiting for some, and that he produced it when asked as his people had not touched it.

The prisoner received a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

ESSEX CASES.

Before Mr. Recorder.

90. HERBERT WATERS (63) , Unlawfully and carnally knowing Lilian Waters, aged 15 years.

MR. HUTTON and MR. FORDHAM Prosecuted.

GUILTY of indecent assault .— Six months' hard labour.

91. CHARLES PRICE (27), PLEADED GUILTY to feloniously setting fire to a storehouse in the possession of the London and India Docks Joint Committee, also to setting fire to a shed in the possession of the said Committee.

MR. MAX for the Prosecution stated that there had been five fires at the Docks, and that the value of the property destroyed was £173,490. Three years' penal servitude.

92. GEORGE HENRY FRANKLIN (32) , Rape on Edith Maud Hewitt. (See page 37.)

MR. GRANTHAM and MR. ELGEE Prosecuted. MR. LEYCESTER and

MR. CAIRNS Defended.

In consequence of the absence of a witness through illness, there being no medical evidence to prove the fact, the Recorder declined to allow his deposition to be read, and adjourned the continuation of the case to the next Session before the same Jury.

Before Mr. Commissioner L. Smith, K.C.

93. ALFRED NOAKES (22) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MR. NORICE Prosecuted, and MR. METCALFE Defended.

EDITH CLARK . I am assistant to Whiteway & Co., Stationers, of Woodgate Road, Forest Gate—on Saturday, October 5th, about 9.50 p.m., the prisoner came in for a dozen black lead pencils and two memorandum books, price 6 1/2 d.—he put down on the counter what I thought was a half sovereign, head upperwards—I put it into the till—I did not take any gold afterwards that night—Rosie Benson was serving in the shop—I took no other money that night afterwards—on Monday morning I took out what I supposed to be the half sovereign and found it was a gilded sixpence—it had "sixpence" on it—I got nine pencils and a memorandum book from Detective McMullen—those were what I sold to the prisoner—I identify the sixpence—it has "1900" upon it—I handed it to Mr. Goodenham, the manager—I next saw the prisoner about a month ago at West Ham Police Court on a Monday morning, and picked him out from about ten other men—Mr. Goodenham returned me the sixpence, which I afterwards handed to McMullen.

Cross-examined. Between October 5th and November 20th I never saw the prisoner—I do not remember him as a customer—there is nothing more particular about him than any other customer—I described him to Mr. McMullen when he came on the Wednesday morning—I gave no information to the police—there is nothing particular about the pencils—we obtained them from the Swan Pencil Co.—they are common, and I do not know anybody else who sells them—I do not say other people do not sell them—the dozen pencils cost 4 1/2 d.—I do not sell them very often—the memorandum book is a common penny one—we were about shutting up when the prisoner came in, and were rather in a hurry—on November 20th McMullen came to the shop saying that there was a man in custody whom he wanted me to identify—I identified the man on the following Monday at the Police Station—Miss Benson was not called to identify the prisoner—she was on the other side of the counter with her back to him when he came in—the men were all in a row, and I picked out the prisoner from about the middle of them—I looked at the others, but did not take much notice of them.

Re-examined. When I got to the prisoner I picked him out—he seemed rather pale, and there is a mark under his eye—there is a black pencil mark at the end of the memorandum book, which it the price—that enables me to say that the book was bought from our shop—there was no gold in the till when I looked in it on the Monday morning.

FRANK GOODINGHAM . I am secretary to Frederic Whiteway & Co., Limited—on October 7th Edith Clark gave me a gilded sixpence and made a statement—I retained the coin till November 20th, when I returned it to Miss Clark, who expected the detective that morning, in order to give it to him.

EMILY WILLIS . I am a confectioner and tobacconist at Woodgrange Road—about 4.30 p.m., on November 9th, the prisoner came in for a packet of tobacco—he tendered what appeared to be a half sovereign—it was a gilt sixpence—I gave him 9s. 7 1/2 d. change—he left the shop, but I discovered it almost directly, and went after him—he ought not to have gone more than about five yards, but he was nearly at the bottom of the road when I caught sight of him running—I said to him, "Give me that back, this is only a gilded sixpence"—he said, "Oh, yes, it is a mistake"—he opened his purse; his hand was shaking very much—he did not give me any gold, although I saw some in his purse—he gave it to me in silver and made the amount up with coppers—on the Sunday afternoon he came to the shop and apologised—I should not have known him, he was dressed so differently—I said, "Were you the one? I can see it is now"—he said, "I was awfully sorry to give you that run, I was so cross I threw it in the fire and burnt it."

Cross-examined. Whoever it was, it was the same man who came on the Sunday—he was talking to me for about ten minutes—I did not recognise him until he told me he was the man—I had a good look at him then, and am quite sure the prisoner is the man—I could not see whether it was real gold or gilded money that was in his purse.

BERTHA CRADDOCK . I am the daughter of Francis Craddock—on November 16th I was in charge of the shop, 1, Woodgrange Road, and between 9.30 and 10 p.m. the prisoner came in to buy a pocket comb—he bought one for 6 1/2 d.—he gave me what I thought was a half sovereign and I gave him 9s. 6d. change—just as he got outside the door I found it was a gilded sixpence—he laid it down head uppermost—I turned it over and found the word "Sixpence." It was gilded—I called out to my father, who ran out after the prisoner—I gave my father the sixpence.

Cross-examined. I know the prisoner perfectly well as a customer—he was in the habit of using the back part of the shop, the barber's part—he was often shaved there—every now and then for some years he had been through the shop—my father superintends.

FRANCIS CRADDOCK . I am a hairdresser of Woodgrange Road, and the father of last witness—on Saturday, November 16th, between 9.30 and 10 the prisoner came in—my daughter Bertha served him, and gave him change, which he picked up, and immediately cleared out of the shop—it was very foggy—he had got as far as the door when she discovered that it was a 6d.—I went directly to find the man—he had gone some distance up the road, and I could see nothing of him—the same night I gave information to the police and at noon on Sunday I went with Detective McMullen to the prisoner's house—he came into the room and pretended not to recognise me—I said, "You know me?"—he said, "No,"—he asked what I wanted to see him about—I said, "In reference to your coming to my shop last night, when you passed a

gilded 6d. and received 9s. 6d. change"—he said that he had not been near the shop or in that direction at all—I said, "There were three of us there who saw you: I saw you, and my daughter, and my wife"—he said that he picked the 6d. up, and expressed his sorrow and regret, and hoped I would not go any further in the matter.—I said to the detective "I must charge him with this attempt to pass a gilded 6d. for half a sovereign"—I knew the prisoner as a customer—directly he received the article and the change he cleared out of the shop.

Cross-examined. By "cleared out" I mean walked out—to my knowledge this man has seen me with my hat on—on the Saturday night I had it on—I had only just come in—the shaving room is upstairs—I was at the end of the shop—his conversation that night was not with me—sometimes he has seen me in the shaving room and sometimes in the shop with my hat off—I had my hat off when I saw him on the Sunday—his conversation on the Saturday night was entirely with my daughter, and I paid no attention to it until my daughter came to me and asked for a 2s. piece to make up the change—I had just come in with the intention of staying a few minutes and going out again—I imagine that the prisoner was about the doorstep when my daughter called out—she brought the coin to me directly and I examined it—he could not have got ten or twenty yards from the shop—my daughter rushed to the door with excitement, and I went with her—it was very foggy indeed—I do not think the man, whoever he was, could have crossed the road, from the time I looked out and the time he left the shop.

EDITH CLARK (Re-examined). I was selling the memorandum books in August, but cannot swear that I did not sell any to the prisoner.

WALTER PATRICK (88 K). Francis Craddock came to the police station on Saturday evening, November 16th, and made a complaint—he handed me this gilded 6d.—I marked it and handed it to Detective McMullen the same night.

Cross-examined. I have no knowledge of any man being convicted twelve months ago or doing this same thing.

FRANCIS CRADDOCK (Re-examined). I wear a wig and have done so for two years—I do not appear in business without it on.

JOSEPH MCMULLIN (Detective Officer). At 1.30 on Sunday, November 17th, I went with Mr. Craddock to the prisoner's place at Forest Gate—he came into the parlour, and Mr. Craddock said, "This is the young man that came into my shop last night and passed a gilded 6d. for half a sovereign to buy a comb between 9.30 and 10"—I said to the prisoner, "You hear what Mr. Craddock says,"—he said, "I was never near the shop, I bought no comb; I was not that way"—his right hand was on his hip pocket—I took it and I found in it this partly gilded Jubilee sixpence—the Jubilee sixpences have not the word 6d. on them—I took him to Forest Gate Police Station where he was charged—he said, "I did not know it was a bad half sovereign or I should never have attempted to pass it," and that he was sorry and was willing to pay Mr. Craddock for making the mistake—when I took the Jubilee 6d. from his hand he had a number of coins—it was in consequence of the complaint of Edith Clark that I went to the prisoner's place—I searched his rooms, and on the second occasion I found the nine pencils produced in a box in the back kitchen,

and this memorandum book in the prisoner's coat which I had seen him wearing—they have been identified by Miss Clark—I have had the 6d. ever since—Sergeant Patrick has put his initials on it and I have put mine—the two sixpences produced bear the word "sixpence" on them.

Cross-examined. The Jubilee 6d. bears the appearance of having been used as a brooch, which might account for it being partly gilded—I have seen Jubilee sixpences gilded and used as brooches—I do not think Jubilee brooches are worth half a sovereign—I cannot give the value of them, but I should not like to give more than 6d. for one—they were all withdrawn, and very few were left in the hands of the public, which no doubt increased their value.

ERNEST GEORGE BIGNELL . I am an ironmonger, at Forest Gate—on Saturday, November 16th, about 8.30 the prisoner came in—I recognised him as a customer—his first purchase was 1 1/2 d., finally he made it into 2 1/2 d. and he tendered what I took to be a half sovereign—the Queen's head was uppermost when he tendered it—before I gave the change I turned it over and saw by the reverse side that it was a 6d.—it was gilded on both sides—I said "This is 6d."—he said "Yes, that is right"—he then looked at it and said "I did not mean to give you that"—he picked it up and tendered me another 6d. and I gave him change for that.

Cross-examined. My shop is at 72, Odessa Road, Forest Gate—I had known the prisoner for some time—after he said that he did not intend to offer me that, I looked upon it as a mistake and did not care to think anything of it as I did not know anything about his character; he acted as if it was a mistake—I am sure I saw the word "Sixpence" upon it—it was not a Jubilee 6d.—I know the difference—it was dated 1900.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . I am inspector of coin to the mint. The two coins produced are both gilded sixpences—the value of a Jubilee Sixpence is about 18d. or 2s. at the most—the similarity of the 6d. is sufficiently close to admit of it being used for fraudulent purposes and it was called in—if a 6d. is gilded over and placed with the head uppermost it is likely to deceive.

Cross-examined. I do not know that Jubilee sixpences have fetched 10s. or 11s. each—a fancy price was given for them when they first came in, especially on the Stock Exchange—they caused a good deal of sensation throughout the country.

The prisoner, in his defence, stated upon oath, that he gave the gil sixpence to Miss Clark, but that he was not the man who passed the coin on October 5th; that he was not at Bignell's shop on November 16th; and that as to the sixpence which he passed to Miss Craddock he picked it up and thought it was a half sovereign.

EMILY WILLIS (Re-examined). I saw the prisoner on the Saturday and Sunday—on the Sunday he told me he had had the 6d. gilded for a brooch.

Evidence for the Defence.

EMMA NOAKES . My husband's name is William—I live with him at 113, Odessa Road, Forest Gate—I adopted the prisoner when a child, and he has always lived with me—I did not see any entries in the books produced

—I saw them at the end of August—he told me about the club—he came home at 3.20 on November 9th, had his dinner, and went out after 7—on the Sunday he went to church in the morning, and in the afternoon went for a walk.

Cross-examined. He usually went out on the Saturday evening.

GUILTY .—A conviction was proved against him. Twelve months' hard labour.

KENT CASE.

Before Mr. Recorder.

94. AGNES SULMAN (31) , Feloniously killing and slaying Agnes Emily Sulman.

MR. HUTTON for the prosecution, offered no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

95. AGNES SULMAN was again indicted for, that she, having the care and custody of the said Agnes Emily Sulman, aged ten weeks, did neglect her; to the injury of her health.

MR. HUTTON Prosecuted.

ELIZABETH ATKINS . I am the wife of Charles Atkins, of 68, Roan Street, Greenwich—the prisoner and her husband occupied two rooms there—they came on July 13th with a little boy, and about the beginning of September the prisoner had a little girl—it was not a large child, but very healthy—I saw it on the Saturday after her confinement on the Monday—it took the breast—she went out a fortnight afterwards, on the Monday—I saw her come in, she was all right then—I saw her on the next Saturday, and she was intoxicated—she had the baby in her arms, and Mrs Reynolds, another lodger, took it from her—I did not see her do so, but she brought it down to my kitchen—I said that it was a shame to take the child out when she was in drink—the prisoner said that she was not—her husband allowed her £1 a week—on the next day, Wednesday, she went out, leaving the baby at home, and returned the worse for drink—I told her she was not looking after the baby in a proper manner, and if it came to anything I should report it—she said that it would do very well, but it had the thrush very bad—I saw her the worse for drink a day or two before the baby died—I heard her husband tell her to take it to a doctor, but she only took it once to my knowledge—she had a feeding bottle, because she could not suckle it.

ELIZABETH REYNOLDS . I am the wife of James Reynolds, of 68, Roan Street, Greenwich—I saw the prisoner's baby born, it appeared healthy and took its food—it used to be left alone for an hour or an hour and a half, and the prisoner returned the worse for drink—about a fortnight after its birth she came to me with the child—she was drunk and not fit to have it—I took it out of her arms and undressed it—it was very cold—I have children of my own—it ought to have been fed every two hours—I told her she ought to take it to a doctor, and I heard her husband tell her so—I went upstairs to her on the Saturday, and found her drunk—I looked after the baby—I have heard Mrs. Atkins speak to her about the baby.

JAMES CHOWN . I am an Inspector of the Society—I saw the prisoner at the Eight Bells on the day the child died—she was the worse for drink, and I advised her to go home.

JOSEPH FITZMORRIS RUSSELL . I am a medical practitioner at Greenwich—the prisoner brought the baby to me when it was about a month old, suffering from mal nutrition—irregular feeding would have the same effect—I saw it dead on the 21st—it weighed 3 lbs. 11 oz.—the ordinary weight would be 8 1/2 lbs.—the organs were healthy, except the lungs—it died from double pneumonia—I saw no reason why it should not take its food—want of food would cause pneumonia—it ought to have been fed every two or three hours—I found the lower parts of the body inflamed from want of washing.

JOHN NOWLAN (Detective, P). I took the prisoner on November 22nd—she said, "I did not neglect the child; I fed it well on Ridge's food."

The prisoner's statement before the Magistrate:

"My baby was taken at 2.30 a.m. with a fit. My husband got up and sat with it before the fire, but it died before he could fetch a doctor."

Witness for the Defence.

WILLIAM SULMAN . I am the prisoner's husband—I was in the house when the child died—I held it while she put her clothes on—I go away at 5.45 a.m.—I have had eight children; only one is living.

Cross-examined. I told the prisoner before she was confined not to go into the public house—I gave her £1 a week—I told her more than once to take the child to a doctor—I was surprised to hear at the police court that she had only taken it to him once—I thought she did because she had cough mixture.

By the COURT. The child that is living is 5 1/2 years old—two of the others were still born, and another lived fourteen weeks—one died at three weeks—there was an inquest on it, but I was not present—all my children were insured—fourteen weeks was the longest that either of them lived—the last was ten weeks old—we have been married twelve years.

GUILTY .

MR. HUTTON stated that, at the inquest on the other child, three weeks old, the prisoner was censured by the Jury. Nine months' hard labour.

Before Mr. Commissioner L. Smith, K.C.

96. FREDERICK LEVAISE RICHARDS (26), PLEADED GUILTY to stealing £9, the monies of His Majesty, while employed in the Public Service, also to stealing 10 Postal Orders, value £30 7s. 1d., also to forging receipts for £2 19s. 5d., £3, 2s. and £2 19s. 5d., with intent to defraud.

Several previous convictions were proved against him. Eighteen months' hard labour.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

SURREY CASES.

97. JOHN VEST (23) and CHARLES MARTIN (32) , Breaking into the dwelling-house of Rosa Hatch, and stealing a cheque for £5 4s. 5d., and certain articles of jewellery. VEST PLEADED GUILTY .

MESSRS. BODKIN and BOYD Prosecuted, and MR. GODWIN defended MARTIN.

Second Session,

1901—1902. 103

ROSA HATCH . I am a widow, of 87A, Broadwall, and 31, Waldock Buildings, New Cut—my daughter, Mrs. Underwood, lives with me—I carry on business as a rag-sorter in Hatfield Street—Vest worked for me for several years, since he was a little lad—he left me seven or eight weeks ago—he knew his way about my house and home, because he had been with me so long—Martin worked for my late husband about 18 months ago for a month or six weeks—Vest went to the bank, and changed several cheques for me—the governor gave him what we opened the door with, a button-hook similar to this produced—I have seen Martin at the Bull in the Pound public house, opposite the shop, frequently—Wednesday is my washing day at Waldock Buildings—on Wednesday, October 23rd, the boy Bailey was at the door when I answered it, as it was getting dusk about 6 or 7 p.m.—he gave me a message about some trousers, and I said I would look for them, and he should have them when I found them—I left my shop that evening just before 7—I came home about 9 or a few minutes past—next day, October 24th, in consequence of what I was told, I looked in my cupboard and missed this cheque for £5 4s. 5d, which is drawn to my order by J. G. Jacob—the endorsement is written by the prisoner Vest—when I last saw it nothing was written on it.

Cross-examined. I have never given Martin the key—I had only moved into the building five weeks before—Vest had the key from the governor—the caretaker did not make the key; the governor did; I mean the bent button-hook—he bought old iron when Martin worked for us, and there were small pieces of girder—Martin was not dismissed over that—about 4 cwt. of old iron came in, and that was supposed to have been taken—that was the summer before last, when Martin worked for us—if the detective told Martin to leave my shop or he would get into trouble, he told a falsehood.

Re-examined. I have never been charged with receiving stolen property, nor has my husband been, that I am aware of—he died eight months ago.

MINNIE UNDERWOOD .—I live with my mother at Waldock Buildings—I kept there a quantity of jewellery—on October 24th I missed two gentleman's rings, a pin, a bracelet, two rows of pearls, and on the Sunday after, this brooch, a 5s. piece and a very small box—I have said that the value is £1, but it is more, I did not reckon in the brooch—I am sure they are my property—the brooch cost 10s. 6d.

Cross-examined. I do not remember Martin being taken from my father's shop for stealing pieces of girder.

GEORGE BAILEY . I am 12 years old—I live at 10, Surrey Buildings—on October 23rd Mrs. Hatch was washing—I met the prisoner in a trap outside the Anchor public house in Lambeth Cut near where Mrs. Hatch lives—they asked me if I would come for a ride—we went to the White Hart public house—the three of us got down—Vest asked me to go to Mrs. Hatch for his trousers—I went there and found her washing—I gave her the message—she said she would look for them—I came back to the White Hart—I delivered that message to Martin and Vest—the three of us got up in the trap and drove down the Cut as far as the Canterbury in Westminster Bridge Road, then we turned round and came back to the White Hart—Vest told me to go to Mrs. Hatch again and say, "Never mind the trousers" and that he would buy a new pair—

I went to deliver the message to Mrs. Hatch—she was not in—I came back to Martin and Vest and told them—they were together when I brought back word that Mrs. Hatch was not in—they went away and left me in charge of the trap—they went towards Mrs. Hatch's and were away about a quarter of an hour—when she came back they drove to the Anchor public house—Martin did not say anything about what took place that afternoon, but a week before, he said "Don't say anything"—it was at night when I went for the trousers—I afterwards saw Martin by our house—he had the same trap.

Cross-examined. Vest is my brother-in-law—before I went to school Vest asked me to meet him at the Anchor—Martin and Vest took a sack each out of the barrow—I did not ask Vest if he was going to do a deal, or buy any metal—two men in private clothes asked me what I knew about it—they were detectives—Vest did not say they were going to buy some old iron—when they came he said to Vest, "Where have you been"—Martin said, "We have been to do a deal."

WILLIAM BIRD , Junior. I am a dealer, and assist my father at Broad-wall—on October 23rd Vest borrowed a pony and barrow about 7 or 7.30—the next morning I let the pony and barrow to Vest about 10.30—it was brought back about 11.30 by Vest and Martin—after the pony was brought back I heard them discussing with my father.

Cross-examined. Vest and Martin had hired the barrow before: Vest lots of times—Martin was not with Vest when he came for the pony and barrow on the 24th.

Re-examined. Martin was with Vest when the pony and cart was returned on October 25th.

WILLIAM BIRD , Senior. I am a dealer at 88, Broadwall—I know Martin and Vest—from time to time I have lent my pony and barrow to Vest—the last time was on October 23rd or 24th—Martin was with him—it was about 12.30 or 1 o'clock on the Thursday—they had the barrow and pony first and the cart and pony afterwards in the afternoon—the barrow was brought back about 10 a.m., and they had the cart about 1 o'clock with the same pony—they owed me 8s. previous to that, and they owed me 18s. on the Thursday morning before they had the cart—I asked for the money—Martin gave me a sovereign, and I gave him 2s. change—there was a little dispute—Martin haggled a little bit.

Cross-examined. Vest borrowed the barrow, not Martin—the hire would be paid by Vest—Martin and Vest used to work together—I have known Martin a good many years as a hard-working respectable man—I have never heard anything against him.

WILLIAM DAVID BAXTER . I am the licensee of the Bull in the Pound public-house—Martin and Vest used the house—about October 24th Martin owed me 5s. or 6s., and Vest owed me 18s. or 19s.—that was paid off about that time, I am not certain of the date—I did not put it down—I keep no books.

Cross-examined. Martin picked up a £100 cheque in my place and gave it to a Mr. Ready—I have known him about two years—the prisoners drove up in a barrow.

WILLIAM SIMS . I am a general dealer, of 29, Oakley Street—I purchased this brooch from Martin about the end of October—I did not want

it, but I have known him ever since he wore knickerbockers—he asked 4s. for it, and I said, "It's no use to me"—he said, "Give me something, I am without food, and I have been walking about all day long," I said, "Here is a halfcrown, and when you pay me back the halfcrown you can have the brooch."

Cross-examined. I knew Martin's father and mother—he bears a good character—he did not say, and I did not enquire, how he got the brooch, because I had known him so long—it was not a valuable brooch—if Mrs. Underwood paid 10s. 6d., she gave enough for it.

JOHN VEST . I have pleaded guilty to this offence—I have been for a considerable time living in Mrs. West's house, and have assisted her in her shop—I have been with her since I was a little boy—she brought me up—I left her employment about six weeks before I was charged—it was some time in September—I have known Martin some time—on Wednesday, October 23rd, I met him between 5 and 6 p.m. outside the Anchor public house—we had a pony, trap and barrow—we had arranged on the Monday—I saw him outside the Anchor—when I first saw him he was walking up and down with another man, whose name I do not wish to mention—Martin said to me, "What are you going to do? Do you go out to-morrow or not?"—I said, "I have not got any money"—Martin said, "I have got 2d., come and have a drink and have a ' pony,' and I had a "fag"—he showed me a key like this (A bent out button hook.)—it was not this one—I said it belonged to Mrs. Hatch—he asked me whether I would go into Mrs. Hatch's—I said "No"—then he asked me again, and I saw him on the Monday, and I went in—he got the pony barrow in the morning, and I went to the place where he used to work, a tidy way off—we came back and went into Mrs. Hatch's—after I met him between 5 and 6 outside the Anchor I went home and had my tea—before then we had been together all the day—we talked about going into Mrs. Hatch's—he said, "You know where everything is, why don't you go in there"—he wanted me to go in the shop—then we both went in—I said I would not go in by myself—I brought the boy Bailey back with me in the cart after I had come from tea—it is only round the corner from the Anchor where Mrs. Hatch lived—we drove to another public-house—then we got out, and Martin went round to the Bull in the Pound to see whether Mrs. Hatch was in her shop—then he came back down Roupell Street, and told me who was there—then we went to Monces, a little beer shop—Martin said, "Pull round the corner and drive to the Harp," another public-house—I left the boy with the cart, and Martin and I went in there—before we went into Mr. Hatch's we sent the boy Bailey with a message about some trousers—he came back and said she was washing—Martin told me to send him again—he came back and said she was out—Martin went to the Bull and came back and said Mrs. Hatch was in the shop—Martin and I walked to where Mrs. Hatch lived—Martin tried to open the door but could not, then he asked me, and I opened it—I only had to shake the door and it came open—this thing (The button hook.) was in the door—I did not have to turn it—Martin put it in the door—we both went inside—Martin told me to look in the cupboard—I pulled an envelope down and there was this cheque in it—I saw him look in a little drawer

—Martin said, "That will do, come on"—he took charge of the cheque—on Thursday I asked him what to do with the cheque—he had put it in a spittoon where he lodged—we went to a public-house and I met my wife—Martin gave me the cheque at the bank—I asked for it in the Bull—he said he had not got it—he went to get it, and I went to get the pony and barrow—I went with him to the bank—he said, "Here you are, take this cheque"—I took it in, as I was in the habit of going in—I put it on the counter—I found it was not signed, and I signed it—this is my endorsement on the back—I got the money for it, £5 4s. 5d. in gold, silver and bronze—I came out of the bank—I saw Martin driving up and down with a pony and barrow—I jumped up into the cart and gave Martin the whole amount—afterwards I got £2 18s.—Martin paid 9s. to Mr. Bird for the barrow—he owed 19s.—he paid 18s. later, for the pony and barrow—he paid 8s., 9s., or 10s. to Mr. Baxter of the Bull in the Pound that day—I paid 9s.—Martin and I were partners—we bought old iron and fat together—I clear from Salisbury's rough and best fat.

Cross-examined. I had been in the habit of going to the bank for Mrs. Hatch—I knew what to do, and that I was going to get the money—Martin left Mr. Hatch's employment first—I was out of employment six weeks before my arrest—I was with Mrs. Hatch between fourteen and fifteen years—I knew the shop and where everything was kept—I did not know she had a button-hook key where she lives now, only at the "block"—I had seen it used—I went to Mr. Bird to hire the barrow—I had done it before—I knew the man who was walking up and down outside the public-house, only I should not like to fetch him into it, because he has been in prison before—I spent some of the money, I did not keep it all—I speak the truth—I have had no friends to bring me up—I pleaded guilty—when I go outside, my life is in danger through speaking—Martin told me not to speak the truth—Mr Baxter and Martin shared the money in his house.

HERBERT MILTON (Police Sergeant, L). On November 3rd about 7.45, I arrested Vest—I took him to the station, where he made a statement—the same evening I went with P.C. Oxley, to the Bull in the Pound where we saw Martin—I said, "We are police officers, a man named Vest is in custody, detained at the Kennington Road Police Station for stealing jewellery and a cheque, he has made a statement to me in the presence of Sergeant Oxley and other officers, which incriminates you; you will have to go to Kennington Road Police Station with me; there I will read Vest's statement over to you, in front of him"—Martin said, "All right, governor"—I took him to the station, and there read to him Vest's statement, which was: "I will tell all; it is no use denying it, I got the money from the Bank, and signed the cheque; Curley drove up in a pony barrow and waited outside the Bank, where I got the money. I had about £2 10s., Curley had the other, and he put the job up; I should not have done it, if it had not been for him; I did not have any of the jewellery; Curley and I was to have met him at the public-house in Gravel Lane, on Monday, he was in the house with me at the time"—on that statement I told Martin that he would be charged with

being concerned with Vest in stealing the jewellery and the cheques from 31, Waldock Buildings, Lambeth, on October 23rd—Martin said "All right, I deny it"—Vest said, "You know it is true, you were with me"—they were then both charged, and the charge read over to them—neither made any reply—Martin goes by the name of Curley Martin.

Cross-examined. I have known Martin eight or nine months—he has not been charged with felony before.

JOSEPH EDWARD GREEN . I am a clerk at the Great Tower Street Branch of the London Joint Stock Bank—this cheque was drawn by a customer, and presented for payment on October 24th, between 9 and 10 I should say—I gave for it £5 and 4s. 3d. in silver and bronze.

Martin, in his defence, on oath, said that Vest hired the pony and barrow to do a deal with him, and he knew nothing about the cheque; and the brooch he found, and did not even know it was worth more than 2d. till Sims surprised him by lending the halfcrown on it; but he had earned money in the market, and he had borrowed 25s. to go to a funeral, and paid 18s. for the pony and barrow, but he received none from Vest, and was innocent.

Evidence for the Defence.

MARGARET WILLIAMS . I am Martin's landlady at 13, Great Tower Street, Blackfriars Road—on October 24th he was at breakfast about 9.45 to 10.15 a.m. as he told me not to call him early as he was going to a funeral—about 10.15 a.m. he went out, a long while after he was called.

Cross-examined. I recollect it because it was my husband's birthday—I next saw him when he was bailed—he never said anything to me—he did not do anything to me on November 13th in the Bull in the Pound, it was his sister did it when I went back for my purse—I made a statement to Oxley in the hospital—I did not sign this statement, I cannot write: "On a Tuesday night the first night Charles Martin had bail, I was in the Bull in Pound public house—this was the second time I had been there that night—the first time my husband fetched me home—I went back the second time for my purse which I thought I had left in the house—Irons was in there, and she came to the door and said, 'What do you want, you cow?' and struck me several times knocking me down on the ground with each blow—I tried to defend myself, but her brother, Charles Martin, struck me in the neck, and stuck his two thumbs into my windpipe, saying, 'I wish you was dead, you cow' shaking me up against the wall"—the signature "H. Williams" is my husband's writing—the "H. Williams" above is not mine—I do not recollect saying it—I was in drink that night—we were all drinking that night, Mrs. Irons, another woman and my husband—I called the woman a bad name—I deserved all I got—they came on the Monday—since I left the hospital none of the prisoner's friends have been to see me—a gentleman brought a paper to the hospital and said I was subpoenaed, and I had to come here, and I am in danger now.

MARY IRONS . I live at 46 Bread Street—I am Martin's sister—on the morning of October 24th, he borrowed 25s. to go to a funeral—he returned some of it during the day.

Cross-examined. I was at the Police Court, but did not go inside.

MINNIE UNDERWOOD (Re-examined). I will swear this brooch is mine, because on this side. where the pin fastens, there are small scratches and

—Martin said, "That will do, come on"—he took charge of the cheque—on Thursday I asked him what to do with the cheque—he had put it in a spittoon where he lodged—we went to a public-house and I met my wife—Martin gave me the cheque at the bank—I asked for it in the Bull—he said he had not got it—he went to get it, and I went to get the pony and barrow—I went with him to the bank—he said, "Here you are, take this cheque"—I took it in, as I was in the habit of going in—I put it on the counter—I found it was not signed, and I signed it—this is my endorsement on the back—I got the money for it, £5 4s. 5d. in gold, silver and bronze—I came out of the bank—I saw Martin driving up and down with a pony and barrow—I jumped up into the cart and gave Martin the whole amount—afterwards I got £2 1s.—Martin paid 9s. to Mr. Bird for the barrow—he owed 19s.—he paid 18s. later, for the pony and barrow—he paid 8s., 9s., or 10s. to Mr. Baxter of the Bull in the Pound that day—I paid 9s.—Martin and I were partners—we bought old iron and fat together—I clear from Sainsbury's rough and best fat.

Cross-examined. I had been in the habit of going to the bank for Mrs. Hatch—I knew what to do, and that I was going to get the money—Martin left Mr. Hatch's employment first—I was out of employment six weeks before my arrest—I was with Mrs. Hatch between fourteen and fifteen years—I knew the shop and where everything was kept—I did not know she had a button-hook key where she lives now, only at the "block"—I had seen it used—I went to Mr. Bird to hire the barrow—I had done it before—I knew the man who was walking up and down outside the public-house, only I should not like to fetch him into it, because he has been in prison before—I spent some of the money, I did not keep it all—I speak the truth—I have had no friends to bring me up—I pleaded guilty—when I go outside, my life is in danger through speaking—Martin told me not to speak the truth—Mr Baxter and Martin shared, the money in his house.

HERBERT MILTON (Police Sergeant, L). On November 3rd about 7.45, I arrested Vest—I took him to the station, where he made a statement—the same evening I went with P.C. Oxley, to the Bull in the Pound where we saw Martin—I said, "We are police officers, a man named Vest is in custody, detained at the Kennington Road Police Station for stealing jewellery and a cheque, he has made a statement to me in the presence of Sergeant Oxley and other officers, which incriminates you; you will have to go to Kennington Road Police Station with me; there I will read Vest's statement over to you, in front of him"—Martin said, "All right, governor"—I took him to the station, and there read to him Vest's statement, which was: "I will tell all; it is no use denying it, I got the money from the Bank, and signed the cheque; Curley drove up in a pony barrow and waited outside the Bank, where I got the money. I had about £2 10s., Curley had the other, and he put the job up; I should not have done it, if it had not been for him; I did not have any of the jewellery; Curley and I was to have met him at the public-house in Gravel Lane, on Monday, he was in the house with me at the time"—on that statement I told Martin that he would be charged with

being concerned with Vest in stealing the jewellery and the cheques from 31, Waldock Buildings, Lambeth, on October 23rd—Martin said "All right, I deny it"—Vest said, "You know it is true, you were with me"—they were then both charged, and the charge read over to them—neither made any reply—Martin goes by the name of Curley Martin.

Cross-examined. I have known Martin eight or nine months—he has not been charged with felony before.

JOSEPH EDWARD GREEN . I am a clerk at the Great Tower Street Branch of the London Joint Stock Bank—this cheque was drawn by a customer, and presented for payment on October 24th, between 9 and 10 I should say—I gave for it £5 and 4s. 3d. in silver and bronze.

Martin, in his defence, on oath, said that Vest hired the pony and barrow to do a deal with him, and he knew nothing about the cheque; and the brooch he found, and did not even know it was worth more than 2d. till Sims surprised him by lending the halfcrown on it; but he had earned money in the market, and he had borrowed 25s. to go to a funeral, and paid 18s. for the pony and barrow, but he received none from Vest, and was innocent.

Evidence for the Defence.

MARGARET WILLIAMS . I am Martin's landlady at 13, Great Tower Street, Blackfriars Road—on October 24th he was at breakfast about 9.45 to 10.15 a.m. as he told me not to call him early as he was going to a funeral—about 10.15 a.m. he went out, a long while after he was called.

Cross-examined. I recollect it because it was my husband's birthday—I next saw him when he was bailed—he never said anything to me—he did not do anything to me on November 13th in the Bull in the Pound, it was his sister did it when I went back for my purse—I made a statement to Oxley in the hospital—I did not sign this statement, I cannot write: "On a Tuesday night the first night Charles Martin had bail, I was in the Bull in Pound public house—this was the second time I had been there that night—the first time my husband fetched me home—I went back the second time for my purse which I thought I had left in the house—Irons was in there, and she came to the door and said, 'What do you want, you cow?' and struck me several times knocking me down on the ground with each blow—I tried to defend myself, but her brother, Charles Martin, struck me in the neck, and stuck his two thumbs into my windpipe, saying, 'I wish you was dead, you cow' shaking me up against the wall"—the signature "H. Williams" is my husband's writing—the "H. Williams" above is not mine—I do not recollect saying it—I was in drink that night—we were all drinking that night, Mrs. Irons, another woman and my husband—I called the woman a bad name—I deserved all I got—they came on the Monday—since I left the hospital none of the prisoner's friends have been to see me—a gentleman brought a paper to the hospital and said I was subpoenaed, and I had to come here, and I am in danger now.

MARY IRONS . I live at 46 Bread Street—I am Martin's sister—on the morning of October 24th, he borrowed 25s. to go to a funeral—he returned some of it during the day.

Cross-examined. I was at the Police Court, but did not go inside.

MINNIE UNDERWOOD (Re-examined). I will swear this brooch is mine, because on this side. where the pin fastens, there are small scratches and

a very small dent—I have never known any harm of the prisoner Martin—he has not been in custody.

MARTIN GUILTY .— Twelve months' hard labour; VEST— Five months' hard labour.

98. GEORGE BENNET (65), PLEADED GUILTY to unlawfully uttering an order for the payment of £2 7s. 5d., knowing it to be forged, having been convicted at Hertford of unlawfully obtaining money by false pretences. Other convictions were proved against him. Twelve months' hard labour —And

(99) WILLIAM GEORGE LINTOTT (30) , to stealing a microscope, the goods of James McCrindle , also to breaking and entering the counting house of William Mason, and stealing twelve pieces of leather, and other goods, his property, also to breaking and entering the counting house of Alfred Ernest Gould, and stealing a cheque book and other articles, his property, having been convicted at Burton-on-Trent on July 28th, 1896. Other convictions were proved against him, and the police stated that about £400 worth of property was missing, through burglaries in which the prisoner was the principal offender. Ten years' penal servitude. The COURT commended Sergeant Hawkins. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

Before Mr Recorder.

100. WILLIAM DEEDS (24) , Unlawfully attempting to break and enter the dwelling-house of Arthur Tucker, and to steal his goods.

MR. PASSMORE Prosecuted.

ARTHUR TUCKER . I am a caretaker of 3, Mount Edgecombe Gardens, Clapham Road—on November 19th, I went to bed about 9.30. p.m.—about midnight I was awake and saw a bit of light on the ceiling, while I was lying in bed—I got up and looked out of the window—I saw some matches being lit in the garden, at the kitchen window—I stayed watching them for about five or ten minutes—I opened the window and called out, "Who is there"—nobody answered, and I took up a flower pot and threw it down, when two or three men scattered—I see them underneath the window, forcing the catch of the kitchen window, and I also saw shadows on the whitewashed wall—the prisoner is the only man I can identify, and when I saw them forcing the window, I got the flower pot, said landed it at them—the prisoner got over the garden wall and ran towards the front way—I ran to the front of the house opened a window, and called out, "Stop him," and "Police"—a constable stopped him—I went out and searched back and front, but found no one else—I examined the ground underneath the kitchen window, and found footmarks there—in the catch of the kitchen window I found a knife—next morning I found another knife in the garden, about three feet from the kitchen window.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. I was at an upper bedroom window, when I threw the flower pot—the house is four stories high, but I was not at the top window, when you lit a light I could see you distinctly—there were several footprints—I do not know where the other men went to—I did not say at the station that I never let you out of my sight, I said I followed you from the back to the front.

RICHARD WHILEY (320 W). About midnight on November 19th, I was on duty in Clapham Road—I heard a window go op and cries of, "Stop

him, stop him"—I saw the prisoner run round the corner from the rear of these premises into Clapham Road—I laid hold of him, he said, "I am not the man, governor, you have got the wrong man"—he straggled very violently and tried to get away—two women came up and one caught me by the neck, and one caught the prisoner and tried to drag him away—a gentleman came to my assistance and the prisoner was taken to the station and charged—on the way to the station he said, "I am a watch-maker," he asked me where I was going to take him—I said, "To Brixton"—he said, "Where shall I be tried"—I told him at Lambeth Police Court—he was searched at the station, and a street door-key, a box of matches, and 1 1/4 d. were found on him—another key was found under the seat where he was sitting—he made no reply to the charge.

Cross-examined. I did not say at the station that you had got into the place, and had come out of the front entrance.

WILLIAM HICKS (Police Inspector, W). In consequence of information I received, about 12.30 a.m. on November 20th, I made an examination of the premises at 3, Mount Edgcombe Gardens—I found footmarks under the kitchen window near the catch and also marks under the dining-room door, which leads into the garden, it is a glass door and is not inside the house—I also saw four footprints near the kitchen window—I went back to the station and obtained the prisoner's boots and made fresh prints with them and they corresponded with the prints already there.

The prisoner, in his defence, said that he was going down the Clapham Road; that he heard a noise and ran down to see what was the matter, and got to the prosecutor's window as it went up, when the constable stopped him.

GUILTY . Four previous convictions were proved against him, one in November, 1897, of Five years' penal servitude, of which he had still one year and sixty-eight days to serve . Twelve months' hard labour

101. GORDON FLETCHER HEWITT (26) , Feloniously forging and uttering a promissory note for £100, with intent to defraud.

MR. MUIR and MR. BIRON Prosecuted, and MR. OVEREND Defended.

GEORGE PERCY YOUNG HULBERT . I am a registered medical practitioner at 94, Brownhill Road, Catford, and have also, since I have known the prisoner, lent money—on November 15th the prisoner owed me £40, which he had had to invest for me—I went to his office on that date—he said he was short of money and wanted £100 to go to America. I said I could not do it as he owed me £40 already—he said he should have to get it from the bank, and mentioned the London and Suburban Bank—I called again, later on, on the same day to see if I could get some of my £40, he then said he could not go to America as they had not the money to lend him at the bank, and that Mr. Harding, the bank manager, had guaranteed it, and he produced this note, dated November 16th, 1900. "Four months after date we jointly and severally promise to pay you or your order the sum of £100 for value received." That is signed by the prisoner, and purports to be signed by Mr. Harding of the London and Suburban Bank—believing the note to be genuine, I said I would give him £60 for it, and gave him a cheque for that amount—I afterwards

found Mr. Harding's signature to be a forgery—and communicated with the police.

Cross-examined. I first made the prisoner's acquaintance when he introduced himself to me when I was seeing my patients—I was not a money lender until I saw him—I registered myself as a money lender because I knew if I had to sue anybody I should be fined £100—I lent him money to lend to other people, and the rate of interest to be charged was left to him—I have no record nor any agreement to show that—he told me he only went to America to fetch his wife back—he always seemed to have plenty of money—I do not know that he had within a year a turnover of £3,000 with this bank, or that he had authority to make overdraughts—I had monetary transactions with him after his return from America.

By the COURT. I never presented the note for payment because I had found that it was not genuine—I may have drank with him once or twice after this occurrence, but I was never friendly with him—I did not give him into custody immediately, because I did not want to drag my name into it.

By MR. OVEREND. I drove about with him in my motor car, which he stole from me and sold—I have never seen this letter before. Read—"January 12th. To G. Fletcher Hewitt—Dear Sir, I have received your promissory note, value £150, of even date, which I understand to be made up as follows: £100 being the purchase price of my motor car, and the remaining £50, which is to be credited to you for such moneys as may be, or is due, from you to me.—Yours truly, G. Hulbert."—that letter is a forgery—it is like my signature, but I never wrote it—the body of it is in the prisoner's writing.

By MR. OVEREND. The only way I can account for the fact of that letter being written on my note-paper is, that the prisoner must have taken some note-paper when he was at my house—I said at the Police Court that I had changed my signature, because I thought he would forge it—I did so after he came back from America.

Re-examined. This (Produced) is a promissory note for £55, purporting to be signed by Ada Alexandra—I lent the money on that to the prisoner to give to Ada Alexandra, and he paid me back two instalments of £11, and I subsequently wrote to Ada Alexandra: "December 3rd, 1900. I beg to inform you that your instalment of £11 will become due on the 31st of this month."

By the COURT. That was when I first discovered that Harding's signature was a forgery.

Re-examined. This receipt (Produced) dated January 3rd, 1901, for the purchase money of the motor car, is not mine—I know nothing about it.

ALFRED BENNETT HARDING . I am the managing director of the London and Suburban Bank—The prisoner has been a customer since September, 1900—the signature "A. B. Harding" to this promissory note is not mine, neither did I authorise anyone to put it there—in my opinion it is the prisoner's writing, with which I am familiar.

Cross-examined. The prosecutor opened an account with us on November 3rd—we discounted a bill for £60 for him with which he

opened the account—we have since had dealings with him as an ordinary customer only—the prisoner's annual turnover with us would be about £2,300—he has overdrawn to the extent of £100, but there was some trickery about it; we should not have allowed it intentionally—on August 28th, 1901, he owed us £61—we first allowed him to overdraw on his return from America in January, 1901—I had written three or four letters to the prosecutor, so he would know my signature—(The witness here writes his signature, and the prosecutor stated that it had no resemblance whatever to that on the promissory note.)

Re-examined. Many of the prisoner's cheques have been presented to our bank, and have been dishonoured.

JAMES MERRILEES . I am a Music Hall artist—in March, 1901, I obtained a loan of £60 from the prisoner and gave him in exchange this promissory note, "C," for £75—(To be repaid by monthly instalments of £18 15s. signed, James Merrilees, Helen Stuart)—those instalments were duly paid, the last payment being in August 1901—I have never given any other Bill of Exchange to the prisoner, neither did I owe him any money after that date—he negotiated the bill with a Mr. Cochrane, who applied to me for payment—I wrote to him letting him know I had paid off the amount of the bill to the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Besides the transactions in reference to the bill that was paid off, I had none whatever—I asked the prisoner for time to pay off the last but one instalment, and he wired back saying that he would give me time if I sent another £5 for interest—I then sold my furniture and met it—I know nothing about this note for £28 (Produced). It is not my signature.

FRANK HAWES . I am a house agent of Queen Street, Cheapside—on March 9th, 1901, the prisoner showed me a bill for £28, signed "James Merrilees"—he said that Merrilees was a good artist, that the money would be quite secure, and asked me for £20 on it, which I gave him, believing the bill to be genuine—he also produced some Music Hall contracts belonging to Mr. Merrilees—the money was to be repaid in two instalments—£20 on April 9th and the remainder on April 15th.

Cross-examined. I had not then seen Mr. Merrilees—the signatures on the assignment and on the note appear to be in the same writing.

Re-examined. The signatures on the assignment and on the £28 bill are totally different to the signature on the genuine £75 bill.

James Merrilees (Re-examined). The signature on this assignment is not mine.

FREDERICK JAMES WILLIAM PARKER . I was a clerk in the prisoner's employ from August 1900 to January 1901—I know his writing—the signatures "A. B. Harding" and "James Merrilees" on these documents, are, in my opinion, in the prisoner's writing—the advance of £60 to Mr. Merrilees on March 20th was all paid off; the entries in the prisoner's ledger, with regard to that, are in my writing—the entry relating to the £28 bill is in the prisoner's writing—nothing appears to have been paid off that.

Cross-examined. I was always on friendly terms with the prisoner—I cannot say I am now—I am at present in Dr. Hulbert's employ.

Re-examined. I was in the prisoner's employ up to the date of his arrest.

ERNEST HAIGH (Detective Sergeant, P). The prisoner was in custody on November 1st, and I charged him with forging Mr. Harding's name to the £100 bill—he said that he had a complete answer to the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

102. GORDON FLETCHER HEWITT was again indicted for forging and uttering an undertaking for the payment of £28, with intent to defraud.

MR. MUIR and MR. BIRON Prosecuted, and MR. OVEREND Defended.

JAMES MERRILEES . I live at Wellesley House, Sistova Road, Balham, and am a Music Hall artist—in March this year I saw the prisoner, and obtained from him a loan of £60, and signed this promissory note, "C," for £75—the money was duly paid off in four monthly instalments, and I had great trouble in getting back my contracts. which I had deposited with him for security—I eventually got them all back except these three (Produced)—this bill for £28 (Produced) is not signed by me, and the signature to the assignment relating to these three contracts is not mine.

Cross-examined. I signed the promissory note for £75 in the prisoner's office, and he handed me the £60 in a public house—I emphatically deny signing any other document in the public house.

FRANK HAWES . I am a house agent at Queen Street, Cheapside—the prisoner brought me this bill for £28 on or about March 9th, 1901—he said that James Merrilees was a good artist, and that the money would be quite secure—believing the bill to be genuine I lent him £20 on it—he also showed me what purported to be an assignment, and three Music Hall contracts for performances at the Palace Theatre of Varieties; Hackney Empire Theatre of Varieties; and the Star, Bermondsey.

Cross-examined. I did not see Mr. Merrilees—I simply relied upon what the prisoner told me.

CHARLES EDMUND HAVERLEY . I am a variety agent—I manage my wife's business—her professional name is Ada Alexandra—she is at present following her profession in Nottingham—in August, 1900, I borrowed £25 from the prisoner, and deposited with him, as security, my wife's contracts, in addition to signing a promissory note—that sum was duly paid off, and neither I nor my wife have borrowed money from him since—the signature to this bill (exhibit D) for £55 is not my wife's, nor was it signed by my authority or her's—this letter was written to the prisoner by my wife: Dated December 13th, 1900, and stating that she had received an extraordinary demand from a Mr. Hulbert for an instalment of £11 on a promissory note of hers, which he alleged he received from the prisoner, signed by her—that she had never had any transactions with Mr. Hulbert or with the prisoner in regard to it—we eventually got a reply to that letter, but I cannot tell you the date.

Cross-examined. I am prepared to swear that my wife did not sign any document in, September.

FREDERICK JAMES WILLIAM PARKER . This bill for £55, purporting to be signed by Ada Alexandra, and the bill for £28, purporting to be signed by James Merrilees are in the prisoner's writing—the bill for

£25, according to the prisoner's ledger, has been paid off; the £55 bill has not.

GUILTY .—He then PLEADED GUILTY to a previous conviction of felony at this Court on May 16th, 1898. Three years' penal servitude.

103. THOMAS RYAN (25), PLEADED GUILTY to feloniously setting fire to the dwelling house of Charles Brakber, persons being then therein. Twelve months' hard labour. —And

(104). JOHN ARTHUR CROSS (24) , to forging and uttering an order for the payment of £30, also an order for £100, with intent to defraud.— Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutors.—He received a good character, and his father promised to send him out of the country.— Six months' in the second division. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

ADJOURNED TO MONDAY, JANUARY 13TH, 1902.