Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 02 September 2014), December 1885 (t18851214).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th December 1885.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT

Sessions Paper.

STAPLES, MAYOR.

SECOND SESSION, HELD DECEMBER 14TH, 1885.

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND, BY

JAMES DROVER BARNETT

AND

ALEXANDER BUCKLER,

Short-hand Writers to the Court,

ROLLS CHAMBERS, No. 89, CHANCERY LANE.

THE POINTS OF LAW AND PRACTICE

REVISED AND EDITED BY

EDWARD T. E. BESLEY, ESQ.,

OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE, BARRISTER-AT-LAW.

LONDON:

STEVENS AND SONS, 119, CHANCERY LANE,

Law Booksellers and Publishers.

THE

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS

On the Queen's Commission of

OYER AND TERMINER AND GAOL DELIVERY

FOR

The City of London,

AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, AND PARTS OF THE COUNTIES OF ESSEX, KENT, AND SURREY, WITHIN THE JURISDICTION

OF THE

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT,

Held on Monday, December 14th, 1885, and following days.

Including cases committed to this Court under Order in Council and

Winter Assize Act.

BEFORE the RIGHT HON. JOHN STAPLES, LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Hon. Sir HENRY HAWKINS , Knt., one of the Justices of Her Majesty's High Court of Justice; Sir ROBERT WALTER CARDEN, Knt., WILLIAM LAWRENCE, Esq., Sir JAMES CLARKE LAWRENCE, Bart., Sir JOHN WHITTAKER ELLIS, Bart., M.P., and WILLIAM JAMES RICHMOND COTTON, Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir THOMAS CHAMBERS, Knt., Q.C., Recorder of the said City; SIR REGINALD HANSON, Knt., HERBERT JAMESON WATERLOW, Esq., EDWARD JAMES GRAY , Esq., and STUART KNILL, Esq., other of the Aldermen of the said City; Sir WILLIAM THOMAS CHARLEY, Knt., Q.C., D.C.L., Common Serjeant of the said City; and ROBERT MALCOLM KERR, Esq., LL.D., Judge of the Sheriffs' Court: Her Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, and General Gaol Delivery, holden for the said City, and Judges of the Central Criminal Court.

DAVID EVANS, Esq., Alderman,

THOMAS CLARKE , Esq.,

Sheriffs.

GEORGE ROSE INNES, Junior, Esq.,

WYNNE EDWIN BAXTER, Esq.,

Under-Sheriffs.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

STAPLES, MAYOR. SECOND SESSION.

A star (*) denotes that prisoners have been previously in custody—two stars (**) that they have been more than once in custody—a dagger (†) that they are known to be the associates of bad characters—the figures after the name in the indictment denote the prisoner's age.

LONDON AND MIDDLESEX CASES.

OLD COURT.—Monday, December 14th, 1885.

Before Mr. Recorder.

72. PERCY FOX (25) and WILLIAM CORDUE (29) PLEADED GUILTY to stealing a bag and other articles, the goods of Eliza James , and CORDUE PLEADED GUILTY to five and FOX to two other indictments for stealing bags and other articles the property of various persons, CORDUE** having been convicted of felony in December,1881, in the name of Victor Seymour. CORDUE— Seven Years' Penal Servitude. FOX— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

NEW COURT.—Monday, December 14th, 1885.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

73. FREDERICK JAMES POUNTNEY (37) PLEADED GUILTY to stealing whilst employed in the Post Office a letter containing orders for 10s. and 2s. 6d. and nine penny stamps of Her Majesty's Postmaster-General.— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour.

74. WALTER HOGBEN (39) to stealing whilst employed in the Post Office a letter containing postal orders for 3s. 6d., 4s. 6d., and 5s., and twenty-four penny stamps of Her Majesty's Postmaster-General .— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour. And> [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

75. GEORGE THOMAS (42) to stealing whilst employed under the Post Office 68 postage stamps out of a post letter the property of Her Majesty's Postmaster-General.— Twelve Months' Hard Labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

76. CHARLOTTE WAUGHMAN , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. LLOYD and WILKINSON Prosecuted; Mr. Purcell Defended.

JOSEPH JOHN HOBBS . I am shopman to John Collier, grocer, of 144,

Bow Road—on 30th October, between 5.15 and 6 p.m., the prisoner came in and bespoke goods value 3s. 9 1/2 d., and directed them to be sent to Mrs. Hatley, Fairfield Road, Bow—I sent them by the errand boy, Richard Thompson, and gave him change amounting with the goods to a half-sovereign—he brought a half-sovereign back, which I examined and found was bad; it was light and dull, this is it (produced)—I afterwards went with the boy to the address given but could not find the prisoner—I then took the coin to the police-station and gave it to Inspector Jackson—I did not get back my goods—we had just lit up when she came in and she was there about three minutes.

Cross-examined. She was a perfect stranger to me—I was taken to Worship Street Police-court on the 10th, into a room where there were five or six women dressed as though they were going out—I then picked out this woman—I am perfectly sure of her.

JOHN JACKSON (Police Inspector). Mr. Hobbs gave me this half-sovereign, I have had it ever since.

RICHARD PAUL THOMPSON . I am errand boy to Mr. Collier, a grocer, of Bow Road—on 30th October I was sent to 79, Fairfield Road with some grocery, and Mr. Hobbs gave me 6s. 2 1/2 d. change—I took the grocery there and saw the prisoner standing at the door—I had not seen her in the shop—she said "Don't knock, there is nobody in; we have only just moved in here"—I then gave her the goods—she gave me this half-sovereign and I gave her the change I had received from Mr Hobbs and took the half-sovereign back to him—I had no other half-sovereign or coin about me—we went back afterwards to Fairfield Road to see if we could find the prisoner but could not—I described her to the police and saw her next at Worship Street Police-court and recognised her.

Cross-examined. I am 12 years old—the woman that I saw at the door was a perfect stranger to me; I was talking to her about two minutes—at the police-station I saw six women in a row, and the prisoner was the last one, and I went along and touched her—Mr. Hobbs went there the same day that I did, and went into the room before me—I said before the Magistrate "I didn't see her again till I saw her a fortnight ago. I was not quite sure of her at first; directly I saw her I knew her. There were four other women besides the prisoner in the room, and I don't think the prisoner was there at first; in about two minutes I picked her out"—that is quite right—there is a long garden in front of this house; it was very dark there.

Re-examined. I could see the number on the door, because they were brass—I didn't see the prisoner at first;, she was the last in the row, but when I came up to her I recognised her.

WILLIAM DURHAM . I am assistant to Mr. Kelly, a grocer, of 815, Commercial Road—on 3rd November, about 1.30, the prisoner came into my shop and ordered some goods, amounting to 3s. 11d., to be sent to her address, 290, Burdett Road; she gave the name of Smith, and paid she had just moved in there—I gave the goods to the errand boy, Clarke, with some directions, and he returned in about ten minutes with this note, "One tin best condensed milk, kindly"—part of it has been torn off—in consequence of that, and of what the boy said, I gave him a tin of milk and 4s. 5 1/2 d. change, which was the difference between these goods and a sovereign—he went away and came back in about 15 minutes—290, Burdett Road, is about 600 yards from my shop—he brought this

bad sovereign back—I went to that address with the boy and no such person had been there—I showed the coin to my master and afterwards gave it to the police—this is it (produced)—the gas was just lit when she came in—I saw her again about a fortnight afterwards at Worship Street Police-court, and have no doubt she is the same person.

Cross-examined. The woman was a stranger to me; she was in the shop about eight minutes—when I went to Worship Street Police-court Mr. Hobbs and the boy were there—I did not speak a word to them or they to me, and they did not know what I was there for.

GEORGE YOUNG (Police Inspector). I received this coin from Sergeant Brown, and have produced it here to-day.

Cross-examined. The prisoner was remanded twice at Worship Street—during those intervals about 12 persons altogether came there to see if they could identify her, and four of them did so.

Re-examined. I saw the witnesses identify her—Thompson pointed her out in about half a minute.

By the COURT. He did not point to anybody else—the other people who came to see if they could identify her came relative to other charges.

THOMAS CLARKE . I am errand boy to Mr. Kelly, a grocer, of 815, Commercial Road—on 3rd November Mr. Durham gave me some goods to take to 290, Burdett Road, with 16s.—I went there and saw the prisoner at the top of the steps, just inside the gate—she said "Oh, you have saved me a good journey, you might run back with this note."—I took the note back with the goods to the shop—this is part of it (produced)—it had on it, "A tin of best milk and change of a sovereign, and pricelist of mineral waters"—I then went to the house again and saw the prisoner outside the gate and gave her the goods, which she put in her apron—she then gave me this counterfeit sovereign, which I took back to the shop and gave to Mr. Durham—after that I again went back to the house, but could not see the prisoner—I had not seen her at the shop—she was dressed rather dark.

Cross-examined. I am 14 years old; I was with the prisoner each time about four minutes—I said before the Magistrate, "I was not quite sure of her when I first saw her; no one moved his head; I am not quite sure about her now"—to the best of my knowledge she is the woman.

FRANK JOHAKIM TIDIMAN . I am a grocer, at 126, Green Street, Bethnal Green—on 10th November, about 10 a.m., a boy came into my shop—the prisoner subsequently said it was her boy—he put down a half-crown and asked for change—as soon as it was put down on the counter I saw it was bad, and said "Where do you come from?"—he said, "My mother is waiting round the corner"—the prisoner was brought in afterwards, and I heard her say that her husband had got the half-sovereign in change the night before at a public-house—the boy was given in charge and afterwards was discharged.

Cross-examined. When the boy said his mother was waiting round the corner I kept him in the shop and sent my man for a policeman—one came in about a minute—the prisoner was then brought in and she said that she had sent the boy in for the change—I had not before to my knowledge seen her.

GEORGE BUCKENHAM (Policeman K 490). On 10th November I was called to Mr. Tidiman's shop and found the boy there in custody of K 526—the prisoner was standing about 50 yards round the corner up

Warely Street—I went up to her and said "Is your name Mrs. Waughman?"—she said "Yes"—I said "Did you send your boy to change a half-crown?"—she said "Yes, I am waiting for it"—I said "Do you know it was a bad one?"—she said "No, I did not; I have some more here," and handed me these two half-crowns and a florin, good money—I then took her to the shop—on the way she said she didn't know anything about it being bad—I said she would have to go to the station with the boy—on the way there she said she went into the Horns public-house the night previous to change a sovereign, and it must have been given to her there—at the station she gave me 1s. 6d. in good silver—nothing was found on her.

Cross-examined. When I got back into the shop the boy said "They wouldn't change it at the other corner, and so I brought it here"—she said "Why didn't you bring it back to me?"

CHARLES DRURY (Policeman K 526). On 10th November I was called into Mr. Tidiman's shop, and was given this coin—the boy was in the shop, and said his mother had sent him there.

Cross-examined. I have made inquiries about the prisoner, and find her to be a respectable woman living with her husband, both hard-working people.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . These three coins are bad; they are made of pewter pots and gilded by a battery.

The prisoner received an excellent character.

GUILTY . Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury. Her husband entered into recognisances to bring her up for judgment if called upon.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, December 15th, 1885.

Before Mr. Justice Hawkins.

77. EDWARD TALBOT (30) , Stealing a trunk containing pictures and other goods, the property of Joseph Simmons Lavington and another, his masters.

MR. BESLEY Prosecuted; MESSRS. KEITH FRITH and MOYSES Defended.

After the case had commenced the prisoner wished to withdraw his plea, and so stating in the hearing of the Jury, they found a verdict of GUILTY . There were other charges against the prisoner.— Six Years' Penal Servitude.

78. EDWARD WIFFIN (19) , Feloniously carnally knowing and abusing Ann Gindra, a girl under the age of 13. MESSRS. POLAND and MONTAGU WILLIAMS Prosecuted. GUILTY of the attempt .— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

THIRD COURT.—Tuesday, December 15th, 1885.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

79. JOHN SMITH (40) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS LLOYD and WILKINSON Prosecuted.

JOHN JENKINS . I am an umbrella maker of 50, New Oxford Street—on 20th November the prisoner came to my door, picked out a sixpenny stick from a bundle on the step, and came in for a twopenny ferrule to be put

on—he offered a half-crown—I told him it was bad and broke it in a vice on the counter—these are the pieces—he said "A conductor give it to me in change of a half-sovereign," and to a gentleman waiting to be served he said "This may get me into trouble"—I said "If you have any more change pay me for the stick, and that is all I want"—he put his hand in his fob pocket and produced a second half-crown, which I saw was bad—I endeavoured to get it from him, but he backed from the counter, turned round, and put it in his mouth—I sent my son for a constable, who had to get it out of his mouth—the prisoner made use of bad language to him—the constable sent for help and they searched the prisoner—nothing was found on him—the two pieces of the first coin I had laid on the counter; the prisoner made a grab to get them and got one piece, I got the other and gave it to the constable—I gave the prisoner in charge.

Cross-examined. The pieces remained on the counter for a second or so—I just touched the second half-crown with my fingers, you literally chewed it up—I saw you get it in your mouth—my assistant was on the same side of the counter as myself, and must have seen all that passed.

Re-examined. The second coin felt greasy—I was three feet from the prisoner.

JOHN EDWARD JENKINS . I am the son of the last witness—I saw the prisoner hand my father this half-crown for the stick—I asked him where he got it—he said he had it given him by a publican, and then by a conductor of a 'bus—my father asked him once or twice how he got it, and said "Have you any more money to pay for the stick?"—the prisoner said he had, and took another half-crown out of his pocket, which he was passing to my father, when I snatched at it, and the prisoner passed it somewhere—I did not see where it went to—I jumped over the counter and went for a policeman, and when I came back my father motioned to me to look at the prisoner's mouth—the policeman took hold of the prisoner's throat and mouth.

Cross-examined. I was to the left of my father, only the width of the counter from you—my father broke the first half-crown with a pair of nippers, I think—you took the change as he passed the pieces towards you—I won't swear if the half-crown remained on the counter—the second half-crown went near your mouth—when you took it out of your pocket I could see by the light shining on it that it was bad, as you were thinking whether to tender it or not—my father snatched at it and you put it near your mouth—I only saw your hand go in the direction of your mouth—the coin was in your hand.

PHILIP PURDY (Policeman E 97). On 20th November I was sent to this shop, "where Mr. Jenkins charged the prisoner with uttering a counterfeit half-crown—the prisoner spoke very thick, and said he had given him a two-shilling piece in change for a bad half-crown—Mr. Jenkins said it was false, and that the prisoner had got a piece of money in his mouth—I asked the prisoner to open his mouth, caught him by the throat, and tried to choke him to make him disgorge it—I am almost certain he had something in his mouth, I could not make him open it; I fancy he swallowed it—when I went in he rubbed his mouth with his lips, as if he was trying to get something down his throat—I took him to the station, where in answer to the charge he said he had got the two-shilling piece still—I found this broken piece of coin in his pocket, but no other money—Mr. Jenkins gave me this piece of a bad half-crown—

the prisoner gave me his address as 21, Cranbourne Street, Leicester Square—I afterwards told the prisoner I had been there and found he did not live there—he said he had made a mistake—he then gave another address, 11, Park Street, Caledonian Road, a lodging-house; there is no such place.

Cross-examined. I did not afterwards take a half-crown out of your pocket, only this small piece.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . I am Examiner of Coins to Her Majesty's Mint—these are two pieces of a bad half-crown—a greasy feeling is an indication of a bad one.

The prisoner in his defence declared the impossibility of his swallowing a half-crown, and dated that the first one he did not know to be bad, and the second he only put in his mouth to try.

GUILTY . He then PLEADED GUILTY** to unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin in November, 1884.— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

80. JOHN RHYAN (30) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. LLOYD and WILKINSON Prosecuted.

HENRY EDWARD STUBBINGS . I am a tobacconist, of 109, London Wall—on 29th November, about a quarter-past 2, I served the prisoner with an ounce of tobacco, price 4d.—he tendered a sovereign—I found it was bad, and said "Where did you get it from?"—he said "I received it in wages last week"—I sent for a constable and told him—the prisoner said that he had received it in wages—I gave it to the constable—this is it.

Cross-examined. I swear I had no other money in the pocket I put this coin into—I gave the constable also a bad florin and a half-crown which I had received.

WILLIAM CUSHINE (City Policeman 202). Mr. Stubbings gave the prisoner into my custody—I said "How do you account for the possession of this coin?"—he said "I got it from my last employer's where I was at work"—I said "Where does your employer live?"—he said "At Bedford Place, Bedford Iron Foundry, Mr. Dean"—at the station he said he should not like to swear he received it from Mr. Dean—I said "Did you get it from any one else then?"—he said no, he had not received any other money from any other quarter—I asked him "How long have you been away from your employer's?"—he said he had been away about a week—I said "Have you been at work anywhere since then?"—he said "I have not"—on searching him I found one penny and an ounce of tobacco—he gave the address, 13, East Street, Walworth—I went there, and on returning I said to the prisoner that I had been there, and he was not known there—he said he thought it must be a baker's shop—I paid it was a butcher's—there is only one No. 13 in that street—communication was made to Bedford, in consequence of which Inspector Phelps is here—I put none of that conversation in writing.

WILLIAM POTTINGER . I am a butcher, of 13, East Street, Walworth Road, the prisoner never lived there—I don't know him.

THOMAS PHELPS (Inspector, Bedford Police). There is no such place as Bedford Place, Bedford, and no such person as Mr. Dean, an iron founder—I have known Bedford for many years.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . This coin is bad, and is made of pewter.

The prisoner in his defence denied any guilty knowledge.

GUILTY . He then PLEADED GUILTY ** to a conviction of felony at this Court in May, 1883, in the name of Henry Heard, of feloniously uttering counterfiet coin. — Five yearsPenalServitude.

81. WILLIAM REDMAN (30) and EDWARD SIMKINS (20) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. LLOYD and WILKINSON prosecuted.

LYDIA CLEARY . I am the wife of Edmund Cleary—we live at Sessions House Chambers, Clerkenwell Road—on 14th November we kept a fruit and oyster shop in Farringdon Road—on Saturday, 14th November, about 8.30, Redman came in for a dozen oysters, which came to 1s. 6d.—he gave me a sovereign and I gave him 18s. 6d. change—I gave him a napkin and he ate the oysters—I gave the sovereign to my husband, it was the only one I had—he afterwards gave it back to me and I gave it to the police—between 11 and 12 that night I saw that it was bad—I put it between two weights and knocked a little bit off the edge—I could not break it—I next saw the prisoner at Marylebone, and picked him out from eight or nine others.

Cross-examined. I identify you by your face, figure, and height—the man did not take his hat off—when I went to identify the man I did not see you the first time I passed down, but the second time I looked you in the face and said you were the man—I said at the police-court I was quite sure you were the man—I did not notice your hands while you were eating the oysters.

EDMUND CLEARY . I live with my wife at Sessions House Chambers, Clerkenwell—between 11 and 12 p.m. on 14th November she gave me this counterfeit sovereign—I gave it back to her at once.

JAMES ROCKLEY (City Detective). I received this counterfeit sovereign from Mrs. Cleary on 18th November, and have produced it here to-day.

CHARLES LIDDLE . I keep a coffee-shop at 111, Kentish Town Road—on 18th November, about 5.30, the two prisoners came in together and had two cups of coffee and bread-and-butter, which would be 3d.—I was at the farther end of the shop—Simkins gave my servant a shilling; she brought it to me; I rubbed it with my thumb and forefinger and discovered it was bad—I spoke to the girl, and then went down the shop and said to Simkins, "What shall I do with this?"—he said, "Take for what we have had"—I said, "Out of that? that is worthless; have you any more about you like it?"—he said, "I have just got off an omnibus, and have taken it in change; I wish you to give me back the coin, and I will give you a good one in return"—I said, "No, I have it, and I will keep it now"—I sent for a constable, who said to Redman, who was on the opposite side of the table to Simkins, "Get up, and let's see what is under the table," and stooped under the table—I saw a newspaper lying on the seat close to Redman; I took it in my hand, reached over the back of the box, shook the paper, and a bad shilling fell out—these are two bad coins (produced).

Cross-examined by Redman. There was no newspaper on the seat before you came in—I did not see you with the newspaper.

By the COURT. I did not see him come in with one in his hand.

Cross-examined by Simkins. You offered me a good shilling in exchange for the bad one.

LOUISA BRANDRETH . I am a waitress in Mr. Liddle's service—on 18th November I served the two prisoners with two cups of coffee and bread-and-butter,

which came to 3d.—Simkins gave me this shilling; I gave it to Mr. Liddle, telling him it was bad—the two prisoners sat opposite to one another; I saw them speaking together.

WILLIAM TURNER (Policeman Y.R. 23). I was called, and saw the two prisoners sitting at a table—the prosecutor said he had received a bad shilling from Simkins in payment for refreshment, and he would give them in custody—I detained them, and sent for assistance—I said, "You hear what the prosecutor says?"—Simkins said, "I got it off a 'bus man"—Redman made no answer, but got off his seat to go, and said, "It is unfortunate I should be here in this affair"—I told him to wait—on the arrival of another constable I told them to get clear of the table, and I asked the constable to look if there was anything, when the prosecutor caught hold of a paper by Redman's side on the seat, and a shilling fell out on the floor; the other constable picked it up—I found on Redman three sixpences in silver and 5d. bronze, and a shilling on Simkins—when asked their addresses Redman said, "I have no home"—Simkins said the same—this shilling I got from the prosecutor, and this from the other constable—the newspaper was close to Redman, it must have touched his clothes.

Cross-examined by Redman. You said, "I shall get myself into a nice scrape coming to have a cup of coffee"—you went quietly to the station—it was 10 minutes before the other constable came, but I had my arm on your coat, you could not get away—I only noticed one paper near you; that was not out of your reach.

JOHN FENNEMORE (Policeman Y 565). I went to this shop, and found the prisoners sitting opposite one another at the same table—I saw Liddle lift up a paper which was by Redman's side; a shilling fell out, and I picked it up—I said, "Here is another bad one"—the prisoners said nothing—I gave it to Turner—I searched the shop, and Simkins, on whom I found a good shilling—I took the prisoners to the station.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . This is a good farthing, on the reverse side of which an imitation half-sovereign has been put, and then it has been gilded; it bears a date on both sides—these are two counterfeit shillings from different moulds.

Redman in his statement before the Magistrate and in his defence, denied all knowledge of the transaction at the oyster shop, and stated that he merely went into the coffee-shop at Simkins's invitation, and knew nothing of the coin in the newspaper. Simkins denied all guilty knowledge.

REDMAN— GUILTY .— Nine Months' Hard Labour. SIMKINS— GUILTY on the first Count .— Six Months' Hard Labour.

82. CATHERINE MOORE (28) and MORRIS MOORE (19) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. LLOYD and WILKINSON Prosecuted.

ANNIE FEATHERSTONE . My husband keeps the Prince of Wales, Ebury Street, Pimlico—on 25th August the female prisoner came in about a quarter to 9 p.m. dressed as a domestic, with a muslin apron—she ordered a bottle of whisky to be sent to 120, Ebury Street; about a minute afterwards she came and asked us to send change for a sovereign with the whisky, as Mrs. Martin had no change—she did not give her own name—I sent the change and whisky by the potman, Howard—I did not see the sovereign.

JOHN HOWARD . I am potman at this public-house—about a quarter to 9 on 25th August I was standing outside the house when the female prisoner went in—when she came out I asked her if she had left an order—she said "Yes," and then "Oh dear, I forgot to tell them to send the change for a sovereign," and she went in again—I went inside to see about the order—I took the bottle of whisky and 16s. 6d. change, and was directed to 120, Ebury Street—when nearing there the female prisoner came up to me with a basket and said "Our people are waiting for this whisky; I was just coming after it; have you brought the change for the sovereign?"—I said "Yes"—she said "Here is the sovereign," and handed me this—I gave her the change and the bottle of whisky—I gave the sovereign to Mr. Featherstone, and he put it in his mouth and sounded it on the counter, and found it was counterfeit—after that I went to 120, Ebury Street—I took the coin to the station-house and gave it to Inspector Adams—on the 18th I identified the prisoner from seven or eight women at Westminster Police-court—she had no apron or mob cap on then.

WILLIAM ADAMS (Police Inspector). This is the counterfeit sovereign Howard gave me.

THOMAS LLOYD . I am assistant to Mr. Debac, a grocer, at 37, Church Street, Marylebone—about 7.40 p.m. on 13th November the female prisoner came and ordered articles to the amount of 5s. or 6s. to be sent to 39, North Bank and paid for on delivery—I gave them to Kingston, our errand boy—North Bank is about 15 minutes' walk from our place—I was not there when the boy returned—I afterwards picked out the prisoner from about seven other females.

SAMUEL KINGSTON . I am errand boy to Mr. Debac—Mr. Jenner, his manager, gave me goods to take to 39, North Bank—I went there and just as I got to the door of the garden the female prisoner came to me from the direction of the house and asked me if I was from the grocer's—I said "Yes"—she said "Take this letter back to the shop and say I want some more goods." (This requested a pound of coffee and change far a sovereign to be sent.) I took the note back with the goods to the shop, and received more goods and 15s. from Mr. Jenner—I then went towards the house again, but the female prisoner met me about 30 yards from the door, and said "Did not I tell you to be quick?"—I said "Yes"—she said I had not made as much haste as I could, and she said "Master is blowing me up" because she had not got the goods—I gave her the goods—she said "Have you got the change with you?"—I said "Yes," and gave it her—she gave me this coin, which I gave to Mr. Jenner at the shop—I afterwards went back with Mr. Jenner to 39, North Bank, but saw nothing of the prisoner there—a constable was afterwards called in, who marked the coin as it is now—I did not look particularly at the amount of money given to me to give to the prisoner.

JOHN JENNER . I am manager to Mr. Debac—on 18th November I gave Kingston some groceries with directions—he returned about a quarter of an hour afterwards with this note in an envelope not addressed; in consequence of that I gave him half a pound of coffee and 13s. 10d. change, I think—he returned in about the same time, and then gave me this coin, which I immediately discovered to be bad—I gave it to Constable Leonard on the Saturday morning—I sent Garrodd and Kingston out again with directions to 39, North Bank, and went there myself with a constable—

we only went to the door and knocked; we did not go inside—I did not see the female prisoner there.

WILLIAM LEONARD (Constable S). From a communication made to me, I went to 37, Church Street, where this coin was shown to me—I marked it in the presence of Mr. Jenner and the boy.

EDWARD CROSSLEY . I am an oil and colourman, at Hendon Street, Pimlico—at half-past 2 p.m. on 18th November the female prisoner came to my shop and asked my assistant in my presence for half a pound of soap, price 2 1/4 d.—my assistant served her—she gave a two-shilling piece—my assistant held it up, and said "This is a bad one"—the prisoner seemed surprised, and said "I must have had the coin some days; I do not know where I had it from"—she searched her pocket for other money and produced twopence—I slightly bent the coin in my hand, and gave it back to her, and she went away—I went to the other side of the road and saw her joined by the male prisoner—they went in company into Sussex Street—I met and spoke to a constable—the prisoners did not see me—the female went into Bacon's shop in Sussex Street, the male prisoner turned to the right; they did not join again—I went into the shop, and subsequently the male prisoner was brought in there—I said to the young woman behind the counter of the shop "Have you served this lady?"—she said "Yes"—I said "What with?"—she said "Some soap and soda"—I said "What have you taken from her?"—she said "This two-shilling piece"—that was the one tendered to me—I asked the young woman to try it; she rang it and looked at it, and said she thought it was good—Mr. Bacon was called in, and the prisoner was given into custody—I knew the coin again, because I had bent it and made a nick in the edge.

JULIA WHEELER . I am assistant to Mr. Crossley—on 18th November the female prisoner came in for half a pound of soap—I served her with it—it was 2 1/4 d.—she gave me this florin; I saw it was bad—I asked her if she knew it was bad—she said "No, I was not aware of it"—I handed the florin to Mr. Crossley—the prisoner gave me twopence for the soap and left, and Mr. Crossley followed her.

GRACE GEAN . I am assistant to Mr. Bacon, oilman, Sussex Street, Pimlico—on 18th November, about a quarter to 1, the female prisoner came to our shop for half a pound of soap and two pounds of soda, which came to 3 1/2 d.—she gave me a two-shilling piece in payment—just as I received it Mr. Crossley came in and said, in the hearing of the prisoner, "Have you taken two shillings from the prisoner?"—I said "Yes"—he said "Is it good?"—I said "I have not looked at it"—I thought it was good at that time, and was just going to give her change—Mr. Crossley asked me to give him the coin, but he being a stranger I called Mr. Bacon from his dinner, and he weighed it and said it was very light.

JOHN BACON . I keep a shop at 18, Sussex Street, Pimlico—on 18th November I was called into the shop by the last witness, who showed me a florin and said "I have taken this coin from this good lady, and that gentleman wants me to give it to him; I have called you instead"—I said "It is a pretty good-looking one, but my sight is bad," and I put it in the tea scale with a proper florin on the other side—it was very light—I said to the prisoner "I should be very sorry to put you in a wrong position if you have come with it unknowingly; if you had come with it knowingly I should have thought it my duty to give you in charge"—

she said she had taken it in change on Friday or Saturday with other money, she did not know where—a constable brought in the male prisoner—what had occurred to Mr. Crossley was stated in their presence—the male prisoner said he had no other money about him—the constable searched him; they were taken into custody—I handed the florin to the constable.

JOHN ROOKE (Policeman B 324). The male prisoner was pointed out to me by Mr. Crossley on the 18th—he was by himself, about 50 yards from Bacon's shop—I followed him; he went round two or three streets—I tapped him on the shoulder—he said "What do you want me for?"—I told him if he would come back to the shop he would have a further explanation—I brought him back to Mr. Bacon's shop—the female prisoner was there; she said "That is my brother"—I searched him in the shop; I found 1s. 6d. in silver and 2d. bronze—I subsequently searched him at the station, and as I was getting to his bosom he said "I may as well let you have them," and out of his bosom he took these seven florins, wrapped separately in paper—I did not ask him how he came by them.

JAMES SMITH (Policeman B 37). On 18th November I was called to Mr. Bacon's shop by Mr. Crossley—Mr. Bacon, in the female prisoner's presence, said "If this woman came by this coin accidentally I don't wish to charge her; but if she got it knowingly I will charge her"—that was referring to the florin—she said "I came by it last Friday; I received it in change, but I don't know where"—she was given in custody and searched; nothing was found on her—I received from Mr. Bacon this bad two-shilling piece—in Sergeant Scott's presence I saw five bad florins found in the back kitchen of the address they gave, 47, Hereford Street, Marylebone.

HENRY REARDON . I collect the rents at 47, Hereford Street—the prisoners have occupied the two kitchens there with their father and mother—I have seen the prisoners there.

JOHN SCOTT (Police Sergeant B). I went to 47, Hereford Street, on the 29th of last month, and searched the front and back kitchens and found five counterfeit shillings on the shelf, wrapped separately in paper, and with paper round them—the prisoner's mother and brother and Sergeant Smith were there at the time.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . These are two bad sovereigns from different moulds—this is a bad florin—the counterfeit shillings found in the kitchen and the florins found on the prisoner are bad—the florin tendered is from the same mould as one of the seven found on the man—bad coins when made are rubbed with lampblack and wrapped in paper, and then before they are uttered the paper is taken off, and the coin is rubbed to remove the lampblack.

Catherine Moore, in her statement before the Magistrate, denied all guilty knowledge, and stated her brother gave her the florin. Morris Moore stated that he had received the money in payment from a betting man.

GUILTY. CATHERINE MOORE— Twelve Months' Hard labour. MORRIS MOORE— Nine Months' Hard Labour.

83. JOHN CHALWRIGHT (19) , Unlawfully having counterfeit coin in his possession, with intent to utter it.

MESSRS. LLOYD and WILKINSON Prosecuted.

JAMES CHARD . I am salesman to Mr. McCowens, a bootmaker, of 6, Little Newport Street, Leicester Square—on 5th December, about 20 minutes or half-past 6, the prisoner came in for a pair of boots—he selected a pair of the value of 6s. 9d.—he offered me these three bad half-crowns—I asked him where he got them from—he said "My father gave them to me," and that he would take them home again—I asked him where he lived—he said 7, King Street, Regent Street—I gave the half-crowns to a police constable.

EDWARD LOOME (Policeman C 289). I was called to this shop and the prisoner was given into my custody—I told him I should take him to the station on the charge of uttering counterfeit coin—he said he picked them up in Coventry Street, which is close by—I went to 7, King Street, Regent Street, where his father, who is a respectable man, lives—the boy is a great trouble to him—I searched the house.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . These coins are bad, from different moulds.

GUILTY .— Six Months' Hard Labour.

FOURTH COURT.—Tuesday, December 15th, 1885.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

84. JULIUS HAHN (29) , Feloniously taking Christina Fischer, under the age of 16, out of the possession of her father and against his will.

MESSRS. MEAD and BURNIE Prosecuted.

CHRISTINA FISCHER (Interpreted). My parents call me Emily Fischer—I was 13 last March—on Saturday, October 24th, the prisoner come to see my parents at 59, Greenfield Street, Commercial Road—we have known him for some two years—he lodged at the same house some time ago—he brought his two children with him, a child of five years and a baby of four months—I took charge of them when he went away—I saw him return about 11 o'clock—I had got the children ready to go—I heard him say during the day that he gas going to Germany—my father sent me out on an errand—I did not put any hat or jacket on—I brought back what I was sent for, and went out again to meet a friend, and as I was coming back I met the prisoner with his children—he said "Will you come with me to Black wall to carry the baby?" and I said "Yes"—I then went home to get my hat—I did not see my parents or any one else—I carried the baby to the Black wall Docks; it is about 10 minutes' walk from where I live—when we reached Blackwall the prisoner said "Will you come with me a little way to the ship? you cannot get out of this gate; you must go by a little boat on board"—I then went downstairs and put the baby to bed—the ship started—I was downstairs about five minutes—I went on deck, and the prisoner said I should have to go with him to Rotterdam—I began to cry, and he threatened me, and said if I told any one I should see what he would give me—I said I would tell the captain—I then went below, and he followed me, and wanted to kiss me—I was not lying down with the children, but sitting up—I would not let him—afterwards he came down again and tried to put his hand up my clothes—I threatened I would tell the captain, and he went on deck—I told a woman and she told the steward—I did not hear what she said to the steward—I have not seen the man to whom the woman spoke here to-day—the prisoner gave me 11s. for a ticket, and afterwards I took a return

ticket for another 6s.—I did not get a return ticket first, for I did not know I could—I put the change in my purse, which I put in the cupboard where the prisoner could get it—we got to Rotterdam on Sunday morning—the prisoner asked me to go with him to to Bingen—I would not go—he tried to get me on the ship to go—I gave the baby to him and ran away, and went on board another ship, and got back at 2.30 on the Monday.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. I did not go on board by a little boat at Blackwall—I did not offer to go with you—it is not true that you gave me 20s. as we went on board, or that I asked you for it—you wanted to touch me but I would not let you—you asked me to go with you to Bingen—there was another man going there too, and he said "It is nicer than it is in England."

Re-examined. That was in the prisoner's presence—the prisoner said "Why don't you go with me to Bingen? it is nicer there than in England."

WILLIAM FISCHER (Interpreted). I live at 59, Greenfield Street, Commercial Road, and am a printer—the last witness is my daughter—she was christened Christina, but we call her Emily—she was born on the 15th March, 1872, in Germany—I have known the prisoner for about two years—on Saturday, 24th October, he came to my house about 8 o'clock a.m. with two children—my wife was with me at the time—I think the prisoner spoke to her—the two children were taken upstairs—the prisoner said he intended to go to Germany that day—he said he was going to the West End, and asked to leave the children there till he returned—he returned about 11 o'clock—he afterwards said "Good-bye," and went away with the children—shortly before I sent my daughter out for a paper—she came back with it and went out again before the prisoner left—I did not see her again until 3 o'clock the following Monday—I did not consent to the prisoner's taking her away—when she did not come back on the Saturday I made inquiries at Blackwall Docks, and on Monday I went to Scotland Yard and gave information to the police—I afterwards went with Inspector Moser to the Thames Police-Court, and obtained a warrant for the prisoner's arrest.

Cross-examined. I do not recollect your mentioning on the 19th that you intended to go to Germany—it is not true that when you were at my house I asked you for a pair of boots—it is not true that when my family were present you asked my wife to let the girl go with you, and I did not make any reply—I did not know that you intended to bring the children to my house.

MARY FISCHER (Interpreted). I am the wife of the last witness—I recollect my daughter going away on Saturday, 24th October—I gave no consent to the prisoner for the child to go away.

Cross-examined. You did not ask my permission to let the girl go with you to Blackwall—you told me on the 19th that you would bring the children to our house—you said you had a pair of boots, and I said if they fitted my children I would purchase them.

MORRIS MOSER (Police Inspector). On 5th November, about 11 o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Greenfield Street, Commercial Road—I had been the same day to the Thames Police-court and obtained a warrant against the prisoner—I said, "I am a police officer, and hold a warrant against you for abduction; is your name Hahn?"—he said "Yes"—I asked

him if he understood English, and he said "No"—he made a statement, which I took down. (Read: "I resided at 59, Greenfield Street 18 months, and then went to the West End, and my wife was taken to the hospital, where she died. On the morning I went to Germany I left my children with Mrs. Fischer, my baby and the other child. Mrs. Fischer allowed her daughter to go as far as Black wall. I did not know what to do with my children on board ship, and asked her to take the baby. She offered her services to me, saying she would like to go with me to Rotterdam. I then gave her 20s., and afterwards another shilling. I then told the captain to take her back again. I should be ashamed to take a child away from school. I am 29 years of age.")

THEODORE PETERS (Interpreted) (Examined by the Prisoner). I asked you if the little girl of 13 was your servant—you said, "Yes, that is my servant, I had to take my servant with me to look after the children"—I told the girl on the ship to take a return ticket as she intended to return to London—she said, "Yes, that is better, for I want to return to-morrow by the Mascotte"—a return ticket costs 17s.—she had taken a single ticket—we did not want a boat to get on the steamer at Blackwall Docks—I did not see that the girl was crying on board—I have not heard that you used indecent language towards her—I saw you in the cabin in the afternoon about 3 or 4 o'clock, and I saw you also come out of the ladies' cabin—the girl did not tell me that she had been touched in any way in an indecent manner—I never heard that she was compelled to go on board ship.

By MR. MEAD. When the prisoner was on board he was a little bit drunk—after that he took two bottles of beer, and that is all he had on board—the only thing I could not make out was if he was sent out by the Society why he should take a servant with him—I asked the little girl, "Have you to pay for yourself?" and she said "Yes."

By the COURT. The steamer was alongside the pier—I saw them come on board on the fore part of the ship—I next saw the girl about 10 minutes or a quarter of an hour after; we had not then left the pier—I saw the girl in the gentleman's cabin first with the children, and after that she was in the ladies' cabin—I saw her next when we left the pier, and I asked her for her ticket—the prisoner paid for himself—I was surprised that the girl paid for herself—she paid with a sovereign—she took a single ticket, which I afterwards supplemented by a return ticket—I said it would save money if she took a return—she did not make any complaint, she simply said she would like to go back to-morrow—there was another woman with one or two children in the ladies' cabin, I think—I did not see her in the night—the prisoner could have gone into the ladies' cabin.

By the JURY. It would not be unusual for a man to go into the ladies' cabin to look after a child four months old.

JULIUS HAHN (The Prisoner) (Examined by interpretation). I was living at the West End with my wife, who was ill, and she went into the hospital, where she died, and she left me with two children, one five months and the other five years—she asked when she was ill that I should take the children to Germany in case she should die—I then lost my work—before that I was living at 59, Greenfield Street—I was well known to the Fischers and a man named Fluntz—on 19th October I came to Fluntz and to the Fischers—I said to Fischer that I was going to Germany

in a short time, and Emily Fischer asked me if she could come with me, and her father said, "Mr. Hahn would like to take you with him"—Mrs. Fischer then asked me for a pair of boots belonging to my wife, and I told Mrs. Fischer she could have them—on the 21st I came to Fischer's and brought the pair of boots—Mr. and Mrs. Fischer told me if I was going away on the Saturday I could bring the children there—on the 24th, about 8 o'clock a.m., I brought the children to Fischer's—Fischer said, "Take the children upstairs, my wife is upstairs"—I found Mrs. Fischer on the stairs—Mrs. Fischer said, "Give the children to Emily, she will put them on the bed"—I then said I was going immediately to the West End, and would return about 11 o'clock—I went there with Mr. Fidler with a cart—Mrs. Fischer said Emily could go with me, in the presence of Mr. Fischer, and he did not make any objection to that, and Mr. Fischer asked me the price of the boots I had given to his wife—I said I did not want anything, as they had taken care of the children—then Fidler went away with the cart, and I and Emily Fischer followed Fidler to Mrs. Schofield's, where I said good-bye, and after that I went to Blackwall—at Blackwall I asked Emily to give me the children, and she gave me the younger one, and the little boy began to cry, and I did not know what to do with the children—I then asked a woman on board the ship, and she said, "My dear Sir, I cannot take the children from you, I have got two children"—thereupon Emily Fischer said, "I will go with you; pay me the fare, and give me a small amount for my trouble," and I said "Most likely they will look after you," and she said "Well, I will go with you, my parents have nothing against it," and then she said "Pay me the fare," and she took the child and went upon the ship—I went to put my box on board the ship, and afterwards I went on board—she then asked me for some money to pay for the fare, and I gave her 1l.—she returned in about a quarter of an hour and brought me 3s., and said the ticket had cost 17s., there and back—I did not take the 3s., but told her to keep it for the present—on the way from London to Rotterdam she asked me for the fare to Bingen—I did not consent to that, and she told me that her father said that she could go with me and find her grandmother—just before we got to Rotterdam I asked her for the money, and she said she had left the money and ticket in the window—I then went to get the ticket from the window, and also the purse with the money, and wanted to give it to her, and she asked me to keep it until we went to the Rhine boat, as she wanted to go with me, and the steward then pointed out the ship by which she was to return—she then went with me to the Rhine boat, and I gave her the ticket and purse and another shilling—she told me she had no pocket—I then gave her a cloak belonging to my wife.

Cross-examined by MR. MEAD. I did not say to the inspector that the girl's mother had consented to her going as far as Blackwall with me—when we got there she offered to go to Rotterdam, and I consented—I said to Inspector Moser, or before the Magistrate, "I never spoke to her mother about her going to Rotterdam."

CHRISTINA FISCHER (Re-examined). It was on going to bed at night in the ladies' cabin that the prisoner wanted to put his hand up my clothes—I was lying down with the baby.

The Prisoner. I did not touch her with any intention.

GUILTY of taking the girl away without her parents' consent.—Judgment respited.

85. EDWARD ASHBY (24) and WILLIAM BLACKMAN (29) , Robbery with violence on Thomas Mills, and stealing a watch and chain.

MESSRS. POLAND and MONTAGU WILLIAMS Prosecuted; MR. PURCELL

defended Ashby, and MR. BURNIE defended Blackman.

THOMAS MILLS . I live at 52, Grosvenor Street, St. Pancras, and have no occupation—at about 6.5 on the 29th October I was walking alone along Bell Alley, St. Luke's, when a man came behind and struck me in the back, and I was thrown to the ground on my face—I got up and turned round and saw Blackman, who struck me on the head with his fist—there were four others with him, and they struck me several times—my coat was unfastened, and my watch and chain, value 50l., taken away—before my watch was taken Ashby struck me on the chest, and threw me down on the back of my head, which was cut—I heard Blackman speak—I was stunned—I afterwards identified Blackman when he was brought to my bedside—I recognise his voice—I afterwards picked Ashby out from amongst other men at Bow Street—before I was robbed on the night in question I had seen Ashby at his house—a young man crossed me coming from the hairdresser's, and told me he knew me, and that his name was Scottie, and I went with him to Ashby's.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. I met Scottie after 12 o'clock in the day—I had seen him before, and I got into conversation with him in the street—I left him before 5 o'clock and went to my tea—he came to me after 5 and went with me to Ashby's house—he said I might come and stop at Ashby's house as he could not take me to his own house—I think Scottie introduced me to Ashby by saying "My friend," or something of that kind—I remained 10 minutes, and then left with Scottie, and arrived at Bell Alley about 40 minutes after—I was alone with Scottie during that time—the part of Bell Alley that I was in is not very narrow; it is brilliantly lit up by a shop there—it was four men who set upon me—Ashby is the man who struck me in the throat and took my watch—I had not seen Ashby from the time I left his house until I was assaulted—I afterwards saw him at the police-station—I had a good opportunity of seeing him at his house; I did not speak to him—I did not think I had seen Scottie before, or say I would find him a situation, and I did not say so before the Magistrate—I went to a friend of mine, a publican in the Kingsland Road—he was not at home, and I waited until 4 o'clock in the afternoon—I had half a pint of stout and mild—Scottie was with me the whole of the time—he was a perfect stranger to me—I went into the parlour and sat by the fire—Scottie was reading a newspaper—I did not speak to him or he to me—I then left the house and went to my tea—we got to the public-house in the Kingsland Road about 2 o'clock—Scottie said he would go in to his friend Ashby and have a warm for a little while—I had my tea at Lockhart's coffee-shop in Old Street—Scottie went to his tea, and came back and said his landlord and landlady had gone to the city to take some skins, and he wanted his great coat or something, and could not get it—I left the coffee house and walked towards the City Road, and he said to me "I live down there," and would I walk a little way with

him, which I did, and he then went and rapped at some one's door, and I said "Do you live there?"—he said "Yes; but if you like to wait a little while I have a friend lower down where I can go in and take a warm"—he invited me to go into the house, and I stayed 10 minutes and came out—I have lived about 16 years in London.

Cross-examined by MR. BURNIE. I have never seen Blackman before—he was brought to my bedroom with eight others—I said to one of the others when they first came in "Have you seen me before?" and he said "No"—it was after that that I picked out Blackman.

Re-examined. I saw Blackman before and heard him speak, and I swear he is the man.

JOSEPH HIGGINS . I am 12 years old, and live at 3, Bell Alley, St. Luke's—I was at the street door at the time in question, when I saw Blackman and the prosecutor about three yards off—the prosecutor was knocked down on his face; I did not see by whom—I saw Blackman on the top of the prosecutor afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. I did not see Ashby there—there was a tall fair man there who struck the prosecutor on the throat.

Cross-examined by MR. BURNIE. There were two there besides the prosecutor, not four or five—I had never seen Blackman before—I was taken to the station and shown a man I knew to be Blackman—I did not pick him out at the station, but at the police-court amongst about a dozen.

THOMAS MILLS (Re-examined). Scottie is stout, fair, and very short.

THOMAS HIGGINS . I live at 3, Bell Alley, Commercial Road—on the 29th October about 6 p.m. I heard a noise—I opened the window of my room on the first floor and looked out, when I saw a man on the ground and four men round him—I called out "You scoundrels," or "cowards"—two of them had their hats off—when I called out, one of them went away, and when I was going downstairs the others ran away—a lad went up and assisted to pick the prosecutor up—there was a lamp but not quite close—he was bleeding from the head, and I advised him to go to the hospital—I think Blackman is one of them, but I am not positive—the man seemed to have darker hair—I was taken to the House of Detention and saw him in one of the cells, but I had to look at several before I saw any one like the man.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. Bell Alley is very narrow and dark where this occurred—there is a little sweetstuff shop there, but it had not a brilliant lamp.

GEORGE EUGENE YARROW . I am a surgeon, of 87, Old Street, St. Luke's—on Thursday, 29th October I saw the prosecutor at the station, and found two lacerated wounds on the head; erysipelas set in, and he was confined to his bed for a considerable time.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. I have known Ashby for several years as a member of a Foresters' Club to which I am surgeon—I have never known anything against his character.

STEPHEN MARRONEY (Detective Sergeant G). At 1.45 p.m. on 3rd November I was in St. Luke's with Cooper and Boultby, when I saw Blackman—I had seen him before—Cooper spoke to him and said he should take him into custody for being concerned with others in violently assaulting a gentleman last month and stealing a watch and chain value 50l.—he turned round to me and said "You know I shouldn't do a thing

like this"—I afterwards took him to the prosecutor's bedroom with five others—he was in bed and pointed out Blackman, saying "That is the man"—the prisoner said "I have never seen you before in my life"—the prosecutor said "Oh yes, you have, you are the man who struck me with both fists after I got up"—the prisoner said "I don't know anything about it, I was miles away with respectable people"—I asked him if I could go and inquire of any one, but he could not tell me.

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. I inquired about Ashby and found he was in the employ of a sole-sewer, who gave him an excellent character—his previous employer also gave him an excellent character.

Cross-examined by MR. BURNIE. A hat was brought to the police station by the prosecutor—it did not fit Blackman—when I took him into custody he had a hat on.

THOMAS BOULTBY (Police Sergeant G). When Blackman was taken into custody he said "Tommy, I am innocent of this; give me a fair chance, and I will tell you who it is."

Cross-examined by MR. PURCELL. I know nothing against Ashby.

WILLIAM COOPER (Policeman G 136). At 12.20 on the 30th October I saw Ashby, who wanted to know why two detectives had been to his house—he said "My name is Ashby, and I live at 9, Baldwin Street, City Road"—I said a gentleman had been robbed of his watch and chain at 6 o'clock the previous evening, and had stated that at 5 o'clock he was taken to the house of a young man, which house he had since pointed out to me as No 9, Baldwin Street—he said "A gentleman came to my house with a lodger at 5 o'clock last evening; Scottie said he was his father, and asked the gentleman to have a cup of tea; he refused, and they then left together and I know nothing of any assault and robbery"—Ashby was placed with several others and identified by the prosecutor, who said "That is the man I saw in the room, I also saw him in Bell Alley"—Ashby said "I was there"—he said going to the police-court "You know when I said 'I was there'?"—I said "Yes"—he said "What I meant was, I was in the room, not in Bell Alley"—I have inquired about Ashby, and find him to be a respectable man.

On MR. MONTAGU WILLIAMS intimating to the Court that he did not intend to press the charge against Ashby, a verdict of acquittal was taken in his case.

STEPHEN MARRONEY (Re-examined). I was present at the police-court—one witness was culled by Blackman—witnesses were called for Ashby.

Cross-examined by MR. BURNIE. The witness called by Blackman was a young woman with whom he was keeping company, I believe.

By MR. WILLIAMS. It was to prove that he was elsewhere.

BLACKMAN— GUILTY . ** He then PLEADED GUILTY to having been convicted of felony on 24th May, 1880, at the Sessions House, Clerkenwell Green.— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

86. WILLIAM BAKER (30) , Stealing one tin box, 53 books, and other articles, the property of John Russell; and two pictures, a work-box, and other articles, the goods of Sarah Ann Simmons.

MR. DARCY Prosecuted.

SARAH ANN SIMMONS . I am the wife of Thomas Simmons, of 4, Salisbury Villas, Grosvenor Road, Hanwell—on 31st October the prisoner came to my house for lodgings, and I let him the front parlour down-stairs

stairs—I had never seen him before—he represented himself to be a carpenter—on 7th November I came downstairs at 6.50, the back door was open—I went to the front parlour, and I first saw my workbox gone—I went upstairs and told my husband, and then went down again and saw that a tin trunk was gone which belonged to Mr. John Russell, who had lodged with us previously—I gave information at the Hanwell Police-station, and then went to Ealing Police-station.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. The tin box was safe on the 6th at 10 o'clock at night—I did not say at the Brentford Police-station that the last I saw of the box was at 7 o'clock—I have seen it since and identified it by a bruise, as Mr. Russell's box—there is no other mark on it—the pictures were not produced, nor the blankets—you had a key of the box in your pocket; it was locked, and Mr. Russell had the key—I went to bed at 11 o'clock on the night of the 6th—Mr. Simmons was not at home—I locked the door—on the way to the Court House from the police-station Mr. Russell told me you had a pair of his boots on, a necktie, and a collar of his—he said he could swear to the collar, as it was marked 15 1/2, and he had a shirt of the same pattern in his box; he had two collars to match the shirt—the collar was blue with a white stripe—I cannot say whether a shirt of the same pattern was found in the box: I did not see the contents of the box—I should know the collar again if I saw it—this is the box (produced); by that dent I identify it; I did that myself—this (produced) is not the collar you had on that day.

SARAH ELIZABETH WARREN . I live at 3, Salisbury Villas, next door to the prosecutor—at 6.30 on 7th November I was at my bedroom window, when I saw the prisoner taking a wheelbarrow, with a tin box and some pictures on it—he stopped in front of my window considering whether he should go up the Boston Road or the Uxbridge Road, and he went towards the Uxbridge Road to go towards Ealing—I recognise the property from having seen it in Mrs. Simmons's front parlour—I know Mr. John Russell who was lodging with Mrs. Simmons—this box belonged to him.

Cross-examined. It was not dark at 6.30—I saw you come out—I heard the wheelbarrow coming under the passage, and I jumped out of bed, and stood in front of my bedroom window and opened it to see which way you went with the barrow—I did not speak to you because you had gone too far.

HENRY PULLEN (Policeman T 214). On 19th November, at midday, I was in Hammersmith and saw the prisoner—when he saw me he went into the Red Cow public-house—I went in after him, and took him by the arm and told him I should take him into custody for robbing some lodgings at Hanwell—he said it was not him—we had a struggle outside, and eventually I got him to Chiswick Police-station, where I searched him and found this handkerchief on him, two keys, one of which unlocked that box, a pawn-ticket relating to property identified, and another ticket for property which another witness will identify—on the way to the station he again said it was not him, and that he knew nothing about the property—after he was remanded at Brentford he came up on the 27th of last month, and on the way there he told me where to find the pictures and workbox at a pawnbroker's opposite the police-station at Chiswick.

Cross-examined. You did not say at the Red Cow that you were never

at Hanwell, and that you knew nothing about the charge—I didn't say in the cell "If you would tell me where the keys were I would send you some coffee"—one of the keys opens the box—on the way from the court-house at Brentford to the police-station, Russell told me and Mrs. Simmons that you had a collar and tie of his and a pair of boots—I think I should Know the collar if I saw it—Russell said he wore a 14 1/2 inch collar; he did not say he knew the collar as he had a shirt of the same pattern in the box—I think this is the collar.

JOHN RUSSELL . I am a barman, of 6, Buckingham Palace Road—about four months since I resided with Mrs. Simmons, and left this box with her—I identify two shirts which the pawnbroker has, as mine.

Cross-examined. I put no name on the box; there was a bruise or dent in it when I left it there—I have been away from there between two and three months; the box was locked—the detective brought in the box and asked me if it was mine, and I said "Yes"—I believe the detective told me that the key in your basement fitted the box—I did not mention the number of shirts; I said several—one of them is a rowing shirt; I call it a cricketing shirt—I had coloured and woollen shirts—the cricketing shirt has been found since; this is my shirt (produced)—I have worn it many times—I did not tell Pullen that I had a stick in my box with a silver ferrule, but a silver mount that came off a stick—I said I had a quantity of coloured plates, which I have seen at the Chiswick Police-station, and several of Cassell's works, and seven or eight parts of "Picturesque Europe," and a few more—I did not mention the number of ties I had; I believe there were five or six—on the way to the station I said you had a collar which I could swear to, as I had a shirt of the same pattern in the box; it was marked 14 1/2 inches; I believe this is it.

By the COURT. He had on a pair of boots belonging to me, and the tie he has on now I believe is mine.

BENJAMIN HAMMETT . I am assistant to Mr. Thomson, pawnbroker, of Norland Road, Notting Hill—this duplicate (produced) relates to two night shirts pawned with me on the 15th—I saw this ticket taken from the prisoner.

THOMAS DEMPSTER (Detective Sergeant T). From information I received I went to 88, St. Katherine's Road, Notting Hill, on the 19th November, where I saw Mrs. Cheeseman—I went up to the back bedroom, where I found the box produced, which I told her was stolen—it was locked, and I conveyed it to Chiswick Police-station—I then went and saw John Russell at 6, Buckingham Palace Road—I told him I had found his property—I asked him to come on Saturday, the 28th, which he did, and I showed him the contents of the box, which he identified.

Cross-examined. I did not ask Mrs. Cheeseman whether you were at home, but if a man named William Baker lived there—she said "No; but she had a young man living there named John Radfield—she was greatly surprised to think you were a thief—she did not tell me you had been to work in the Portobello Road—I found a lot of handkerchiefs on your dressing table; I did not see any initials on them—Mr. Russell told me he had a buckhorn handle with a silver ferrule on it—I have my list here of what the box contained—there are not a lot of things in the box now which did not belong to Russell—there was a hair-brush, but no comb.

ELIZABETH CHEESEMAN . I live at 88, St. Katherine's Road, Notting

Hill, and take in lodgers—the prisoner came to lodge with me on the 7th November, and brought with him this tin box—it remained in my house until the 19th November last, when the police came.

Cross-examined. You came in the evening about 5, I think—you left the box and went out afterwards about three-quarters of an hour—you asked Mr. Cheeseman to go to the station with you to bring the box—I called you Radfield; I did not see any initials on the handkerchiefs in your room—you said you had not been long back from America, and that you had come to stay at my house as you were going to work in the Portobello Road as a staircase maker—the first week you were at my house you always went out before I came downstairs, and never returned before night—you told me the second week you were going to work at Parson's Green—that is a long way to walk.

The prisoner in his defence said that the box taken from his bedroom was his own property, the key found in his possession was proof of it. The handkerchiefs on his dressing-table and a lot of things in his box the prosecutor never stated he had lost, and the shirts and things he produced were not there.

GUILTY . He then PLEADED GUILTY to having been convicted of felony at Wandsworth Police-court on the 13th April last.— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

87. JACOB KLEIN, alias KLIENT , PLEADED GUILTY to forging and fraudulently altering an entry relating to a certain birth and certified copy of a register of births made and kept under the provisions of an Act of Parliament.— One Month's Hard Labour. And

88. DAVID MITCHELL (53) to forging and uttering a receipt for the sum of 6s. 6d., with intent to defraud, and stealing a silver salver and a quantity of other articles of plate, value 250l., the goods of John Stirling, his employer.— Two Years' Hard Labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

OLD COURT.—Wednesday, December 16th, 1885.

Before Mr. Justice Hawkins.

89. HARRY PATRICK (24) was indicted for, and charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with, the wilful murder of Rachel Bailey.

MESSRS. POLAND and MONTAGU WILLIAMS Prosecuted; MESSRS. FULTON

and MARSHALL HALL Defended.

ANN ADAMS . I am the wife of Richard Adams, and live at 3, Edward Street, Canning Town—I had a daughter named Rachel Bailey, but she went by the name of Emily; she was 19 years old, and had been a domestic servant, but latterly had been living a bad life—I last saw her alive on Sunday, 22nd November, at my house; she had dinner and tea there—I had seen the prisoner with her there on two occasions—on 20th November she brought her box to my house, but did not sleep there, and on the 23rd November I saw her dead body.

CECILIA STILLMAN . I live at 93, Leman Street, Whitechapel—in November I was living at 1, Ettrick Street, Bromley, with my husband, an instrument maker—I had two rooms to let on the first floor, a front and back room—on Saturday, 21st November, between 4 and 5 in the afternoon, I let the back room to Rachel Bailey at 5s. a week—she gave

the name of Johnson—she left 2s. deposit, and said her husband was a cook; she was a perfect stranger—she said that she would come on Monday morning and take possession; she then left—the next day, Sunday, I was out, and did not come home till about 1 o'clock in the morning—my room is on the ground floor—when I came home my boy told me that a man and woman had gone to occupy the room—during the night I heard no disturbance—about 10 o'clock next morning I heard some one come downstairs; I could not tell which room that person came out of—he ran down quick and went to the door, but could not open it, and my boy, aged 16, opened it for him, and then he called out "Call my missus in two hours," and slammed the door and went away—I never saw the prisoner at all—about half-past 11 I sent my servant Annie Connor to call the woman—I heard her knocking at the door, and receiving no answer she called out to my boy Harry "I can't get any answer"—he worked in the next room—he went and opened the door with a pair of pincers, and I then heard screams of "Murder," and my boy went for a doctor, and the police came—I did not go into the room, I was afraid—when I let this room there were no marks on the wall—I was shown a dagger by the police at Arbour Street; it does not belong to me or anybody in the house.

ANNIE CONNOR . I was servant to Mrs. Stillman—on Saturday night, 21st November, Rachel Bailey came and took a furnished room at the house—on Sunday, the 22nd, she and the prisoner came together there—that was the first time I had seen them—they went upstairs, and then the woman came down into the kitchen and had some supper, and gave me a half-sovereign to get a pot of ale—the prisoner came down while she was having it; he was sitting there when she gave me the half-sovereign—I went for the beer and brought it back and gave her the 9s. 8d. change—they both drank the beer and I had some too—they appeared then to be on friendly terms—about 10 minutes or it might have been five minutes to 11 they went up to bed—before they went I heard the young woman say to the prisoner "The gin palaces are open yet, I will go and see George"—he made some reply, but I didn't hear what it was—he then got up and went upstairs; the young woman then bid us all good night, and followed him—I sleep at home; I then went home to sleep, and I saw no more of them that night—next morning I got there about 9 o'clock—about 10 o'clock I heard the prisoner come downstairs; he tried to open the door, and the landlord's son went and opened it for him—as he went out he told us to call his missus in two hours' time—I went upstairs at half-past 11 and knocked at the door, but received no answer—the door is opened by a handle and two knobs; one had gone and the other was inside the room—the son went and got a pair of pincers and opened the door—I then went inside and saw the young woman lying on her face and hands on the bed, and there was a great quantity of blood all over the pillows and bed; I then called out and the son came in and ran for the doctor—the dagger I saw at Arbour Street Police-court I had never seen before—the deceased had only her chemise on, drawn up about the neck; I could not say if it was dragged up; the clothes were all up by her head, I think—you could see the lower part of her body down to her feet.

HARRY STILLMAN . I am 16 next birthday, and was living at 1, Ettrick Street with my father and mother—on Sunday, 22nd November, about

10 p.m. I went into the kitchen and saw the prisoner and the deceased there; the servant fetched some ale and they both drank of it—after supper the deceased looked at the clock, and said "It is not 11 yet, the gin palace is open; I will go and see George"—the prisoner replied "All right"—she then said she was going upstairs to get her hat, and the prisoner followed her; that was about 11 o'clock—my room is on the game floor as theirs; the upstairs kitchen—during the night I heard nothing of them—next morning about 10 o'clock I saw the prisoner at the front door; I opened it for him; as he went out he said we were to wake her up in two hours' time, and I said "All right"—he was then fully dressed, and had an overcoat over his arm—about half-past 11 the servant went upstairs and knocked at the door of their room, and then called to me in my room—I then went and knocked at the door, and getting no answer I got a pair of pincers and opened it—the servant then went in and screamed, and went downstairs and told my mother something which I could not hear—I went into the room and saw the woman lying on her face on the bed in a quantity of blood, and there was blood on her left hand—her body was exposed from the legs to the feet—the furniture in the room had not been disturbed except the bed; nothing was touched till the doctor came—I have seen this dagger; I had never seen it before this matter occurred.

ELLEN INGE . I live at 3, Morris Road, Chrisp Street, Poplar—I knew Rachel Bailey—she had lived with me at different houses, where we were both in the habit of bringing men home—I believe she first made the acquaintance of the prisoner when she lived at Mrs. Underwood's—she afterwards lived at 1, Laurence Street, Rathbone Street, Canning Town—from the Friday to the Wednesday before this murder, all but Saturday night, she was living with the prisoner at 46, Athol Street, Canning Town—she left there on Saturday night—on the Wednesday he said he was going to Chelmsford—I next saw him on Saturday night, downstairs, at the Queen's Music Hall, in High Street, Poplar, with the man Ted—the deceased girl came from them upstairs—I believe Ted is a quarter-master in the Garonne—I did not see her alive again after that—I do not know where she slept on that Saturday night—I have heard the deceased woman several times say to the prisoner that she was going to see Ted—I could not tell you what was the prisoner's conduct to her when she said that to him—on the Sunday night, a little after 10 o'clock, I saw the man Ted in the gin palace, which is about five minutes' walk from Ettrick Street—on the Tuesday night, when the prisoner and the deceased woman slept together, the woman came into my room and went out again, and the prisoner came after her; he was drunk; he had a revolver in his pocket—I could not tell exactly what the deceased said to him—they went back again to their room, and I called my landlady up, and all we could quiet him with was that we would fetch a policeman, and she laid on the revolver all night—I saw the revolver; it was a very little one—the next day she brought the revolver into my room; it was loaded, and she was going to unload it—as she was going to take two out the prisoner came in and took it away from her, and went into his own room.

Cross-examined. Since he has been home this last time I have seen him several times at the Queen's and with Emily Bailey—I had seen

him with her when he has come home on previous voyages, but never had a conversation with him—I have never seen him in a fit.

WESTON ERSKINE WADLEY . I am a surgeon, and live at 121, Brunswick Road, Poplar—on Monday, 23rd November, about a quarter past 11, the witness Harry Stillman fetched me to 1, Ettrick Street—I went immediately, and got into the room about half-past 11—the deceased was lying on her face in the bed, with the lower part of her body down to a little above the knees uncovered—I examined her—she was cold, and had been dead from an hour and a half to two hours—there was a great quantity of blood in the bed, and I saw some blood on her right hand, I think—I then sent for the police, and saw them find the blade of the dagger under the pillow—the handle was found, I think, on the floor—I afterwards made a post-mortem examination—the wound in the neck was from left to right, cutting through the whole of the tissues down to the vertebrae; it was a stab first, and then the knife was drawn right across, nearly severing the head from the body—death must have been almost instantaneous. (The prisoner was here seized with a fit, and the proceedings were adjourned far a short time.)

By the COURT. After a wound of that character I should say she would be absolutely powerless, the nerves being completely separated as well as everything else.

GEORGE HIGGINS (Policeman K 400). On Monday, 23rd November, about half-past 11, I went to 1, Ettrick Street, into the back room, first floor, and there saw the surgeon, and the woman lying dead on the bed—I searched the room, and found the handle of the dagger on the righthand side of the deceased's body; there were no stains on it—I then made a further search, and found stains of blood between the pillow and the pillow-case—I also found on the wall near the foot of the bed smears of blood, as if fingers had been there—I searched the woman's clothes in the room, but found no money in her pockets—she was wearing her ring.

JAMES SMITH (Policeman K 113). I followed the last witness to 1, Ettrick Street, and remained there till the Coroner's officer came—I then made a farther search, and found between the feather bed and mattress the sheath of the dagger; there were no marks on it.

Cross-examined. At the last examination before the Magistrate the prisoner had an epileptic fit, and the proceedings had to be stopped for about two minutes.

FREDERICK DICKER (Police Sergeant K). On Monday, 23rd November, about half-past 6 p.m., I went to 34, Buxton Terrace, Boyd Road, Canning Town, and went into the kitchen—there was a crowd of persons there, the prisoner being one of them—I said to him, "I am a sergeant of police; I am going to take you into custody for the wilful murder of Rachel Bailey at Poplar this morning"—he said, "I was just getting myself ready to go and give myself up"—there was a kind of will on the table being written by a man, a lodger in the house; this is it (produced)—the prisoner asked me to allow him to sign it—after I had read it I said, "Yes, you can sign it," and he did so in my presence—I then took him to the Poplar Police-station, where he was charged—he made no reply—I searched him, and found on him this letter (produced) in his coat pocket, and 5d. in money.

Letter read: "30, Morris Road, Chrisp Street, Poplar. Dear Harry,—According to promise I write, hoping to find you in much better health

than when I left home. I am very pleased to say I am enjoying the very best of health, thank God, but I have not the yellow flag up yet I wanted to get something to-day to do away with it, but Mrs. Bray advises me not to, but I can't see how I can help it. Dear Harry, I suppose you will write and let me know if you are all right, because I have not found out anything wrong with myself. I don't think I have much more to tell you at present. Remember me to Wallow, and tell him he must begin to save it all up for M. I must now conclude with fondest love from M. I have seen papers at the back, but I should like to screw you."

The will was read at follows: "I, Henry Patrick, do hereby give in trust to Mrs. Charlotte Cooper, residing at 34, Hoxton Terrace, Boyd Road, in the parish of West Ham, my chest and all clothes therein, and all my effects and whatsoever I may possess, to be divided between my sister, Agnes Patrick, and my brother, Albert Patrick. The two oil portraits I leave to my sister Agnes, and I would wish my brother Albert to pay Mrs. Charlotte Cooper 2l. 13s., which I am indebted to her; I also wish my sister Agnes to receive what money there may be received from the Prudential Assurance Company, in which I am insured. So witness my hand this 24th day of November, 1885.—H. PATRICK."

SALLY BEER . I live at 30, Morris Street, Poplar—the deceased lodged with me from September to the Friday week before the murder—I know the prisoner; they were on very friendly terms, and I never saw them quarrelling—I know Ted, he visited her at my house about three times—she told me she was pregnant, but about three weeks after the prisoner went away she said it was not so—I did not know, except what she told me.

ALFRED COOPER . I live at 34, Kensington Terrace, and am a stevedore—the prisoner is my wife's nephew; he is a ship's cook, and when at home he lives with me—on the Saturday night before this occurred he slept with his cousin, a man, at my house—on Sunday he had dinner with me, and I saw him as late as 7 o'clock in the evening—he did not tell me that he was not coming back or where he was going—the next day, Monday, about 6 in the evening, I went home and went into the kitchen and saw the prisoner there among seven or eight other persons—one of them in his presence said that Harry said he had killed Rachel—I knew that referred to a young woman—I then took him into my bedroom, where we two were alone, and asked him if it was true, and I understood him to say "Yes," and that he had told his aunt what to do with his things—I asked him if he had told her so in the presence of his father—he said "No," but he would do so, and called a young man downstairs named John Bastien—he said he was waiting till I came home from work to give himself up—we then went out of the bedroom into the kitchen, where the prisoner dictated that statement to John Bastien—a police sergeant came in and he was allowed to sign it.

Cross-examined. During the last six months he has been subject to very severe epileptic fits; the earliest period that he had one was in April, I think, on his return from Montreal—the ship he was in went between London and Montreal—on his return from his last voyage his hair was cut, and he was in a very bad state of health; I helped him off the ship when she came in dock—he was then recovering from an attack of brain fever, so he stated to me—he then commenced attendance at one of the London hospitals as an out-patient—before the time of his return

from his last voyage he has had fits in my presence; I can hardly count how many—he had one on the Sunday preceding the 22nd.

LLEWELYN ARTHUR MORGAN . I am surgeon of the House of Detention—the prisoner has been confined there since 24th November, and I have seen him daily; he suffers from epileptic fits—in my opinion he is a man of sound mind and understanding.

Cross-examined. I understand he had a fit at the police-court—he has had two since he has been in the gaol, of a somewhat similar character to the one to-day—I have no means of ascertaining whether he has suffered from brain fever at any time.

HENRY CHARLTON BASTIAN, M.D., F.R.C.P . I am one of the physicians of the National Hospital for Paralysed and Epileptic Patients—I saw the prisoner for the first time yesterday, and examined him—in my opinion he is a man of sound mind and understanding; there was nothing in his manner or demeanour to lead me to the conclusion that he was insane.

Cross-examined. He has suffered from these fits eleven months, so far as I can gather—such fits sometimes affect the mind, but that depends upon the frequency and violence of the attack—it is often hereditary—that would not necessarily increase the tendency to mental failure—brain fever is a very vague term, we do not know it in medicine; it is inflammation of the membranes, or meningitis; if a person recovers from that he often dies from meningitis—if he recovers he might have fits, or might not.

GUILTY .— DEATH. He was subsequently respited.

90. SAMUEL DAVIS (32) and ALFRED GEORGE PLANK (31) were charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with the wilful murder of Thomas Cooper. They were also indicted for the manslaughter of the said person.

MESSRS. POLAND and MONTAGU WILLIAMS Prosecuted; MR. KEITH FRITH

defended Davis, MR. GEOGHEGAN defended Plank.

EDWARD TILLEY . I am potman at the Clock House Tavern, Knights-bridge—on the night of 2nd December three soldiers and the two prisoners were in the bar—the soldiers were wearing medals—Davis was annoying them about the medals—he said they had no buisiness with them—they told him to mind his own business and keep his own company—Davis attempted to pull off his coat—I ordered him out of the house, and I and the barman put him out—Plank walked out—in about two minutes Davis came back without his hat and coat—he came about two feet within the door—the deceased was waiting at the door for his two comrades—Davis seized him by the chest and tried to pull him out—the barman and I pushed Davis out and pulled the deceased in—the soldiers subsequently left—they had behaved quietly and peaceably throughout.

HARRY DENTON . I am a private in the 1st Battalion Coldsteam Guards—on the night of 2nd December, about a quarter-past 11, I went into the Clock House two with other soldiers, Thomas Cooper and Samuel Lockwood—we were in uniform—Davis was there and two other men with him—I do not recognise the other two—Davis began chaffing us and saying we had not earned our medals—I said we did not want any bother with him—he said he would have it—he was put out by the potman—he afterwards came in with his hat and coat off—about five minutes afterwards I came out of the house with my two comrades—we went to the corner of Sloane

Street and there we shook hands and said "Good night"—Cooper went down Sloane Street towards the barracks; I went towards Piccadilly—a second or two after I got hit under the jaw and knocked down—not a word was said—a constable came and picked me up—I dropped my stick when I was knocked down—I had not used it or done anything before I was struck—my stick was given to me and I joined Lockwood on the other side and went on down Piccadilly—I did not know what had happened to Cooper till the next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. KEITH FRITH. I did not speak to Davis in the Clock House—he spoke to all the lot of us—we only told him that we did not want to have any bother.

SAMUEL LOCKWOOD . I am a private in the 18th Battalion of Cold-stream Guards—I went with Denton and Cooper to the Clock House—about five minutes afterwards Davis came in—he took off his coat three or four minutes after he came in, and wanted to fight—the potman put him out—I saw him outside making a rush at the door—we went to the top of Sloane Street and bid each other good night—I went towards Piccadilly; Cooper went down Sloane Street—we do not belong to different barracks, but two of us were on leave all night—when I looked back I saw Denton lying on the ground—a policeman picked him up, and we went on—I saw no more of Cooper.

DANIEL PARROTT . I am a butler, and live at 42, Prince's Gardens, Kensington—between 11 and 12 o'clock on the night of 2nd December I was walking alone by the Clock House—I saw some men outside; the prisoners were two of the men; there was a third—before I got up to them there was a slight scuffle—they were coming from the door of the Clock House—I heard Plank say to Davis, "Wait a minute, Bill, until they get away, or round the corner"—I then saw the three soldiers come out—I think Davis said something about being struck on the head with a stick—I noticed at that time a mark across his hat—the soldiers went towards Sloane Street—I saw them at the corner—the tallest soldier went down Sloane Street; one of the others went across the road towards Albert Gate; the other one, Denton, came and stood on the kerb close to me—Davis ran sideways and hit Denton down by the left side by the ear, and knocked him down—a police constable who was standing close by me picked him up—Davis was going to hit him again, but as soon as he saw him in the constable's hands he left him, and two other men (Plank was one) ran after Cooper down Sloane Street—I did not recognise the third man—I ran after them, and just before I got to them I saw Cooper lying across the pavement—I did not see Davis, Plank, and the other man there—I ran back to the top of Sloane Street and fetched a constable, and I found Cooper lying down insensible—he was taken in a cab to the hospital—I afterwards went with the constable to the Pakenham Arms; I saw Davis come out of that house, and I pointed him out to the constable—Plank was with him—Davis said, "What do you want me for? I have done nothing; I have been with these here," referring to Plank and another man, "for the last two hours; I have been with them all the evening," and Plank and the other man said, "Yes, he has been with us all the evening"—Davis was taken into custody; Plank was not taken—I went with Davis and the constable to the station—as we were going Davis said, "Oh, I know what you want

me for; a soldier hit me across the head with a stick, and I gave him a clip under the ear."

Cross-examined by MR. KEITH FRITH. I was about two or three yards away when I saw Davis run up—I did not see him strike him—Denton was across the road, standing by himself.

THOMAS THOMAS (Policeman B 537). About half-past 11 on the night of 2nd December I was on duty at the corner of Sloane Street—I saw the prisoners outside the Clock House—Davis had his coat off calling the soldiers out, and he would fight the three of them—he made a rush at the door; I stopped him, and requested him to go away—Plank then said to Davis, "If you don't pay these three I will pay you"—Davis then went away—two minutes after I was called into the Clock House, and I requested the soldiers to leave—they had been drinking; they knew what they were doing; I could not say whether they were sober or not—two more constables came up—I saw the soldiers go to the corner of Sloane Street, shake hands, and part; one went down Sloane Street, one down Piccadilly, and the third stood at the corner—I turned round and saw Denton on the ground—I picked him up and gave him his stick—Davis was in the act of striking him; I got between them—the prisoners went towards Sloane Street—Parrott ran up to me, and from what he said I went about 100 yards down Sloane Street—I there saw Cooper lying on the pavement with his feet towards the house and his head towards the kerb, and a stick lying by him—I left a constable with him, and went with Parrott in search of the men; I could not find them then—Cooper was one of the three soldiers I had seen come out of the Clock House.

Cross-examined. A soldier was near him when he was picked up—Davis was perfectly sober—he said, "I have been grossly insulted by these soldiers"—I requested him to go away, and he went away quietly, and did not come back again till about five minutes afterwards.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. Plank is a much smaller man than Davis.

ADAM STOREY . I am a private in the 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards—on the night of 2nd December, about 11.30, I was coming down Sloane Street from Knightsbridge towards the barracks—I saw Cooper and crossed over to him—I saw Davis strike him just behind the right ear and knock him down on the roadway—there were two other men with him, Plank was one—Cooper appeared to be stunned, he never said a word—I went to him at once—I said to Davis, "You have killed the chap"—Davis said nothing to that—one of them said, "Let's run away"—I tried to lay hold of Davis, but they all three went away—I shouted for police, constables came, and the soldier was taken to the hospital; he was still insensible—there was no fight or anything of the kind; the soldier had done nothing to him—when Davis struck him he was just in behind him.

GEORGE BARLEY (Policeman BR 27). About 20 minutes past 11 on the night of 2nd December I saw three soldiers, and afterwards saw the deceased in Sloane Street insensible, with blood pouring from his ear—about 10 minutes past 12 I went with Parrott to the Pakenham, and saw the two prisoners come out—I told Davis he would have to go to the station—he said, "What for?"—I said, "You know what for"—he said, "We had a fight, and I struck the soldier under the ear"—I was

with pearce at 3 o'clock next morning when Plank was taken in Exeter Court—I took Hawkes, not Plank.

WILLIAM WALSH (Police Inspector B). I saw Cooper in Sloane Street, and had him conveyed to St. George's Hospital—he died there next morning.

Cross-examined by MR. KEITH FRITH. I have Davis's hat here—I did not receive it until it was produced at the police-court—it is in the same condition as it was them—there is a mark on it as though it had been struck with a cane or stick.

HARRY MARMADUKE PAGE . I am house surgeon at St. George's Hospital—on the night of 2nd December, between 11 and 12, Cooper was brought there—he was insensible and appeared to be dying; he died at 1.40 next morning; he never regained consciousness—I made a post-mortem examination—I found that the skull was fractured and the brain lacerated under the fracture; the immediate cause of death was pressure of blood on the brain—there was an external bruise behind the right ear, beneath which was the focus of the fracture that would cause the effusion of blood; it had lacerated a large vein; it might have been caused by the blow of a powerful man's fist.

Cross-examined by MR. FRITH. I could not form an opinion whether he was sober or not—I saw no reason to think he was not—there was a very faint smell of spirit in the stomach; I do not think that injury could be occasioned by a fall—there was another injury which I believe might have been caused by a fall—he was a thoroughly healthy person.

THOMAS BAILEY . I am a footman—I was called as a witness before the Coroner, not before the Magistrate—I was in Sloane Street on this night, and saw Davis knock the soldier down; I was from 10 to 15 yards off—there was no fight or struggle—the man that gave the blow picked him up.

FREDERICK CHURCH . I apprehended Plank—I said I should take him in custody for being concerned with two other men in violently assaulting and killing a man in Sloane Street last night—he said "I don't know what you mean."

Cross-examined. The third man, Hawkes, was discharged by the Magistrate.

ADAM STOREY (Re-examined). When Cooper was struck, Plank stood with his hands behind him, the length of the street away—he took no part in the row.

The Prisoners' Statements before the Magistrate. Davis said: "When I hit him in self-defence I never thought it was going to cause any death or any crime; you might knock a man down four or five times and never cause such a thing as that, which I only done in self-defence." Plank said: "I know nothing more about the matter, merely being outside the Clock House, and saw one soldier strike Davis over the head with a stick."

DAVIS— GUILTY .— Five Years' Penal Servitude. PLANK— GUILTY as accessory .— Fifteen Months' Hard Labour.

NEW COURT.—Wednesday, December 16th, 1885.

Before Mr. Recorder.

91. ALBERT STANLEY HOOTON ROWE (20) PLEADED GUILTY

to embezzling orders for 30l. and 5l., the property of Armitage Clough and others, his masters; also to forging and uttering an endorsement to an order for 5l. 5s., with intent to defraud. He received a good character.— Nine Months' Hard Labour.

92. THOMAS GEORGE AUSTIN (43) to falsifying a cash-book, the property of the Merchant Taylors' Company, and to omitting to make certain entries therein.—[Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.] Judgment respited.

93. FREDERICK JERRARD (17) to four indictments for forging and uttering requests for the delivery of goods. (He was stated to be suffering from heart disease, and was taken ill in the dock.)— To enter into recognisances to appear and receive judgment when called upon. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

94. CHARLES HENRY OSBORNE (42) to indecently assaulting Edith Osborne, a girl under 13.— Twelve Months' Hard Labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

95. FREDERICK HERRING (17) to unlawfully endeavouring to carnally know and abuse Elizabeth Fanny Herring, a girl under 13.— Twelve Months' Hard Labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

96. GEORGE HENRY CHALK (29) to feloniously marrying Esther Selina Miller, his wife being alive.— Three Months' Hard Labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

97. MARK FISHER (26) to stealing a jacket, a cape, and other articles, value 7l., of Alfred Chamberlain, in his dwelling-house.— Six Months' Hard Labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.] And

98. ROBERT CHARLES SMITH (24) to two indictments for stealing securities for the delivery of 24 tons and 17 tons of spelter, the property Emilie Ralph Merton and others, his masters.— Nine Months' Hard Labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.] MR. BESLEY applied for an order for restitution, which MR. J.P. GRAIN, for the prisoner, opposed. The RECORDER granted the order, and postponed hearing MR. GRAIN'S argument until after the writ had issued.

99. JAMES SAMUEL VEALE (30), GEORGE COOPER (25), and WILLIAM COOMBE (42) , Stealing one bag, one dressing-gown, and other goods, the property of Matthew Cain , to which VEALE PLEADED GUILTY .

MR. GRAIN Prosecuted.

MATTHEW CAIN . I am a Major in the Army—on 28th November I was travelling from Dublin to Willesden, and was at Holyhead Station at 11.40 p.m.—I put a bag containing money and other articles into the carriage, and also a bundle, and sauntered about the platform—I missed them before I got into the train, and gave information to the authorities—I remained at Holyhead that night to trace them—this bag and other articles (produced) are mine, and this blank cheque-book and papers also, and I believe these post-cards.

GEORGE BOSHER (City Policeman). On 29th November, about 5.40 p.m., I was in Widegate Street with another officer and saw the three prisoners walking together—Coombe was carrying this bag—I followed them into Middlesex Street, where Cooper took the bag—I said to him "What have you got in that bag?"—he said "I don't know; I am carrying it for that man," pointing to Veale—I asked him where he was going to take it—he said "Down to Cambridge Road to sell it"—I took them all to the station with assistance, and they were charged with unlawful possession—I opened the bag there; it contained a rug, a dressing-gown, and a copper coin—Cooper was wearing the overcoat when I took him.

ROBERT SAYER (City Policeman). I was with Bosher—I searched Veale at the station, and found two pocket-handkerchiefs marked M.N.G.K., this cloth cap, and these spectacles and case, knife, key, and

razor—Cooper was wearing this overcoat; I found a book in the pocket of it—I found on Coombe a portable inkstand, idenfied by the Major, a cheque-book containing eight black forms, some post-cards, letters, and a paper-knife—he said that Veale gave them to him.

ELLEN GAGE . I live at 22, Tufton Street, Westminster—on Sunday, 29th November, Cooper came in and bough a loaf, and in the afternoon he came and asked me if I would take care of, a parcel for him, and he would not be long—he did not come back—the parcel contained a Bible, prayer book, hymn book, Lett's Diary, a shaving brush, and other articles.

The Prisoners' Statements before the Magistrate. Cooper says: "I desire to make a statement which I have written. I desire to add to that statement that on Saturday last I purchased a saw at Mr. Renshaw's, at the corner of Compton Street, Soho; I can also prove that on Saturday night last I did some work." (A statement made by Cooper in the House of Detention was here put in, in which he said that he put the coat on believing it to be Veale's property.)

Cooper in his defence stated that he did not know the things were stolen; that Veale came to his lodging and said that he was going to Australia next day, and as the shops were closed wished to sell him some things, and that what he did was through friendship. Coombe stated that he had nothing to do with the robbery.

Witnesses for Cooper's Defence.

JOHN STAINTHORPE . I Live at 118, Southampton Row, and am assistant to a grocer—Cooper was at my place on Saturday, 28th November, at 9 o'clock, repairing cutlery for me.

JOHN LOVELL . I am manager to Mr. Redding, of Old Compton Street, Soho—on 28th November Cooper was at our place and bought a handsaw of me.

Cooper received a good character.

COOPER and COOMBE— NOT GUILITY . VEALE further PLEADED GUILTY to a former conviction of felony.— Eighteen Months' more after the expiration of a sentence of Five Years Penal Servitude passed at Cork in December, 1881, upon which he was out on a ticket of leave.

100. FREDERICK PARKER (25) , Feloniously forging and uttering an order for the payment of 25l., with intent to defraud.

MR. HORACE AVORY Prosecuted.

LUCY COTLAND HOLLAND . I am the wife of Philip Henry Holland, of Heath Rise, Hampstead; he is a great invalid—I keep a banking account of my own at Hampstead Brach of the London and South-Western Bank—the prisoner was constantly employed in the house doing odd jobs—there were no other workmen—he kept his tools in a cupboard under the kitchen stairs—when my pass-book came back from the bank if there was a fire, I tore the cheques up and put them in the fire—the waste paper was generally put by the servants in the cupboard where the prisoner kept his tools—I kept my cheque book in an unlocked desk in the drawing room—my pass-book was returned at the beginning of July, and among the cheques returned was one to my brother for 25l. and one to Mrs. Paterson—I received about the same time a letter from Mrs. Paterson, which I tore up and put in the waste paper basket—this

(produced) is part of it—on 7th October I ordered the prisoner to put up a curtain bar in the drawing room, which he did, and I afterwards paid him for it—on 10th November I discovered by my pass-book that I had overdrawn, and I saw in it two cheques for 25l. drawn to Paterson, and I said "Why, that is Parker's writing"—I had been accustomed for four years to seeing his writing—the endorsements are his, to the best of my belief—this is a very close imitation of one of my genuine cheques—on 12th November the prisoner was given in custody, on another charge—I was called down, and he said "You know I never took the value of 6d. out of your house"—I said "You have also forged my name"—I did not hear what he said—this paper (produced) has my name and other names on it; it is Parker's writing—this is a letter which was addressed to me and thrown in the waste paper basket; on the back of it here are some memoranda of accounts.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. I have had my cheque-book since 15th March, and missed two cheques on, I think, 10th November, but if they were abstracted before I do not think I should have missed them—I tear up or burn my cancelled cheques; I never leave them lying about the room—a servant left me on 14th September; I don't think she was aware I had a cheque-book—she was with me nine months; I had a very good character with her—I missed a gold chain last summer, but I found it again—a half-sovereign was taken from my purse in the pocket of a dress hanging in my bedroom—I did not miss seven gold rings, only one, and a brooch, a watch, and a locket—she did not steal quite all the jewellery in the house, and I think, not to sell, but only what suited her to wear—I saw her wearing a gold chain which I still believe was mine—she had a false key to my daughter's dressing case—I had a very good character with her, and did not prosecute her because of her family—she had no followers—she had access to every room in the house—I generally left the key of the desk tied on, and you knew that—Mr. Holland never goes out of doors—the cheque book was kept 10 or 12 feet from his chair—if he was close to the fire you would have to pass his seat to do the curtain—his back was to the desk—if any cheques were thrown down to be burnt you might have taken them—I know that since September you have been contemplating going to Australia.

Re-examined. I did not keep any transfer paper in the waste paper basket—these cheques have been taken from the end of the book; the counterfoil and all has been torn out—the servant girl could read very, little and she wrote a very scrawly hand—the signature to the cheque is nothing like her writing.

MATILDA TENNANT . I am in Mrs. Holland's service—on the 7th October I saw the prisoner in the kitchen and in the drawing room putting up a curtain rod for about an hour—Mr. Holland was in the drawing-room that morning but he was asleep most of the time—he was asleep when I went into the room shortly after the prisoner left—he always sleeps in the morning.

Cross-examined. I went into the room to poke the fire and you were then putting up a curtain pole across the folding-doors—you must have heard me open the door—Mr. Holland had a book in his hand—I did not notice whether you were excited or flurried.

Re-examined. Mr. Holland is very deaf.

JOHN DALE . I am cashier at the Hampshire branch of the London and

South-Western Bank—I cashed this cheque for 25l. dated 9th October, and payable to G. Paterson or bearer, over the counter in gold—I have no recollection of the person—it came out of Mr. Holland's book, and the other cheque also—it is dated 9th October, but it comes next after one dated 30th October.

JOHN FLEMING (Police Sergeant). On 12th November I was sent for to Mrs. Holland's house, and took the prisoner on another charge—Mrs. Holland said, "I must tell you also, Parker, that you forged my name at the bank"—he said, "Do you mean to say that I have been forging your name to a cheque?"—she was going to make a reply, but I stopped her and said, "Nobody has said anything about a cheque"—the prisoner laid, "I suppose it must be a cheque"—going to the station he said, "Does Mrs. Holland say it is one or two cheques?"—I said, "Mrs. Holland said nothing about cheques at all"—I searched him at the station, and found 14s. 6d. in silver, 11d. in bronze, and some memoranda, but nothing relating to this charge—he gave his address in Harrow Road—I went there, and in a cash-box found 16l. in gold, and on a table a roll of carbon paper, and in a drawer of the same table these two pieces of paper—the larger piece has two pencil lines on it corresponding with the lines on the cheque, and on the smaller piece I can see the words "Lucy C. Holland" in two places, exactly corresponding with the signature to the cheque—at the bottom of a drawer in a chest I found some pieces of paper twisted up into a little ball, containing Philip Henry Holland's name and Lucy Holland's name three times, and on the table a memorandum of expenditure or of pledgings amounting to 9l. 17s., and several articles of new clothing value about 12l.—I went to the pawnbroker's, and found articles worth 14l. pledged for 4l. 10s.—"25l." is written on this memorandum in pencil.

Cross-examined. The clothes were not all new—there was a new Glad-stone bag.

THOMAS WILLS COLE . I am a cashier at the Hampstead branch of the London and South-Western Bank—I know Mrs. Holland's signature—I see the words "Lucy C. Holland" more than once on this small piece of transfer paper, and I consider them an exact copy of her signature—I have one of her cheques here.

The prisoner in his defence stated that he had no idea that Mrs. Holland had a cheque-book, as the never paid a cheque to him; that he was at work 14 feet from the desk, with Mr. Holland in the room, and had no opportunity of taking a cheque; and he contended that the servant-girl was the guilty party.

GUILTY .— Nine Months' Hard Labour.

THIRD COURT.—Wednesday, December 16th, 1885.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

101. GEORGE PARKER (25) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. LLOYD and WILKINSON Prosecuted.

ROBERT HURST . I am a compositor, and keep a little tobacconist's and stationer's shop at 40, North Street, Grove Road, St. John's Wood—on 1st November a boy came in for a pennyworth of tobacco, and gave me this florin, which I put in my pocket, giving him change—I had no other florin there—Mrs. Chambers afterwards spoke to me, and I found it was

bad, and put it on one side in a glass—my wife gave it to the police next day.

ERNEST CHAMBERS . I am 10 years old—on Sunday, 1st November, about 4.30, I saw the prisoner at the corner of North Street—he asked me to fetch him a pennyworth of tobacco from Mr. Hurst's, and gave me a florin—I could see the shop from where I was standing—I went with the coin he gave me and got the tobacco—Mr. Hurst gave me 1s. 11d. change, and I gave it and the tobacco to the prisoner at the corner of North Street—he gave me a penny.

ELIZA CHAMBERS . I live at 139, Carlisle Street, Maida Hill—the last witness is my son—on the evening of 1st November I saw the prisoner in Richmond Street a little after 5 o'clock—I said to him, "Are you aware that you have given my little boy a bad two-shilling piece?"—he said he did not know it was bad—I told him it was, and he had better come back to the shop where he had sent my little boy to change it—he said he would go back to the shop and pay the change back again.

ANNIE HURST . I am the wife of Robert Hurst—on the morning of 2nd November I took a counterfeit florin out of the glass and gave it to the constable—there was no other florin there.

WILLIAM BLATCHFORD (Policeman S 209). On 2nd November I went to the shop, and Mrs. Hurst gave me a florin out of a glass—I gave it to Inspector Leonard, who marked it in my presence.

GEORGE STEVENS . I keep a chandler's shop at 82, Salisbury Street, Marylebone—on 1st November, about 3.30, a boy came in for a pennyworth of tobacco, and gave me a florin, which I broke in the tester—I went out with him, saw the prisoner, and said "Did you send this coin with the boy?"—he said "Yes"—I showed him the pieces, and asked him if he knew it was bad—he said, "No, I did not Know it was bad, if I had known so I should not have sent it"—I said, "Have you any more?"—he said, "No, I have not"—I said, "Look in your pocket to see if you have got any more"—he fetched out a handful of silver—I examined it, but could not find one bad one amongst it—I dare say there were 15s., florins, half-crowns, a shilling, and two or three six-pences, no coppers—I gave him back the pieces and said, "Take them back to where you had them from"—he went off at once as if going to do so—as far as I know the prisoner is a hard-working man with a family—his father has been in one situation 42 years, and they are willing to do a job when they get it.

FREDERICK MASON . I am an errand boy, and live at 43, Richmond Street, Marylebone—on 1st November the prisoner spoke to me in Richmond Street, about 20 minutes past 4, and said "Will you go and get me a pennyworth of tobacco?"—I said "Yes"—he said "Go down to Mr. Briggs's shop in the Edgware Road"—he gave me a florin—I went there, gave Mr. Briggs the florin, and got the change and the tobacco—I gave them to the prisoner, who was standing where I had left him—he gave me a penny—soon after I heard him call "Here" to Chambers.

WILLIAM LEONARD (Detective Sergeant). I saw the prisoner at Paddington Police-station on 30th November, and said to him "You will be charged with uttering a counterfeit coin about a month ago"—he said "Yes, I own I did, I only passed two"—at the station, when Chambers had identified him, he said "I only passed two; I sent this little boy with one," pointing to Chambers, "and another boy with the other; but

that man with me had the benefit of it. I had been for a walk round the country in the day, and they were given to me by another man; that is the truth"—I received this coin from Blatchford, and marked it in his presence.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . This coin is bad.

The prisoner in his defence stated that he had had a little extra beer, that a man asked him to fetch some tobacco, and that he had no idea the money was bad.

GUILTY . †— Fifteen Months' Hard Labour.

102. CHARLES LOWING(36), Unlawfully uttering a medal resembling a sovereign. Other Counts for obtaining goods and 3s. 6d. by false pretences from Charles Brown, with intent to defraud.

MESSRS. LLOYD and WILKINSON Prosecuted.

CHARLES BROWN . I am a farm labourer, of Kingston Lane, Hillenden—on 20th November I was at the White Bear, Hounslow, about 5.30 p.m., and I had a horse and cart with 10 trusses of hay with me, the property of Mr. Freeman, my master—I had some conversation with a man named Woodley, and then the prisoner asked me "How much do you want for your hay?"—I said 18s.—he offered me 17s., and I sold it to him at that—I had not known him before—he sent his man out from the beerhouse, and helped to unload it from my cart to his—after it was loaded on his cart he came back to the beershop and said "Here is a sovereign, give me the change"—I gave him 3s. 6d. change, and he went into the White Bear—Woodley came and spoke to me, and I looked at the coin, which I had put in my pocket, and found it was not a sovereign—I went into the beershop and said to the prisoner "You gave me this here piece for a sovereign," showing it to him—he made a bit of a jeer and said he did not give it to me, and laughed—I said "I want my hay back, and also my money"—he said nothing—I went to look after my hay; it was gone, and his man and horse and cart with it—I asked the prisoner his name and address—he said "I shan't tell you"—I said "I shall have you locked up"—he said "Have me locked up"—I gave him in custody.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. I asked the landlord to change the coin in your presence—he said "No," and then I said to you "You scamp, you gave me this"—I did not ask you for change—you did not say you gave me a good sovereign—you never offered me a good one—you said "If you send for a policeman you can have me locked up"—you said you would stop till I came back with a policeman, and you were there when I brought one back.

Re-examined. I gave the coin to the constable five or ten minutes after I received the coin—the horse and cart were gone.

HENRY WOODLEY . I am a hay dealer—on 20th November I was at this public-house and saw Brown with the hay in his cart—I asked the prisoner if he would buy the chap's hay—he said "Yes, if I can buy at a price"—Brown said at first there were twelve trusses, and asked a guinea, then he remembered he had sold two, and there were only ten, and he asked 18s. for it—the prisoner bid 16s., and they split the difference and made it 17s. and a pot of ale—the prisoner pulled a coin out from his pocket, I could see it was not a sovereign—he said "Will that do?"—I said "No, it is a bad one, the man is too fly for that"—the prisoner then went outside to pay Brown—Brown afterwards came

inside and pulled out some coins and said "I have not enough," and then he said to the landlord" Change this for me, governor"—the landlord said "No, I should think not, a thing like that"—Brown turned to the prisoner and said "You scamp, you have given me this, I will have my hay and my money"—the prisoner said "No, I gave you a good one."

Cross-examined. I was the instigator of your buying the hay—I know you well and have had several sovereigns from you—I never knew anything wrong about you—I did not have the coin you showed me in my hand—I could not swear to it, it was the colour of a sovereign and resembling a sovereign.

By the COURT. I have known the prisoner all my life; he is a hay dealer—I never knew him in any bother before.

THOMAS WORT (Policeman T 431). I was in London Road, Hounslow, about 6.30 p.m., Brown spoke to me and I went with him to the White Bear—the prisoner must have followed me in—I had the medal in my hand, Brown gave it me—I said "What do you know about this medal?"—he said "I bought some hay of that man and gave him a good sovereign, not that thing"—Brown said "You did give it to me"—the prisoner said "I did not, I gave you a good one"—I said to Brown "Have you a good sovereign in your pocket"—Brown said "Yes," and produced one loose with other money, chiefly silver, from his trousers pocket—I took the prisoner to the station; he was searched, and on him was found 10s. in gold and 9s. silver, all good.

Cross-examined. Brown was a little excited.

CHARLES BROWN (Re-examimed by the COURT ). I never got my hay back—I took out a load of hay and sold nine trusses about 12 o'clock; then I sold other trusses at different places, and had ten left when I got to the White Bear—I got the good sovereign I had in the middle of the day for the nine trusses.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . This is a Hanoverian medal, originally struck as a card counter.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite certain I gave the man a sovereign, and he put it in his pocket with his other money. I never had no bad coin.

NOT GUILTY .

103. ELLEN HEARD (31), Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. LLOYD and WILKINSON Prosecuted.

DIANA SMITH . My husband keeps a beerhouse at 56, Euston Street, just by Euston Station—on 3rd December the prisoner came in about ten minutes to 4 for a glass of stout, price 2d., and gave me this half-crown—I put it in the till where there were no other half-crowns, and gate her 2s. 4d. change—my husband afterwards showed me the half-crown, it was bad—on the following Monday, the 7th I think, the prisoner came in again for a glass of stout; I called my husband to serve her as soon as she came in—I saw her give him this half-crown, which he afterwards gave to the policeman.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. We said nothing to you about having been there before till the policeman came—you then said you had not.

WILLIAM HENRY SMITH . I keep a beer-house at 56, Euston Street—on Thursday at 3.45 the prisoner came in and was served by my wife, and paid with this half-crown, which my wife put in the till—about 10 minutes

after the prisoner had gone—I examined the till and found the half-crown was bad—the only silver there was two sixpences—on the 7th when the prisoner came my wife called me from the next room into the bar—the prisoner called for rum first, but we have no spirit licence, and she had a glass of stout—I took the half-crown she tendered and cracked it in the tester and gave her in custody with the half-crown tendered on the 7th—the other was locked up in a cupboard and afterwards given to the police—I knew her again directly I saw her.

EDWARD JONES . I live at 58, Euston Street, the next house to Mr. Smith's—on the 3rd December, Thursday, I was at the door and saw the prisoner peeping in at the entrance doors of the beerhouse, and then she went in—on the Monday Smith called me to stop at the door while he went for a policeman—the prisoner was then inside.

Cross-examined. It was about 4 o'clock on Thursday—I knew you again directly on the Monday.

ROBERT CURZON (Policeman SR 39). I was called to take the prisoner about 5.15 p.m.—I said "You are charged with uttering two counterfeit half-crowns"—she said "You have made a mistake, I have never been in the house before"—I received these coins from Mr. Smith—the prisoner had a purse in her hand which contained 1s. and 6d.

Cross-examined. You gave the address 34, Lower George Street, Pimlico Road—you had not lived there for seven weeks.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . These coins are both bad, and from the same mould.

The prisoner in her statement before the Magistrate and in her defence denied passing the half-crown on the Thursday, and stated that the wot visiting her mother at St. Giles's workhouse at the time.

GUILTY .— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

104. WILLIAM DONOVAN (18) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. LLOYD and WILKINSON Prosecuted.

EMMA WEBB . I manage the Milford Arms public-house, Milford Lane, Strand—on 15th November the prisoner came in at 9.20 for half a pint of stout-and-mild, price 1 1/2 d., and gave me a shilling—I gave him change, of which a sixpence was rather smooth, and he asked me to change it; I did so—I noticed the shilling he gave me, and said nothing, but sent for a constable, who searched him in a compartment where no one else was—after he was taken away I saw a purse in that compartment, and found in it these 10 shillings wrapped separately in paper—three days before the prisoner had come in holding a handkerchief to his face as if he had the toothache—he stayed a long time—after he had gone I gave a gentleman a bad shilling in change—I found four in the till that day—we had had a great number of people that day—I gave the shilling I took on the 15th to the police, and the 10 shillings in the purse I brought to the station—when the policeman came I told the prisoner about it; he said he did not know it was bad—three persons had been in before trying to pass a bad shilling.

GEORGE REECE (Policeman ER 9). On 15th November I was called to the Milford Arms—the last witness showed me this bad shilling and said, "The prisoner just gave it me in payment for some beer"—the prisoner said, "I don't know what you mean"—I forced him into the inner compartment and searched him—he was crying or pretending to cry and

said, "Don't give me into custody, I am an orphan"—I found 1s. 8 1/2 d. in bronze loose in his trousers pocket, a good half-crown, two shillings, and three sixpences and a threepenny piece good—I took him to the station, and after a few minutes the last witness brought this purse containing 10 counterfeit shillings, and stated in the prisoner's presence she found them behind the door in the compartment where I had searched him, within one and a half yards—he said, "I don't know anything about that purse"—he could have put it behind the door as we entered—I had to force him through the door.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . This shilling is bad, and from the same mould as one of these 10 counterfeit shillings.

EMMA WEBB (Re-examined). The three men who came in were in the public compartment, not the one where the prisoner was searched—they ran out directly I saw the coin they tendered was bad.

GUILTY.— Judgment respited .

105. JOHN REID (35) and JAMES WILLIAMS (30) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. LLOYD and WILKINSON Prosecuted; MR. BLACK defended Williams.

WALTER OUTRAM (City Policeman 637). A little after 5 o'clock on 7th November I was with Sharplin, and saw the two prisoners going together up Ludgate Hill and through St. Paul's Churchyard—just as they entered Cannon Street Reid handed something to Williams, who crossed the road and looked into a cafe at No. 3, Cannon Street, Reid remaining on the other side of the road—Williams did not enter there—Reid crossed and joined him; they walked farther up Cannon Street together—Williams left him and looked into the Red Lion public-house, but did not enter—he joined Reid again, and they walked as far as the Skinners' Arms public-house, where Williams left Reid and looked in the door, but did not enter—he spoke to Reid, crossed the road, and went into No. 40, the Aerated Bread Company's shop—he came out with a small paper bag in his hand—Sharplin immediately went in the shop—Williams turned to the right and walked to the corner of Queen Street; Reid walked down on the other side—Sharplin came out, and from what he said to me we watched the two prisoners—Williams crossed and joined Reid—we went up to them; I caught hold of Reid, and Sharplin caught hold of Williams—I said, "We are police officers; we shall take you in custody for being concerned together in uttering a counterfeit half-crown at a shop up the street"—Reid said, "I don't know what you mean"—he tried to get his hands into his pockets, but I pushed him into the road and called a constable on the opposite side to assist me to take him to the station, where I said, "Have you any more?"—he put his hand in his right-hand coat pocket and pulled out this piece of paper, and these four coins dropped on the floor—I put my hand in his right-hand coat pocket and found these two coins wrapped in this piece of paper—I said, "These are bad"—he made no reply—I also found on him 2s. 7 1/2 d. in bronze and a number of small articles—on Williams I found 2l. 0s. 10 1/4 d. in good money, a number of small articles, two buns, and a silk handkerchief—when told the charge Reid made no reply—Williams said, "I met this man at Ludgate Circus," pointing to Reid, "I did not know him before; we walked together up Ludgate Hill to Cannon Street; when in Cannon Street I asked him to have a drink, and he said, 'No, I am going to

have some tea,' and he gave me the half-crown to go and buy him two buns"—when asked their addresses Reid said "I come from Manchester," Williams said "I come from Birmingham."

Cross-examined. I had never seen Williams before—I saw him with Reid for out 20 minutes—all the money found on him was good; it was one sovereign, two half-crowns, five florins, three shillings, four sixpences, a fourpenny piece, and 6 1/4 d. bronze—I do not know what Williams handed Reid—there were two buns in the bag.

EDWARD SHARPLIN (City Detective). I was with Outram on Ludgate Hill—I have heard his evidence, it is correct—I saw Williams enter No. 40, Cannon Street, and buy something from the young lady behind the counter—when he came out he had a small paper bag—I went in the shop and spoke to Miss Rowlands, who showed me this coin marked "G"—I bit and bent it, my teeth sank in it—I handed it back to her, went out, spoke to Outram, and we followed and took the prisoners—I said to Williams, "You will be charged with being concerned with this man (Reid) with uttering a bad half-crown in the shop over the way"—he said, "I don't know this man, I have never seen him before in my life"—I took him to the station, where he was searched—I went back and received this half-crown from Miss Rowlands.

Cross-examined. I had never seen Williams before—I have made no inquiries about him—Miss Rowlands said she had put the coin in the till, and she took it out and gave it to me again—I have no reason to doubt Williams's story that he met Reid accidentally; so far as I know the coin is a good imitation.

MARY ROWLANDS . I assist at 40, Cannon Street—on 7th November, about 5.15, Williams came in for two buns, and gave me half a crown—I gave him the buns and 2s. 4d. change, and put the half-crown in the till—there were no other half-crowns there—soon after Sharplin came in, and in consequence of what he said I gave him this coin, which he bit and bent—I gave the coin to Sharplin when he came back.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . This half-crown which was tendered is bad, and from the same mould as one of these six bad ones.

The Prisoners' Statements before the Magistrate. Reid says: "I did not know they were bad, and he did not know they were either." Williams said that he met Reid on Ludgate Hill, and that they talked going up the Hill; that he ashed Reid at one or two public-houses to have a drink, which Reid refused; that Reid asked him to buy him some buns, and gave him the half-crown to pay for them.

Reid in his defence stated that he found the coins on the embankment, and did not know they were bad.

Williams received a good character.

GUILTY . RElD †.— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour. WILLIAMS— To enter into recognisances in 30l. to come up for judgment when called on.

OLD COURT.—Thursday, December 7th, 1885.

Before Mr. Justice Hawkins.

106. WILLIAM McCLEAVE (24) , Feloniously carnally knowing and abusing Harriet Mackenzie, aged 11 years.

MESSRS. POLAND and MONTAGU WILLIAMS Prosecuted; MR. OVEREND

Defended.

The Jury were unable to agree in this case, and were discharged without returning any verdict. The prisoner was subsequently retried before another Jury, who found him GUILTY.— Judgment respited.

107. CHARLES MOLLISON (48) PLEADED GUILTY to feloniously sending a letter to Henry George Viscount Clifden, demanding money with menaces.— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

NEW COURT.—Thursday, December 17th, 1885.

Before Mr. Recorder.

108. CHARLES BROOK (19) and WILLIAM REED (19) PLEADED GUILTY to stealing in the dwelling-house of Alfred Grant, three coats and other articles, and afterwards burglariously breaking out of the same, Reed having been convicted at Clerkenwell in March, 1885, in the name of Joseph Sharp . BROOK— Nine Months' Hard Labour REED**— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour. And

109. ALPHONSE COVELLE (34) to two indictments for feloniously forging and uttering orders for the payment of 8l. and 11l. 4s., with intent to defraud.— Six Months' Hard Labour. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

110. SAMUEL HERBERT MORRIS (50) and FRANCIS MORETON (38) , Unlawfully obtaining money by false pretences, with intent to defraud. Other Counts for a conspiracy with persons not in custody.

MR. C. MATHEWS Prosecuted; MR. H. AVORY appeared for Morris, and

MR. MURPHY, Q.C., for Moreton.

During the progress of the case the Jury stated that they did not wish to hear any more evidence, and had made up their minds to convict the prisoners, upon which MR. AVORY applied that the Jury might be discharged, and the trial of the case postponed to the next Sessions, to which the RECORDER assented. Jury discharged.

THIRD COURT.—Thursday, December 17th, 1885.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

111. CHARLES BAKER (20) PLEADED GUILTY to burglary in the dwelling-house of Joseph Surman, with intent to steal therein.— Ten Months' Hard Labour. And

112. ALEXANDER YOUNG to breaking and entering the warehouse of Charles Wedderburn Sutton, and stealing 250 boxes of Cockle's pills; also to breaking into the warehouse of William Francis Leach, and stealing 74 boxes of Beecham's pills.— See Third Court, Friday. [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.]

For cases tried this day see Kent and Surrey Cases.

OLD COURT.—Friday, December 18th, 1885.

Before Mr. Justice Hawkins.

113. JOHN SHACKLETON (56) was indicted for a rape upon Jessie Walker . MR. CARTER Prosecuted; MR. MARSHALL HALL Defended.— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

OLD COURT.—Saturday, December 20th, 1885.

Before Mr. Justice Hawkins.

114. ERNEST PAYNE (18) , Feloniously wounding Charlotte Dench, with intent to murder her. Second Count, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm.

MESSRS. POLAND and MONTAGU WILLIAMS Prosecuted; MR. FULTON

Defended.

CHARLOTTE DENCH . I am single, and live at 42, Collodion Street—I have been acquainted with the prisoner about two years—I have been living with him 10 weeks at Collodion Street and some weeks at another place, about six months altogether, not always sleeping with him; sometimes I did, some weeks he would not sleep there at all, but generally on a Saturday night—he was barman with his brother, and lived at his place—he was in the habit of sleeping there, except on Saturdays, when he slept with me—he paid my rent—on Wednesday, 22nd October, he slept with me at Collodion Street—before that day we had had quarrels about a girl named Eva Walker; I was jealous of her—we had no quarrel on the Wednesday, we went to bed about half-past 9; we were on perfectly friendly terms then—I was awoke by a pain in my throat, and I saw blood coming down my night dress—the prisoner was lying with his face towards me—the bed was against the wall, he was lying next the wall; I was on the outside, lying on my side, with my face towards him—it was a double bed, a bed for two persons—I did not notice anything with regard to him then—I said "What is the matter?"—he said "I have cut your throat, you won't die; come back and let me cut it more"—I was in bed at that time—I told him I must call somebody, and I got out of bed and went to the door to call Mrs. Evans—I threw him a towel before I called her—he asked me to throw him something, but I never noticed that his throat was cut till after I had called Mrs. Evans—he threw the towel round his throat—I did not ask him what he wanted it for—I saw a knife in his hand as soon as I woke up, before I got out of bed; I can't say whether it was open or shut—I heard a click, as if it was being shut, because it was a new knife—I told him to throw it out of bed; I did not see what he did with it—I saw him throw it away after I got out of bed, before he asked for the towel—I was then sitting on the foot of the bed; it was during the time I was calling the landlady—she had been in the room once, and she had to go out again to get a light—it was while she had gone for the light that the prisoner threw it away—it was not able to see whether it was open or shut—he threw it out of his right hand; I could not say where it went—when the landlady came in without the light I said "I am dying"—she said "Nonsense, wait till I get a light"—when she came back with the light I was still sitting in the same position at the foot of the bed—the prisoner was lying in bed; he had not got out at all—when the light came I saw that the towel I had thrown to the prisoner was saturated with blood; it was round his throat—he said nothing—the policeman came—before he came Mrs. Evans said "What is the matter? whatever has he done?" and he said "I have done it, fetch the doctor"—Mrs. Evans then went to dress herself, and her husband came into the room, and the man and woman in the front room next to us; their name is Pemberton—Mrs. Pemberton was taken in fits, and had to be taken back to her own room—I kept

saying I was dying, and that Ernest must have done it—the doctor came, after the police—they dressed the prisoner's neck first, and they put lint round mine, and I was taken to the London Hospital—the prisoner was sent to Poplar Hospital—the prisoner had sent me to buy the knife on the Wednesday night; he gave me a two-shilling piece to buy it—he told me to get a one-bladed knife—he said he wanted it for the purpose of cutting hard tobacco—there were table knives in the house—I paid 1s. for the knife; I did not give him the change, I kept it—I gave the knife to him; he did not cut any tobacco with it—he told me to go out again and buy some writing paper—I did so, and gave it him; he wanted it to write a letter—I did not see the letter; he was writing it to his brother Henry, who he had been living with—he did not give it me to read—he left it on the table, but after he wrote it he burnt it—he did not put it in an envelope—I was standing behind him looking over his shoulder as he wrote it; I saw two or three words in it—it was something about his mother, and that he had been in trouble, and to remember him to some people, and that he loved the girl; it did not say what girl, there was no name; and that he left his watch and chain to his brother Jack—I did not ask him what the letter meant, or who the girl was; of course I thought it was Eva Walker—it was about a quarter or half an hour after I had seen the letter that I went to bed witn him quite friendly—I did not ask him what he meant by leaving his watch and chain—I did not ask him to explain the letter at all; only he was crying, and I asked him what he was crying for—he said he had had words with his brother Henry—we were not in the dark then; I had a lamp burning all night—he was crying before he got into bed—nothing more was said—I asked him if I should post the letter, and he said no, it did not matter; that was before ho burnt it—I had not touched the knife at all before the police came.

Cross-examined. He had not left the bed until the landlady and police came in—I was out of bed at the time he said "Come back and let me cut it more"—as soon as I found my throat cut I got out of bed—the lamp was not burning then, it had gone out—I did not say just now that I was in bed when he asked me to come back and let him cut it more; if I did say so I did not understand the question—I said "I must call somebody, throw the knife away"—I saw it in his right hand at that time, but I could not say whether it was open or shut; he did not throw it away, not exactly then, a few minutes afterwards—I saw him cut his own throat during the time I was calling Mrs. Evans—I had to go to the door to call her; she slept in the next room on the same floor—I had not to go out of the room; I opened the door and called as loud as I could—at this time it was dark—of course I saw him cut his throat—at that time in the morning it was between dusk and dark, and I turned the blind on one side so that I could see—I did that before I called Mrs. Evans—it was a long blind, one that pulls up—I did not pull it up; I just turned it back—it was not in that position when Mrs. Evans came it; it had fallen back again; it fell back two or three times; it took me some time before I could get it back to see what was the matter with myself—I saw the knife in his hand before I turned the blind—I saw Mrs. Evans when she came in, because she had on a white night dress—I put a pair of drawers round my own throat—I threw the prisoner the towel after that; I threw him the towel before I saw him

cut his own throat—I saw him put the towel round his neck—that was not before I saw him out his throat—he intended doing it; he did not put the towel round his neck directly he got it, after; it laid on the bolster some time before he put it round his throat—I threw it on the bolster, and there it remained until he cut his throat—I did not say anything to him about my own throat, only he asked me if I was bleeding; that was before I called Mrs. Evans, when I was in the dark—I saw the blood on my night dress when I drew the blind on one side—I did not say anything when he asked me if I was bleeding; I said I was dying—I felt faint from loss of blood, exhausted and sinking—I saw him cut his throat; it was not cut when I awoke—I stated before the Magistrate that he said "Come back and let me cut it more"—I am quite sure of that—I have stated before to-day about his writing the letter, and I saw the knife in his hand—I did not mention anything at Arbour Square about the contents of the letter—I did not intend to do anything more against him than I could, but since he has been out on remand he has attempted to knock my brains out with a lemonade bottle—he sent for me to a person's house, and said if I attempted to go against him he would knock my brains out with a lemonade bottle—this was at a private house in Burnham Street—he sent me a message by the person's daughter, and I went there and saw him—he had sent for me several times to the same house—I can't tell the whole of the conversation; we were talking on very friendly terms at first—it was when we were in the front room by ourselves that he said this—the lemonade was poured out in a glass, and the empty bottle was on the table, and when he was drinking it Mrs. Palmer was in the room—when I was before the Magistrate I did not want to do anything against him; his brother came to me—when I would not say what the brother wanted me to say they turned the reverse way to me—I told him I should have to come and say the truth, and say what I knew—it was between the second and third examinations before the Magistrate that this occurred about the lemonade bottle—I was not asked questions about it on the last occasion; I was going to speak, but I was put back and not allowed to say what I was going to; that was why I did not mention about the letter—I know David Davis, potman to Mr. Payne—I did not tell him that if the prisoner got off this time I would blow his brains out—I did not before the 21st November repeatedly threaten to different persons to do him an injury—I did not say to Robert Dearmouth that I was waiting for Eva Walker, and that I meant sticking a knife into her, and show him the knife I intended to do it with—I did not say to Emma Boddicomb that I would put a b——knife into the prisoner's throat—I did not say to Jim Smith that I would rip up his guts and take his liver out—I did not say to Rebecca Wood that I intended to do for him the first chance I had—I did not say to James Smith that I had heard the prisoner had slept with Eva Walker, and if I thought it was true I would have his liver out—I said I had heard that he had slept with Eva Walker, and I would pay her; I never wanted to use any knife—Eva and I had had a fight before that—she is a prostitute; I have been, but am not now—I have made an attempt on my own life—I was charged at West Ham with attempting to commit suicide, by taking poison last July; it was on account of my being mixed up with bad company, and I did not want my mother to know it—it was not about being jealous of a man I was

living with—I never lived with another man, only the prisoner—it was about a man named Herman Bottoman, who I had been sleeping with—I have seen the prisoner with hard tobacco on several occasions and cigars—I saw some hard tobacco on this night in his coat pocket as I was hanging it up—I was looking for his handkerchief, as next day was washing day—I think I said several times in the constable's presence that Ernest had done it, and also in Mrs. Pemberton's presence—I have not mentioned before to-day that I heard the knife click.

Re-examined. I was taken to the hospital the same morning—I remained there as an in-patient until 2nd November, and was an outpatient afterwards.

By the COURT. I had awoke during the night and spoken to the prisoner, and had gone off to sleep again—I had not got out of bed; yes, I did get out of bed, and got in again, and I said something about having left the window open, and should I get up and light the fire—he said no, so I got into bed again—he was in a pretty good humour then; I don't know what time that was—I did not see where the knife was when I went to bed; I did not see where he put it after I gave it to him—I saw it in his right hand when he was writing the letter, and the pen was in his right hand; the knife was not open then—I saw him write the letter—I saw the words "I love the girl"—I did not say anything to him about it—he knew I was watching him write.

MARY EVANS . I am the wife of James Evans, of 42, Collodion Street—the prisoner and prosecutrix lodged there for about 10 weeks in the back room, first floor—it was a furnished room; the prosecutrix took the room; they passed as Mr. and Mrs. Payne, and lived as man and wife—I supposed them to be so—on Thursday morning, 22nd October, about 6, my husband awoke me, and I got up and went to their room—the door was open—I had not heard anything—the prosecutrix was sitting on the foot or the bed in her night dress, the prisoner was lying in bed; it was not light, I could just see him—the prosecutrix said "I am dying"—I said "Nonsense, you must wait a minute till I get a light, to see what is the matter"—she seemed rather faint—I saw that her nightdress was stained, but I could not see what with—the prisoner did not speak—I went and got some matches and returned—the woman was still sitting on the foot of the bed, and the prisoner was still in bed—I lighted the lamp, but it soon went out—I said "Whatever is the matter with you?"—the prisoner said "It is her neck, Mrs. Evans, fetch the doctor; I have done it"—I then saw that he was lying in a pool of blood, and her nightdress was all over blood—I ran and fetched my husband, and he knocked up the people in the next room, and went fetohed the police—the prisoner still remained in bed—I did not see the knife till the police showed it to me—I did not see where it was found—I had not heard anything during the night.

Cross-examined. Both the lodgers came into the room, they were not dressed; they went out again very shortly—I did not hear anything said in their presence—the woman did not have a fit there, she fainted away in her own room.

WALTER SCOTT (Policeman K 117). I was fetched by Mrs. Evans to the house about five minutes past 6—I went there with Keens and went up to the back room, first floor—I saw the prosecutrix sitting on the end of the bed, with blood on her nightdress, and the prisoner lying on his back

in bed—I saw a quantity of blood there—I at once sent for a surgeon—the prosecutrix said "I awoke up and felt a pain in my neck, and saw blood trickling down; I got out of bed and called for assistance, and then saw blood oozing from his throat; I saw him throw a knife out of the bed"—the prisoner said nothing; he heard what she said—he seemed to be sensible; he seemed to be listening, to be paying attention—his eyes were open and moving about—I did not speak to him—I searched the room and found the knife on the dressing table, closed—it is an ordinary clasp knife; I opened it—there was wet blood on the blade, but not on the handle—there were traces of blood on the table near the edge, about the middle—I assisted the prisoner to dress—he was very weak from loss of blood; I never heard him speak—I assisted him out of bed and downstairs, and took him to Poplar Hospital.

Cross-examined. I was in uniform, and so was Keens—Mrs. Evans was in the room, and the prosecutrix made a statement, which I took down—she did not say "Ernest has done it"—she was groaning, but I never heard her make use of words—I did not ask who had done it—they wore both very bad.

WILLIAM KEENS (Policeman KR 9). I went with Scott and saw the prisoner in bed—I afterwards saw that he had a wound in the neck—he had a towel lying loosely across his neck—he seemed very weak; he only gave a groan as I was pulling the towel tight—I put something round the prosecutrix's neck to try and stop the bleeding—I got an ambulance, and removed the prisoner to Poplar Hospital—he did not utter a word going along.

Cross-examined. I had not heard the prosecutrix say he had done it—there was a piece of brown oilcloth on the table.

ARCHIBALD GEORGE ANDREWS . I am house-surgeon at Poplar Hospital—on Thursday morning, 22nd October, a little after 6, the police brought the prisoner there—he had a cleanly cut wound in the neck extending from the left to the middle line and termination there, about four inches long and about half an inch deep; it became less deep as it extended; it had not severed any of the large vessels—there had been some veinous bleeding, not much—it might have been self-inflicted or it might have been done by somebody else—any ordinary cutting knife would do it—it was not a dangerous wound—he remained as an in patient till the 2nd November, and left when he was taken into custody—I did not see him when admitted; I saw him an hour or two later—I saw no blood on his hands.

THOMAS HORACE OPENSHAW . I am a surgeon at the London Hospital—I saw the prosecutrix there on the morning of the 22nd; I admitted her—she was suffering from a wound on the left side of the neck—it was about half an inch in the deepest part—no arteries were cut, only some superficial veins—it might have been self inflicted or otherwise—there was nothing in the wound itself that I could tell by; it was an ordinary clean-cut wound inflicted by a knife—she had lost a fairly large quantity of blood, the usual amount amount, about six or eight ounces—she was not unconscious at all—it was not a dangerous wound.

HERBERT DUCK (Detective Officer). On 22nd October, after the people had been taken to the hospital, I went to this house to make inquiries—I was in plain clothes—I saw Mrs. Evans—on Monday, 2nd October, I took the prisoner into custody at the Poplar Hospital when he was discharged—I

said "You will be charged with attempting to murder Charlotte Dench by cutting her throat on 22nd October at No. 42, Collodion Street, Bromley, and further with attempting to commit suicide by cutting your own throat with a knife at the same time and place"—he said "I knew nothing about it until the landlady came into the room with a light; I then felt something running down my neck, and found my throat was cut."

CRESWELL WELLS (Police Inspector K). I made the plan produced showing the position of the things in the room; it is made to scale, and is correct.

Witnesses for the Defence.

EMMA BODDICOMB . I am a shop assistant, and lire at 10, Victoria Dock Road—I know the prosecutrix by seeing her—I heard her say that if Ernest dared go over the bridge this night she would put this b——knife in his throat—that might be a month or two before it was done, I am not sure—she had a white-handled knife in her hand at the time.

Cross-examined. I have never spoken to her; I knew her by being pointed out to me—she was passing by with Jim Smith when this was said—I know the prisoner, and know she was referring to him—I was in service at his brother's—she took the knife out of her pocket, and said this to Ginger Bob, that is Smith—I think she was sober—I did not mention this till after the prisoner was taken up-—I did not think much of it at the time.

REBECCA WOODS . I was in the Boilers Arms one night about a week before 22nd October, and heard the prosecutrix say she would rip the prisoner's b——guts open and take his bleeding liver out, the first chance she had.

Cross-examined. She said this over the bar to a young man—I have known the prisoner from a child—I did not tell him of this threat; he was there at the time, and she pointed her finger at him.

NOT GUILTY .

There was another indictment against the prisoner for attempting to commit suicide, upon which no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT.—Friday and Saturday, December 18th and 19th, 1885.

Before Mr. Recorder.

115. JAMES DAY PLEADED GUILTY to feloniously marrying Lucy Rogers, his wife Martha being alive.— Five Days' Imprisonment.

116. WILLIAM BENJAMIN GILES (38) , Forging and uttering a transfer of 497l. Stock of the Great Western Railway Company.

MR. E CLARK, Q.C., and MR. MONTAGU WILLIAMS Prosecuted; MR.

LOCKWOOD, Q.C., Defended.

JOHN CRAFT . I am registrar of the Great Western Railway Company—I produce three transfers marked A, B, and C of 1,000l. G.W. Stock from the name of Mr. Sanger, proprietor.

JOHN SANGER . I am part proprietor of Astley's Amphitheatre—I was a client of Mr. Ricardo, stockbroker—I deposited with him Scrip to the amount of 1,000l. in the Great Western Railway Company for safe

custody—he had them from the time he purchased them, but I do not remember the date—the signatures "John Sanger" on these three transfers are not in my writing—I take an equestrian troupe round the country—on 12th June, 1884, I was at a place called Pandy, Rhondda Valley, South Wales, therefore I was not in London to execute these transfers—I know the defendant Giles well—I do not know his writing; I have seen him write but never noticed it—I can't tell whose signature the attesting witness is—I did not give Giles or any other person authority to sign my name to these transfers, and until the box was broken open by Mr. Ricardo and the stock missed I had no idea that my stock had been sold.

Cross-examined. I should say that this is not a bit like my writing—I always sign this class of document myself; I do not entrust the duty to others—I have a great deal of correspondence, Mr. Levy and Mr. Butler conduct that for me in my name; they have no authority to use my name in writing letters—"H.B. for John Sanger" is the proper way—Mr. Ricardo has acted as my broker for a number of years—I have seen Mr. Bastard constantly in Mr. Ricardo's office, but not in the private room—he never transacted buisness for me; I always went to Mr. Ricardo in his private room—I did not leave it to Mr. Ricardo to use his discretion in altering my investments, but sometimes he would say "There is a good opportunity for you to sell so-and-so"—he is the only broker I do business with—I think I have suffered no loss in respect of this matter—I have never had he scrip, I don't know what has become of it—I have had other stock conveyed to me I believe instead of this, they have paid the dividends—I have not had other stock transferred to me yet representing this 1,000l., but I believe it is in the hands of the gentlemen of the Great Western Railway—I have received dividends upon it—when I have been in the country I have been in the habit of sending transfers which I had signed, up to MR. Rioardo to be attested.

Re-examined. When I have been in the country Mr. H. Bertram always witnessed my signiture, any document which purports to transfer property has to be signed in the presence of somebody else, and when I have signed such documents he was the person who witnessed it—I am not a very good scholar, and he would write the document, and I put my name at the bottom in his presence—I never authorised Mr. Ricardo or Mr. Giles to deal with property of that kind without my authority—I used afterwards to get a sale note "Sold for John Sanger"—I did not send the transfers up to Mr. Ricardo to be attested; I know nothing about attesting—I was in the habit of just signing my name to the document and sending it back to Mr. Ricardo's office to have the details filled up—I was not aware there was anything wanted.

Cross-examined. Mr. Bertram filled up the details, and then used to sign it and send it up to Mr. Ricardo; I never tent such a document up to Mr. Ricardo without either Mr. Bertram or Mr. Levy seeing my signature; he signed it as the attesting witness—Mr. Botham is my secretary, and kept my books and accounts.

By a JUROR. I have not one of my transfers here which I sent up from the country; it ought not to be sent up without the attesting witness being present—I used to tend everything back to Mr. Ricardo and leave it in his custody—he used to say "You had better leave it in my custody."

ALBERT RICARDO . I am a stockbroker of between 30 and 40 years'

standing, carrying on business at 11, Angel Court, Throgmorton Street—the prisoner was in my employ about 20 years—he was my authorised clerk, and was entitled to go into the Stock Exchange and make bargains on my behalf—a gentleman named Bastard, a stockbroker, had a seat in my office—he used to tell Giles to do business, for him, I believe—I did not myself do much personally in the conduct of the business or in the management of the books, I left it entirely to Giles—I kept securities belonging to my customers which had been left with me for safe custody in a strong room in a box—about the middle of 1884 Giles had the keys of both the strong room and the box; I had none—I left them entirely in Giles's keeping; that had been the case for some years—I left the axamination of the books to Giles; I had entire confidence in him—Mr. Sanger was one of my customers—he used to consult me from time to time with regard to his investments—when he has been travelling in the country he has sent transfers up to me, and his signature has always been witnest ed—among my customer's securities I had scrip for 1,000l. Consolidated Stock of the Great Western Railway belonging to Mr. Sanger—in October, 1884, Giles left my office without any explanation, and I heard no more of him until he was brought back from America—after he had left in that way I had the strong box broken open, and I then found that Mr. Sanger's scrip was gone—the signature to this document is in Mr. Giles's writing; the date is 12th July, that was four months before he left—I never heard of that transfer from Mr. Giles or from anybody, and I never received Mr. Sanger's authority to make such a transfer, or heard of it from him, and I have had to pay this money—on the Stock Exchange if a forged transfer is found it does not operate, and the broker in whose name it has been made has to stand the loss.

Cross-examined. The amount of the sale of the stock has not been brought into my books; 1,390l. odd does not appear there—I have my cash-book here—the sum was paid into my account by Giles at Lubbock's bank, and I have got credit for it—he had authority to draw there on my account—I know nothing about how my losses have been sustained—I was not aware that Mr. Bastard at the time of this transaction was heavily in my debt, but I believe it is so—I have some doubt as to the amount—the amount paid in by Mr. Giles to my account would be simply credited to my account in the ordinary course of business—Mr. Bastard has had a seat in my office 15 or 20 years; he is constantly there, but I do not know whether he has done any business lately; he is my nephew—he had no authority from me to use my clerk, but he did so with my knowledge, and is doing so now—since this transaction took place there has been very little business but looking into the accounts—Mr. Bastard does not come there to assist me in this prosecution of Giles; he comes for the purpose of ascertaining how much he owes me—I have been trying to find out for a year how much he owes me; it is about 5,000l.; that is as far as wo have got—I presume Giles, who had the drawing of my account, paid Mr. Bastard with my money—I have no doubt that any differences which were paid for those transactions were paid on account—if Bastard or any one has gained an advantage at all it has been Bastard who has gained it—we sent Mr. Sanger's transfers down to him to be filled up, and they often came back without my seeing

them—they would be opened by Mr. Giles—I know that Giles lost his wife in October, 1884.

Re-examined. The transactions with Mr. Sanger took place through me or through Giles, as my clerk—Mr. Bastard had nothing whatever to do with them—I do not know that before Mr. Giles disappeared, Mr. Bastard's transactions were being entered to my account in my name—I have lost altogether about 10,000l., money taken from my account which ought to have been invested and which I was liable for—the securities taken from the box were of the value of between 15,000l. and 20,000l.—Giles did not ask me for leave of absence, or say that he was going away.

SAMUEL LYTHEL (City Detective Sergeant). On 11th November, 1884, I received a warrant for the arrest of Giles—I went to his address here in England, but could not find him—I continued from time to time to make inquiries as to his whereabouts, but could not find him—in consequence of information I received, on 12th October I left England for New York—when I arrived there, using the information I had received, on 25th October I found the prisoner at 79, M'Dougal Street, living under the name of William Gouch—on 31st October I received him from the United States Marshal—he waived all technical matters before the Commissioner on the 26th, and said he would come with me—we came back in the City of Chester—I said to him on board "You have heard the warrant read?"—he said "Yes, I know about that"—I brought him to England—he was charged at Moor Lane Police-station, and made no reply.

PERCY THOMAS DODD . In June, 1884, I was a clerk in Mr. Ricardo's employ—it was my duty to keep a book called the jobbers' ledger, in which the separate accounts are entered of the different jobbers with whom transactions are being carried out—this (produced) is the jobber's ledger from 14th May to 11th and 12th June, 1884—in the account with Roscoe and Beasley of 12th June the sale of 1,000l. Great Western Stock does not appear at all—on that account it appears that 66l. 5s. was due to them on 12th June on account of Mr. Ricardo—this cheque of 12th June, drawn on Mr. Ricardo's account for 71l. 17s. 6d. and payable to Roscoe and Beasley, is in Giles's writing.

Cross-examined. I keep the principal's ledger and the jobber's ledger—I know that in June, 1884, Mr. Ricardo was engaged in speculations—I am now in his employ—I am not aware that at that time he was owing sums of money on differences and on speculative accounts—I do not know whether Giles had instructions from Mr. Bastard or not; I believe he gave him orders sometimes—Mr. Bastard continued to come to the office after Giles had gone away, and comes still—the key of the strong room was kept in the iron drawer of the safe, and the key of the safe was kept in Mr. Giles's desk; anybody could get it who wanted it—I made no formal entry in the books of Mr. Ricardo with regard to the Great Western transaction, but the day after I checked the account with Messrs. Roscoe and Beasley because it disagreed—I made no formal entry, but I find here some pencil figures which I made at the time—the Great Western account was entered in my cash-book, but nowhere else.

Re-examined. Though the amount is entered there is nothing in the cash book which shows that such a transaction took place in Great Westerns—a day or two afterwards it was my duty to check it with

Roscoe and Beasley's account, and I must then have discovered that 66l. 5s. appeared to be due, and that 71l. 17s. 6d. had been paid—on finding out that a transaction had taken place which did not appear in the books I spoke to Giles about it to the best of my recollection, and he said that it was all right.

MR. BLAKE. I am clerk to Messrs. Roscoe and Beasley—I produce the books showing the account with Mr. Ricardo on 12th June—on that account the transaction appears of the Great Western Railway Stock—this cheque for 71l. 17s. 6d. satisfied the account of Messrs. Roscoe and Beasley accurately.

ALGERNON BASTARD . I am a stockbroker, and occupy a seat in Mr. Ricardo's office, and transact my business there—Giles was his authorised clerk—I had no knowledge whatever of the transfer of this 1,000l. Great Western Stock from Mr. Sanger's name, and no part of that money went to my benefit or use.

Cross-examined. Giles acted under my instructions from time to time—I had never more speculative accounts than I could pay for or settle at any time—if Mr. Giles told me he required any money he could always have it—I was not in June, 1884, to my knowledge heavily indebted to Mr. Ricardo on my speculative account—I have been trying to look into the books for the last 12 months, but there is very little done—I am not aware that my liability to him is something like 5,000l.; I cannot tell if I owe him anything—Giles acted for me when I told him to—my own securities were kept downstairs or in the safe upstairs; some of them were registered Stocks—I did not stand to lose in June, 1884, on my speculative account something like 10,000l. or 12,000l.—the account might show against me a little, I should say 400l., I have nothing to show it—the account of my sales and purchases was entered in Mr. Ricardo's books by my knowledge—I should think Mr. Ricardo was aware of it, because everything that Mr. Giles did was generally entered in Mr. Ricardo's name on my behalf; that was not by my instructions; I tried to get the entries in my name—I never told Mr. Ricardo it was being done because I thought if I told the prisoner that I liked the thing in my name it would have been sufficient; I did object to it to Giles, I do not know how often, I forget when; I do not know if I objected more than once, I was always against it—I had a strong natural objection to it, but did not tell Mr. Ricardo because it had nothing to do with him.

Re-examined. I had no authorised clerk in the house—Giles was Mr. Ricardo's authorised clerk, and the only authorised clerk at that office.

GUILTY.— Judgment respited.

117. CHARLES HARDING Unlawfully attempting to carnally know and abuse Edith Hiscock, a girl under the age of 13 years. Second Count, indecent assault.

MR. GILL Prosecuted; MR. AVORY Defended.

The prisoner received a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

118. SAMUEL JAMES HENNIS (75) , Obtaining by false pretences from Walter Stillwell Standerwick 5l. with intent to defraud. Other Counts for attempting to obtain 45l. from the same person with a like intent, and for obtaining from Richmond Story two cheques, each for 50l., with a like intent.

MESSRS. MEAD and BODKIN Prosecuted.

WALTER STILLWELL STANDERWICK . I am a salesman in the London Central Meat Market, and live at 18, Enfield Road, Kingsland—in October last I saw an advertisement in a daily paper for a manager of a depot in the Commercial Road, and I applied to Messrs. Collins, Chancery Lane, who referred me to the prisoner—I wrote this letter of 30th April. (Applying for the situation, giving references, and stating that he was prepared to deposit the required cash security.) The advertisement mentioned a cash security—in reply I received a letter dated 2nd May, signed "S.J. Hennis," written on the back of a circular. (This said that he was willing to appoint him manager, as he personally knew one of his references; that he had agreements with two silica companies, the Imperial Silica Stone Company and the Silica Paint Company; and asking him to call on Messrs. Collins.) On 6th May I received this letter. (Asking what arrangement he had made with Messrs. Collins.) On 7th May I went to Messrs. Collins, and I then sent this telegram: "Have seen Messrs. Collins this morning and completed arrangements; they will send you a letter"—the prisoner telegraphed a reply the same day—I received this letter of 8th May from the prisoner. (This stated that he had specimens of silver ore in several museums, and that he would be in London on Saturday or Monday. Another letter, of the 9th made an appointment for Tuesday at Collins's.) On 12th May I met the prisoner at Messrs. Collins's—he showed me specimens of what were supposed to be silica—I had a long conversation with him about my engagement, and the result was I paid 5l.—I was to be his manager at the Commercial Road Basin of the Regent's Canal—the silica was to come from his mine and hot lake in North Wales—he showed me lots of diagrams and plans of the hot lake and mountains surrounding—he said his works were at Queen Street, Chester, where the silica went through certain processes—he then asked me for 50l., "on account of your having such an important post and having such a lot of silica, which will be under your hands, I shall require some security"—I asked him whether it would do from the Guarantee Society, but he objected—I was to have 150l. a year salary, and commission of about 25 per cent.—this agreement (produced) was drawn up between us; I signed one and he the other. (In this agreement the prisoner was described as constituting the Globe Silica Company.) I told him I could not get 50l. at that moment, but I would get a deposit on account—I gave him a 5l. note, and the receipt was endorsed on the agreement—I believed the representations he made in his verbal statements and the prospectus, and that induced me to part with the 5l.—on the 13th I went to the Commercial Road Basin and made inquiries—I found no office whatever belonging to the defendant or any trace of him—on 13th May I received this letter from him. (Stating that he had arranged at Chester for the storage at the Commercial Road branch up to 50 tons, and requested the prosecutor to meet him next day at Collins's, when other arrangements could be made.) I met him next day at Collins's, and a day or two after I went with him to Regent's Park Basin, where he introduced me to the dock officials as his manager—he showed me a shed where the silica was to be deposited, and suggested that I should live in the Commercial Road—we went to a public-house in the neighbourhood, where he showed me a copy of the lease of this hot lake, saying he had left the original behind him—I have never acted as manager, I have had no opportunity—I know

of no branch office belonging to the prisoner—I communicated with my solicitors—I did not pay the other 45l.

RICHMOND STORY . I am a schoolmaster, of Ilford—I put an advertisement in the Telegraph on 22nd August, and in answer to it received this letter of the same date. (This stated that he was concentrating a branch office near the Regent's Canal Basin at 276, Commercial Road; that the manager's salary would be 100l. a year, and that hit material was a monopoly, and went into 100 manufactures.) In answer I sent a post-card, dated 22nd August, suggesting a meeting at Liverpool Street—I then received this letter of 22nd August. (Mentioning the 60l. deposit, and stating that someone else was seeking the situation, and enclosing a printer's proof of a circular.) Then I received another letter making an appointment for 4 p.m. on 31st August at Liverpool Street—I met the prisoner, and we adjourned to the Broad Street waiting-room—he showed me what he called vouchers, a lease of some property in Merioneth, a plan, several railway companies' invoices, printed extracts from a book describing the locality, and this document: "Produce and workings of Cwm Bychan"—I went through all the vouchers; they gave me a general idea of the work, but I came to no conclusion—he showed me these circulars—he said several times he had several offices—I wrote this post-card "H" to the effect that I was after a situation, and wished him to decide, after several interviews—on the afternoon of 2nd September I again saw the prisoner, and he repeated what he had said at former interviews as to the nature of the business—he showed me a copy of an agreement, which I agreed to, subject to certain letters being interpolated with it—at the next interview I told him I required my appointment in writing, and drafted one on this—he gave me this memorandum, which sets forth the advantages of the business—on 4th September I saw him at Broad Street Station when he brought the agreement, and a duplicate, in which he agrees to take me as manager at Commercial Road, and I am to pay 50l. as a guarantee of fidelity—we then went to the King's Arms billiard-room, where the agreement was read over, and we each signed a part—I then gave him. this cheque for 50l., drawn by my wife on the London and County Banking Company in his favour—it was crossed, and "and Co." written on it—when I gave it him I told him that as I had only his word to depend on, and as the money was in my wife's name, I should like it to remain for a month until I began to draw some money, and he agreed—he repeated that an office had been taken at 276, Commercial Street, and we were to have goods there—he gave me a promissory note for the 50l.—I received this letter from him dated 5th September asking for another cheque, as the one he had was obliterated by the erasure "and Co."—I saw him on the 7th; he gave me back the cheque, and I gave him another, and arranged with him that it should not be cashed for a month—I asked him who his bankers were—he said the London and Scottish—I knew such a bank in London or Scotland, and remarked I was very glad—after that I went to 276, Commercial Road, and could not gain access; no one was there—it appeared uninhabited—it had the appearance of a private house—I wrote to the prisoner about my visit, and saw him on 8th September at 276, Commercial Road—when I explained I could not get in he said he would go with me to the house—I expected to go in with him, but as the door opened he pushed in, and the door closed, and I was left on the step—on coming out he appeared to be much surprised,

and said he had had quite a row; it was a fixed thing, and they would not let him have the the room now, and if they had been men instead of women, something would have happened—I went with him to look for other premises, and ultimately we went to 691, Commercial Road, on 12th September—I saw Mr. Weller and the prisoner, and heard the arrangement made—Mr. Weller asked for a reference—the prisoner gave the name of Orr—I subsequently went to the house, and Mr. Weller said he had had no answer—I felt annoyed; I expected to have begun business before that—Weller agreed instead of reference to take a month's rent in advance, and I agreed to take possession of the office, and did so on the 12th, I think—I attended daily up to 16th October—at one of our interviews the prisoner told me the office was furnished; that No. 276 was already fitted, but afterwards he said the futniture was just bought—after I had been at the office two or three days, furniture came in little by little—I did really nothing during the three days, furniture came in little by brought down a few envelopes, and asked me to fill them with small samples of silica to be sent out—I had 25 circulars or so to send out, but I had to correct them before they could be used, and so I could not use them—the prisoner came to the office at first pretty regularly once or twice, but latterly very seldom—I employed two girls as clerks; they were not paid—no business whatever was carried on there—the prisoner had always written to me from Rodney Street, Walworth—one of my letters was returned from there—I made inquiries, and found he was gone—I then had a letter from him from Sparkbrook, near Birmingham—I followed him to Birmingham and Chester, and spent three or four days looking for him, but could not find him—I could find no office—I gave information to the police.

WILLIAM MACKEWAN . I am general manager of the London and County Bank, Lombard Street—I do not know the prisoner at all and never gave him advances on cheques with erasures on them.

Cross-examined. My father was manager of the Custom House Quay—I have no recollection of your name—I had two brothers, George and David—I dined with my father over the office more than forty years ago.

Re-examined. My father and brothers were not managers of the London and County Bank.

JAMES REANEY . I am a cashier of the London and County Bank, Stratford Branch—I cashed this cheque on 7th September—I cannot remember who took the money.

THOMAS WELLER . I live at 691, Commercial Road—on 12th September the prisoner came with Mr. Story—I asked for a reference, he gave the name of Mr. Orr, Charlton, Kent—I wrote to him and received no reply—afterwards the prisoner and Mr. Story called and said "Did you receive an answer?"—I said "I have not yet"—he jumped up and seemed quite astonished, and said "I cannot account for that at all"—they consulted and said "Time is going on, what shall we do"—I said I would take a week's rent in advance, and no doubt Mr. Orr would answer my letter in the mean time—the prisoner paid 1l. 12s., this is the receipt I gave—no business was carried on at my place by the prisoner or anybody—everything left there the police took possession of except the office fittings, a few chairs and a table, which I have kept for rent—3l. 4s. was due for rent—no notice was given.

JAMES WILLIAM BUTLER . I am Managing Director of the Imperial

Stone Company—I only saw the prisoner once before I saw him here, that was in Liverpool in 1880 or 1881—we have no agreement with the Globe Silica Company—we do not use infusorial silica, but silicate of soda—that might be made from infusorial silica, but we have never used any of it—we had correspondence with the prisoner; he dated his letters from Liverpool—it resulted in no business—that was four or five years ago, and there were one or two letters in May this year—there is no Company at Greenwich, as far as I know, called the Imperial Silicate Stone Company.

Cross-examined. The letters four years ago were about your supplying us with silica to make silicate of soda.

JOHN BRYSON ORR . I and others carry on business as the Silicate Paint Company at Charlton, Kent—I have had no dealings with the prisoner, and no agreement nor contract under the style of the Globe Silica Company—I received a letter from Mr. Weller, which I did not answer—I had seen the prisoner twice before, but did not know him sufficiently favourably, and I thought no answer would be best.

Cross-examined. I heard your name mentioned in connection with Griffiths 15 years ago—I don't recollect at our last meeting saying I should be happy to do my best for you—I may have answered your letters once or twice; I received a great many from you.

JAMES MURPHY (Detective Sergeant Chester Police). I pass along Queen Street, Chester, several times a day—I have made inquiries at 29, 30, and 32, and find that no Globe Silica Company carries on business there—no person of the name of Hennis is known at either of those three places—29 is occupied by an architect, Hewitt; 30 by a draper, Williams; 32 by a widow lady, Sorrell—one of those persons has been there 13 years, another 9, and the third 5—29 is on the left-hand side, and 32 and 30 on the right-hand, about 30 yards from the other.

Cross-examined. Parry, of the Peruvian Bark Company, is at 28, Forgate Street—I know nothing about your arrangements.

JOSEPH JACKSON (Detective Sergeant Manchester Police). No business is carried on in the name of the Globe Silica Company at Corporation Street, Manchester, or in the name of Hennis—I have searched every place.

MARY MCEWAN . I am the wife of William John McEwan, and live at 276, Commercial Road—in June this year we had a room to let as an office—the prisoner called and asked us to let it to him for a coal office—about 4th September I received a letter from the prisoner, and shortly afterwards he called—I declined to lot the room to him.

Cross-examined. My husband never wrote to you—I wrote offering you the office at 1l. 2s. a week; my husband knew nothing about it—you called three times, the last time I declined to take you—I said you had bothered me, and I did not feel inclined.

EDWIN BENNETT (Inspector Birmingham Police). I received a communication from the London police with regard to the prisoner, and on 30th October I went to the railway station and took the prisoner into custody; a woman was with him who came by the London train—I charged him with obtaining 50l. and other securities from a London gentleman by fraud—I had no warrant then, and did not know the gentleman's name—he said "Oh, fraud; it is but a County Court case at the best"—he said to the woman "Oh, it is that man Story"—the prisoner was lodging at the time at 162, Bradford Street, Birmingham; he gave me that address

—I searched him and found several papers, a pawn-ticket for a gold ingot, 5s., and 1s.—I went to his lodgings and saw there a lot of papers in a bag, which I gave to Sergeant Wolsey—there Were two rooms, sitting and bedroom—it was a private house; the only indication of an office was a table with these papers on it—next day Wolsey came from London with the warrant, and I delivered the prisoner into his custody, and all the documents—there is an address on the circular, Schude Hill, Birmingham; there is no such place there—I know the town well, and have made every possible search, but have not been able to find any office or depot occupied by the Globe Silioa Company or by Hennis—Sparkbrook is about a third of Birmingham, and is not a sufficient address to find a person by.

JOHN WOLSEY (City Detective). I went to Birmingham on 31st October and received from Bennett some papers, amongst others those which have been put in to-day—I found about 100 circulars of the Globe Silica Company.

JOHN MITCHELL (City Detective Sergeant). On 3rd November I went to 691, Commercial Road, with the last witness—the room was furnished as an office—I found a regular set of account books with no entries, addressed envelopes, and about 400 packets of samples—I went to Finsbury Pavement; there was no Globe Silica Company nor any Mr. Hennis there.

JOHN GLASS . I am sub manager of the Regent's Canal Company—the Globe Silica Company had no offioe there, nor any warehouse or storage yard—there was no business card there about the company.

Cross-examined. I do not recollect your waiting on me at the Leadenhall Street office—it is possible you had a long conversation with me as to our warehouse at the basin, I do not recollect it—no rates could have been quoted to you or I should have known it.

The Prisoner in his statement before the Magistrate and in a written defence stated: That the circulars found were only outlines of those he meant to send out; that Story told him to do what he liked with the cheque; that ill feeling arose between them because he objected to put up an expensive signboard and buying a bookcase. That he expended all the 50l. in furnishing the Commercial Road office, and that he possessed large deposits of silica and copper, and was the founder of the silica paint.

RICHARD STORY (Re-examined by the COURT ). It is not true that we quarrelled about expensive fittings, and from what Mitchell has seen the furniture is all secondhand—I never pressed him to put up a signboard—I never mentioned a bookcase, but suggested plain shelves in the corners.

GUILTY. It was stated that the prisoner had been in custody in Chester on a similar charge, which was withdrawn on payment of a certain sum of money .— Judgment respited.

119. MARY DRISCOLL (47) , Unlawfully committing wilful and corrupt perjury at Bow Street Police-court.

MR. MONTAGU WILLIAMS Prosecuted; MR. BLACK Defended.

ALEXANDER BERESFORD . I live at 10, Turner's Court, St. Martin's Lane—the prisoner lodged with a woman at No. 5—she said she lived at No. 46, Eaton Place, Manchester Square—at the time

of this occurrence I lived at No. 5—Fraise and his wife lived in the same house—before the night of the 19th and morning of the 20th I had been a witness against Fraise at Bow Street Police-court and this Court—he was charged with knocking a man's head with a chopper-hammer, and got nine months' bard labour—on the night of the 19th February I went to bed at 10 o'clock in the back parlour—my brother, William Hereford, who slept with me, went to bed at the same time—after I had been in bed some time I heard a noise outside the window; I recognised Mrs. Raisers's and the prisoner's voices cursing and swearing, and they shook the windows as well—they tried to force the door of the room I was sleeping in—after that I heard them go upstairs, and then I heard one of them fall—Mrs. Fraise went down and came up again, and said "Come on upstairs, Poll"—then I heard them go upstairs again, and then go down the court—they came back a short time after, and came upstairs again—then they came down and Mrs. Fraise said "Mind, Poll, hold this door; that man in the parlour hit you on the head with the poker; I saw him do it; I will go down and fetch the police"—after that two constables came and knocked at my door; it was opened, and the constables came in with the prisoner and Mrs. Fraise—the policemen asked who did it, and the women pointed to me, and said that I did it—I was taken to the police-station at 5 minutes to 12 at night, remanded till Saturday on my own recognisances, and then discharged by the Magistrate after he had heard the evidence—I did not strike the woman on the head with the poker—I never saw her till I got out of bed; I did not injure her in any way on this night.

Cross-examined. My family does not know the prisoner's—I know Mrs. Raisers's husband and children; my family don't know hers—there is no ill-feeling between me and her family—the prisoner is a woman of drunken, dissolute habits—I often see her drunk; she is very insulting—she comes and goes out with Mrs. Fraise—I was annoyed on this night at the way she came in; she was drunk and used foul language—I heard her fall downstairs, and I heard Mrs. Fraise say "You do not know the way of the stairs or you would not have fallen down"—I said at the police-court I heard a rumbling noise—I did not ask them to keep quiet; it was just after 12 o'clock, I think; I had been to sleep—my wife and mother were in the front parlour; my brother and myself in the back—there is a door between the parlours, and there is another door in the back parlour, but it is never opened.

WILLIAM BERESFORD . I live at 5, Turner's Court—on this night I and my brother went to bed in the same back room; my mother and my brother's wife sleep in the front room—after we got into bed I heard the prisoner's and Mrs. Raisers's voices swearing and rattling the windows outside—I heard them go upstairs, and one of them fall down—my brother was in bed at the time—after the fall I heard the tread of people going out, and shortly after two constables came with the prisoner and Mrs. Fraise, and my brother was taken away—from the time I heard the rattling at the window to the time the constables knocked at the door my brother had not left the bed at all, so that he could not have used a poker—when the prisoner came with the constables her head was bandaged up.

Cross-examined. It was about 20 minutes to half an hour from the time I first heard the prisoner in the passage till I saw her with the

bandage on—I was asleep till the noise awoke me—they were knocking at the parlour window which looks out on the court—the door of the bedroom opens into the passage and the house into the court—I think I and my brother awoke at the same time—I swear positively he did not leave the room—I heard some one falling downstairs; I could not say it was the prisoner; I heard their voices and believe it was—I had not known the prisoner two months before this occurrence to my knowledge—I knew her and Mrs. Raisers's voices—I had known Mrs. Fraise as long—I have only noticed one door to our bedroom—I have lived there two years; we had been sleeping together; we do not now; we slept on the floor—I used to sleep there; we did not both do so.

Re-examined. I sleep on that ground floor; my brother usually slept on the second floor of the same house, but after Faster was brought up my brother slept in my room.

By the COURT. After I heard some one fall downstairs Mrs. Fraise said "Poll, come upstairs"—before the persons left the house and came back with the policeman I heard Mrs. Fraise say to the prisoner "Hold the door, Poll while I go and fetch the police; mind, he hit you on the head with the poker."

JANE BERESFORD . I am the mother of the two last witnesses—on this night I was sleeping with the prosecutor's wife in the front, and my two sons were sleeping in the back—I heard the two women cursing and swearing outside the window—Mrs. Fraise went upstairs, and the prisoner followed, and as far as I know fell down; I heard some one fall—to get into the passage where the stairs are the prosecutor would have to pass through my room—when the police came with the women I opened the door—my son did not go out of the door at all into the passage—when the women came back from where they had been, the prisoner came to the street door and Mrs. Fraise said "Hold this door, and see no one comes out of the parlour, and mind, I saw him hit you on the head with the poker."

Cross-examined. One held the door while the other went for the police—we did not listen to their very strong language—no one tried to open the door till the police came—I know the prisoner stood by the door all the time—she is a very drunken women, and was very drunk on this occasion—the back parlour is partitioned off from the front—there is no back door in the room my sons sleep in; we have no back door—when the police came and asked who was the man, Mrs. Fraise pointed to my son, and said "That is the man that did it"—the prisoner said "You wicked wretch; what have I done to you to make you do that to me?"—he made no reply.

FRANCES CARTER . I am the wife of Frederick Carter, a bricklayer—on 20th February I lived at 5, Turner's Court—I went to bed about nine o'clock on the 19th and about one next morning I heard Mrs. Fraise and the prisoner trying to get upstairs—I knew them by their voices—heard a noise as if somebody had slipped downstairs, and when M Fraise got the prisoner up to their landing she said, "I know who So that; a man downstairs in the parlour, with a hammer; I will take to the hospital"—I heard them go to the hospital, as I supposed Now, lay awake till they came back—when they came back she said

of this occurrence I lived at No. 5—Fraise and his wife lived in the same house—before the night of the 19th and morning of the 20th I had been a witness against Fraise at Bow Street Police-court and this Court—he was charged with knocking a man's head with a chopperhammer, and got nine months' hard labour—on the night of the 19th February I went to bed at 10 o'clock in the back parlour—my brother, William Hereford, who slept with me, went to bed at the same time—after I had been in bed some time I heard a noise outside the window; I recognised Mrs. Raisers's and the prisoner's voices cursing and swearing, and they shook the windows as well—they tried to force the door of the room I was sleeping in—after that I heard them go upstairs, and then I heard one of them fall—Mrs. Fraise went down and came up again, and said "Come on upstairs, Poll"—then I heard them go upstairs again, and then go down the court—they came back a short time after, and came upstairs again—then they came down and Mrs. Fraise said "Mind, Poll, hold this door; that man in the parlour hit you on the head with the poker; I saw him do it; I will go down and fetch the police"—after that two constables came and knocked at my door; it was opened, and the constables came in with the prisoner and Mrs. Fraise—the policemen asked who did it, and the women pointed to me, and said that I did it—I was taken to the police-station at 5 minutes to 12 at night, remanded till Saturday on my own recognisances, and then discharged by the Magistrate after he had heard the evidence—I did not strike the woman on the head with the poker—I never saw her till I got out of bed; I did not injure her in any way on this night.

Cross-examined. My family does not know the prisoner's—I know Mrs. Raisers's husband and children; my family don't know hers—there is no ill-feeling between me and her family—the prisoner is a woman of drunken, dissolute habits—I often see her drunk; she is very insulting—she comes and goes out with Mrs. Fraise—I was annoyed on this night at the way she came in; she was drunk and used foul language—I heard her fall downstairs, and I heard Mrs. Fraise say "You do not know the way of the stairs or you would not have fallen down"—I said at the police-court I heard a rumbling noise—I did not ask them to keep quiet; it was just after 12 o'clock, I think; I had been to sleep—my wife and mother were in the front parlour; my brother and myself in the bank—there is a door between the parlours, and there is another door in the back parlour, but it is never opened.

WILLIAM BERESFORD . I live at 5, Turner's Court—on this night I and my brother went to bed in the same back room; my mother and my brother's wife sleep in the front room—after we got into bed I heard the prisoner's and Mrs. Raisers's voices swearing and rattling the windows outside—I heard them go upstairs, and one of them fall down—my brother was in bed at the time—after the fall I heard the tread of people going out, and shortly after two constables came with the prisoner and Mrs. Fraise, and my brother was taken away—from the time I heard the rattling at the window to the time the constables knocked at the door my brother had not left the bed at all, so that he could not have used a poker—when the prisoner came with the constables her head was bandaged up.

Cross-examined. It was about 20 minutes to half an hour from the time I first heard the prisoner in the passage till I saw her with the

bandage on—I was asleep till the noise awoke me—they were knocking at the parlour window which looks out on the court—the door of the bedroom opens into the passage and the door of the house into the court—I think I and my brother awoke at the same time—I swear positively he did not leave the room—I heard some one falling downstairs; I could not say it was the prisoner; I heard their voices, and believe it was—I had not known the prisoner two months before this occurrence to my knowledge—I knew her and Mrs. Raisers's voices—I had known Mrs. Fraise as long—I have only noticed one door to out bedroom—I have lived there two years; we had been sleeping together; we do not now; we slept on the floor—I used to sleep there; we did not both do so.

Re-examined. I sleep on that ground floor; my brother usually slept on the second floor of the same house, but after Fraise was brought up my brother slept in my room.

By the COURT. After I heard some one fall downstairs Mrs. Fraise said "Poll, come upstairs"—before the persons left the house and came back with the policemen I heard Mrs. Fraise say to the prisoner "Hold the door, Poll, while I go and fetch the police; mind he hit you on the head with the poker."

JANE BERESFORD . I am the mother of the two last witnesses—on this night I was sleeping with the prosecutor's wife in the front, and my two sons were sleeping in the back—I heard the two women cursing and swearing outside the window—Mrs. Fraise went upstairs, and the prisoner followed, and as far as I known fell down; I heard some one fall—to get into the passage where the stairs are the prosecutor would have to pass through my room—when the police came with the women I opened the door—my son did not go out of the door at all into the prisoner came to the street door and Mrs. Fraise said "Hold this door, and see no one comes out of the parlour, and mind, I saw him hit you on the head with the poker."

Cross-examined. One held the door while the other went for the police—we did not listen to their very strong language—no one tried to open the door till the police came—I know the prisoner stood by the door all the time—she is a very drunken women, and was very drunk on this occasion—the back parlour is partitioned off from the front—there is no back door in the room my sons sleep in; we have no back door—when the police came and asked who was the man, Mrs. Fraise pointed to my son, and said "That is the man that did it"—the prisoner said "You wicked wretch; what have I done to you to make you do that to me?"—he made no reply.

FRANCES CARTER . I am the wife of Frederick Carter, a bricklayer—on 20th February I lived at 5, Turner's Court—I went to bed about nine o'clock on the 19th, and about one next morning I heard Mrs. Fraise and the prisoner trying to get upstairs—I knew them by their voices—I heard a noise as if somebody had slipped downstairs, and when Mrs. Fraise got the prisoner up to their landing she said, "I know who done that; a man downstairs in the parlour, with a hammer; I will take you to the hospital"—I heard them go to the hospital, as I supposed, and I lay awake till they came back—when they came back she said, "Now,

Poll, hold the door open, I will go and fetch a constable; remember the man in the parlour has done that with a poker."

Cross-examined. The street door was generally open, but it would go backwards and forwards—it has a latch, and you can get in if it is shut without any one from the inside opening it—I have known the prisoner about one and a half years, seeing her go up and downstairs—I have only seen her and Mrs. Fraise since they lived in the house—I recognised their voices—I lived on the first floor, they lived higher up—I could hear distinctly—they were three stairs below me—my window was open at the top—I heard some one fall down—I did not say at the police-court that I fancied I heard it.

ALBERT ROBERT JOLIFFE , M.R.C.S. I am house surgeon at the General Hospital at Helena—on 20th February I was house surgeon at Charging Cross Hospital—on that morning the prisoner came there with a woman—she had a scalp wound, which she said was caused by a kick on the head, in answer to a question it was my duty to ask her—I entered in the book as "Cause of injury" "boot"—if she had said it had been done with a poker I should have put "poker."

Cross-examined. If the boot was thrown I should have put "boot," but I distinctly remember her saying she was kicked on the head—I dare say Dr. Marriott attended her next morning—I was on night duty—it was an ordinary very slight contused scalp wound—a boot or poker or stick might cause it—there had been some loss of blood—I cannot say how much; there was not much on her hair—I can't remember if there was on her clothes—I don't remember if she was drunk, they nearly always are in cases of scalp wounds, and we don't take much notice.

By the COURT. I dressed the wound—it may have been caused by her falling downstairs and striking her head on the edge of a stair.

ROBERT LARGE (542 E). At half-past one on 20th February I was called to 5, Turner's Court, by Mrs. Fraise, and saw the prisoner standing in the doorway with her head bandaged, and marks of blood on her dress collar—Fraise said she saw Alexander Hereford rush out of the room and strike the prisoner on the head with a poker as she was ascending the stairs—the prisoner said that he did so—on hearing that I knocked at the door—Mrs. Hereford answered it—I asked for her son—he came out from the inner room half undressed, apparently just out of bed—Fraise and the prisoner came into the room—Hereford was pointed out, and they said, "That is the man that did it"—he denied it—Mrs. Fraise pointed to a poker in the fender and said, "That is the poker that Hereford struck Mrs. Disco with"—I examined it, and could find no mark on it—I took Alexander Hereford to the station; his brother came too, and the charge was entered. "Alexander Hereford assaulting Mary Disco by striking her on the head with a poker at 5, Turner's Court. Person charging. Mary Disco, her mark.

Cross-examined. Mrs. Fraise had been drinking, but was not in such a condition that she was likely to stagger—the prisoner was standing in the street door.

JOSEPH ROBERT SAYER . I am one of the clerks at Bow Street Police-court, and was on duty taking notes on February 20th, before Mr. Flowers, when the charge against Hereford for assaulting the prisoner was heard—she was sworn, and gave her evidence—this is my note—I heard her say, "Hereford came out of his mother's door and

struck me on the head with a poker," and said to her, "I will give you witness."

PARTRIDGE (Sergeant E). This charge was preferred by the direction of Mr. Flowers against the prisoner for perjury, placed in the hands of the Public Prosecutor, and at the same time Mr. Flowers directed that proceedings should be taken against Mrs. Fraise for perjury—they were not gone into because Mrs. Fraise was too ill to attend, and the case was adjourned for two or three months on that account, but she is still too ill.

The Prisoner's Statement before the Magistrate."On my oath Hereford struck me as I put my foot on the first step. Up the stairs I never went."

GUILTY .— Four Months' Hard Labour.

THIRD COURT.—Friday, December 18th, 1885.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

120. WILLIAM WREN (38) , Burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Morris, with intent to steal therein.

MR. GREENFIELD Prosecuted.

HENRY MORRIS . I am a tailor at 16, Chick sand Street, close to Smithfield—on the 20th November my premises were safely secured and I went to bed at 10.30—I was awoke about 4 a.m.—my wife heard a noise, got up, opened the bedroom door and listened, and asked who was downstairs—my brother, who sleeps down in the front kitchen, called out "There is a man down in the kitchen"—my wife called me up, I ran down as quick as I could and woke up the people that live in the shop parlour—then I ran to the street door, unbolted it, and ran out for a policeman—I found one in less than five minutes and went with him into the back kitchen, where we found the prisoner detained by my brother and some other people—I had never seen him before—I missed no property in the kitchen—the whole house is mine, but I let the shop and parlour to a milliner.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. There was a light in my back kitchen window at 4 o'clock—I did not secure the back door and don't know if it was fastened or not—I did not hear you shout in the passage that you wanted to see the governor; you said so to my brother—I did not see you before the police brought you up—nothing was moved, displaced, or broken—you had no time to get away or to take anything—I sleep upstairs.

MOSES MORRIS . I am the son of the last witness—on 20th November about a quarter to twelve I saw the place securely fastened, except the bolt of the yard door into the back Kitchen, which I forgot; it was simply on the latch and could be opened from inside or outside—I went to bed—I afterwards heard a noise downstairs, and went down with Solomon Grand, who sleeps with me—I saw the prisoner in the passage downstairs; he kept on saying he had come to see the governor—my uncle Simon had spoken to him first and asked him what he wanted—he said "I have come to see the governor"—in this kitchen were clothes, crockery, and boxes—nothing was taken or disturbed.

SIMON MORRIS . I am the uncle of the last witness and the brother of Henry Morris—I lodge in the house, and my bedroom is the back kitchen—on the night of 20th November I heard somebody come

from the yard door which opens into the kitchen—I got out of bed and opened my door and asked who was there, he said "Me"—I asked what he wanted, he said "The girls sent me in, and I want to see the governor"—I made a noise and the missies came down and the prisoner was detained till a constable came, and given in custody—when I first saw him he was in the passage, he went past my door and into the front kitchen, where my brother's children sleep—my door opens into the passage.

GEORGE TOOTH (Policeman H 151). I was on duty at this place, which it at the back of Eely Place, Smithfield—on a wall about 6 feet high I made a private mark for police purposes when I first went on duty that night—about a quarter to 4 I found it had gone, and a brick was off the top of the wall—I got on the wall and looked over into the garden which was at the back of the baker's shop, No. 15, next door to the prosecutor—I saw this rope hanging by a hook over the wall, from which there was a 15 feet drop on the other side into the yard—while I was waiting the prosecutor called me into his place—I said to the prisoner "What are you doing here?"—he said, "Some girls brought me here"—I took him to the station and he was charged—the last witness's daughter and young girls work in the place, they were all in the house; there were no other girls at the place—when charged at the station he said, "I did not burglarously break and enter, I only lifted the latch and walked in"—I went back and examined the premises—I found at an oil and colour merchant's next door a window was broken and the latch forced back, and shutters smashed, and the door of the shop had been attempted to be prized open—nothing was missed there—there was no way of reaching the yard except by going over the wall, unless you got through one of the houses—if you got into one yard you could get into all.

The Prisoner's Statement before the Magistrate. "I had had a little drop to drink, and I was taken to the house by some girls."

The prisoner in his defence stated that he had been drinking with two women, who took him with them, and that he fell asleep and awoke in the yard; that seeing a light in the window he knocked at the door, and finding it unfastened went in and called for the master, and then asked for the women who had brought him there.

GUILTY . He then PLEADED GUILTY* † to a conviction of felony in May, 1884, in the name of John Gregg.— Five Years' Penal Servitude.

121. ALBERT CLARE (18) and GEORGE BOSWELL (18) , Burglary in the dwelling-house of Nicholas Sabine, with intent to steal. CLARE PLEADED GUILTY to feloniously entering the house in the nighttime.

MR. BRINDLEY Prosecuted.

JEMIMA WRIGHT . I am servant to Nicholas Sabine, at 125, Blenching Crescent, Notting Hill—on the night of 16th November I went to bed about 10.15, having gone through the house and fastened all the doors, and seen that all was secure—the kitchen window was fastened with a catch; there were no shutters—about 2.30 a.m. I was awoke by a noise, went down, and found my master there—I found a piece of candle in the sink; it was not there when I went to bed—the constable showed me a key which belonged to the scullery door—nothing had been moved but the plants off the kitchen window-sill, to enable them to get in.

WILLIAM BAMBER (Policeman X 558). About 2.30 a.m. on the 17th

I went past 125, Blenching Crescent, and was attracted by a light in the area window—I listened, and heard some one moving about inside—the window was open about two inches from the bottom—I knocked at the front door—Mr. Sabine answered it—I spoke to him—I left him in the area, and went down the stairs into the kitchen—when I opened the kitchen door I saw two men getting through the front kitchen window, one of those was Glare, the other got away—I was about to pursue them when I saw Boswell hiding behind the scullery door—I said "What are you doing here"—he said "All right; I will come quiet"—I took him upstairs, through the front door, into the front garden, where I saw Claire detained by Mr. Sabine—I held them till I got assistance; they struggled a little, not very much—I took them to the station—I blew my whistle; another policeman came, and we took them to the station—Boswell said at the station "I found the window open, and lifted it up, and got in; I said to my mate 'Come along,' because he did not want to"—I found on Boswell these two knives, this key, which the servant spoke to as belonging to the scullery door behind which he was, this piece of coal, which is carried by this class of people for luck, and two or three silent matches—nothing was found on Claire—I went back to the prosecutor's house and examined the window—I found marks on the sashes by the catches, which could be done by either of these knives—I found a hat in the garden; it did not belong to the prisoners—I had seen a third man go away, and a man has been taken since, and is under remand now.

NICHOLAS SANINE . I live at 125, Blenching Crescent—on the morning of the 17th I was awoke by a policeman knocking at my door at 2.30—he left me in charge of the front-to watch while he went into the kitchen—I stood on the stairs, and when the policeman came into the kitchen I saw the boys—I saw that one escaped—I threw a flower-pot into the area, and Claire said "Don't throw away more flowers"—he gave himself up and afterwards came from the area, and I held him till the officer came—I had no trouble to hold him—the officer blew his whistle and they were taken to the station.

The Prisoners' Statements before the Magistrate. Claire says: "I did not struggle; I went quietly." Boswell says:"I have nothing to say."

Claire in his defence stated that the knives were used for working chairs, and that they had found the window open.

GUILTY.— Judgment respited.

122. WILLIAM DAY (50) , Stealing five watches, the property of Charles Robert Allen. Second Count, receiving the same.

MR. JONES LEWIS Prosecuted.

CHARLES ROBERT ALLEN . I live at Rye, in Sussex, and am a jeweller—on 7th November about 1 or 2 a.m. my shop was broken into and a great number of watches taken away—these five (produced) are part, of them—they were in the window with others on the 6th, and on the 7th, about 2 o'clock a.m., they were not there—I do not know the prisoner—about seventy watches were taken, amounting with other property to upwards of 200l.—I was called by a neighbour at 2 o'clock and the shutters were gone and the window broken.

RICHARD LA FEUILLADE . I am a pawnbroker at 26, St. George's Road, Southward—on 7th November between 6 and 7 p.m. a person came to me and pledged this watch for twelve shillings (produced)—I couldn't positively

swear to the man—I gave information to the police and produce the watch—on 13th November the prisoner came and pledged this other, watch (produced); it is a make for the country market—the retail price would be 4l. or four guineas—I advanced him 12s. on it—they were both pledged in the same name, "William White, York Road"—soon after I had taken in the second watch I found from our list that is was advertised as stolen, and called a constable in and gave him a description tallying with the prisoner.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. I can't say that I have never made a mistake in taking one man for another, but I think the description I gave of you would be quite sufficient to identify you—I had no suspicion about the watch not being right or I should not have taken it in—I asked you if it was your own watch—you said "No," you brought it for a mate—I said "It is a country watch"—you said "Yes, it was made in the country."

By the COURT. I don't know if I put similar questions on the first occasion, we usually do—I identify the prisoner as the man who pledged the second watch.

HENRY BIRKETT . I am assistant to John Ashbridge, pawnbroker, of 34, Mile End Road—on 17th November the prisoner brought this watch, and asked 1l. on it—I gave him 13s.—he gave the name of John Field, Lisbon Street.

Cross-examined. It was between 1 and 2 o'clock—I recognise you and I gave your description to the sergeant.

THOMAS CRANNING . I am assistant to Barbara Wells, pawnbroker, of Old Street, Bloomsbury—about 1.30 or 2 on 20th November the prisoner came and offered me this watch (produced) in pledge—I looked into my watch book and found it in the list of the 10th, and immediately sont for a constable and gave him in custody—10s. would be the pledging price of this watch.

CHARLES KING (Policeman ER 44). At 1.30 on 20th November I was called to Mrs. Wells's shop, and the prisoner was given in my charge for having a stolen watch in his possession—I asked him where he got it; he said he bought it of three men whom he did not know at Holloway for 10s.—the pawnbroker handed it to me.

CHARLES ROBERT ALLEN (Re-examined by the COURT ). This last watch is worth 2l. in the trade—the one tendered to La Feuillade is worth 3l. 5s. cost price, and the one tendered to Birkett is worth 1l.

The Prisoner's Statement before the Magistrate."The watch I had I bought it."

The prisoner in his defence stated that he ought to have been put with other men to see whether the witnesses could identify him, that the last watch he had he had bought, and he knew nothing about the others.

GUILTY of receiving.—Nine Months' Hard Labour.

123. CHARLES WILLIAMS (35) , Burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Manuel, with intent to steal.

MR. BROXHOLME Prosecuted.

THOMAS JAMES MANUEL . I am caretaker at 2, Great Marlborough Street, and am a painter—on 1st December, about 9.30 p.m., I was on the first floor—I had been up there about an hour and a half—after Mr. Prelly, the dentist, who occupies the rooms underneath, had gone, I went

down as usual to fasten up the door, but I had a letter to write, and I did not put the chain on as I had to go out and post it—this was about 9 o'clock—I then returned upstairs, and was sitting down reading, and heard a noise like shutting a door—I then heard somebody moving about downstairs—I took up a light and a poker, and met the prisoner face to face—I said, "What are you doing there?"—he said, "The door was open"—I said, "It is false," and took him downstairs and put the chain on the door, opened it, and called "Police" two or three times—the prisoner attempted to get to the door, but I told him if he did I should knock him down—he said, "You b——old thing, what do you intend to do?"—I said, "To lock you up"—a policeman came, and I gave him in charge—a chisel was found on him.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. There were no marks on any of the doors.

HENRY TOWILLS (Policeman C 369). I was in Poland Street; Manual called me, and I went to 2, Marlborough Street, and saw the prosecutor with the prisoner in the street door open—I asked him to the station and searched him, and found this chisel on him—he said he was a labourer—I said, "Where do you live?"—he said, "I refuse my address."

Prisoner's Defence. No keys were found on me, and how could I open the door?

THOMAS JAMES MANUEL (Re-examined by the COURT ). The door could only have been opened by a latch key—I am quite sure I closed it—the place had been previously robbed on 15th November—I found no window open.

GUILTY . He then PELADED GUILTY to a conviction of felony at this Court in June, 1882, in the name of Charles Wilson.— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour.

124. ALEXANDER YOUNG and JOHN EVANS , Burglariously breaking and entering the warehouse of Charles Wedderburn Sutton, and stealing 786 boxes of pills, his property, Young having been convicted at Edinburgh in July, 1879, to which YOUNG PLEADED GUILTY .

MR. GILL Prosecuted; MR. LYNE defended Evans.

MATTHEW SUTHERLAND (City Policeman 585). On Saturday, 28th November, about 11.5, I was on duty in Bow Churchyard, and heard a noise which attracted my attention—I went up the passage and found this bag and a great-coat there—I remained still, and the prisoner Young came over the wall from the back of No. 10—I took him by the collar, spoke to the witness Phipps, and got assistance and took him to the station—another constable took a jemmy from the prisoner's left trousers pocket and handed it to me.

WILLIAM SAUNDERS (City Detective). On Monday, 30th November, I received information, and in consequence of facts which within my knowledge I went to a public-house on Casland Road, Hackney, and there saw Evans with the witness Berry—I said "I am a police officer, and shall take you in custody for being concerned with Alexander Young in breaking and entering 10, Bow Churchyard, and stealing a large quantity of Beecham's Pills"—he said "Yes"—I said "You will be further charged with receiving the same, well knowing them to be stolen"—I then said to Berry "You have taken a note to 44, Lamb's Conduit Street, applying for the balance of some money"—he said "Yes, Mr. Evans sent me"—Evans then said "I took the pills, and sold them to

Messrs. Nunn, 44, Lamb's Conduit Street, but I deny breaking into the premises; I met the prisoner Young at 2 p.m. on Saturday, and he asked me if I could sell the pills for him—at the station when charged he said "I admit selling the pills, but I deny breaking into the premises."

NELLIE PHIPPS . I am single, and live at 4, Worcester Place, Upper Thames Street—on Saturday night, 28th Nov., a little after 11 o'clock, I was with my mother, entering Bow Lane; as we passed a passage, Sullivan spoke to me, in consequence of which I went to look for a constable towards the Mansion House Station—at the corner of Watling Street the prisoner Evans stopped me, and asked me where I was going—I told him a constable wanted me higher up, and he said "You are not going for a policeman"—I then saw a policeman, and ran to him—I am quite sure Evans is the man—I afterwards picked him out from other men at the station.

Cross-examined by MR. LYNE. I didn't see Evans in Bow Passage; he stopped me right in the pathway in Watling Street—I saw his face from the Light from the lamp that hung outside the restaurant—I did not say at the Mansion House that the light was inside the restaurant window—he put out his umbrella in a larky manner at first, but not when I told him I was going for a policeman—the man who stopped me had on a rather light coat, and when I identified him at the station he had it on—when he stopped me he had on a felt hat, I believe; I will swear it was not a silk one—my mother was not with me when the man stopped me—I don't know why she went; she went with me to identify Evans—I saw about half a dozen men there; they were wearing black felt hats—none of them had silk hats.

CHARLES WILLIAM CUTLER . I live at 27, Acton Street, and am manager to Thomas Nunn, West Central Stores, 44, Conduit Street, dealer in patent medicines—on Suturday night, 28th November, about 10 o'clock, Evans came to the shop with a bag like this, full of pills and wanted to sell them—he said there were 30 half-dozen of 1s. 11 1/2 d. and three dozen of 2s. 9d.—I bought them, and paid him 5l. on account, and he was to get the receipt on Monday—the price was not agreed upon then—on Monday a man called upon me bringing this card: "Mr. Cutler,—Please give bearer the balance from Saturday night's 30 1/2 and 3 dozen 2s. 9d.; 5 received; everything all right; will come and see you soon; his receipt is perfectly good. Signed, J.E." I had received this letter by post before that arrived: "Mr. Cutler. Emphatically deny knowing me or heard my name, also deny receiving anything whatever from me. Put out of sight. Please send balance money to J.E., care of Mr. Berry, Streeter and Co., 5, Bond Court, Walbrook. N.B.—Be very careful. Red hot."—I know Evans's writing; they are both in his writing—before I got that card from Berry a detective had been to my place.

Cross-examined. I have bought small quantities of patent medicines from Evans for the last 12 months—we asked him from what source he got them, and he said that he attended sales and got hold of job lots—I do not know that patent medicines are not sold in job lots at sales—I did not ask him from what source they came, because he had had quite enough' drink, and a disturbance occurred, and to get him away we let him have 5l.—we were suspicious then, but not during the 12 months: we thought him highly respectable—we were suspicious on this Saturday night because of his manner, he came in in a hurry with

the pills in a bag, and at that time of the right, and he was half drunk—I spoke to Mr. Nunn about it; he said, "We can inquire about it on Monday morning when he comes"—the price was not agreed on—he was not in a fit state to make a bargain, and we did not want to take advantage of him—I usually gave him 8s. or 7s. 9d. for the 1s. 1 1/2 d. size, and sometimes more than that; and 20s. for the 2s. 9d., that was the lowest—those are not the ordinary wholesale prices—I make entries in a rough book of the goods purchased from Evans, the clerk at the desk keeps the book, I generally made the entries of the prices paid to him, because I paid him, and then the total amount added up is entered into the books of the firm—there may be entries in the books of so many dozens of Beecham's pills, or they may be put down by the word "Pills"—the principals examine this rough book every day (produced)—we have not had many dealings with him lately—(The witness here pointed out several items in the rough book)—he sold us other pills besides Beecham's.

GEORGE BERRY . I live at Albany Chambers, Blackfriars Bridge Road—on Monday, the 30th November, I met Evans at Victoria Park Station; he had written to me, I have known him three years, and know his writing—he wanted me to bring him 10l. from my employer, Mr. Woolston—he asked me if I would mind going up to Lamb's Conduit Street, as he had a balance of an account there, and it would not be convenient to go himself, and would I go and get the balance; I said "Will you write me a note, as they do not Know me, and I cannot go till after office hours?"—he then scribbled this on this card, I went to the place with it and saw Mr. Cutler, who said he didn't know me—this letter and envelope are in Evans's writing.

Cross-examined. He always appeared to me to be a respectable man—I conducted a Chancery suit for him—I have raised nearly 250l. recently for him—before the 28th November I obtained 25l. for him, he might have had anything up to 100l.—I am clerk to Messrs. Wolston and Straker, inquiry agents, of Walbrook.

CHARLES OLDBERRY . I am warehouseman in the employ of Mr. Sutton, of 10, Bow Churchyard—it is my duty to lock up the place when I leave it—on Saturday, the 28th November, a little after 3, I left the place safe, and on Monday morning I found that an entry had been made through a window at the back; it had been closed on the Saturday, first by a pair of catches and then two heavy shutters lined with iron, pulled together from the side, and then a bar falls into a catch securing the whole—I missed 65 1/2 dozen boxes of Beecham's pills, value rather more than 31l.

FREDERICK MANN . I am station sergeant at Thames Street Police-station—on the 28th November, between 11 and 12 p.m., Sutherland gave me information in consequence of which I went to Bow Churchyard and examined the premises—I found that the shutters had been forced, and the marks on them corresponded with this jemmy; the catch had also been forced from the window, and a ladder belonging to the warehouse had been placed on the outside of the window ledge on to a low roof—at that time I was unable to say whether the prisoner had been concealed there or had broken in, but I found marks on a well and on a water pipe leading from the low roof to the wall.

WILLIAM OLDHAMPSTEAD (City Detective). On 29th November I had a

conversation with Young at the station with regard to this matter—Evans was not present.

ALEXANDER YOUNG (The Prisoner). I have pleaded guilty to this charge—I first went to these premises on the 28th, about half-past seven—I was with Evans most of that afternoon—he and I took a cab to a place near my lodgings, and he waited for me till I had changed my clothes—we then took a cab from the Belvidere public-house to Cannon Street Station—I had got a jemmy—I dismissed the cab, and went to Mr. Sutton's place, leaving Evans in the Skinners' Arms—he knew I was going to break into Stone's place, and I was to come back with the pills and meet him there—I went back to the Skinners' Arms about half-past nine—that is just at the foot of Bow Lane—I had got four packets besides the bag full—we then took a Hansom to Lamb's Conduit Street, and he took the bag into Mr. Nunn's place, and came out with 5l. on account, and gave me 4l., and he had 1l. on account—he then asked me to go back to the place again that night—I said "No, it is too late," but I consented, and we went back in a Hansom, and I left him at Cannon Street Station, where I was to meet him again—that is not many yards from Sutton's place—I went in, and a policeman stopped me when I came out—I have known Evans about six months—he is a chemist—I have been convicted before.

Cross-examined. The sovereign I gave Evans was simply a commission for selling pills for me—I have been convicted twice—seven years was the longest sentence I had.

Re-examined. I told Evans I had been convicted, when I came home from sea six months ago—I am a carpenter, and I went to sea on board a ship as boat trimmer.

EVANS received a good character. GUILTY .— Five Years' each in Penal Servitude.

THIRD COURT.—Saturday, December 19th, 1885.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

125. WILLIAM NOONAN (34) , Unlawfully attempting to carnally know and abuse Florence Sullivan, a girl under the age of 13.

MR. WILKINSON Prosecuted.

NOT GUILTY .

126. HENRY BROWN (60), JOHN PHAWSEY (56), and GEORGE HILLIARD (35) , Unlawfully attempting to break and enter the shop of Joseph John Baker, with intent to steal therein. Second Count, Being found by night with housebreaking implements in their possession.

MR. WARBURTON Prosecuted.

ALFRED GARROD (Policeman B 448). A little after midnight on 17th September I saw the three prisoners loitering about in a very suspicious manner near Victoria Road Station—I kept observation on them—after a minute or two Brown and Phawsey left the other man and went into the doorway of one of the shops in the Victoria Buildings adjoining the Metropolitan Railway—Hilliard was left standing near the kerb—a few minutes afterwards police-constable McGovern came up, and I called his attention to this—at that moment something dropped on the pavement,

which sounded like iron—Brown and Pawsey then came from the doorway—Pawsey picked it up, and they all three then went away—I said something to McGovern, and he ran through the station yard and got in front of them, and I saw him seize Phawsey and Hilliard, and I took Brown and said, "Come back with me"—he said, "What for? I have done nothing"—on taking them back I saw this padlock, with this key in it, drop from underneath Phawsey's coat—it is about the same size as the other—I then took them to the station, and went back and examined the door, and found that the staple on one side where the padlock went through was wrenched round—there were two dents in the woodwork behind the hasp, and inside the lock were several marks where the poker had been used, and the brass scutcheon was bent—I found on Hilliard a box of silent matches and a pocket knife—nothing was found on Brown—this is the broken hasp (produced)—this house projects 3 or 4 feet farther than the railway—I observed them loitering there for six or seven minutes.

Cross-examined by Brown. I saw you at the door—I was between 30 and 40 yards from it—I did not see you doing anything, because you were beyond my view round the corner—I didn't take you when you were at the door—I had not an opportunity until assistance came—you then made away—when I took you back to the house and tried the handle I said, "You will have to go to the station with us"—I did not say, "If I can't take you for burglary I will take you for loitering"—I charged you at the station at first with loitering, but after we came back from seeing these injuries to the door, you were charged with burglary—this look was taken off next morning after the proprietor had gone in—the part was broken off where the padlock went through.

Cross-examined by Hilliard. I found a pipe three-parts full of tobacco in your pocket, which I threw on the fire.

Re-examined. If I had found out at first that they had actually broke into the premises I should have charged them with burglary.

FREDERICK MCGOVERN (Policeman B 589). At a little after 12 o'clock on this night I was in Wilton Road—Garrod called me, and I watched Hilliard, and heard a piece of iron fall, and simultaneously with that two men came out of the doorway, one of them picked it up, and then all three walked away together—I ran through the station yard—they were going off as quickly as possible, and were looking back—I crossed the road and took Phawsey and Hilliard—Brown got a little in advance and hurried away, but was overtaken by Garrod—on Phawsey I found this poker (that was the iron which dropped), and as we were going to the station he dropped this other part of it—at the station I searched him and found four pawn-tickets, a pipe, a small brooch, a box of matches similar to the other, and this iron chisel concealed up his back between his two shirts.

JAMES WHITE (Policeman B 184). I was at the station when the prisoners were brought in—they were left in my charge while they went back to examine the premises—I saw Phawsey put his hand in his pocket and put this piece of candle behind a notice board on the mantelpiece—I took it out, and accused him of putting it there, and asked him how many more he had got about him—he said, "You have bought the candle and put it there on purpose to convict me"—no other candles were found on him.

ARTHUR BAKER . I am manager of the firm of Joseph Jonn Baker, tea dealer, 1 and 2, Victoria Buildings—this second lock is my property—I fastened it on the night of the 16th at 9.30; the hasp and fittings were then perfect—nobody resides on these premises—there is tea and other articles of value there.

Brown's Defence. I had just left the Pimlico Station, and saw the constable take these two men, and then he took me. I am innocent.

Phawsey's Defence. I was going home, saw a poker lying in the road, and picked it up and put it under my coat, thinking it might be handy at home; and I bought the padlock for 3d. I put the chisel down the back of my neck that it might not be taken from me.

Hilliard's Defence. These men spoke to me, but I did not know them before. I never offered the slightest resistance, and had no more to do with it than this board.

GUILTY . Brown then PLEADED GUILTY ** to a conviction at Middlesex Sections in July, 1875, and Phawsey to a conviction at this Court in the name of John Est in September, 1884.— Twelve Months' Hard Labour each.

NEW COURT.—Monday, December 21st, 1885.

Before Mr. Recorder.

127. THOMAS PAGE (46), JAMES THOMPSON (25), CHARLES HUNT (36), and THOMAS SAUNDERCOCK (41) PLEADED GUILTY to a conspiracy to defraud William Brass and another, and obtaining 2l. 9s. 7 1/2 d., 5l. 14s. 2d., and other sums by false pretences.PAGE— Twelve Months' Hard Labour. THOMPSON— Nine Months' Hard Labour . HUNT SAUNDERCOCK Four Months' Hard Labour each.

128. ANDREW ROBERTSON (33) , Unlawfully endeavouring to abuse Louisa Palmer, a girl under the age of 13.

MR. BROXHOLME Prosecuted. GUILTY .— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

129. MICHAEL GOGAN (23), WILLIAM CHARLES (19), and THOMAS CHANDLER (29) , Robbery on Robert Spikin Betts, and stealing from his person a gold watch, his property.

MR. BEARD Prosecuted.

HENRY COSTIN (City Detective). On 9th November, about 3 o'clock; I was on duty on Ludgate Hill, and saw the three prisoners in the crowd—they pushed against Mr. Betts, and Charles put his left arm against Mr. Betts's breast and his right into the folds of his overcoat—Gogan stood on his left, and Chandler pushed Charles on his back—Charles then withdrew his hand and passed this watch (produced) to Gogan—the three then went down Little Bridge Street, through the Arcade, and across Smithfield into a public-house in Long Lane—I got the assistance of four officers, and saw the three prisoners coming towards us—I took Gogan, and pointed out Chandler to another officer, who took him; I ran up Long Lane, caught Charles, and said "Where is the watch you stole from the gentleman in the Broadway, Ludgate Hill?"—he said "I have not got it; the man with the overcoat has got it," pointing to Gogan—I took him to Bridewell Station—Gogan denied having the

watch, and said "Charles has got it"—he was very violent, and tried to get his hand to the waistband of his trousers, and he and I and 150 G all fell, and when on the ground I said to Gogan "It is no use your trying to get rid of it; I know you have got it"—he said "All right, let me get up, and you can have it"—we lifted him up, and he said "Here, take it out of my fob"—150 G took it out of his watch-pocket, and handed to me—they were taken to the station—I made inquiries, and Mr. Betts came to the Old Jewry, and afterwards gave evidence at the Mansion House, and identified Gogan in the dock.

Cross-examined by Gogan. You did not pick the watch off the ground nor did you say so.

Cross-examined by Charles. I was in the crowd and saw you take the watch but was not c✗lose enough to take you—you did not stop in the Arcade and ask a man for a light—I know that the watch would be handed from one to another—you all three went inside the public-house.

Cross-examined by Chandler. I saw you covering Charles's actions—I was in plain clothes, got up for the occasion.

WILLIAM NEALE (Policeman G 150). On 9th November Costin spoke to me—I went with him to Long Lane and saw the three prisoners come from a public-house—I took Gogan—he became very violent going to the station, and tried to get his hand to his fob pocket, but could not, and threw me and the detective to the ground—we got him on his legs, and I took this watch from his pocket.

Cross-examined by Gogan. You had your hand in your fob pocket—Charles did not lay hold of my staff, nor did I hit you with it.

ROBERT SPIKEN BETTS . I live at 29, Romilly Koad, Herne Hill—on November 9th about 3.30 I was on Ludgate Hill, and felt a pull, and found my watch chain hanging down and missed my watch, worth 10l.—I saw Gogan there—I identified him at the station.

Cross-examined by Gogan. You were within a yard of me.

Gogan's Defence. I picked the watch up, anybody could see that it had been dropped.

Charles's Defence. I asked this man Chandler for a light; we got into conversation, and were going into a public-house, but it was full, and the constable arrested me, but I am innocent.

Chandler's Defence. Charles asked me for a light, and we were going to take the train at Aldersgate Street, but the detective caught hold of me. I am innocent.

GUILTY . GOGAN then PLEADED GUILTY ** to a conviction of felony in January, 1884, in the name of Michael Finnigan .— Five Years' Penal Servitude. CHARLES **— Eighteen Months' Hard Labour. CHANDLER*— Fifteen Months' Hard Labour.

130. JOHN COUNTER, Feloniously personating a voter at an election, to serve in Parliament.

MR. BEVAN Prosecuted.

WILLIAM PERRING . I live at 162, Hackney Road—I was the presiding officer at Wilmot Street School, Bethnal Green, on 25th November at the Parliamentary Election, at about 4 o'clock one of the polling clerks pointed out the prisoner to me—he came up to put a ballot paper into the box, and I said "Is your name Ayton?" he said "No, it is not"—I said "I must ask you to step this way while my brother presiding officer

reads to you the Ballot Act, or that portion of it which relates to your particular case; I am afraid you have got yourself into trouble; but I will hold a consultation with my brother officer," which I did, and we sent for the returning officer for the district, and he was given into custody.

GEORGE AMES . I live at 478, Bethnal Green Road—on 25th November I was a poll clerk at Bethnal Green Election—the prisoner came to my desk about 4 p.m. and asked for a voting paper—I asked him what address; he said "Cambridge Road"—I asked "What name?"—he said "Benjamin Ayton"—I gave him a ballot paper and he went to a booth to fill it up as I supposed—I spoke to Bliss, another polling clerk.

HENRY GEORGE BLISS . I live at 164, Bethnal Green Road—I was a polling clerk at the Wilmot Street School, at the Bethnal Green Election—Ames made a communication to me—I saw the prisoner there and told the presiding officer—I know Benjamin Ayton, he is not the prisoner.

GEORGE KITCHENER (Policeman K 20). On 25th November I was on duty in the Wilmot Street polling booth and took the prisoner in charge for personating Mr. Ayton—he said that he was very sorry; he was ignorant of the law, Mr. Ayton was busy and sent him to vote for him—I got this ballot paper, 2,896, from him at the station.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not an educated man; I never went to school, and what little I know is self-education. It is my misfortune to have not read the Ballot Act. This was done in pure ignorance. I did not know I was offending in any way. Mr. Ayton is here.

Witness for the Defence.

BENJAMIN AYTON . I am a voter for Bethnal Green—I know the prisoner—I asked him if he would oblige me and go and vote for me as I was busy.

GUILTY . Strongly recommended to mercy by the prosecution. He received an excellent character.— Eight Days' Imprisonment.

THIRD COURT.—Monday, December 21st, 1885.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

131. GEORGE HENRY LARKING (23) and THOMAS JONES (18) , Burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Franklin and stealing 5l.

MR. GORDON DILL Prosecuted.

CAROLINE ELIZABETH GROVE . I am married, and manage the prosecutor's house—on Wednesday, 2nd December, 5l. or 5l. 10s. in coppers was shut up in a cupboard ready for Mr. Franklin to take away—the cupboard is never kept locked; it is just at the top of a trap-door, and the only ways of getting to it are by passing through the bar-parlour or coming through the cellar and up the flap.

Cross-examined by Jones. Mr. Franklin came home about 20 minutes or a quarter past 12—we went out about 3 or 4 o'clock in the afternoon, and came back then—the public-house was not closed then.

Re-examined. We do not as a rule keep open till 12.30.

PETER FRANKLIN . I am landlord of the Coopers' Arms, Golden Lane, St. Luke's—on 2nd December I went out with the last witness, and we came back about a quarter past or 20 minutes past 12—the house was closed at 25 minutes past 12 as usual—I saw the house perfectly safely

locked up—I went in the bar-parlour at 20 minutes to 1—I heard a noise outside the cellar-flap in front of the house, which can be raised—it was fastened, but some one shifted the shutters from the outside, and got a hand under the flap and unbolted it in some way—I went outside, saw the trap was shifted, and called on Grove, the husband of the last witness and my brother-in-law, to come and stand on the flap—I then went downstairs and saw the two prisoners concealed in the wine cellar, crouched down in the corner, endeavouring to hide—I said, "What are you doing here?"—Larkin said, "We have come down here to sleep"—I said, "All right, you have no business"—I locked them in the place, sent for the police, and charged them—after that I searched the house, and we missed the 5l.—there is no way of getting at the cupboard except through the bar-parlour and cellar—I was in the bar-parlour before I heard the noise.

Cross-examined by Jones. I can swear the cellar-flap was fastened; there are two bolts on it.

By the COURT. Jones used to clean my windows when he was out of work—just inside the public bar where the public are is a bolt, which if they raise they can get their hand in, but then they would have to undo two bolts—when I was in the cellar a third person came to undo the flap, and I put the candle in his face—a person from the inside of the bar can unloose the bolts.

JAMES GALLAGHER (Policeman G 350). I was called to the last witness's house, and took the prisoners, whom I found in the cellar, into custody—the cellar is below the bar, and opens on to the pavement—other access is through the bar—the prisoners said they came down to sleep—I took them into custody—I found nothing on them—no money was found; the 5l. must have been passed through the cellar-flap.

The Prisoners' Statements before the Magistrate. Larkins says: "I should like the case to be settled here." Jones says: "We are not strangers to the prosecutor. I used to clean his windows every Saturday. I went there to sleep."

The prisoners in their defence stated that they were the worse for drink, and went into the cellar to sleep.

GUILTY.— Judgment respited.

132. HENRY CHAMBERS (42) and HENRY COLBORNE SEAGRAVE (35) , Stealing a gross of toothbrushes and 12 boxes, the goods of Thomas Frank Lynch, the master of Chambers. Second Count, receiving. CHAMBERS PLEADED GUILTY .

MR. MARSHALL HALL Prosecuted; MR. GRAIN defended Seagrave.

GEORGE PARSONS (City Policeman 331). On 11th December, about 7 p.m., I was watching, by Sergeant Wright's orders, Messrs. Lynch's premises (they are large druggists' sundry-men), and saw Chambers, who was employed there, leave—he had a parcel with him, and his pockets appeared to be bulky—I watched him—he went to Aldersgate Street Station and took a ticket to Bishopsgate—he there met Seagrave, with whom he shook hands and crossed into No. 199, a public-house—it was quite dark—they had something to drink, and talked for a few minutes—Chambers then in front of the bar took out of his pocket one of these boxes and gave it to Seagrave, who put it in his outside pocket—Chambers took out this box from another pocket, and Seagrave put that in his other pocket—after talking a few minutes they walked down

to the picture shop; Chambers went in, leaving Seagrave outside—Chambers came out with this parcel containing 10 of these boxes, each containing a dozen toothbrushes, and after talking to Seagrave for a few minutes gave them to him—Seagrave put his hand in his pocket and gave him something in return—they then went into the same public-house again, had another drink, waited a few minutes there, then stopped talking a few minutes on the pavement, shook hands, and left each other—I was in plain clothes—I followed Seagrave into the North London Rail way-station, where I stopped him—I said, "lam a police officer, I want to know what you have got there"—he said, "I don't know"—I said, "Where did you get it from?"—he said, "I don't know"—I said, "It is no use your telling me that, I have been watching you; where did you get it from?"—he said, "I got it from a man named Chambers"—I said, "Who is Chambers?"—he said, "A man that works for Lynch in Aldersgate Street"—I said, "What are they?"—he said, "Brushes"—I said, "Where is them two boxes you had in the public-house?"—he took these out of his pocket and said, "These are them"—I asked him what he paid for them—he said "10s., and Chambers owed me 30s.," making it 2l. which he was to give for them—I said, "I shall have to take you to the station"—he said, "Don't you do that, for God's sake, if you do you will ruin me"—I said, "There is a mark on the brushes"—he said, "I said to Chambers 'There is a mark on them;' and he said 'That don't matter, that is all right' "—I took him to the station, searched him, and found on him 3l. 3s., nothing relating to the charge.

Cross-examined. I am a plain clothes patrol—I took down a note of the conversation as soon as I got to the office—I referred to my notes when I gave evidence at the police-court on the next day—I know a good deal turns on the conversation in this case—I said at the police-court "I followed him to Broad Street Station, where I stopped him and said 'lam a police officer; what have you got in that parcel? I want to know what you have got there; I am a police officer"—the prisoner did not say "I don't know" before I said I was a police officer—I said "Where did you get it from?"—he said "Of a man named Chambers"—that is what I said at the police-court—he said he did not know from whom he got it, and the second time I asked him he said "From Chambers"—I had to ask him twice before he told me—my note of the conversation is at the office—he gave me Chambers's correct address on his own card at one when I asked him for it—he gave me his business card with his correct address—he is a dealer in all kinds of medical bottles and all sorts of things—I have never seen any tooth brushes there—he said he would give me anything not to take him to the station because his wife was about to be confined, and it might kill her—I went to his house and saw her that night; it was true; she was on the eve of confinement

WILLIAM WRIGHT (Detective Sergeant). I took Chambers into custody, who has pleaded guilty to stealing these things—I instructed Parsons.

JAMES WRIGHT KIRBY . I am show-room manager and caretaker at Messrs. Lynch and Co.'s, Aldersgate Street—Chambers was a clerk in the export department—these tooth brushes are our property—I gave Chambers no authority to take them—I know Seagrave; he is a druggists' sundryman, and would deal in tooth brushes—he could buy them

at the shop if he wanted to—the wholesale value of the brushes is 3l. 18s.—2l. would not be fair value for them in the wholesale way from one dealer to the other—we have never been paid for these goods; they are our best quality.

Cross-examined. Chambers was with us for some years previous to my going into the employment, and engaged in a confidential position—he left two years ago to better himself, but, disappointed in that, was taken back by the firm—the post he had held being filled up, the firm put him into a minor post, but still a post of trust, as they had every confidence in him—Mr. Lynch showed him every kindness—I had known Seagrave as a customer of our firm for some years—he buys a number of articles we deal in, and has a monthly account; his payments have been regular—I looked on him as a regular honest customer, and had no reason to suspect him of malpractices—his purchases were not large but regular—tooth brushes vary a good deal—you can get a gross for 2l.; we have them at 36s.—we have invoiced some to Seagrave at 3s. 9d. per dozen—there is nothing special about these to indicate they were of special value—they are made expressly for our export department.

By the COURT. We had not been missing things.

Re-examined. Only our best goods are put in these coloured boxes—I am not aware that there is any regular trade in tooth brushes in public-houses in the evening—I should know these were worth more than 2l.

Seagrave's Statement before the Magistrate. "I have nothing to say except that I did not take them with any felonious intent. I gave him the value of the brushes as I considered it."

Seagrave received a good character.

Witness for the Defence.

HENRY CHAMBERS (The Prisoner). I have pleaded guilty to stealing these brushes—I owed the prisoner 2l.; he gave me 10s., that left 30s.—I said "Now that puts us right"—he lent me the 2l. a little while ago when I was out of work—Mr. Lynch has been kind to me, and lent me 5l., and Mr. Seagrave was kind to me also.

SEAGRAVE— GUILTY . Strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury and prosecutor on account of his previous good character.— Three Months' without Hard Labour. CHAMBERS— Fifteen Months' Hard Labour.

133. ROBERT BARTON (40) and BERNARD WHITE (34) , Robbery with violence on Thomas Liddle, and stealing 3s. and a key.

MR. LYNE Prosecuted.

THOMAS LIDDLE . I am a felt maker, but cannot work now—I live at 7, Vivian Road—on the night of 4th December I was in Shadwell Road, about dusk, coming out of a urinal in the middle of the road when the, two prisoners came up, and White, I think, showed me 2 1/2 d., and asked me to make up the difference between that and a pot of ale—they persisted, and I agreed to it, and went with them to the Coach and Horses, Shadwell Road, where I paid the difference, 1 1/2 d.—then I paid for another whole pot, and after that wanted to leave—they followed me out, and put their hands in my trousers pockets—I caught hold of Burton's hand, and he swung me down and kicked me and broke my toe, and I was kicked on the knee and became pretty well unconscious—when I came to I was

at the station; I don't know how I came there—I had 4s. when I went into the public-house—I lost that and these two keys.

By the JURY. I had paid for two pots and half of a third out of the 4s.—my money was dropped out of Barton's hand.

WILLIAM JONES (Policeman H 371). On 4th December I was off duty in High Street, Shadwell, and saw Barton leading Liddle across the street from the direction of the urinal—White joined them on the pavement, and they forced Liddle up High Street 16 or 17 yards, one on each side pushing him—Liddle showed some resistance, but was too drunk—at the Duke of York steps they turned him round the steps, and at the top Barton gave him the foot and threw him over the steps, which led to a side turning—Barton fell with him—White followed down the steps, and I went down behind him—White took hold of Liddle and held him down—Barton put his right hand in Liddle's right-hand trousers pocket and pulled it out—the prosecutor held it by the wrist, and some money flew out and rolled on the stones—White said "It is time to clear out," and started to go up the steps, leaving Barton on the ground with the prosecutor—I had previously sent to the station, and at that time a constable came round the corner—I called on him to stop White—he did so, and brought him down the steps—the same constable secured Barton—I took him to the station—White said "You don't think you are going to take the two of us, do you?"—I said "If you offer any resistance I shall hit you over the head with my stick"—I secured 8d. from off the ground after the constable left with the two prisoners—the prosecutor and I followed a short distance behind to the station; he was drunk—Barton had been drinking, but White appeared sober.

By the COURT. I was not well, and have not done duty for nearly 12 months.

WILLIAM BACON (Policeman H 375). On this evening the last witness called me, and I took the prisoners into custody—I searched, and on Barton found 3 1/2 d. in bronze and these two keys—on White I found nothing—they made no statements in my presence.

White, in his statement before the Magistrate and in his defence, stated that he saw a mob, and the prosecutor and Barton were very drunk and had fallen down, and that he went to assist them.

Barton, in his defence, stated he was drunk.

GUILTY . BARTON PLEADED GUILTY* to a conviction of felony in July, 1875, at this Court.— Seven Years' Penal Servitude. WHITE.— Nine Months' Hard Labour.

OLD COURT.—Tuesday, December 22nd, 1885.

Before Mr. Recorder.

134. HENRIETTA BATTENBERG was indicted for a libel on Alfred Seroka.

The witnesses did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

ESSEX CASES.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

135. JOSEPH ELLIS (47) PLEADED GUILTY to burglary in the dwelling-house of George Godsell, and stealing therein three bottles of wine and other articles, and 1l. 15s. 3 3/4d. d.—Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

KENT CASES.

Before Robert Malcolm Kerr, Esq.

136. JANE THOMAS (40) PLEADED GUILTY to stealing a piece of plaid, value 4s., the goods of Thomas George Wicks, and 18 yards of serge, value 12l., of John Trevethen, and to a former conviction.— Two Years' Hard Labour.

137. JOHN MAGUIRE, Stealing a pint and a half of milk and one can, the goods of Jabez Martin and others.

MR. M. WILLIAMS Prosecuted; and MR. R.B. MUIR Defended.

JAMES WHITFIELD . I am foreman at Martin and Sons, milk purveyors, and keep a book—prior to the 20th November I had complaints from my customers of the non-delivery of milk, and on the 28th November I was opposite the Wickham Arms in a shop, keeping a look out, at about 6.15 a.m.—I saw one of our men, named Pooley, leave a can marked "No. 5, J. Martin and Sons," at the Wickham Arms—he left it outside the side door on the step—it contained, according to my book, one quart—I saw the prisoner drive up in Crutcher's cart to within three doors of the Wickham Arms—I saw a boy named Richard Burke come to the Wickham Arms, where the can was, and pick it up—I followed him, and spoke to him—the prisoner was about one and a half yards off—I asked the boy where he got the milk from in the can, and he hesitated, and then said "The beershop"—I told him I should take im back to the place—he said "He sent me, Crutcher's man," pointing to the prisoner in the cart—the man drove off—I afterwards went to 24, Brockley Road, and made inquiry there—this can (produced), marked No. 8, is ours—this, as well as No. 6, were found at Crutchers place—this one was found amongst the prisoner's cans by Mr. Crutcher—he had no right to any cans of ours, or to take any milk from the boy.

Cross-examined. It was dark at 6.15—there are three cans, two fives and one No. 8—we have about 50 No. 5's, and about the same number of No. 8's—cans of different purveyors may get mixed where two milkmen serve one customer—on the morning in question I saw the prisoner again about 8.15 in the Brockley Road, about 100 yards from Martin's farm—I asked him to drive into the yard, as Mr. Martin wanted to see him—he did so, and Mr. Martin asked him some questions—I was in Court when Burke was examined on the first occasion, and I heard him say that on the 18th November, when in Shardross Road, the prisoner lent him to take cans from outside the doors—I have not made inquiries at that place—I did not inquire of the customers, but I inquired of the firms who served them with milk.

HENRY POOLEY . I am in the employ of Messrs. Martin and Sons, milk purveyors—on the morning of the 28th November I delivered a

quart of milk at the Wickham Arms at the side door, to be taken in—the day before I left one of these cans there.

FREDERICK GREEN . I am in the employ of Messrs. Martin and Sons, and deliver milk for them—on the 20th November I left milk at 24, Brockley Road—I afterwards had a complaint of the milk not being delivered.

Cross-examined. There are four cans numbered "8" in my place.

GEORGE CRUTCHER . I am a dairyman, these cans marked "Martin and Sons," found on my premises, are not mine.

Cross-examined. The prisoner has been in my employ about six weeks—I had a first-class character with him, and found him honest to the last minute—it is a common thing for cans to get mixed, and when two milkmen serve the same customer cans get exchanged—when I find cans of another milk purveyor in my place I do not take much notice of it.

Re-examined. It is not a common thing to make off with milk left on steps, but it is done—I do not call it honest by a long way.

JAMES HYDE (Detective). In consequence of information I went with the foreman to Messrs. Crutcher's on the 29th November—the can No. 5 was found there—I afterwards saw the prisoner and told him he would be charged with stealing a can containing a quart of milk, and inciting a boy to steal the milk and can—he said "I did not tell the boy to take the milk, I cannot help what he does."

Cross-examined. I have inquired into the prisoner's character, which I find good.

WILLIAM BURKE . I live at 10, Falcon Street, New Cross, and am in the employ of Mr. Crutcher, the prisoner's master—I used to go round with the prisoner, and on Saturday, 28th November, I was with him in Brockley Road at about 6.30, near the Wickham Arms—he was in a cart and he told me to go and get the milk from the Wickham Arms—there was a can containing a quart of milk standing on the steps—I took it to him—Martin's foreman caught me, and the prisoner drove off and the foreman took the can—I had done this for the prisoner before, but not at the Wickham Arms—I was out with him seven weeks—when I took the milk to the prisoner he emptied it into his own cans—it happened six or seven times.

Cross-examined. I have been in the service of Crutcher four months, and have been going out with the prisoner about six weeks—I knew what I did was wrong—I did not tell any one—on the 28th November I went out on my rounds as usual—I go to two or three customers and join the cart again in the same road—I do not know how the prisoner knew the milk was outside the Wickham Arms—I could not see it when he told me—I go through the Lewisham Road on my rounds—it is not very far from the Wickham Arms, about a quarter of an hour's walk—I said before the Magistrate "We were in the Lewisham Road when ho told me to go to the Wickham Arms for the can"—he told me in the Lewisham Road first, and when we were in the Brockley Road he told me again—there was another boy in the cart named Finch—he was there when I was opposite the Wickham Arms—he was not there when the prisoner told me to go and get the milk, he had got down—I was sittting between Finch and the prisoner—the prisoner whispered to me—I was three or four yards from the cart when Martin's foreman caught me—I was behind the prisoner, Finch was in the cart then—I never spoke to him about it

—I have often been out with Finch—Finch is not in the employ of Crutcher—he has been out with me for a drive every day for about a week and a half—I know Dolling—I used to go about his yard—he caught me one day and said "What are you after? my cash box?" I said "No, sir," and he told me to go—I did not steal anything—he accused me of trying to steal it—he did not say "Have you stolen my cash box?"—my master does not serve the Wickham Arms.

GUILTY .— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

Before Mr. Justice Hawkins.

138. HENRY BROWN (16) PLEADED GUILTY to carnally knowing and abusing Susan Amelia Westbrook, a girl under the age of thirteen.— Nine Months' Hard Labour.

Before Mr. Recorder.

139. EDWARD BARKER and GEORGE BATEMAN were indicted for certain indecent acts.

MR. DAVEY Prosecuted; MR. GEOGHEGAN Defended.— NOT GUILTY .

140. JAMES LUMB (29) PLEADED GUILTY to feloniously marrying Mary Emma Bellamy, his wife being alive.— Six Months' Hard Labour.

141. MINNIE REID and GEORGE REID, Unlawfully obtaining by false pretences from George Turner 91b. of beef, and from George Horner 9lb. of mutton, with intent to defraud.

MR. SANDERS Prosecuted; MR. MARSHALL HALL Defended.

MINNIE REID PLEADED GUILTY.— Judgment respited.

No evidence was offered against GEORGE REID.— NOT GUILTY .

142. LEVI TWIGGER (25) , Stealing 12s., the property of Keziah Hall.

MR. ERNEST BEARD Prosecuted; MR. BLACK Defended.

KEZIAH HALL . I keep the Wheatsheaf public-house, Greenwich—on 10th November two men came in about 9.30 a.m.; the prisoner is one of them—I did not hear them order anything—I saw them there about an hour and a half, but did not see them leave, though I saw that they had gone—about 11 or 11.30 I came into the bar, and found them there again—I had to go into the bar-parlour, and turned round and saw the prisoner kneeling on the counter, with one hand on the mantelpiece and the other on the money which is kept there for change—I saw some money fall, and two sixpences and a shilling were picked up on the hearth rug, the rest was scattered about the mantelpiece—he jumped off the counter as quick as he could, and ran away—the other man was standing by the door, and ran out—I told my nephew, who pursued them, and came back with the prisoner in about five minutes—he is the man I saw on the counter—there was 2l. and a half-crown on the shelf, and I picked up about 1l. 9s. 6d.—about 12s. was gone—I had seen the money safe about five minutes before.

Cross-examined. There are two compartments—the mantelpiece is about 3 feet from the counter—there were no customers there then; there had been an old lady there—the other man was dark complexioned, and had a moustache and a felt hat—I did not describe the prisoner to my

nephew—the men had two half-pints of ale when they first came and two half-pints afterwards—my barmaid was in the bar—I called out, "You thief, you are robbing me; you are taking my money," and the barmaid ran to the door—my nephew was then in the cellar—he came up, and rushed out immediately—I am positive the prisoner is the man—I did not know him before; he is not a customer.

Re-examined. I had had an opportunity of seeing his features that morning, because I was speaking to him about my little girl.

JULIA MOORE . I am barmaid at the Wheatsheaf—on 10th November, about 9.30 a.m., two men came in; the prisoner is one of them—I served them with some ale—they remained about an hour, and went out—they came back about 11 o'clock and had some refreshment—I heard Mrs. Hall call out, and saw the prisoner just jumping off the counter—he rushed out, and the other man in front of him—I was present when Larkin brought the prisoner back—he is the man I saw jump off the counter—I saw some money picked up off the floor.

Cross-examined. There were only one or two customers on that side of the bar when they first came—the prisoner wore a green-black coat and an Oxford hat—his side was towards me when he jumped off the counter—Mrs. Hall's little girl served them on the second occasion, and Mrs. Hall said to me, "Those two men are here who were here in the morning"—I looked through the window and saw them—Mrs. Hall did not ask me what the man was like, since the prisoner was arrested, nor did I ask her, because I knew him—I have never mistaken one person for another.

Re-examined. The first time they came I had a good opportunity of studying their features, and when they came the second time I saw that they were the same men, and. the prisoner is one of them.

EDWARD LARKIN . I am a nephew of the prosecutrix—on 10th November, between 10 and 11 a.m., I saw the prisoner in the bar—I was just coming up from the cellar, and heard Mrs. Hall call out—the barmaid ran to the door, and said, "We have been robbed"—I ran out, and found the prisoner walking up Church Street, about 100 yards from the house—I said "You are wanted down at the Wheatsheaf for stealing a lot of money"—he made no answer—he was taken back there in custody—he is the same man I saw in the bar.

Cross-examined. I did not talk to Mrs. Hall—I did not say at the police-court that she gave me a description of the prisoner—I signed my depositions as correct—I did not say I got a description of the man who had taken the money from Mrs. Hall, which corresponded with him—I could not have understood that if I signed it—I had seen the prisoner in the bar before, and Miss Moore said it was the two men who were over in the side bar—if she had not said that I should not have known who to run after—I had no idea which way he had gone; I went anywhere to find him—I did not say at the police-court that he was just coming out of a public-house—I am rather deaf.

WILLIAM MARCHMONT . I am assistant inspector of the River Thames—was at the Wheatsheaf on November 10th, and saw two men in the bar; the prisoner is one of them—I spoke to them—I went into the cellar with Larkins, and came up, and Mrs. Hall called out, "Run, I have been robbed"—I followed Larkins, into the street, and saw the prisoner coming out of another public-house about two minutes' walk from the Wheatsheaf—we crossed the road to him, and Larkins said, "You are the

man I want for robbing Mrs. Hall," and he was given into custody—I am certain he is the man I saw in the bar that morning.

Cross-examined. I saw the prisoner there twice that morning, and conversed with him—he did not say that it was a misfortunate joke.

CHARLES SHADDICK (Policeman RR 33). The prisoner was given into my custody in Church Street, Greenwich, for robbery at the Wheatsheaf—he said, "All right, I will go to the Wheatsheaf with you"—I took him there, and the landlady recognised him—I took him to the station, searched him, and found on him a sixpence and a halfpenny

Cross-examined. I did not find 12s. 6d. on him—I have made inquiries about him—nothing was known about him at the station.

The prisoner received a good character. GUILTY .—Recommended to mercy by the Jury.— Two Months' Hard Labour.

143. EDWARD TOOMEY (19) , Feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lucy Wootton, and stealing two bottles, 300 cigars, and 1l., her money.

Mr. D'ARCY Prosecuted.

LUCY WOOTTON . I keep the Lord Nelson, Trafalgar Road, East Greenwich—on the night of 21st Nov. my three daughters, my boy, and Mr. Foy and the potman were in the house—we retired about twenty minutes past 12—I fastened up the house myself—next morning I was aroused about seven—I went downstairs—Mr. Foy and the potman had been first aroused, and they went downstairs—these gloves belonged to Mr. Foy, whom I have known for two years—these three coins were in one vase on the bar parlour mantelpiece, and these five in another vase—this pencil was with the coins—they were taken away—I am certain they are the same coins.

FRANCIS WOOTTON . I am the daughter of the last witness—I went to bed that night about 20 minutes past 12—as far as I know the house was securely fastened—next morning I was aroused at seven—I found that there had been a breakage in the back window, and that the front door had been opened from the inside, and left open—the fastening of the kitchen window had been wrenched off, and a pane of glass broken—a ladder had been put to the first floor back window—that window swings, and was fastened, by a button, which could be pushed by a knife through the meeting bar—that window had been opened, the drawers in the parlour were all open, a bag of coppers was taken from the drawer, old buttons and coins had been taken from ornaments off the mantelshelf, two bottles of spirits and tobacco were taken, and there were three empty cigar boxes on the counter, and one by a chair—more than a hundred cigars were gone—the bag contained about 1l. worth of coppers, which was taken from the bar parlour—these coins were in the vase on the mantelpiece—these gloves belong to Mr. Foy.

HENRY PHILLIPS (Inspector R). On Sunday morning, 22nd November, I received information of this robbery about half-past 7—I proceeded to the house—I afterwards met Inspector Robinson, and we went to 10, Marsh Lane, Mrs. Toomey's house, where the prisoner lodges with his mother—in the upstairs room we found his mother, his sister, and the prisoner—he was partly dressed, with only his coat off—I said "Where have you been all night?"—he said "In bed, Sir"—he knew me—I noticed these gloves on the bed, and said "Whose gloves are

these?"—his sister said "They are mine"—Robinson said "They are men's gloves"—she said "Yes, but I wear them"—I put them back on the bed, and we allowed the prisoner to go downstairs—I then noticed that he had gone to the back somewhere, and I took charge of the gloves, which were afterwards identified.

Cross-examined. You took down a pail of water with you, and when I got down the pail was there with the water moving about in it, but you were not there; I followed you immediately you went down the stairs.

WILLIAM ROBINSON (Policeman R). I was sent for to the Lord Nelson at half-past 7, and examined the premises—I found an entry had apparently been effected by climbing over the outer wall, forcing the latch of the back kitchen window, and entering—the thief apparently could get no farther, and then he obtained a ladder, and got in by the w. c. window on the first floor—that was secured by a button, which was forced back by a knife; from there he could get access to the whole house—he must have passed downstairs into the bar, and then have gone out by the front door—after making an inspection of the house I accompanied Phillips to 10, Marsh Lane—I corroborate what he has said.

THOMAS SHORT (Police Sergeant R 9). On night of 23rd November I went to Woolwich Lecture Hall, where a boxing match was going on—after some time the prisoner came in—I went behind him, and took hold of his arm—I was accompanied by another officer in plain clothes—we took the prisoner outside, and then he said "What have you got me for?"—I said "You will be taken to Greenwich, and you will be charged with breaking and entering the Lord Nelson public-house"—he said "I know nothing about it"—I said "There was a pair of gloves Inspector Phillips found at your apartments yesterday morning, which have been identified by the landlady of the Lord Nelson"—he said "Anyhow you weren't b——fly enough to catch me"—I took him to Woolwich Police-station, and found on him this chisel, knife, and flask containing whisky—he was charged at Greenwich, and in answer said "I don't know nothing about it"—I searched him in the presence of Inspector Phillips and the landlady, and the coins, buttons, and pencil were identified by her.

JAMES FOY . I live at the East London Industrial Schools, Lewisham—on the night of 21st November I was staying at the Lord Nelson—this is my coat; it was a uniform coat which I had in Greenwich Schools—I hung it up in the kitchen on the 21st, and these gloves were in the pocket—next morning it was missing.

JOHN HITCHINS . I live at 24, Old Woolwich Road, and work at a greengrocer's—I found this coat stuffed in some tubs when I went round to our stable on Sunday morning, November 22nd about 12 o'clock—the stable is about two minutes' walk from the Lord Nelson.

ELLEN TOOMEY . I live at 10, Marsh Lane, East Greenwich, and am the prisoner's sister—on the night of 21st November my brother came home between half-past 12 and I—I said to the Inspector on the 22nd that these were my gloves—I was confused and did not know what I was saying—they are not my gloves—I had not gone to bed when he came home; I stayed up to let him in—we live about 10 minutes' walk from the Lord Nelson—I did not notice if he had anything with him when he came in—he did not go out again till 7 or 8 o'clock.

The pritoner in his statement before the Magistrate and in his defence stated that he picked up the gloves on the Sunday morning, and that the coins, button, and pencil were his own.

GUILTY . He then PLEADED GUILTY ** to a conviction of felony at this Court in May, 1883.— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

144. GEORGE GAY (27) and JOHN COOPER (38) , Stealing a mare of William Henry Umfreville.

MR. NORTH Prosecuted.

WILLIAM HENRY UMFREVILLE . I live at Broadmead Farm, Catford—I had a pony running out at gram in a meadow by the Mid-Kent Line—I saw it there on the 10th November, between half-past 4 and 5 in the evening—there was a perfectly sound railway fence all round the field—the following day I missed the pony, and the same evening I went to the greenyard, and Detective Shave showed me the pony—I recognised it.

FRANCIS SHAVE (Detective R). A little before eight on the 10th November I was with Constable Wooding in Czar Street, Deptford, and saw Gay leading a pony by this old piece of rope—I asked him where he brought it from—he said, "It belongs to a gentleman living here," pointing to No. 29, opposite to where we were then standing—I again—asked him where he brought it from—he said, "From Burnt Ash Lane" I asked him the name of the man who lived at 29—he said, "Mr. Lloyd"—I knocked at the door; Mr. Day answered it—I asked him if any one of the name of Lloyd lived there—he said, "No"—when Day came to the door Gay said, "That is the gentleman"—I asked Day if the pony belonged to him—he said, "No"—I took Gay to the station—as we were going back to No. 29, Cooper crossed the road, and from what Wooding said to me we watched him—he went to 29, and knocked at the door—I asked him if he lived there—he said, "No"—I asked him what his business was there—he said, "I came to ask him if he would give me a job of work"—I asked him if he knew the man's name that lived there—he said, "No"—I asked him if he knew what his occupation was—he said, "No"—I told him I had a man in custody, detained for unlawful possession of a pony, and he answered the description of a man he had told me to bring to Deptford, and he would have to go to the station with me—he answered the description which Gay had given at the station—I took him to the station, where he said, "I don't know the name of the gentleman at No. 29, but he lent me a shilling a few days ago, and I went there to ask him to lend me another"—the following day, in Cooper's presence, Gay said, "It appears to me Cooper wants me to stand to all this myself; but I don't mean to do so."

HENRY WOODING . I was with the last witness on the night of the 10th—I have heard his evidence, and corroborate it—at half-past 11 that day I had seen the prisoners within 100 yards of where we apprehended them in Czar Street, Deptford.

THOMAS DAY . I live at 29, Czar Street, Deptford, and am a joiner—about a quarter-past one on 10th November I met Cooper, who asked me if I could do with a pony—I said I could—he said if he knew anybody that he could get one from he would let me know—he thought his brother had got one, or his brother-in-law, I don't know which, and if be would sell it he would bring it up to me—I saw no more of him till

I saw him in the dock at Greenwich Police-court—I had seen him about twice before—that evening Gay was brought to my door by the police.

Cross-examined by Cooper. You did not meet me on the Monday or Tuesday before this—I never lent you a shilling—my friend lent you a shilling a week or two prior to the 9th—I never gave you my address.

Cooper, in his statement before the Magistrate and in hit defence, stated that he had met Lay, who asked him if he knew of any one who had a pony to sell; that he thought he did, and promised to let Day know; that Day gave him his address; that immediately afterwards meeting Gay he told him about the horse, and gave him Day's address; that next day he and Gay went to Day's address and walked about waiting for him, and when he came he (Cooper) told him Gay knew where there was one; that they then went to Mill Lane, Deptford, and Gay wanted him to walk to Sydenham and Norwood, he (Cooper) declined, and Gay then told him to meet him at 7 or 8 o'clock.

Gay in his defence said he did not know the horse was stolen.

COOPER— NOT GUILTY . GAY— GUILTY .* He then PLEADED GUILTY to a conviction of folony in March, 1885.— Nine Months' Hard Labour.

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

145. SARAH OLIVE SNELLING (30) , Obtaining by false pretences from Charlotte Grelinger a quantity of butcher's meat, from William Wolsey 1 1/2 lb. of beefsteak, and from John Edwards a can of Swiss milk and 1/2 lb. of butter, with, intent to defraud.

MR. CRANSTOUN Prosecuted.

CHARLOTTE GRELINGER . I am assistant to William Wolsey, a butcher, of 123, High Street, Peckham—about 20th November the prisoner came into the shop and said "I want to open an account"—I said "Yes"—she said "I want to have some meat here and pay weekly"—she said she came from her mistress, Mrs. Saunders, of 149, Southampton Street—I then took down the name, and opened an account in that name—she then had about three pounds of mutton, some pork sausages, and one pound and thirteen ounces of steak, amounting altogether to 5s. 2 1/2 d.; she did not pay for them—I let her have credit because I thought her tale was genuine, and that she had a mistress, Mrs. Saunders—next day she came and said her mistress liked the mutton, and she wanted something to-day, and she then took some suet and pig's fry, worth about 10d.—a day or two afterwards she came a third time, and wanted two pork chops, which my man gave her—she did not say for whom they were, but I booked them to Mrs. Saunders—I had by this time made some inquiries, and told the prisoner that I had sent the boy to No. 149, but that he couldn't find Mrs. Saunders—she said that wasn't the right number, it was No. 131—I do not think I sent to that other number—she has never paid any money for those goods—I am cashier.

WILLIAM WOLSEY . I am a butcher, carrying on business at High Street, Peckham—on Friday, 20th. November, about 12.30, I heard the prisoner ask my clerk for some rump steak, which I ordered my manager, George Mason, to cut—she said about a pound and a hall—he cut a pound and 13 ounces, price 2s. 1 1/2 d.—she asked my clerk, the last witness, to book it—I said "Very well, do it"—she then took the steak, and went out of the shop—I had no conversation with the prisoner—I heard her say it was for Mrs. Saunders—I let her have the steak because

I supposed that the was a customer's servant—I have no customer named Saunders, but I supposed it was all right, because my clerk didn't say to the contrary—the prisoner had been to the shop on a day previous to the 20th; nothing passed between me and her, but I heard her say to my clerk that her mistress, Mrs Saunders, was living at 149, Southampton Street, that she was a lady who had just come over from Australia for a few weeks and wished to open a weekly account with me, and that she had been with the lady eight years—I didn't hear her order anything then—I have seen her pass the shop once since the last occasion on which she came and got goods, but I have never had the steak back nor the price of it.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am a cheesemonger, carrying on business at Park Road, Forest Hill—on 26th November, about halt-past nine p.m., I was called into my shop by my son, where I saw the prisoner, who said, "Will you call for orders on Saturday, two or three doors this side of the Police-station at Forest Hill, as the family is coming in to-morrow (Friday), and I am searching out the tradespeople whom we wish to deal with?"—I agreed to send—she mentioned the name of Mrs. Pager as her mistress, who had just returned from Australia, and that she had been in her service ten years, and was receiving 30l. a year—I believed that statement for a little while—before leaving she said she wished to take a few things to last her over to-morrow, and asked for 1/2 1b. of butter and a tin of milk, and then said "Or I may as well have a pound of butter"—I thought it a good deal for one day, and gave her 1/2 1b.—I parted with my goods on the idea we had a new customer, Mrs. Paget—about a quarter past nine p.m. I was sent for to the Forest Hill Railway Station by my son, where I saw the prisoner—I said, "I thought you were going to take these to Sydenham"—I had sent a younger son to see where she went to, and he came back and told me—she said, "I am going; I only came in here to have a rest"—I said, "Have a rest, certainly"—she then said, "I am going to London"—I said, "What are you going to do with the things?"—she said, "I am going to leave them in the booking office"—I said, "That is funny"—she said, "I have often done that"—I then went with her to Dartmouth Road, where Mrs. Paget was supposed to be going to live—she was supposed to be at the Grosvenor Hotel at present—it was an empty house, in charge of a caretaker—she knocked at the door and said, "Give me the goods; this is the house"—I had been carrying her things for her—I said, "I will see you inside first"—a young woman came to the door—the prisoner said, "Good evening," and went in—I said, "Do you know this person?"—she said, "No, Sir"—I said, "Is any one else here"—she said "Mother"—I said, "I will see her, then"—an old lady came up, and I said, "Do you know this person?"—she said "No"—I said, "She says she has got her bed and bedstead here"—she said, "Nothing of the sort"—the prisoner said, "It is let through the agent"—the old lady said, "I should know it if it was"—I then sent for a policeman—I said to the old lady, "Should you be surprised if I sent for orders here on Saturday?" and she said, "Yes, I should indeed"—the prisoner went to the police-station, and was given into custody.

SELINA BOWLES . I am a widow, and live at 131, Southampton Street, Camberwell—Mrs. Saunders does not live there, and has never done so—I have been there two months and four days—on 23rd November the

prisoner came and asked for a furnished room or apartments—I said "Furnished?" she said "Yes"—she gave her name as Mrs. Bates, and said that she was a widow—I declined to receive her as a lodger—she went away then, and came again on the 25th—I opened the door to her, and told her I had written to her—she said she had not received the letter—I had received the letter back through the Dead-letter office—this is it (produced)—it is addressed to 197, Asylum Road, Peckham—I said I did not wish to speak to her—between the first and second times of her coming parcels came repeatedly to my house addressed to Mrs. Saunders—I should think there were two or three a day—that lasted for about a fortnight—they were brought by different tradesmen—I sent them away again.

JUBAL BUTLER (Policeman P 428). On 26th November, about 10 p.m., I was called to 126, Dartmouth Road, Forest Hill, by one of Mr. Edwards's sons, and saw the prisoner, and told her she would be charged with obtaining goods by false pretences—she said that her mistress was coming to live three or four doors this side of the police-station, that her mistress's name was Mrs. Paget, and that she was now staying at the Grosvenor Hotel, Westminster—I then took her to the station, where she was charged, she made no reply—I have applied at 131 and 149, Southampton Street, no such person as Mrs. Saunders or Mrs. Paget lives there—I went to the Grosvenor Hotel.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not get them by false pretences, or with intent to defraud. I did not do such a thing in my life.

GUILTY .— Three Months' Hard Labour.

146. THOMAS JONES, Indecently assaulting Harriet Howard.

MR. GORDON DILL Prosecuted; MR. PURCELL Defended.

NOT GUILTY .

SURREY CASES.

Before Mr. Recorder.

147. WILLIAM QUINLAN PLEADED GUILTY to three indictments for burglary and to a previous conviction of felony, when he was sentenced to five years' penal servitude. A sentence of one day's imprisonment was passed, his former sentence not having expired.

148. JOSEPH WEBSTER was indicted for not discovering to his trustee in bankruptcy the disposal of various sums and portions of his property, in other Counts for obtaining quantities of hops and for conspiracy to defraud, and LEONARD HERRING (30) for aiding and assisting him to commit the said offences.

MR. GRAIN Prosecuted; MR. GILL appeared for Webster, and MR. FILLAN

for Herring.

HENRY ALFRED STAGEY . I am superintendent of the Records of the London Court of Bankruptcy—I produce the proceedings in the bankruptcy of Horace Richardson and Joseph Webster—the petition was presented on January 8, 1885, the petitioning creditor being Thomas Samuel Wylde—the receiving order was made on 19th January, 1885, and the adjudication against both bankrupts was on 10th March, 1885—Mr.

John Seear, chartered account, was appointed trustree on that day—the statement of affairs by both bankrupts was filed on 9th February, 1835—that was only sworn to by Richardson—all the sheets are signed—the gross liabilities are put down at 21,369l., expected to rank 13,284l., and the gross assets 6,828l.—among the book debts I find Herring and Co., 33, Albert Street, Birmingham, 350l.—under the heading of "Property" there is "Hops 367l., beer 130l., oyder 17l., cigars 300l., malt 57l., and bottles 50l. "—that purports to show property held by Herring and Co. belonging to Richardson and Webster—under list J. headed "Bills of exchange available assets" I find three bills of 50l. each accepted by Herring, due respectively on 4th July, 4th September, and 4th October, 1885.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. Webster was examined about twice at private meetings, and also at public meetings—Herring was also examined twice—Richardson was only examined on one occasion.

WILLIAM VYNER EDSALL . I am one of the shorthand writers to the Court of Bankruptcy—I took shorthand notes of the examination of Webster on 23rd March, 1885—he was the only person examined in this matter on that day—I also took notes of his examination on 17th April, and of Herring's examination on 8th of May—on 10th July Webater was again examined, and on the 23rd and 24th July—I have my notes here—the transcripts produced are correct.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. Richardson was only examined on the 23rd March—he passed a public examination—no notes were taken by me on that occasion.

JOSEPH HERMAN EPSTEIN . I am a hop-factor, carrying on business at the Hop Exchange Buildings, Borough—I have known Webster about 10 years, and lately as a member of the firm of Richardson and Webster, hop merchants, in the Borough—in May, 1884, I had a small transaction with them, which they paid for duly—from that time up to November, 1884, I had no dealings with them—on or about 18th or 19th November, 1884, Webster came and brought a hop sample, and said he wanted to buy about 20 bales of hops equal to that sample, and to match the colour as nearly as possible—he said that by that sample he had sold a quantity of hops to a brewer—they were of a yellowish tinge—the yellow are inferior to the green as a rule—I offered him green, which I considered better, but he would not have them—he selected some to the amount of 172l.—he beat me down in price—he said he had had a certain price offered by the brewer, which would leave him only a very small profit on the price he paid me, which was 83s.—I believed his statement—he received delivery orders for the hops he selected, and they were ultimately delivered on those orders—I sent the invoice in the ordinary course—we are creditors on the estate for the amount, less the dividend which I have received, 280l. altogether—if necessary I can give the marks of the hops by referring to my books—I know Mr. Ashby, of the Borough—he is not a brewer, he is a hop-factor—in consequence of information I went to Ashby's, and made inquiries about some of the hops I had sold to Webster—I sold them at rather a low price; under the market price—I was present at a private meeting of creditors early in December—Webster was there—I did not see any statement of affairs presented by him as of 1st December, 1884—I saw Webster after the meeting, and asked him why he had given me to understand that those hops were for a brewer, when I learnt afterwards they were for Mr. Ashby—he said the brewer had

found them not up to sample, and therefore they had not been accepted.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I have known Webster about 10 years in the market as a hard-working man in his business—this was a falling market; the season was not good, but the present is worse—in 1884 hops might be bought one day and sold at 20 per cent under price within a week or less—I inquired the nature of Richardson and Webster's business after parting with the hops—I know they had brewers for customers who were in good position and well known—after selling the small lot Webster did not say he would like to cancel the sale—he inspected the bulk in this instance—hop factors occasionally warehouse other people's hops—there are facilities for sampling at the Exchange—hop merchants begin to buy new hops as soon as they come on the market, about September—to carry on a successful business a hop merchant should have in stock a certain quantity in proportion to their business; it would not be necessary to have in stock such hops as were bought from me on this occasion—they were not what would be generally required by a brewer, because of their peculiar colour—Mr. Ashby is a friend of mine, a man of very high character.

HERMAN STEINBERG . I am a hop factor in the Borough—I am one of the committee of inspection of the estate of Richardson and Webster, and am myself a creditor for over 2,000l.—I had a transaction with Richardson and Webster in 1882; that was for cash on delivery—I then broke off the transaction for some time—in January, 1884, they began to warehouse some goods with me, for which I charged rent in the ordinary way—I did not sell them any goods until October—they warehoused a considerable quantity with me—on or about the 1st October Webster came to me saying that he wanted some hops—he said it was the beginning of the season, and asked me to draw on him at three months and the other transactions would be for strict cash—he ordered 50 bales of hops for the first delivery, amounting to 379l.—I had 50 bales of similar hops on the road, and he bought those to be delivered on arrival; they amounted to 634l.—on 16th October he gave me a further order for 37 bales, amounting to 485l.—payment for the last two lots was due on 15th November—on 28th October he ordered 33 bales, amounting to 421l. on the same terms, cash in a month—all those goods were delivered to him, at least they were in my warehouse, and were taken away except the last lot—I did not give a delivery order for that, but in spite of that they got them out—in the beginning of November I began to be somewhat doubtful about the matter, and in consequence did not give a delivery order for the last lot—I did not authorise anybody to give them up—on 15th November the two amounts added together were 1,192l. due—I called on Webster for payment, but did not find him—next day he sent me a note, stating that he would not be able to pay me on the Saturday, but I should have it during the week—he never paid me that amount, or for any portion of the 269l.—since the bankruptcy I have traced some of the hops; some have come back from a Mr. Fowler, I believe, and some from Westehead and Co.—the prices I charged Webster in October were the market prices, and he could have obtained a proper profit from his customers on those days—there was no fall at all on those days; it was a rising market if anything, the market was very firm; he would of course know that-factors never sell to

brewers—the English factor is between the grower and the merchant; the foreign factor is in a different position—the merchant is between the factor and the brewer; we keep the stock—during the last few years the hop merchants unfortunately have not been in the habit of keeping a large stock—they buy samples from us and sell the hops—I thought these hops were required for the ordinary course of Webster's business, to sell to brewers—I have not been paid for any of the four lots—the bill for the first lot was dishonoured.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. Different houses have different rules as to stock—a good many do not keep any now, and have not for the last three years—on account of those disastrous years heavy losses were sustained by many persons in the hop trade—I have known Webster several years; I have not known much about him—the firm of Richardson and Webster warehoused a good many hops with me in January, 1884; at one time they had 200 or 300 packages; sometimes 100, sometimes only 50—on one occasion I saw a brewer come to my warehouse and weigh hops there—they had brewers of respectability and position as customers—I saw Webster frequently—when he did not pay the first instalment I said I was rather anxious about it, and he said "Oh, my dear sir, I am sorry you should think so; I must see and try to get you some security"—he did try to do so—I may have had other persons' hops warehoused—I sold Webster other hops beside these four lots, perhaps 200l. worth; they were to arrive, but they did not arrive—I gave him contract notes for them, but the sale was cancelled the day before the meeting of creditors, and I got the contract notes back from him—he proposed it—I attended the first meeting, Mr. Wylde was in the chair—I think Webster proposed that the business should go on—the amount owing was said to be 4,000l.—I said it was only 2,000l.—there was no unpleasantness about it; that was not the reason the meeting broke up—Mr. Few said that the estate would realise something about 10s. in the pound, and taking off bad debts and other things, it might realise about 8s. nett—I don't think any proposition was made as to paying; no offer was made; none was made to pay in four instalments—I don't think I was present at the second meeting—no proposition was made that Richardson should find 500l.—it was against my wish—I don't know whose proposition it was.

THOMAS SAMUEL WYLDE . I am a hop factor in the Borough—I am a creditor of Richardson and Webster for about 1,600l., and am a member of the committee of inspection—the greater part of the debt had accrued at the end of 1883 or in the early part of 1884, but I did not press them—prior to their failure, in December, 1884, I had only sold them to a very trifling amount—Webster had been to see me on several occasions with reference to buying hops; I refused to give him credit—Richardson very seldom came—at the wish of the body of creditors I became the petitioning creditor—I was present on 3rd December when they called their creditors together at their office by private arrangement—I was elected chairman of that meeting—Webster was present; he was questioned by different persons, and gave answers—some foolscaps were given to me containing a rough statement of their liabilities and assets, which I gave to Mr. Seear, the official trustee—according to those figures they were solvent on 1st September—I had not heard, when that meeting was called, anything of the Midland Beer Company, or Herring and Co., of

found them not up to sample, and therefore they had not been accepted.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I have known Webster about 10 years in the market as a hard-working man in his business—this was a falling market; the season was not good, but the present is worse—in 1884 hops might be bought one day and sold at 20 per cent, under price within a week or less—I inquired the nature of Richardson and Webster's business after parting with the hops—I know they had brewers for customers who were in good position and well known—after selling the small lot Webster did not say he would like to cancel the sale—he inspected the bulk in this instance—hop factors occasionally warehouse other people's hops—there are facilities for sampling at the Exchange—hop merchants begin to buy new hops as soon as they come on the market, about September—to carry on a successful business a hop merchant should have in stock a certain quantity in proportion to their business; it would not be necessary to have in stock such hops as were bought from me on this occasion—they were not what would be generally required by a brewer, because of their peculiar colour—Mr. Ashby is a friend of mine, a man of very high character.

HERMAN STEINBERG . I am a hop factor in the Borough—I am one of the committee of inspection of the estate of Richardson and Webster, and am myself a creditor for over 2,000l.—I had a transaction with Richardson and Webster in 1882; that was for cash on delivery—I then broke off the transaction for some time—in January, 1884, they began to warehouse some goods with me, for which I charged rent in the ordinary way—I did not sell them any goods until October—they warehoused a considerable quantity with me—on or about the 1st October Webster came to me saying that he wanted some hops—he said it was the beginning of the season, and asked me to draw on him at three months, and the other transactions would be for strict cash—he ordered 50 bales of hops for the first delivery, amounting to 379l.—I had 50 bales of similar hops on the road, and he bought those to be delivered on arrival; they amounted to 634l.—on 16th October he gave me a further order for 37 bales, amounting to 485l.—payment for the last two lots was due on 15th November—on 28th October he ordered 33 bales, amounting to 421l. on the same terms, cash in a month—all those goods were delivered to him, at least they were in my warehouse, and were taken away except the last lot—I did not give a delivery order for that, but in spite of that they got them out—in the beginning of November I began to be somewhat doubtful about the matter, and in consequence did not give a delivery order for the last lot—I did not authorise anybody to give them up—on 15th November the two amounts added together were 1,192l. due—I called on Webster for payment, but did not find him—next day he sent me a note, stating that he would not be able to pay me on the Saturday, but I should have it during the week—he never paid me that amount, or for any portion of the 269l.—since the bankruptcy I have traced some of the hops; some have come back from a Mr. Fowler, I believe, and some from Westehead and Co.—the prices I charged Webster in October were the market prices, and he could have obtained a proper profit from his customers on those days—there was no fall at all on those days; it was a rising market if anything, the market was very firm; he would of course know that—factors never sell to

brewers—the English factor is between the grower and the merchant; the foreign factor is in a different position—the merchant is between the factor and the brewer; we keep the stock—during the last few years the hop merchants unfortunately have not been in the habit of keeping a large stock—they buy samples from us and sell the hops—I thought these hops were required for the ordinary course of Webster's business, to sell to brewers—I have not been paid for any of the four lots—the bill for the first lot was dishonoured.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. Different houses have different rules as to stock—a good many do not keep any now, and have not for the last three years—on account of those disastrous years heavy losses were sustained by many persons in the hop trade—I have known Webster several years; I have not known much about him—the firm of Richardson and Webster warehoused a good many hops with me in January, 1884; at one time they had 200 or 300 packages; sometimes 100, sometimes only 50—on one occasion I saw a brewer come to my warehouse and weigh hops there—they had brewers of respectability and position as customers—I saw Webster frequently—when he did not pay the first instalment I said I was rather anxious about it, and he said "Oh, my dear sir, I am sorry you should think so; I must see and try to get you some security"—he did try to do so—I may have had other persons' hops warehoused—I sold Webster other hops beside these four lots, perhaps 200l. worth; they were to arrive, but they did not arrive—I gave him contract notes for them, but the sale was cancelled the day before the meeting of creditors, and I got the contract notes back from him—he proposed it—I attended the first meeting, Mr. Wylde was in the chair—I think Webster proposed that the 'business should go on—the amount owing was said to be 4,000l.—I said it was only 2,000l.—there was no unpleasantness about it; that was not the reason the meeting broke up—Mr. Few said that the estate would realise something about l0s. in the pound, and taking off bad debts and other things, it might realise about 8s. net—I don't think any proposition was made as to paying; no offer was made; none was made to pay in four instalments—I don't think I was present at the second meeting—no proposition was made that Richardson should find 500l.—it was against my wish—I don't know whose proposition it was.

THOMAS SAMUEL WYLDE . I am a hop factor in the Borough—I am a creditor of Richardson and Webster for about 1,600l., and am a member of the committee of inspection—the greater part of the debt had accrued at the end of 1883 or in the early part of 1884, but I did not press them—prior to their failure, in December, 1884, I had only sold them to a very trilling amount—Webster had been to see me on several occasions with reference to buying hops; I refused to give him credit—Richardson very seldom came—at the wish of the body of creditors I became the petitioning creditor—I was present on 3rd December when they called their creditors together at their office by private arrangement—I was elected chairman of that meeting—Webster was present; he was questioned by different persons, and gave answers—some foolscaps were given to me containing a rough statement of their liabilities and assets, which I gave to Mr. Seear, the official trustee—according to those figures they were solvent on 1st September—I had not heard, when that meeting was called, anything of the Midland Beer Company, or Herring and Co., of

Birmingham; all I knew was the business of hop merchants in the Borough—to my memory nothing was said by Webster at that meeting about the business at Birmingham, I first heard of it after the appointment of the trustee—no offer was made by Webster or his solicitor on 3rd December—the meeting broke up, and I called another a few days afterwards at Webster's office; I was chairman—I think Webster then suggested some offer—we requested him to find proper securities; he did not tind them, and the thing went into bankruptcy.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I had known Webster some years, as a hard-working, respectable man—I remember the firm of Richardson and Webster being started on the death of Richardson's father—the business was in a great measure thrown upon Webster, Richardson was not much assistance—I cannot say anything about his driuking, I do not know—I have made myself conversant with the nature of the business carried on by Richardson and Webster—the indebtedness to me in 1882 was in my opinion the result of misfortune—I received bills from them in reference to hops bought from me—the particulars of the transactions with Kitchiner I know nothing of—I took the bills from Kitchiner in payment of goods; they were accepted by Richardson and Webster—I did business with them for four years, to the amount of 4,000l. or 5,000l. a year, up to 1882—since then I have been on friendly terms with Webster—I sold them a few goods in 1884—they warehoused hops with me—I have from time to time discussed with Webster the state of his affairs—he said that in time he believed he would be able to pay me—he came to mo before the meeting of creditors, to speak to me about the matter—between 1882 and 1884 I sold them large parcels of hops—I knew that they were doing business with brewers in good position—the season of 1884 was a very lamentable one; there was a general depression of trade and a large fall in the value of hops—when the new hops come in the old ones get put aside, and would be very much depreciated and more difficult to sell—at the end of 1884 there was a great fall in the price of hops—when Webster came to me he told me he had been served with a writ for 400l.—I do not think that I had hops warehoused for them then, I am not sure, there might have been some, at any rate a very small quantity—Herring and Co. may have been mentioned as an asset—at the second meeting something was said about stock at Birmingham—I do not remember what value was put on it—Mr. Sendall was there—I think I saw a list of the stock at Birmingham—I do not remember an offer to transfer everything to the creditors—I think they offered to transfer all the assets to us, whatever they might be—there was some dispute about Steinberg's debt—the English creditors would have been willing to take what was offered properly secured, but the foreign creditors declined—no security was offered—I believe they offered to pay so much down, and the rest over an extended time—there was a suggestion that it would be secured by Mrs. Richardson, that we said we would take; that falling through the thing went into bankruptcy—I do not think he has conducted himself fairly and honestly to his creditors; I think he has been very irregular in his transactions in every shape and form, not only in the way the books were kept, but in every possible way—no books of any moment were kept—I have not ascertained that a great part of the business was Richardson's department—I should say Richardson was quite capable of keeping books, but

he never did anything in the business that I could find—I was not present at any of the public examinations—at the first meeting it was discussed whether the business should go on until some conclusion was arrived at.

JOSEPH HOOK . I am a hop-factor, at 87, Talbot Yard, Borough—our firm are creditors of Webster and Herring, to the amount of 729l. 14s., made upon two or three orders during October, 1884—Webster gave the orders—he said they were wanted for a brewery; they always do—he has not paid for them.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I don't know where they went to, or that they did not go to a brewery—there was nothing out of the ordinary course of business—my only complaint is that I have not been paid.

HERMAN STEINBERG (Re-examined by MR. GILL ). These are the contract notes—there is one contract for 50l., sold by sample to arrive—credit would run from the date they are delivered—I should not consider them delivered till I have given my delivery order—the buyer can sell on sample—not on his contract, that is nothing—the transaction is not complete till the hope are delivered and have been examined and weighed—it is not the practice to deal with hops immediately the contract note is passed, it is done sometimes—there would be nothing extraordinary in Webster selling the hops represented by this note; they could have done that if they had liked—I offered them no hops after that; neither in the presence of Mr. Crosswell nor of Webster's brother—I never came in and read a telegram, and said there would be no hops, and now was the time to buy—I thought the market was good—I went to Parton, I did not tell him if some money was found for me I would cease to be unfriendly—I remember going in when Mr. Sendall was in the room—I did not say that I would not say what I wanted to say in his presence; nor did I ask to be personally shown some consideration—Mr. Richardson told me that I had always acted very gentlemanly to him, and he was very sorry that I should be such a loser, but if he would come out of it all right again he would pay me his share—I said "I cannot go on your word at all; if your master is willing to do what you say, I am perfectly willing to help you in anything afterwards; when you start in business again I will assist you"—I met Richardson, quite casually, at a restaurant, when he spoke to me about it—the 5,000l. got from Richardson has reached the Court—we have had a dividend, I do not know if from that—the hops represented by contract note never came, except one portion—that portion we sold, not at a profit.

By MR. GRAIN. The hops arrived two or three days before they were stopped, and I gave orders to my foreman to deliver no more—I sold them at 82s. 6d., I believe—the others I sold a long time afterwards—the usual portion arrived in April this year, the market had fallen very much—the market fell quite at the end of 1884 and has continued to fall till now—up to that time it was very firm, at one time there was a rise—since 1881-1882, hop merchants have not kept any considerable amount of stock—they can, unfortunately, always come to the hop factors and borrow samples, and sell them, and then come to us and buy—in fact they use our stock—they wanted to make out before the Magistrate that I sold bad hops.

CHARLES DOWSE . I am a hop-factor in the Borough—on or about 21st November, 1881, I remember Webster calling on me, and choosing

some hops, and I sold him hops value about 115l., payable on 6th December—I had had occasional transactions with him shortly before—I am his creditor for 115l., which has never been paid.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. We had several transactions—I had always been paid until this—this was in the ordinary course of business—I make no complaint personally in this matter—I went to none of the meetings of creditors—1884 was a calamitous year—the market began to go back in October.

THOMAS USBORNE . I am a hop factor, of 52, the Borough—on 7th November, 1884, Webster came to me for a few Green Sussex, and I sold him 10 pockets, which came to 91l. 10s.—on 18th November the same year he came to me again, and bought two pockets of hops for 13l. 19s. 6d.—he has not paid me.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. We had very few transactions before, and had been paid—these two were in the ordinary course of business—I don't know if they went to a brewer—he offered to pay some money down—I expected him to pay in the ordinary way, and did not press it—the 10 pockets formed part of a larger lot of 20 pockets—the prisoner picked the best—I did not want him to take any more, and did not press him—he saw the 20—I would have let him take them all.

Re-examined. He did not ask discount for cash.

FREDERICK ASHBY . I am a hop factor in the Borough, and am a creditor of Richardson and Webster for about 1,000l.—I have known them since they started, in 1874—I have known Webster for 20 years—1,000l. has been owing to me since 1882, or probably the beginning of 1883—when the debt was due they gave me as security Viscount Hinton's bonds, and in consequence I let it stand over—after that I had several transactions, and sold them goods, and they sold to me—they warehoused goods with me, on which I charged them a rental—in November, 1884, they owed me on a new account 120l. for hops—they paid me 80l. in cash—on 10th November I bought for Webster's firm about 238l. worth of hops—I did not pay for them, but put it against their debit—about the 13th they sold roe hops for 23l.—I put that against their account—on 24th November hops to the value of 14l., and on the 26th November hops to the value of 466l., making a total of 820l. which they sold to me, and which I put to their credit—I think I paid them 179l. in cash, leaving about 680l. to their credit—I did not ask Webster to send me these hops; he sent them of his own accord—they were in my warehouse, and I purchased them—he did not tell me where they came from—some of the hops I received from Webster I returned to the committee of inspection of the estate—I am a hop factor—all hop merchants keep a more or less extensive stock; they cannot do business without.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I have been in the hop trade since 1857, and understand it pretty well, and the usages of the trade—I should say it would be a very awkward and limited business if a hop merchant had no stock, and sold by sample—if I delivered up hops I handed over the hops warehoused with me—on those I had no lien except for warehouse charges—my name is well known in the hop trade—I have known Webster for quite 20 years, I should think—he has always conducted himself as a hard-working, respectable man of business, and I have always had a good opinion of him—there is nothing in the hop trade against him now that I am aware of—I bought these hops, with others,

at the market price—they were warehoused at my place—if Webster wanted to get money for them there was nothing to prevent him selling to a member of the hop trade outside us, to whom he owed nothing—I never asked him to sell to us—by selling to us it went against his account, instead of his getting credit—if they had not failed we should have put them all against the account, and Webster knew that—there was no pressure from us to sell them—I parted with no goods on the strength of Hinton's bonds—Richardson and Webster had always done a fairish business to my knowledge, and had sold to brewers—it is necessary to have a fair stock on hand if one is doing trade as a merchant—hops vary tremendously in price—last year there was a slight rise in the market for a week or a fortnight in October, but it would soon drop again—except that, I should describe the season as a falling market—it is not right to say that there was a strong, firm market up to Christmas—I bought Americans at 55 and sold at 28—I don't know that it is a risky trade; I suppose not—there is a degree of risk in most seasons—the 1,000l. debt was contracted under peculiar circumstances—Richardson and Webster were connected with a firm of Kitchener that failed.

FAULKNER MORGAN . I live at Stork's Hotel, Birmingham, and have an office at 33, Albert Street—I am a commercial traveller; I travelled for Richardson and Webster in England and Ireland in September, 1882—I received no salary, but half a share of profits on the orders I obtained—I acted so up to their failure in September, 1884—in February, 1883, with a knowledge of the firm, I started a small hop business in Union Street, Birmingham, in the name of my wife—the arrangement with the firm was that they were to supply the hops in my wife's name, and I might retail them in small quantities among brewers—the goods which I so received were to be paid for out of the commission I received on the larger orders—I carried on that business in my wife's name up to April, 1884—in the preceding March I had a conversation with Webster, in which I suggested I should have to give up the business, and it was ultimately arranged about May that the business should be carried on, and that I should add to it bottled beer, stout, and other articles required by publicans, and that the title should be the Midland Beer Company—I took a store at 33, Albert Street on 24th May—Richardson and Webster were to pay the rent—I was to manage the business and to receive half the profits, and to draw four guineas a week on account of it—I was first introduced to Herring about Whit Monday, 1884, as from Mr. Webster, and as a traveller for Waterlow and Sons, stationers, of London—Webster introduced me—paper was designed; I had this set of books in the business, I brought them from home—I can't say that this was one of the books I used in the Midland business, it was a similar book; they are certainly books I used—I saw Herring again about the end of June; he said he had come down to assist me in the business—I understood that he was bent by Webster; he did not say he had been sent by any one, he said Webster would be down in the course of a few days, and then would tell me all about it—Webster came, and it was then arranged that Herring was to keep the accounts, and I was to do all the buying and selling, and Herring to assist me as far as was in his power—he continued to assist me till I went to Ireland on 21st September, leaving Herring behind—I returned on 6th October—I then noticed that Herring had sold some hops at under cost price—I asked him why he had done

that—he said because he considered the prices too high, and we ought to get it reduced—I wrote to Richardson and Webster complaining, and received an answer from Webster saying he could not understand it, and that he would inquire into it—about August there was a discussion about taking Stevenson; it was not a partnership—for that purpose it was arranged that a balance-sheet should be drawn out by a firm of accountants, and this was drawn up. (This was dated 6th September, 1884, and contained a statement of the business, showing a loss on the trading up to that time of 97l.) I was not in England at that time, but I received a letter from Webster telling me what the contents were—I saw Webster on 11th October at Birmingham; Herring and Richardson were present—then was an angry discussion about the way the business was going on, and the irregular way in which the accounts were kept, and different things, principally between Webster and myself; it lasted some time, and then Richardson and Webster went out together, and made an appointment to meet me at the Storks Hotel at 2 o'clock—I met them; Herring was not there—it was arranged at that meeting that for the future Herring should be called manager of the business, and keep the accounts, and I was to do the buying and selling—I had previously been manager—Herring came in as soon as the arrangement was made; we went to the railway station together; Richardson and Webster left for London—on 17th October I went to London and saw Webster at his house—on the 18th I saw Mr. Few, the solicitor, with Mr. Webster, with a view of getting an agreement drawn up—I returned with Webster that day to Birmingham, and his daughter, Herring's wife's sister—on the journey down I and Webster discussed the business—not a word was said then about transferring or selling the business to Herring—I left Webster at the station at 7.30, he saying he was going to Herring's house, and an appointment being made to meet early on Monday morning—next day, the 19th, I was writing a letter in the office at Albert Street when Herring came in and said he had just seen Webster off by the train—I expressed surprise, and was going on with my writing, when Herring said he had bought the business, stock, lot, and barrel; that an agreement had taken place on the previous night; that certain money had been paid, but no agreement drawn up, in the presence of Herring's wife and Webster's other daughter, Webster and Herring being also present—he also said Webster had written me to my house explaining what had occurred—I had a house in Herefordshire when off my journeys—I ultimately received this letter in Webster's handwriting. (This, dated Birmingham, October I8th, was read, stating that urgent business prevented his meeting him on Monday, referring to some hops, and adding that he had made an important alteration in the business, which would be explained when they met.) In consequence of what Herring said I wrote and made an appointment for the 22nd at the Agricultural Hall, where a brewers' exhibition was going on—I saw Webster, Richardson, and Few there—Webster, addressing Richardson, said: "You know, Horace, we agreed it would be best to sell the Midland Beer Company, that we arranged to so sell it to Herring. I have scarcely seen you since my return from Birmingham, but I went down there and so sold the business to Herring"—he said to me, "You know, Morgan, the Birmingham business has been a heavy drag on us; it seemed to be all money going out one way; no doubt it will come in eventually, but we

thought it would be best to sell the business to Herring, upon whom we can draw bills, which would assist us; it will, however, not make the slightest difference to you"—I continued to assist in the management of the business till I left for Ireland on 2nd November—I travelled for the firm in Dublin till I heard of the failure, and then came back—I drew my commission from London—the stock might have been increased after I left for Ireland; I cannot say—I should say the value of the goods and stock at the date of the transfer was very nearly the same as the valuation made by Mr. Howard—I heard of Webster being in custody in September, 1885—I saw Herring at his house in Birmingham—he brought down papers and gave them to me—amongst them were these books—there were a set of books kept at the Midland Beer Company—I cannot say if this is the cash book; it was similar to this—174 pages are torn out of this—a cash book was kept at the Midland Beer Company up to the time I went away—it was labelled "cash-book" outside—he gave me a waste book to make up my commission in—I took the books to my solicitor, and they were given to the trustee—in the waste book, under date of October 10th, 1884, I see I sold on behalf of the Midland Beer Company ten pockets of hops to Mr.Evans, Letchfield Road—that was before the transfer—it came to rather more than 100l.

Cross-examined by MR.GILL. I knew my customers; they were brewers in the Midland Counties and Ireland, and one dealer to whom I sold goods for Richardson and Webster—I had been selling for them since September, 1882—the idea of selling hops retail in Birmingham was mine, and I carried it on in my wife's name—I did not want to stop; it about paid itself—I said to Webster I thought I should give it up—he said it would be a pity to do so after the expense, and we agreed to enlarge it—Webster and Richardson took it over, enlarged it, and put me in as manager—webster came down to look after it, and it took a good deal of his time—Richardson was not a good business man; not safe to leave to conduct a London business—Webster's coming away was injurious to the London business—the new arrangement began in May—the business was valued and the books gone through in September, and a loss shown of 97l.—Webster complained from time to time of the trouble of coming down to Birmingham to look after it, and said it was a great nuisance to him, and complaining also of the drain on his London business to supply money—there was not a money drain—the liabilities incurred have been paid afterwards—100l. or 200l. was going out—I got 4l. a week; there were two clerks and several men, and the working expenses were about 30l. a week—Webster asked me in October as to some suggestion about what should be done—I forget if Webster was in favour of closing it, and Herring in favour of keeping it open, or vice versd—it was my suggestion that Herring should be manager, and I buy and sell—after Herring came to Birmingham he was supposed to keep the books—it is impossible for me to say if this was one of the books. (By the COURT. There were six books, and there was a cash-book; this is not the cash-book; it is not here.) I have seen another cash-book—I went to Ireland at the end of October according to custom—when the interview took place, about 18th October, I was very much annoyed about the sale of the business—I remained after Herring was in possession on the same terms with him till September, when I went to Ireland—I sold hops in Birmingham at three or four months'; other things for cash—it would require some

capital to work it—I did not know that Evans complained with regard to some hops—it was impossible for them all to be slack-dried hops.

Cross-examined by MR. FILLAN. There was a cash-book of the Midland Beer Company—I should say this certainly was not it—this other is a copy of it—I have never seen it before that I recollect—Herring may have started a fresh cash-book after I left for Ireland—this is not the book that was kept in the Midland Beer Company before I left—I cannot swear if this was the cash-book or not; it is an exactly similar book, but there is no writing in it—this cash-book begins 27th May, 1884, and goes up to September 8th, 1884; the balance brought forward being 6l. 17s. 7d.—it looks as if it is in the handwriting Mr. Howard—Herring kept his accounts when he took up the business in a book similar to this one with the leaves torn out. (MR. FILLAN called for Herring's cash-book.) Webster said in the conversation with Richardson that he had agreed the business should be sold—I and Herring had not altogether agreed—it was not a matter of complaint that I sold hops to persons not quite respectable to earn commission, because I had a half-share of profits, and therefore the money had to be paid before I received any—I never made bad debts; I did not make bad debts with Mr. Langley to the best of my belief, nor with Mr. Webb—I took beer in exchange for hops, which I could have sold again—there was no complaint about a cab I hired all day and did not use till the afternoon; the cabman was carting when not driving me—Herring did not complain of that; if he had he would have done so to Webster—Webster was the only man I should have recognised.

THOMAS M. HOWARD . I am an accountant, of Birmingham—in September, 1884, I was asked to make a statement of the affairs of the Midland Beer Company, which I did, and I wrote a short letter—this (produced) is a copy of the trading account—I sent that letter to Webster in October, and saw him many times—he said one morning that he had bought the business, at which I was rather surprised.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I was employed by Mr. Webster, and prepared a balance-sheet—I knew that it was contemplated to make a Company, and I made a conscientious report—I was told that it had been in existence about six months—it snowed a lots of between 90l. and 100l. from May to September 6th—a stock list was made out, and stock taken by one of the servants, and the value put on the plant was given to me.

(MR. GRAIN here read parts of Webster's examination in the Bankruptcy Court)

HENRY WOODCOCK NEEDHAM . I am one of the firm of Needham and Crick, maltsters, of Leicester—I knew Webster for a very short time before the failure—early in the spring of 1884 I entered into a contract with Morgan, the traveller for Richardson and Webster, to supply 500 quarters of malt to them at a later period, and they subsequently confirmed it—the first portion of it was delivered in May to the order of the Midland Beer Company, and on 14th October I sent them 50 quarters of malt, value 97l. 10s.; on 16th October 20 quarters were delivered, value 29l.; and on 23rd October 95 quarters, value 185l. 5s.—on 24th November I received this letter, making an offer for 250 quarters more, 60 quarters of which I supplied—it came to over 90l.—this is our account (produced), but I have very little to do with the books—we succeeded Mr. Harrison. (The account was here put in for malt supplied from September 3rd to December 4th. Total 781l. 17s. 1d. ) We are creditors for 781l. 17s. 1d.—Herring and Co. afterwards wrote to us.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. We had 84l. 7s. 6d. from Herring—I never saw him till he came to this Court—500 quarters of this malt was bought of us as long ago as May, 1884, value over 700l.—a portion of the 250 quarters was in order at that time, but we did not deliver it—I came up to London one day and called at Webster's—there was a meeting of creditors there—we went into a cellar, and from one room to another, and was told that it would be all right; I did not deliver any more—I made the contract with Morgan, not with Crick—I said nothing at the meeting—I heard the question discussed as to whether they should go on or not; I did not prove in Herring's bankruptcy; I had nothing to prove for—Herring wrote for the last lot delivered, and sent a cheque—all the other deliveries were continuing deliveries of the first contract.

Re-examined. I saw Webster at the meeting—he took me into the cellar, and said that there was a meeting of creditors.

JOHN GIBSON . I am a maltster, of Burn, Lincolnshire—I had some small dealings in hops with Webster, and on October 27th, 1884, I received an order from Herring and Company, for 83l., which I sent to Richardson and Webster's order, and went to London and saw them several times, and Webster bought the malt, and I sent it—he said, "May I draw at two months?" I said, "Yes," and this (Produced) is one of the bills—I have not been paid.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I had bought odd pockets of hops from Richardson and Webster, through their traveller, Morgan—they were paid for up to the last one or two lots.

MR. EDWARDS. I am traveller for Mr. North, a brewer—at the end of September, 1884, Herring engaged me as traveller for the Midland Beer Company—I knew nothing of him before that—he told me he was a hop merchant at Albert Street—I went to the place of business and saw "Midland Beer Company" up; and he led me to believe he was the proprietor—I was engaged at 30s., a week, and two and a half commission—I commenced business on October 1st—I saw Mr. Morgan and spoke to him about Herring having engaged me—there was then a considerable stock of malt, hops, sugar, beer, bottled stout, cigars, and other articles, and after that stock kept coming in from time to time value 20l. or 30l. a week, for seven or eight months from 2nd September, till the business closed—the cash book was similar to this (produced), but there is no writing inside—Herring directed me to go to Mr. Evans, of Lichfield Road, Birmingham, and collect 72l. 9s. 10d.—I was to give any discount from 15 to 25 per cent., and get the money under any circumstances if I possibly could—I took off 17l. 9s. 10d. discount, and received 55l., which I gave to Herring, who was so pleased that he gave me a 5l. note—I heard no complaint about the hops when I collected the money—I saw Mr. Webster last June, at Herring and Co.'s premises—Mr. Herring was there—I was not then aware of the Bankruptcy proceedings, but I became aware of them then—I knew that Webster was bankrupt—he asked me if I could find 200l. and join Herring in trying to keep the business afloat—I said it was possible I might do so among my friends—we went to a restaurant, and Herring came in; we had a conversation, and I afterwards wrote to Webster and had a reply—Mr. Herring then suggested that we should come to London

capital to work it—I did not know that Evans complained with regard to some hops—it was impossible for them all to be slack-dried hops.

Cross-examined by MR. FILLAN. There was a cash-book of the Midland Beer Company—I should say this certainly was not it—this other is a copy of it—I have never seen it before that I recollect—Herring may have started a fresh cash-book after I left for Ireland—this is not the book that was kept in the Midland Beer Company before I left—I cannot swear if this was the cash-book or not; it is an exactly similar book, but there is no writing in it—this cash-book begins 27th May, 1884, and goes up to September 8th, 1884; the balance brought forward being 6l. 17s. 7d.—it looks as if it is in the handwriting Mr. Howard—Herring kept his accounts when he took up the business in a book similar to this one with the leaves torn out. (MR. FILLAN called for Herring's cash-book.) Webster said in the conversation with Richardson that he had agreed the business should be sold—I and Herring had not altogether agreed—it was not a matter of complaint that I sold hops to persons not quite respectable to earn commission, because I had a half-share of profits, and therefore the money had to be paid before I received any—I never made bad debts; I did not make bad debts with Mr. Langley to the best of my belief, nor with Mr. Webb—I took beer in exchange for hops, which I could have sold again—there was no complaint about a cab I hired all day and did not use till the afternoon; the cabman was carting when not driving me—Herring did not complain of that; if he had he would have done so to Webster—Webster was the only man I should have recognised.

THOMAS M. HOWARD . I am an accountant, of Birmingham—in September, 1884, I was asked to make a statement of the affairs of the Midland Beer Company, which I did, and I wrote a short letter—this (produced) is a copy of the trading account—I sent that letter to Webster in October, and saw him many times—he said one morning that he had bought the business, at which I was rather surprised.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I was employed by Mr. Webster, and prepared a balance-sheet—I knew that it was contemplated to make a Company, and I made a conscientious report—I was told that it had been in existence about six months—it showed a loss of between 90l. and 100l. from May to September 6th—a stock list was made out, and stock taken by one of the servants, and the value put on the plant was given to me.

(MR. GRAIN here read parts of Webster's examination in the Bankruptcy Court)

HENRY WOODCOCK NEEDHAM . I am one of the firm of Needham and Crick, maltsters, of Leicester—I knew Webster for a very short time before the failure—early in the spring of 1884 I entered into a contract with Morgan, the traveller for Richardson and Webster, to supply 500 quarters of malt to them at a later period, and they subsequently confirmed it—the first portion of it was delivered in May to the order of the Midland Beer Company, and on 14th October I sent them 50 quarters of malt, value 97l. 10s.; on 16th October 20 quarters were delivered, value 29l.; and on 23rd October 95 quarters, value 185l. 5s.—on 24th November I received this letter, making an offer for 250 quarters more, 60 quarters of which I supplied—it came to over 90l.—this is our account (produced), but I have very little to do with the books—we succeeded Mr. Harrison. (he account was here put in for malt supplied from September 3rd to December 4th. Total 781l. 17s. 1d. ) We are creditors for 781l. 17s. 1d.—Herring and Co. afterwards wrote to us.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. We had 84l. 7s. 6d. from Herring—I never saw him till he came to this Court—500 quarters of this malt was bought of us as long ago as May, 1884, value over 700l.—a portion of the 250 quarters was in order at that time, but we did not deliver it—I came up to London one day and called at Webster's—there was a meeting of creditors there—we went into a cellar, and from one room to another, and was told that it would be all right; I did not deliver any more—I made the contract with Morgan, not with Crick—I said nothing at the meeting—I heard the question discussed as to whether they should go on or not; I did not prove in Herring's bankruptcy; I had nothing to prove for—Herring wrote for the last lot delivered, and sent a cheque—all the other deliveries were continuing deliveries of the first contract.

Re-examined. I saw Webster at the meeting—he took me into the cellar, and said that there was a meeting of creditors.

JOHN GIBSON . I am a maltster, of Burn, Lincolnshire—I had some small dealings in hops with Webster, and on October 27th, 1884, I received an order from Herring and Company, for 83l., which I sent to Richardson and Webster's order, and went to London and saw them several times, and Webster bought the malt, and I sent it—he said, "May I draw at two months?" I said, "Yes," and this (Produced) is one of the bills—I have not been paid.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I had bought odd pockets of hops from Richardson and Webster, through their traveller, Morgan—they were paid for up to the last one or two lots.

MR. EDWARDS. I am traveller for Mr. North, a brewer—at the end of September, 1884, Herring engaged me as traveller for the Midland Beer Company—I knew nothing of him before that—he told me he was a hop merchant at Albert Street—I went to the place of business and saw "Midland Beer Company" up; and he led me to believe he was the proprietor—I was engaged at 30s., a week, and two and a half commission—I commenced business on October 1st—I saw Mr. Morgan and spoke to him about Herring having engaged me—there was then a considerable stock of malt, hops, sugar, beer, bottled stout, cigars, and other articles, and after that stock kept coming in from time to time value 20l. or 30l. a week, for seven or eight months from 2nd September, till the business closed—the cash book was similar to this (produced), but there is no writing inside—Herring directed me to go to Mr. Evans, of Lichfield Road, Birmingham, and collect 72l. 9s. 10d.—I was to give any discount from 15 to 25 per cent., and get the money under any circumstances if I possibly could—I took off 17l. 9s. 10d. discount, and received 55l., which I gave to Herring, who was so pleased that he gave me a 5l. note—I heard no complaint about the hops when I collected the money—I saw Mr. Webster last June, at Herring and Co.'s premises—Mr. Herring was there—I was not then aware of the Bankruptcy proceedings, but I became aware of them then—I knew that Webster was bankrupt—he asked me if I could find 200l. and join Herring in trying to keep the business afloat—I said it was possible I might do so among my friends—we went to a restaurant, and Herring came in; we had a conversation, and I afterwards wrote to Webster and had a reply—Mr. Herring then suggested that we should come to London

and see Webster, which we did, at his house—Mr. Howard the accountant was with me—I did not buy the business, my friends thought they wanted too much for it—Webster said he wanted the business kept afloat till after he got his discharge, and then he might be able to do something with it himself—after that we had further negotiations—the stock was then nearly all gone—I know now that Herring is bankrupt.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I did not know that Morgan, or Richardson and Webster, intended to close the business—I do not think Herring was a very good man of business—there was a greater stock when I first went—I did not know till some time after the meeting that Richardson and Herring had had a meeting of their creditors, and that the stock was offered to the creditors—I kept no account of my sales—Mr. Tucker, Herring's solicitor, was a party to the interview, which came to nothing—no swindle was contemplated, that I am aware of—we did not shut ourselves up in a room.

Cross-examined by MR. FILLAN. I went at 30s. a week; I thought afterwards that my labours were worth 4l. a week, and I got it—the orders I got may have been less than 10l. or 12l. a week for the first month or two, but afterwards they were 20l. or 30l.—Herring made a mistake when I first saw him, and said he thought he knew me, and that he thought he could give me a berth—I do not know that slack malt was supplied, nor did he ask me to take off 15 or 20 per cent, for that reason.

JOHN SEAR . I am a chartered accountant, and Trustee under the bankruptcy of Richardson and Webster—I knew nothing of the affairs till the day of the meeting—on looking over the statement of affairs I came across the name of Herring and Co.; they were put down as debtors for 350l. in one of the sheets—Herring's book debts are 200l. on a bill held by E. T. Webster and three bills of 50l. each on Jay—they put him down under different heads as a debtor for 700l., and he is not put down for more—this total, 921l., is the stock of Richardson and Webster, Birmingham, warehousemen, and never charged to Herring and Co.; it is put down as stock at Birmingham—I am now Trustee under Herring's bankruptcy—he became bankrupt long after these proceedings—I am Trustee of both estates—I now find that Herring is indebted to Webster's estate about 2,000l. more—in consequence of seeing these entries referring to Herring I made a claim for the 350l., a printed application, for the amount which appeared to be due from him, and received this letter from him denying that he owed the money—in consequence of that I sent my partner down to Birmingham to have a personal interview with Herring, and when he came back I wrote to Herring and received answers from him—I first saw him on 5th May this year, when he called with Webster—I asked him for information as to the stock which was in existence on 11th October, when it was alleged that the business was transferred, and also as to the book debts—he agreed to give me a proper account—he claimed to be a proprietor of the business—in consequence of the inquiries and search made examinations were made by order of the Bankruptcy Court, after which I demanded all the books of the Midland Beer Company, and received some of them, which were put in yesterday, but not this book with the leaves torn out and the amount of proof sent to me—in Webster's statement of affairs, here is "Richardson and Webster, 19,468l. 17s. 4d. "—up to this time I have realised 2,070l. 7s. 7d. on their estate, and at a

fair estimate there may be about 500l. more to come—the real deficiency is about 14,000l.—I find in the ledger in Needham and Crick's account; a purchase by Richardson and Webster on 13th October, 97l. 10s., and on 16th October, 29l.; 23rd October, 139l. 5s.—in the same ledger I find in the account of Herring and Co. 97l. 10s. on October 13th, invoiced to the same amount "No profit," and on the 16th the same amount "No profit"—I find in Needham and Crick's account the last entry made is goods purchased on 23rd October, 1884—I find no entry of goods purchased by Needham and Crick on 1st and 4th December, nor do I find any such goods invoiced to Herring; there is no entry of those two transactions—I find in the account of Gibson and Bow, two items, 56l. 5s. and 27l., and in Herring's account I find the two same items entered to his debit, but there is no entry in Gibson's account of the subsequent transactions—Mr. Gibson swears to a delivery of goods late in November—I find in Richardson and Webster's cash book on 14th November, 1884, that a cheque for 75l. 12s. was drawn from the banking account of the firm; this is it (produced)—it is entered in the cash book, and signed by Webster in the name of the firm, "Pay Furniture or bearer 75l. 12s. "—it is entered "Furniture, J.W."—I find on 28th November another cheque, "Pay J.S. or bearer 112l. 10s. "—that is entered in the cash book "J.S. interest"—here is another cheque in November, 1884, "Pay interest account, 50l. "—Webster has not disclosed to me that he had a private banking account, but I wrote to the bank to furnish me with particulars, and they gave me information; I got a copy of his banking account from them—the cheque of November 18th was paid into his private, account, and so was the next one for 112l. 10s.—I found no trace of the furniture alluded to in this cheque; Webster has not told me anything about it—just previous to his private examination he was asked if he wished to alter his statement, and his attention was called to these three cheques, by Mr. Woolf; he said that he did not—I knew then that he had this private account, and wished him to have the opportunity of amending his statement, but as far as I knew of he did not know that I knew it—I find in Richardson and Webster's ledger an entry of 60l. in pencil, from J.C. Foster; there is no mention of that 60l. in any cash book or in any cash account filed in the Court—I was the petitioning creditor in Herring's estate as trustee of the estate of Richardson and Webster—the date of the petition is 10th September, 1885—he has been adjudicated bankrupt on that petition—this (produced) is his statement of affairs signed by him—the liabilities are 15,088l. 3s. 4d., and the assets 1,508l. 1s. 11d.—442l. of the assets are book debts—there is 4l. rough stock—the date is 23rd October, 1885—according to his statement 1,135l. is due to myself as trustee of Richardson and Webster—Herring's books are in my possession; they are the ordinary books—I have taken out the purchases made by Richardson and Webster in September, October, and November—those goods are not all unpaid for; you will find each item is explained; that includes Needham and Crick.

Cross-examined by MR. GILL. I was introduced into this case at the first meeting in March, by Messrs. Goldbeck and Langley and Mr. Edward Lee, the solicitor acting for Steinberg—I know nothing about the case prior to March—I know that a meeting had been held on December 13th, through the examination of the bankrupt—I did not

know that they had made an offer—I do not know that the only reasonable offer went off, on account of a question of security—I was not told that the creditors were offered the business at Birmingham and the stock and book debts—I know that Mr. Sendel, an accountant, had been employed, because I had to pay his charge—he prepared the statement of affairs at the private meeting; I knew nothing about it; I did not think it concerned me—I do not know what the nature of the affair was, or why it went off—I examined the books when I took control—a man named Gardner kept them, but Webster appeared to know more of their contents than anybody else—Richardson did not attend to matters in the office, I understand that he did the travelling, and Webster remained in town—Richardson solicited orders from the customers, and I believe Webster bought—I believe the business was originally Richardson's father's, and he came into it, and Webster was taken into partnership—I cannot swear to Richardson's writing in the books—I examined him on March 23rd and made a report—I gave my instructions to Mr. Lea, and he used his discretion under the guidance of Counsel as to the examining of Richardson further—I only ceased my examination because Webster seemed to know more about the business than Richardson—he had to refer to Webster, and I considered that Webster could give us more information; therefore it was considered better to examine Webster first—I made no proposal to either of them that their relations should find money to stop this, nor did any one by my instructions—I have got money from Richardson's relations—both Mr. Lea and myself advised the Committee that they should not accept the sum without submitting it to the Court, and having the sanction of the Court, and it was submitted to the Court—Mr. Grain did not advise me to take 500l.; I got 500l.; I believe it came from Richardson's mother; that was not that he should not be examined—I think his examination had ceased then—the condition was that the payment of the 500l. should be held over till he got his discharge, and it was submitted to the Court—I made no report—I can't tell you when he got his discharge; the file of the Court will show—I was there and gave Mr. Woolf instructions in the absence of Mr. Lee—I left the matter entirely in the hands of the Court—I remember when Richardson came up for his examination and when he passed—no question was put about the 500l. being paid—I prefer that you should look at the shorthand writer's notes—I made a report with a view to a prosecution, and got Counsel's opinion, upon the transcript which you nave in your hand—Mr. Grain gave his opinion, and Mr. Woolf also—the prosecution was taken up when the Registrar made the, order—the Registrar was present at all the public examinations and at some of the private ones—there was no stock in trade, but they put down the stock as worth 2,335l. 5s.—I have not got possession of some of it—I have realised between 500l. and 600l. for stock estimated to have cost 3,600l., which was estimated to produce 6,500l.—the stock was hops—what I have got passession of is estimated to produce 2,500l.—I took possession of the Birmingham stock; that is estimated to produce about 400l.; the estimated cost of it as set out in this statement is 1,000l. or 1,100l.—I have not ascertained that there has been an immense fall since December—the market was falling when I took possession of the hops, and I was advised not to force them on the market—I consider that matters got better—I hold some still, but I have sold the bulk of them

—I can't swear to Richardson's writing or figures—I did not ascertain whether he exercised a supervision over the books, or ticked or checked the entries—I heard what the Registrar said about Mr. Webster being examined on the accounts—the Birmingham stock was estimated to cost 1,100l.; some of it was sold for 215l. 6s. 9d., and I have some stil—when I became trustee I sent my partner down Birmingham, and he was refused possession by Mr. Herring—I do not know that Richardson, and Webster had offered to hand over the business to their creditiors in December—the accounts which they filed were all prepard by an accountant; the same accounts were signed by both partners—I asked for a further deficiency account, and it was furnished to me prepared by Mr. Sandell—Mr. Barton was acting for Richardson—between September 7th and December the amount of business shown is 9,800l. in the deficiency account—I expressed myself satisfied with these accounts and papers, and Richardson was allowed to pass—I find that Webster put money in from time to time, and his account is debited with the sums during 1884 which he brought in—on September 2nd I find 183l. 3s. 2d.; September 16th, 347l. 11s. 2d.—there are large contra items on the other side about the same dates—Ionly knew of his borrowing money and paying heavy interest on it from the examination at the private meeting—he was asked the name of the man to whom he paid the 112l., and he said,"Sheldrake"—this 75l. 12s. 4d. is debited to the trade expenses account—there is and erasure, and "J.W."is put against the very next item—that goes to his private account, but this one does not—the 50l. is drawn to interest—I should say that is in Webster's writing—I believe these two cheques are his writing—75l. has entered against it,"Furniture, J. W's expenses"—refers to the cash account—from information at my disposal I agree with Mr. Tucker that Herring's indebtedness was 1,200l., subject three or four items on the other side, 200l., and three bills of 50l. each; that increased the cost to 350l. more—the 50l. one has been dishonoured since—Mr. Tucker offered me the Birmingham business subject to my paying the liabilities—that was an insane propsition—after May, Herring assigned his business—I found that the assignment was prejudicial to the estate, I objected, but it was never offered to me to assign; the condition was that I should pay his liabilities, and take over the business for my debt, but I should have been worse off than I am now—Richardson told me that he went to Birmingham at the time Herring was left in possession of the business—I don't think he said that he went down to shut the doors of the place and stop the business, but he went down to see why they did not get money out of the business—I did not know that it had been a loss; Howard's report does not say so—it is not so disastrous a report as to expect no money from it—I understood that an arrangement had been made to leave Herring to carry on the business as long ago as March.

Cross-examined by MR. FILLAN. I know that Herring had never been in business before—I do not know that he has been a singer for many years at the Chapel Royal, Whitehall, and Westminster Abbey—I understand that he left me to take a certain amount of stock, but that was objected to—a certain amount of stock he elected to take over at once; he arranged for that in the books; the remainder he simply had to realise, and credit the account with it—he was to take over what he sold, with the exception of the things agreed to everthing to remain the property or Richard-

son and Webster—the whole of the stock as sent down on 1lth October was 1,200l. or 1,300l. I believe in addition to what I have quoted—300l. Herring was to buy, and 1,200l. was to be Richardson and Webster's property, and the book debts—the Registrar ordered the prosecution on my report, based on Counsel's opinion and the shorthand notes—I believe Mr. Lee submitted a case—I did not take possession of 1,200l. worth of stock estimated to produce 600l.; nor did I sell part realising 250l.—I have taken a portion of the Birmingham stock, not the whole, but about 300l. worth; the date appears in the depositions—no particulars are given in the statement of affairs—I estimated that it would realise 8l. more than I have already realised—I sold it on May 19th by public auction on the premises—I do not know whether hops had fallen considerably then—I put a reserve on—I should not have realised more by private contract, and I was quite satisfied with the prices realised—I had a long correspondence with Mr. Tucker, Mr. Herring's solicitor, and the offer was made in this letter. (From Mr. Tucker, dated May 21st.) I should not have liked to give much for the goodwill of the business.

Re-examined. I was to realise the whole of what was alleged to be due to Richardson and Webster—I did not accept that—I sent them 263l. 15s. 10d. in cash under all heads—I have realised 215l. from the stock I got possession of—the estate has received under 500l. from October 11th to the present time—the book debts at Birmingham due to Richardson and Webster are 902l. 1s. 5d., of which 248l. 18s. 11d. has been paid to Herring—he admits receiving that, and in addition to that we have discovered large sums—I do not say that Herring has collected them since then, but they are under his control—credit is given in the books for the 112l. 10s. and 7l. 10s. interest.

GEORGE WILLIAM FRYER . I am a clerk at the London Joint Stock Bank, Southwark Branch—I produce Joseph Webster's private account for the last year—it has been kept during the whole of 1884—the last entry of payments in is on December 12.

HORACE RICHARDSON . I am 28 years of age—I commenced business on my own account about 5 1/2 years ago; I had not much experience then—I afterwards entered into partnership with Mr. Webster—I have brought into the business from the beginning to the end about 2,000l., and Webster brought in 300l. or 400l.—I went out travelling—my mother has paid 500l. into the estate.

Cross-examined. We were in the hop trade, and had a large connection among brewers of good position, like Younger's and Ashby's—I took two-thirds of the profits—I have put in from time to time 1,900l.—Webster afterwards brought money into the business, and I know that he mortgaged property—when he came to me he had been travelling for a large firm, and I entered into partnership with him on account of his kuowledge of the trade—Mr. Gardner kept the books, and I went through them and ticked them from time to time; some of them have my ticks—we began buying hops at the beginning of the season, and went on buying up to December for the brewers—we were supplying brewers in England, Scotland, and Ireland right up to the time we failed—I used to go to Ireland and to Scotland, where Mr. Younger and others were my customers—it was necessary that we should have a considerable amount of stock to supply our orders—up to the time we were served with a writ, we had no idea of stopping payment—the year was most

disastrous—between October and December Morgan started the Birmingham Beer Company, and was going to shut it up, and proposed that Webster and I should carry it on—the business went on till October, but we were both very dissatisfied with it, it did not pay—it very often took Webster away from the business in London, and we determined to shut the doors—a suggestion was made that rather than close it Herring should be allowed to carry it on, realise the assets as he could, and pay for it as he realised it—the stock was to remain the property of Richardson and Webster, Herring was to have the business, and the book debts were to be collected and paid over as they came in—I was present when it was discussed, both in Birmingham and London, and as far as I saw, no fraud was thought of—this was early in the season of 1884—we were desirous that Webster should give the whole of his time to the business in London—I was attending to the business up to the meeting of 3rd December, and as soon as I was served with a writ I called our creditors together, and the position of the Birmingham business was explained to them—a proposal was made as to our paying a dividend, and as to security being given by a relation of mine, but there was some difficulty about that, and the matter fell through, and went into bankruptcy, and Mr. Seer was appointed—I was examined, and it was said that my friends ought to find a certain amount—I do not know who fixed upon 500l., but I had not got it; it was got from my mother—I was examined two or three times in private, but not after the arrangement was made—Mr. Porter was the solicitor, he instructed an accountant—I gave an intimation about being served with a writ, and Mr. Steinberg came to the office and got the contract notes—they were kept on a file; I did not set him take them.

Re-examined. I only know the travelling part of the business—Webster suggested the transfer of the business to Herring—there is no pretence for saying that my mother was to pay 500l. to prevent my being prosecuted.

WEBSTER— GUILTY .— Six Months' Hard Labour. HERRING— GUILTY on the 5th Count only .— Two Months' Hard Labour.

Before Mr. Justice Hawkins.

149. PATRICK FITZGERALD and ROBERT BAXTER (31) were indicted for feloniously setting fire to certain heath and furze in the occupation of the Earl of Faversham and others, trustees of Fletcher, Lord Grantley, deceased.

MR. CUNDY Prosecuted.

WILLIAM THOMAS SKINNER . I am a sergeant, No. 15, of the Surrey Constabulary, and am stationed at Albury, Surrey—on Sunday night, 22nd November, about a quarter to 11, I went out with two constables, named Collins and Tytherly—I was on duty at Blackheath, in the parish of Wonersh—I left the two constables at the Volunteer Inn, and I went in the direction of Chilworth—when I got nearly across the common, near the main road, I saw a fire light up—I was going across a footpath leading from the Volunteer Inn to the main road to Chilworth—I saw a fire light up on the common—it is called Blackheath Common—I also saw two men run away from it—I could not identify the men; I was not near enough to see them—I immediately blew my whistle and went towards the fire—when I got to the fire I found the two prisoners in

custody of Collins and Tytherly—the constables informed me that they had stopped these men running away from the fire—I told them the charge—I said, "I shall charge you both with setting fire to the common"—Fitzgerald said he knew nothing about it till he was brought back—I had noticed a fire, before this, about a quarter-past 10, when I passed the place—we put the fire out—altogether about five square yards were burnt—I took the prisoners to the station—I assisted in searching Fitzgerald at the time, I found on him 10 matches, and Baxter delivered one match to one of the constables in my presence—I believe Baxter had nothing on him besides the match—I did not see any pipe—he might have had a pipe; the other constable searched him.

Baxter. We were going across the common; he did not see me run away from the fire. Witness. I told him at the time that I did not know it was him.

SAMUEL JOSEPH COLLINS . I am a constable of the Surrey Constabulary, No. 18, and am stationed at Framley—on Sunday, 22nd November, I went out with the sergeant and the other constable—about a quarter to 11 I left the sergeant at the corner of Blackheath Common, and I and the other constable, Tytherly, proceeded in the direction of Wonersh—we saw a fire, and immediately heard two men running away—I saw the fire light up—we were then about 250 yards from where the fire was—I should think the two men were about 50 yards from the fire when we first heard them—we stopped them 150 yards from the fire and arrested them—they were the two prisoners—we took them back to the fire—Sergeant Skinner came up, and we told him we met the two men running away from the fire—they were charged, and we took them to Guildford—next day I went with Constable Tytherly to the place where the fire was, and about two yards from where the fire was Tytherly picked up a box of lucifer matches—I saw him find them; they were lying on the ground about two yards from where the fire was, and underneath the furze bush that was partly burnt Tytherly picked up two lucifer matches; one was partly burnt and the other scratched—they corresponded with the matches that we found in the box; they were the same sort of matches, and they also corresponded with the match that was found on the prisoner Baxter—they were not like those that were found on Fitzgerald—I think those are what are called paraffin matches, a different sort altogether—I was present when the prisoners were searched at the police-station that evening—Baxter had a pipe on him, and I believe Fitzgerald had a pipe.

Cross-examind by Fitzgerald. You were 150 yards away from the fire when we stopped you; you were running—I came from the direction of the Volunteer Inn—I was not at the cross roads by Chilworth—I ran down the road as soon as I heard you running from the fire—I ran to meet you.

Fitzgerald. I was going to my lodging—you stopped me and laid hold of me, and I was out of breath—I asked you what was up—you said, "A fire"—I said I did not know anything about it; I was never near the fire. Witness. I did not say anything to you; I had not hold of you.

Baxter. You were at the four cross roads; that would be 150 yards from where you stopped us—you say we were only 150 yards off, and we could have been indoors comfortably if you had only come from the cross roads. Witness. I was not at the cross roads—I left the Volunteer Inn

and proceeded in the direction of Wonersh—I was farther down than the cross roads; I had not 100 yards to go.

WILLIAM TYTHERLY . I am a constable of the Surrey Constabulary, No. 27, and am stationed at Wonersh—on Sunday, 22nd November, about 11 o'clock at night, I went out with the sergeant and the other constable—I had the second prisoner in my custody to take to the station—on the way there Fitzgerald said to Baxter, "We have got ourselves in a pretty mess now"—Baxter replied, "Shut your mouth, and keep quiet."

Cross-examined by Fitzgerald. I saw you running down the hill, and I stopped you—I first asked you what was burning on the top of the hill, and you said you knew nothing about any fire—you were then about 150 yards from the fire—you were running down the hill when I stopped you.

Prisoner. I was only about 15 yards away from where I was lodging at the time—you stopped me going across the road—did I say, "We are in a nice mess now"?

Witness. That was what you said to Baxter going along.

By the JURY. There was no one else about the Common besides these two men. I did not see any one else.

JAMES HARVEY . I am steward to the trustees of the late Fletcher, Lord Grantley, and acting bailiff for the Manor of East Langley—I have seen the spot where this fire was—I saw it on the Tuesday morning following the fire—the furze belongs to the trustees of the late Lord Grantley—the extent of the damage was about six feet by four.

The Prisoners' Statements before the Magistrate. Baxter says: "I was going over Blackheath; I stopped to light my pipe. I took two or three matches out of my pocket to light my pipe, and struck them all together. I threw the matches down, and was walking away unconcerned, not thinking I had left any fire behind. When we came to the end of the heath it was rather steep. We went down between a run and a walk. Two constables made their appearance, and asked us what we had done. We said, 'Nothing.' They said we had set fire to the heath. We denied it." Fitzgerald says: "I reserve my defence."

Fitzgerald's Defence. This man here and I were walking over Black-heath, coming from the public-house. He stopped behind to get a light. I walked on down the hill when the police stopped us at the bottom. He asked what was up. He was out of wind. He said, "Hold on, there is a fire." I said, "I know nothing about it."

Baxter's Defence. I was going across Blackheath between 10 and 11 with Fitzgerald. I stopped to light my pipe, not thinking that I had caused any fire. I took two or three matches out of my pocket, struck them, lighted my pipe, threw the matches down, and walked on. When we got to the bottom the police made their appearance. We asked what was the matter. They said we had made a fire on the heath. We said we knew nothing about any fire. They asked us to go back. We did, and when we got back the sergeant knocked the fire out with a stick. We are quite innocent of it.

NOT GUILTY .

150. PATRICK CONNELLY (44) , For an unnatural offence.

MESSES. POLAND and MONTAGU WILLIAMS Prosecuted; MR. GEOGHEGAN

Defended.

GUILTY .— Twelve Years' Penal Servitude.

151. ALFRED SEYMOUR FREEMAN was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with the manslaughter of Daniel Heading.

MR. DE MICHELE, for the Prosecution, offered no evidence on the Inquisition the Grand Jury having ignored the bill.

NOT GUILTY .

152. ELIZABETH WHITE was charged on the Coroner's Inquisition with the manslaughter of Amy Sackley.

MR. DE MICHELE, for the Proscution, offered no evidence on the Inquisition, the Grand Jury having ignored the bill.

NOT GUILTY .

153. WILLIAM WITHEY (35) and LOUISA WITHEY (24) PLEADED GUILTY to unlawfully omitting to register the death of a child named Arthur Minns .— Two Months' Imprisonment. They were also indicted for the wilful murder of the said child.

MESSRS. POLAND and MONTAGU WILLIAMS Prosecuted; MR. WARBURTON

Defended.

The evidence in this case was partly heard, but there being no proof of the cause of death, the Jury (under the direction of the Court) fonnd the prisoners NOT GUILTY .

154. MATILDA FINCH, Feloniously setting fire to a stack of hay, the property of Henry William Cannon.

MR. CUNDY Prosecuted; MR. MEAD Defended.

HENRY WILLIAM CANNON . I am a farmer, and live at Buckland, Surrey—on Monday, 16th November last, about a quarter to five in the evening, I was finishing my tea when the prisoner came in to tea, and said "One of your haystacks is alight"—I went out immediately, and found some men there, and immediately sent for the prisoner—I saw that one of the stacks was alight at the corner end; that was the one that was farthest from my house—the pump is at the farther end of the yard, beyond the other stacks—after some two or three hours we managed to put out the fire—20l. was the claim for damage allowed by the Insurance Company—after it was all finished I went into the kitchen—the prisoner brought in something for my cupper, and I then said to her "How did you know of it?"—she said "I heard some one calling, 'Fire!' down the garden"—I said "How did you know it was one of the haystacks?"—she said "I did not know; I did not say it was one of the haystacks"—I said "You did," and then I repeated to her the words she said as she gave the alarm—I sent and informed the police, and Inspector Gray came over the same night—nothing was said then in the presence of the prisoner that night—next day Superintendent Lambert came over from Dorking to see me on the matter, and then the prisoner was questioned in my presence—she was asked to account for what she was about at the time the fire took place—she admitted nothing—she was asked if she had been near the haystack—she said she had not been near the haystack—she afterwards said she had only been out for some wood for fire-lighting, and then I and Lambert said "You must have passed the stack to have gone to and fro to have fetched the wood"—she adhered to her statement; she would admit nothing, and there was an end of it as regards that day—on the 18th, in the evening, Inspector Gray came to make further inquiries—he had appointed the time 10 o'clock—he did not see her—on the 18th I was pawing through the

kitchen to go out of doors, and the prisoner followed me through into the scullery, and said "Please, Sir, I did do it"—those were the words she said—nothing else except that she said "What shall I do? I don't know how I came to do it; I never thought of it before; it came into my head all at once"—I had not said anything to her before she told me this—I had not referred to it since the inspector came—I had not asked her any questions—she was in my service at the time as a general servant—I kept but one—she was under notice to leave for misconduct—I had given her notice a week previous.

Cross-examined. She was taken into custody on the 18th—I was at the police-court at Reigate on the 19th—I passed the prisoner as I passed through the passage to go into the Court—I spoke kindly to her, and asked her what sort of a night she had spent—I said "I am glad you have admitted it, and I will do all I can; I have no wish to punish you vindictively; I will do all I possibly can for you"—I did not say "You say you did it, and don't alter your mind and I will get you off this"—on the 17th, when superintendent Lambert was there, I was present at an interview between him and the girl—he did not press her at all to confess—when he came in I said "Mr. Lambert has come for you to tell him what you know about the fire," and I said "The best thing is for you to tell the truth; it will be better for you to tell the whole truth"—that was when Lambert came in the kitchen to speak to her—there was no undue pressure on the part of Lambert—he gave her the usual caution, whatever she said might be used against her on a future occasion.

HERBERT WILLIAM COLLINS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Thomas Saunders, carpenter, at Bucklands—I live not far from Mr. Cannon's farmhouse—on the 16th of November, 1885, Monday night, I saw the prisoner about three or four minutes past five—Mr. Saunders told me to go and shut the shop shutters—I went towards Mr. Cannon's, and I saw the prisoner coming from Mr. Cannon's towards the Pump-house.

ALFRED MULLENS (Surrey Constabulary 81). On 16th November I was passing Mr. Cannon's farm, and noticed a fire—I ran back through the yard and shouted "fire"—I saw the prisoner come to the window and look through—I assisted to put the fire out.

By the JURY. It was a quarter past five.

JOHN GREY . I am superintendent of the County police, stationed at Reigate—I went to Mr. Cannon's on the 16th, 17th, and 18th—on the 18th I saw the prisoner, and charged her with setting fire to a haystack, the property of Mr. Cannon, her master—she made no reply just at the time—shortly afterwards she said, "I don't know what made me do it; I did not do it when I got the wood; I went indoors, came out again, and set it on fire."

The Prisoner's Statement before the Magistrate. "I did it; I don't know how I came to do it."

MR. MEAD stated that he was furnished with no materials, and could advance none in explanation of the case, and did not desire to address the Jury.

GUILTY. MR. CANNON recommended the prisoner to mercy, as he considered she was of weak mind .— Three Months' without Hard Labour .

155. ROBERT ATHERTON CHURCHILL , for manslaughter of Robert Lamb.

MR. WILKINSON Prosecuted; MR. MEAD Defended.

ELIZABETH LAMB . I live at Ivy House, Church Rood, Guildford—the deceased was my husband—his age was 37 at the time of his death—he was a farm labourer—he was hay and straw tallying—on the 14th November he was in good health, and left home about seven o'clock to go to Dorking—he was a member of the Temperance Brass Band—the same night, from eleven to half-past, he was brought back to my home—I saw him there—he was injured—I sent for a doctor—Dr. Shallott came to the house—he died on 28th November.

WILLIAM HENRY LOVELAND . I live at Devonshire Cottage, Thisleton Road, Guildford, and am an iron founder, and a member of the Temperance Brass Band, Guildford—Robert Lamb was also a member of that band—on 14th November I went with Lamb and the other members of the band to Dorking by the South-Eastern Railway for the purpose of playing, as we were accustomed to do in the streets—we arrived at Dorking something after eight o'clock, and marched from the station up into the town, through "West Street—we came first to the High Street—we had with us the drum and fife band—we played from the station into the town alternately—we Played down the High Street into East Street, a continuation of High Street, and we played down East Street, about 150 or 250 yards towards the Box Hill part of the town—we went all together down there, the Temperance Brass Band in front, and about four Feet between the two bands—we kept on the left-hand side of the road going towards the High Street close to the kerb—the road is 24 feet 5 inches wide measured from kerb to kerb—this is a plan (produced), which I have made from measurements I took in company with Head; it is correct according to the measurements—the street it very well lighted with lamps and lights from the shops—we were four abreast in the band, and there were about 18 of us in the brass band and 11 in the drum and fife band—at the time we came back the drum and fife band were playing, and they were playing piano—there was a large and a small drum; that was the only band playing—I know Mr. Trussler's shop; when we got there I looked round; there was a noise behind—a horse and cab was in among the members of the drumb and fife band—when I looked round I saw the horse coming through the drum and fife band—he turned right into the drummer of the temperance band, and hit the deceased to the left—he was not playing, but was carrying the drum under his arm; that was the big drum—it was an ordinary four-wheeled cab—the horse came into us at a fair trot—I noticed the driver; he was standing on his box with the reins in one hand and the whip in one hand—I could not say if he had both hands on the reins or not—I saw Lamb at that time; he was knocked to the left by the horse and the drum came to the right—the horse went on for four or five yards, and then it was stopped—when it went through it did not go fast; it was only a walk, because he was knocking men right and left—when I turned my head and saw it it was going at a trot—I saw Lamb knocked down; the horse went about four yards after striking him, and then stopped—I was about four feet from Lamb at the time; I went to him round the rear of the cab—I found he was hurt iu the knee—I went home in the same train, not in the same carriage with him, and helped to take him to his house—the band would occupy about 10 feet in the road, which would leave about 15 feet of

space clear—there were no other cabs or conveyances of any kind about at the time—there was plenty of room on my right and very few people about—I saw the horse afterwards; he was standing very quiet; some men had hold of his head then—the driver stood up on his seat—I heard no calling out on the part of the driver.

Cross-examined. The drum and fife band broke out when we came to forts; sometimes they came to fortisstimo—they did not do so on this occasion—I was not alarmed when the horse came among us, because it did not come to me—I was not excited—the man was not doing his best to try to check the horse—I saw his whip was in his hand.

By the JURY. The driver was sober—I have driven to London the last day or so; it is rather rare for me to drive.

FREDERICK WATLING . I live at West Street, Dorking, and am a carpenter—on the night of 14th November I was in High Street, Dorking, and saw the drum and fife and the brass bands there—I was against Mr. Flood's in East Street—I saw the prisoner driving his horse and cab just behind the two bands, coming up behind and about five yards behind the bands at what I should call a full trot, in the direction of the Box Hill Station—the fife and drum band was playing: at the time; they were on the left-hand side of the road, just by the side of the footpath—he kept on; I was on the footpath, and when he oame across that way I could nearly have touched his cab—then he went angleways across the road, and seemed to cut the corner of the fife and drum band; he seemed to have full control of the horse—he had the reins tight in his hands; he was pulling the reins tight; the whip was in his hand across like—he was not using it at the time he was in the crowd—I saw him using the whip when he was coming towards the crowd; that was five yards before he came up to the drum and fife band—the horse simply out off the corner of the fife and drum band, and went into the middle of the road—it stopped when it got between the two bands—I heard no calling out by the driver.

Cross-examined. If he had called out I think I should have heard him—I will not swear he did not call out—I could not say he slackened the cab as he came to the crowd—he might have slackened a bit, but he came in full trot—he was going the same way as the band—his near side would be the same side as the band—I did not notioe if there was a lady and gentleman in the cab—I saw a man put his head out, therefore somebody was in it—the whip was in his hand.

By the COURT. I was not before the Coroner.

WILLIAM PETO . I live at 2, Stokefield, Guiidford, and am a labourer—I am a member of the Temperance Brass Band, and went with them to Dorking on this day—I remember this affair with the cab taking place in the High Street—we were coming back again then—I was in the front rank of the brass band, on the right hand—I heard some screams, looked over my left shoulder, and saw the cab going over some members of the band, and others I did not know—I did not see Lamb till afterwards—the cab went from seven to ten yards, I should say—I did not hear the driver call out at all—I did not see him get off his box to do anything—we were marching quick step at the time—the left hand man was close to the footpath—there was a good light there, shops and lamps—there was a lamp not above two or three yards from the spot where the

cab knocked the people down—on the left hand side were shops—I don't think there were on the right.

Cross-examined. I did not hear the prisoner call out—I was in the front row of the brass band—the fife and drum band were playing—I will not swear that he did not call out—I did not see him get off his box—I did not know Mr. White seized the horse and kept him quiet.

JOHN HEAD . I live at 2, South Place, Guildford, and am a carpenter, and a member of the drum and fife band—I went with these two bands to Dorking on 14th November with Lamb, the deceased—I remember this occurrence taking place—the first thing I heard or saw of the occurrence was that the horse's head, I believe, came knocking up against me, and knocked me down—it was the horse and cab driven by Churchill—I had a bruise on my temple, and two on my head—I got up, and I went to Churchill and asked him how he came to drive into us in that manner—he replied, rather lightly I should call it, and said he halloaed out to us before he came into us—I heard no shout or calling out by him whatever—he was perfectly sober, I should say—he stayed on the box—the horse was stopped—I saw some one holding its head—the horse was apparently very quiet when I went up to him—the street was well lighted—it was close to a street lamp—the street is 24ft. 5in. wide there—I have measured it with Loveland—I did not notice the reins—I think I saw the whip in his hand as I was falling backwards—to the best of my recollection I saw it in his hand—I should say he was holding the whip and reins together in his hands—the horse was going at a very fair trot when it knocked me down—I was partially stunned—when I recovered I got up and want to him.

Cross-examined. I saw it as it spun me round.

JOHN TUGWELL . I live at Vincent Road, Dorking, and am a baker—on Saturday night, November 14, I was in High Street, Dorking, and saw the collision between the horse and cab and these bands—I was on the pavement on the right hand side—that would be the side farthest from the bands—I was behind the bands at the time of the occurrence, about three or four yards—I heard some shouting—there were a lot of people shouting besides—I heard Churchill halloaing something like "Move out of the way," or something like that—I heard the prisoner shout—I do not know what he said—hearing the shouting I turned round—I saw the prisoner on the box of the cab, which was just behind me, to the left of me—I was behind the bands—I saw the prisoner pulling back—the horse and cab at that time were more to the left of me, more behind me—the bands were just a little in front of me, and in front of him too—the horse was going at a good trot—Churchill was pulling back, he had one rein in one hand and one in the other—from what I could see he was pulling back as hard as he could with one hand on each rein—he had not got the horse under his control, he could do nothing with it—the whip was in its right place, in its socket—the horse kept along by the side of the band and then turned into the brass band—the drum and fife was the only band playing at that time—there was good space in the road for the horse to go along.

Cross-examined. I heard the fifes playing at first with the rat-tat of the drum, and then the roll of the drums began and that frightened the horse.

ABEDNEGO TRUSTNESS . I live at 157, High Street, Dorking, and am

a baker—on the evening of Saturday, November 14, I heard the playing of bands in the High Street—I went and stood on the steps of my front door, about three steps high—I saw Churchill's horse and cab going up the street the same way as the bands—I could not see it before it came to the corner, nor before it came in just opposite me and came in collision—when it came to me they hit the drums, the horse gave a bit of a jump—the prisoner had the reins tight in his hands—the horse jumped up, holding his mouth wide open—the horse was all right till the drums struck, and was going along at a steady trot—it had been going at a very slow trot, and when the drums began the horse gave a jump—I saw the man knocked down—it is a well lighted street—there were a great quantity of people about—I saw no other cab or vans there at that time.

Cross-examined. The drums were making a great noise.

Re-examined. I did not notice how many were playing—the unfortunate man was brought into my house—I saw it knock them nearly all down.

ALBERT KNIGHT . I live at Holmwood, near Dorking, and am a coachman—on Saturday night, October 14, I was in the High Street, Dorking—I saw the bands coming in towards the town and walked with them—I saw the prisoner with his horse and cab—before he got to the bands I should think he was going at a very steady trot—I could not say the pace, about four miles an hour—he was close on the bands when I first saw him, there was no space between the horse and bands—the drums were making rather a heavy noise and the horse took a terrific plunge and reared up on his hind legs and swerved right into the bands, who were on the left side of the road—there were people all over the road—I don't think there was room enough for the prisoner to get by on that side without the people got out of the way—the horse reared and swerved—he could not try to pass on that side because the accident happened—he was in the middle of the road—the road was wide—I went and stopped the horse—the prisoner did not get off the box—the horse seemed very quiet and right enough.

Cross-examined. After I had stopped him the prisoner had hold of the reins with both hands, doing his best—the bands were bound to stop; they were knocked all over the place-they had frightened the horse, I think—I said in my evidence at Guildford he had not got the whip in his hand—I think now he did touch the horse with his whip to prevent his backing on the people—he used it to control the horse—after I had the horse he had the whip in his hand and the reins in both hands—I did not notice where the whip was before that—the hook of the curb-chain was broken, and that released the chain, and then he would not have so much control over the horse.

Re-examined. I took it off—I thought it would frighten the horse again; it was hauging.

WILLIS WATLING . I live at Dorking, and am a bricklayer—I saw the horse and cab knock the people down—I saw it when it was against Mr. Legg's, the veterinary surgeon's—it was about 10 yards from the bands then—the horse was going about a full trot, four or five miles an hour.

The Jury here intimated that they desired to stop the case, and returned a verdict of NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

156. GEORGE JARMAN (22) and JAMES HARRIS (20) , Robbery with violence on John Wilder, and stealing from his person 2s. 6d., his money.

MR. HOFFMEISTER prosecuted.

JOHN WILDER . I am a bricklayer of 28, Borough Road—22nd November, about 12 o'clock, I was at the corner of Lant Street—I had had a glass or two but I knew what I was about—there was a woman by my side, but I was not in her company—there was a dead wall on both sides and the public-house light was out—I was asked for a match, and was going to give it, when a man came behind me and put his hand in my trousers pocket—I struggled with him and another man put his hand in the other pocket—I was hit by a fist two or three times behind my head, and went down on my knees, but I got up again and struggled with them to the gutter—they got me down on my back—I said "Don't knock me about, take what I have got," but as soon as I said that I got a kick on my jaw and knew nothing for a minute or two; and my top teeth went through my bottom jaw, and there is a hard lump there, a kernel—I do not identify the prisoners because it was very dark, but I saw them when the constable came up with Jarman in custody—a florin was taken from my right trousers pocket, sixpence from the left, and I lost this comb, (produced) and this direction, which was written out for me on Monday, from my left pocket—my coat was buttoned at the top—I have not been under medical treatment, but I was in my house a week—I could not eat anything, and had to use alum and water to fasten my teeth—the two prisoners were alongside of me when the first constable came up.

JAMES HAYWOOD (Policeman M. R. 36). On 22nd November, about 11.35, I was in Blackman Street and heard a cry of "Oh!"—I ran 60 or 70 yards into Lant Street and saw a man, not the prosecutor, and a women—I saw the prosecutor at the end of Harris Street in Lant Street, a little way up the turning, leaning against a wall, with the prisoners one on each side of him—seeing blood coming from his mouth, I said, "What is the matter?"—he could not speak for a minute or two—I asked him again; he said, "I have been robbed, knocked down, and kicked after they had rifled my pockets"—I said "By who?" he said "Those men you have got"—I was holding the prisoners, and I told them they would have to go to the station; Jarman said "All right, I will go"—Harris commenced struggling and got away, and ran up to a man and woman in Lant Street, and appeared to hand them something—those were not the people I had first seen; the man ran up to me and caught hold of Jarman, I blew my whistle, Hughes ran up and I said, "Take that man, take him to the station," pointing to Harris—I took Jarman to the station—he was charged and said "I am innocent"—he said to the prosecutor, "We had several pots of beer together, Bricky, at the Hole in the Wall"—that is a public-house in Blackman Street—I said "You were not there when they turned out"—Jarman said "All right, you ask Sergeant Harvey for my character"—two pence were found on Jarman and a halfpenny on Harris—I afterwards searched the spot and found blood on the pavement and this comb and piece of paper near the blood—I asked some other men in the prisoners' hearing if they saw anything of it, they said "No, we came up when you did"—I have seen one of those men with the

prisoners, but not the other—I have frequently seen the prisoners together in Blackman Street.

Cross-examined by Jarman. I did not see you speak to the men or see you with them.

Cross-examined by Harris. I saw you with Little Mike on Sunday evening half an hour before this occurred.

Re-examined. Jarman and two or three more were with them—Jarman was holding the prosecutor's arm when I went up.

JOSEPH HUGHES (Policeman M 207). On 22nd November, about 11.30, I heard a whistle, ran up Lant Street, and saw Haywood with Jarman in custody—he said something, and I saw Harris running across the road from where Haywood and Jarman stood—I caught him, and Haywood said "Bring him to the station"—he said "You have made a mistake this time; it is not me"—about a quarter of an hour afterwards I went back and found the marks of a struggle, some blood on the pavement, and these two pieces of comb.

Cross-examined by Jarman. Haywood was struggling with you, you had hold of one another; you were trying to get away, you had hold of his arm.

JAMES HAYWOOD (Re-examined). Jarrett wrestled with me—he did not attempt to get away, but another man caught hold of him and pulled him to get him away, and he was pulling me—I do not know who the other man was, but I have seen him with a prostitute—Jarrett went quietly, but the other man was struggling to get him away.

JOHN WILDER (Re-examined). I had not been drinking with these men, I did not know them before—I am called Bricky because I am a bricklayer.

Cross-examined by Jarman. I was not at the Hole in the Wall that night—I left a friend at the Elephant and Castle at 11 o'clock.

Jarman's Defence. I was coming from the engine house and saw Wilder holding a woman; they went as far as a lamp and were talking to a young chap and two women. They were struggling, and I said to Harris "Look, she has thrown him on his face; pick him up." We picked him up and stood him against the wall. He said "I have had a knock down and a kick." A policeman came up and he gave us in charge for robbery.

Harris's Defence. I say the same. After picking the man up I put my hand against the wall to save him falling down again.

JAMES HAYWOOD (Re-examined). Wilder had been drinking—he could hardly speak on the Monday, and I thought he was drunk, but he could hardly wag his jaw, and blood was coming from his mouth—I do not think he would be likely to fall of himself.

NOT GUILTY .

157. GEORGE JARMAN and JAMES HARRIS were again indicted for assaulting John Wilder and occasioning him actual bodily harm, upon which no evidence was offered.

NOT GUILTY .

158. HENRY NASH, Unlawfully attempting to abuse Elizabeth Smith, a girl under the age of 16. MR. WHITMORE Prosecuted; MR. WILKINSON Defended.

NOT GUILTY .

159. FREDERICK CONNOR (21) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin, and having others in his possession.

MR. GOODRICH Prosecuted.

CAROLINE RICHARDSON . I am the wife of Joseph Richardson, and we keep a general shop at 45, Warrior Road, Camberwell—about 11 o'clock on the morning of 27th November the prisoner came in for some tea and tendered half-a-crown—I looked at it and told him it was a bad one—the prisoner said it was too bad, and if I would give it back he would go next door and change it—I gave it to him—a friend of mine, Mrs. Jarvis, came in at the same time; she followed him—later on I went to the police-station and found the prisoner in custody.

GEORGE RYDEWOOD . I live at 16, Castle Street, Camberwell Road—on 27th November I saw the prisoner with another man in Effra Road, by the Warrior Road, and in consequence of what Mrs. Richardson said to me I followed them into the Wyndham Road—I made a communication at the police-station.

GEORGE DEAN (Policeman P 24). At 11.30 on 27th November I saw the prisoner in the County Grove, running as hard as he could—that was about a quarter of a mile from Mrs. Richardson's shop—I heard there was something on, and I stopped him and took him to the police-station—a man named Walsh was in custody, and was discharged before the Magistrate, and the prisoner charged—about one o'clock Hall came to Camberwell station with five bad half-crowns—in consequence of what he said I went with him to a spot in the County Grove, about 100 yards from where I stopped the prisoner—he said nothing when charged.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. The coins were found on the right hand side—that was the side you were running on.

HENRY EDWARD HALL . I am a tin worker, of 71, Avenue Road, Camberwell—shortly before one o'clock on 27th November I was in the County Grove, and I picked up these half-crowns, which had been wrapped in paper, but as I picked them up the paper fell off, from being in the mud—I saw the man running past the spot where they were picked up—I gave them to Dean at the station, and then took them to the spot.

Cross-examined. I can't say I saw you near where I found them, but I saw a man running.

Re-examined. I did not see his face, but it was a man of the prisoner's stamp.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . The five half-crowns are all bad, and from three different moulds.

CAROLINE RICHARDSON (Re-examined by the COURT ). The half-crown tendered to me was darker and more shiny than a good coin—it had a duller ring, was lighter, very slippery and greasy, and grated when I rubbed it against the edge of another; it was gritty.

The Prisoner's Statement before the Magistrate. "I know nothing about the half-crowns that were found; the half-crown I had earned from a gentleman for holding his horse."

The prisoner, in his defence, denied all guilty knowledge of the half-crown he had tendered, and stated that on leaving the shop he broke it, threw the pieces away, and then ran.

GUILTY .— Ten Months' Hard Labour.

160. WILLIAM MORRIS (21) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MR. POLAND Prosecuted; MR. BLACK Defended.

AMELIA DEER . I live at the Raven and Sun public-house with Mr. Deer, who has not seen his wife for eleven years—I am the mother of his children—on 19th November, between 5 and 6 o'clock, the prisoner came in and asked for a glass of mild and bitter, price 1 1/2 d., and put down what appeared to be a half-crown—I took it up and bent it with an iron gas key in his presence, and said "This is a bad half-crown, if you want your change you will have to fetch a policman"—he said "Very well, I will fetch a policeman"—I said to the potman "Edward, stop that man, fetch me a policeman"—I could not say whether the prisoner heard it—the potman chased the prisoner, and after some little time came back with the prisoner's black felt hat—I had noticed the prisoner wearing it—I afterwards gave the hat and the half-crown to my husband—on the following Saturday week I was taken to the Southwark Police-court to see if I could identify the prisoner—I saw him in a narrow passage with about nine or ten more, and recollected him at once—I have no doubt he is the same person—he was bareheaded then.

Cross-examined. He went out within three minutes—he was quite alone—I never saw him before—we do an ordinary business—the bar was empty—I was the only person behind the bar—I could not swear to the prisoner's dress—I gave the police a description of him—I said he was a little man, sharp featured, and a little bit of fair moustache—height about 5ft. 6in.—this was a very quiet time of the day—the potman was in the taproom, not behind the bar—he saw the prisoner rush out of the door—when I took this bad half-crown I took a good look at the man so that I should know him again—I said at the police-court I was Mrs. Deer.

ALFRED JAMES DEER . I am landlord of the Raven and Sun, Tanner Street—on 19th November the last witness gave me this half-crown and black felt hat, which I took to the Bermondsey Police-station, and gave to the Inspector, with some information.

Cross-examined. It is a common hat—size 6 5/8.

EDWIN WINDLEY . I am potman at the Raven and Sun, Tanner Street—on 19th November, between five and six p.m., Mrs. Deer called me from the taproom, and I saw a man running out of the front door—from what Mrs. Deer said I ran after him—when he got outside he began to run very quickly—I ran about twenty yards and slipped down, failed to catch him, and he got away—in the pursuit the man dropped his hat, which I picked up and took back to Mrs. Deer—I did not see the man's face at all, but the prisoner is something similar to the man I went after.

Cross-examined. I was not called at the police-court to identify the prisoner.

GEORGE STANNARD . I took charge of this hat and half-crown when they were brought to the station, and afterwards gave them to Police Sergeant Brogan.

CHARLES BROGAN (Police Sergeant M). The prisoner was in custody on another charge from 21st November, and was remanded to the 28th—on that day he was placed with six or seven others at the police-court, and Amelia Deer identified him at once—the hat picked up had a ticket in it, 6 5/8—when I looked at the hat the prisoner was wearing on the 28th there was a ticket in it, 6 5/8—it was given back to the prisoner, and

the ticket has now been taken out—I did not take it out—I said in the prisoner's presence that the two tickets corresponded, and he said the hat did not fit him, and I said it did, it appeared so to me—I noticed on the 2nd December the ticket was taken out of the hat—he was charged with the uttering on the 28thNovember—he said "I am innocent, you have made a mistake."

Cross-examined. I can't say it is common for tickets to fall out of hats—Mrs. Deer did not say "I think this is the man"—she identified him at once.

ROBERT KENNY (Policeman M 205). On Saturday, 21st November, I took the prisoner into custody on a charge of assault—I took him to the station and searched him, and found on him a bad half-crown, two good florins, three sixpences, and 3 1/2 d. in bronze, good money—when I took him I heard some one in the crowd say "The prisoner is trying to throw something away," and I kept his hands from his pockets—when I found the half-crown he said he had got it in change for a postal order in the New Kent Road at a cigar shop—he was remanded on the charge of assault till the 28th, and during that time I saw the description and the information about the uttering of the half-crown, and spoke about it.

Cross-examined. There was a crowd of 50 persons perhaps, laughing and jeering—I am sure the person in the crowd said "He is trying to throw something away"—he was trying all the way to the station to get his hands to his pockets, and also to get away—he had a coat and hat on.

Re-examined. I have made inquiries, and find that there was a postal order changed on the 21st, but not in the prisoner's name.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . The two coins are both bad and from different moulds.

GUILTY . There was another indictment against the prisoner for assaulting Rose Courtney and occasioning her actual bodily harm, and also assaulting a constable in the execution of his duty.— Ten Months' Hard Labour.

161. ROBERT ALLEN (34) and WILLIAM HENRY PROUT (26), Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin and having others in their possession.

MR. BODKIN Prosecuted.

MARY ANN RAY . I am the wife of George Ray, landlord of the City Arms beershop, Borough Road—on 30th November, about 8 o'clock, the two prisoners came in there—Allen asked for two half-pints of four-ale, and put down a shilling—I gave my little girl 10d. change to give him, and saw her do so—I then saw it was a bad shilling, and took it into the parlour and put it on the shelf—when I came back the men had drunk a little of their ale and gone out—about 10 o'clock my husband came home and I gave him the shilling—shortly after 10 o'clock the same night the two prisoners came in again, and Allen called for a pot of four-ale, half of stout and mild, and a half-ounce of tobacco, amounting altogether to 7 1/2 d., and put down a good shilling in payment, and I gave him 4 1/2 d. change—my husband then fetched the police—Sergeant Martin came, and he then said to him, "This is the party that gave the missus the bad money," speaking of the two prisoners—Allen said, "I have no bad money"—they were then taken away—Prout did not speak then or on the former occasion, he walked to the opposite side away from Allen—they came in together and walked up to the counter—I have seen them

in company before, about three weeks ago—Allen has been in the habit of using my house about two years and a half—my husband gave me the bad coin and I took it to the station.

GEORGE RAY . I am the husband of the last witness—on 30th November I arrived home a few minutes before 10 o'clock, and my wife gave me a bad shilling—shortly after that the two prisoners came into the house, and in consequence of a communication made to me by my wife I fetched a police-constable and charged Allen with having passed a bad coin at 8 o'clock previously—he said, "I have no bad money on me"—he was then taken to the station—I then searched the compartment in which he had been standing and found this counterfeit half-crown—there were five or six other men in there; I knew them all—I did not charge Prout with anything, as I knew him—I gave the shilling and half-crown to the missus, and she gave them to the constable—I had broken the shilling with my fingers before they came in the second time.

Cross-examined by Allen. I did not hit you and knock you against the door—I assisted the constable to arrest you.

By the COURT. The two prisoners have been in and out of my house together for about three weeks.

THOMAS LANGDON . I am a tailor and live at 30, Union Road, London Road, I know Allen—on 26th November I was sitting in Mr. Ray's house, and the prisoner called me out into the yard and showed me a base half-crown, and asked me whether I could do with it—I said "No, not on any consideration"—he then asked me which way I was going—I said I was going over the water—he said, "I am going that way"—I said, "I am going to work"—I saw no more of the half-crown.

Cross-examined by Allen. You did not ask me what I was going to back, there was no race that day—I have been away about 11 weeks to see some friends at Sheffield and Derby—I had not been to Newmarket—I worked for Government Stores about four months ago—I have not been betting—I have only gone to races for pleasure sometimes.

By the JURY. I do not know he is a racing man—the half-crown he showed me was bad.

FANNY GODFREY . I am employed at 104, High Street, Peckham, a confectioner's—on 2nd November Allen came into the shop alone and asked for some sweets, I served him, he put down a bad shilling—I asked him if he bad another, he said he had one, and said, "What is the matter with it?"—I said it was bad, he then gave me a good one, and I gave him his change—I next saw him two days after at the station with others and identified him.

By the COURT. I tested the coin on a piece of slate; it marked greasy and looked leady.

GEORGE MARTIN (Police Sergeant M). On 30th November, about half-past 10, I was called to the City Arms—I went there in company with Police Constable 309—Mr. Ray entered first and caught hold of Allen and said "This is the man"—he then began to struggle to get his hands into his coat pocket—Mr. Ray and I secured him and handcuffed his hands behind him—Mr. Ray did not knock him against the wall; we struggled—he might have been struck in the struggle, he was not near the door by about a yard—he said "What is this for?"—I said "For bad money"—I took this down immediately after I got to the station—I

then commenced to search him—he said "I have no bad money"—Mr. Ray said "You scoundrel, to do this after the way I have behaved to you"—Allen said "I know, you have behaved like a gentleman to me; I never gave you a bad shilling"—on the way to the station he repeated "What is this for?"—I said "You appear to know, you have mentioned about bad money"—he then said "Yes"—at the station this bad shilling and new shilling were produced by Mrs. Ray, the new one has been bitten and knocked about, but it is a good one—Allen asked me to take it and see if it was bad—I said "I think it is" (it was not then knocked about so much as it is now), "but I will have it tested in the morning"—I had it tested, and it proved to be good—I searched them there, and on Allen found 1s. 0 3/4 d., two threepenny-pieces, four shillings, and two sixpences, a bag containing sweets in the name of Harbon, 184, High Street, Peckham, another packet of sweets from Winter's, 94A, Queen's Road, Peckham, two scones in a bag with the name F. Horne, 77, Queen's Road, Peckham, and one scone, with the name Kennedy, 107A, Queen's Road, Peckham; those shops are all close to each other—when at the beershop Mrs. Ray pointed out Prout as the other man, and I directed Police Constable 309 to detain him—at the station I searched him, and on him found a plain paper bag with two scones in it, 1s. 5d. in bronze, and two sixpences and three shillings, all good money.

Cross-examined. I thought it rather strange that you should repeat what you had said in the public-house—these shops were all within half a mile.

GARROD (Policeman M. 309). On 30th November I went with Sergeant Martin to the City Arms, and from certain information given me there I arrested Prout—while doing so he said he did not know what it was for—I then took him to the station.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . This half-crown and this fragment of a shilling are all bad—the test of marking with a bad coin on a slate is a very old and good one—this other shilling is a good one.

The prisoners received a good character.

PROUT— NOT GUILTY . ALLEN— GUILTY of uttering .— Twelve Months' Hard Labour.

162. EDWARD POLLARD (20) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MESSRS. POLAND and BODKIN Prosecuted; MR. BLACK Defended.

LILY ELLIS . I am barmaid at the Pelican, Southwark Street—on Monday, 9th November, the prisoner came in about 6 p.m. with another man, and they had three-halfpennyworth of rum and half a pint of ale—he gave me a half-crown in payment—I gave him change, and put the half-crown in the till—the prisoner stayed a few minutes, and went away—there was no other half-crown in the till where I put this one—a few minutes after Mrs. Arms went to the till and called my attention to a half-crown—I had put some coppers in in the interval, no half-crown, and I think no one else had been to it—I saw that was the only half-crown there; that was put on the shelf at the side—on 12th November the prisoner came again with a man, who gave the name of Wilshire—the prisoner asked for the same drinks as before, and gave a half-crown—I looked at it, found it was similar to the other one, and showed it to Mrs. Arms at the end of the bar, and she sent the potman for a constable—I recognised the prisoner directly he came in—Mrs. Arms told him the half-

crown was bad; he said he did not know it was bad—I told him about his having been there on the Monday—he denied it—I told him I was quite sure he was the same man—he wore a long coat each time and a hard felt hat—I have no doubt about him.

Cross-examined. The first time was Lord Mayor's night; we were very busy—I could see no other half-crown was put in—we take no money out of that till, change is taken from the shelf—I could see all the money in the till, and am sure no other half-crown was there—the man with the prisoner was rather a short man—Mr. and Mrs. Arms described him to the police—Mrs. Arms told me on the Monday night to watch and serve the prisoner with drink and see what money he gave me—I don't know if I ever saw the prisoner before that Monday—I did not know he had given me bad money till Mrs. Arms called my attention to it—when I accused the prisoner he said the coin he gave me on the Monday was good.

ELIZABETH ARMS . I am the wife of John Arms, of the Pelican, Southwark Street—on 9th November I was with the last witness serving in the bar about 6.30—I went to the till and saw only one half-crown there—I called Miss Ellis's attention to it, and said she had a bad half-crown—I took it up, looked at it, bent it in the tester, and found it was bad—I had not put a half-crown in the till recently that night—we keep change on a rack at the back—the half-crown was taken change of—on the 12th, about 10.30, the prisoner was there with another man, when Miss Ellis brought me a half-crown and spoke to me—I sent the potman for a constable, and then said to the prisoner and the other man, "I shall detain you for giving the barmaid a bad half-crown"—he said, "No, I have not"—I said, "Yes you have, and you passed one on Monday night"—I produced the half-crown that was passed on Monday night—the prisoner said he was not there at all on Monday night—I had not seen him there—they were taken into custody—the other man was discharged—I gave the two half-crowns to Constable Nicholls.

Cross-examined. The rack is beside the till—we always keep enough change on the rack—there was 4l. 10s. in the till and only one half-crown there, I am sure of that—sometimes we might give change from there—we were not very busy at that time—it was not very long before I discovered the bad half-crown—Miss Ellis said, "I shall know him again" without hesitation—the prisoner did not attempt to run away—he said he did not know it was bad, and denied being there on a former night.

JOHN NICHOLS (Policeman M. 266). I was called to the Pelican on this night; the prisoner and another man were there—Ellis said, pointing to the prisoner, "This man is trying to pass a bad half-crown to-night, and he passed one on Monday night"—the prisoner said he was not there on Monday night—I searched and found no money on him—I found 6d. on Wilshire and a knife and key on the prisoner—I said I should detain them, and sent for another constable—Wilshire was discharged by the Magistrate—when I told the prisoner I should take him to the station he said, "All right, I have a friend inside," pointing to Wilshire—I went and told Wilshire he would have to go too—Pollard gave me a correct address—I produced these two half-crowns.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . These two half-crowns are both bad and cast in the same mould.

—GARDINER. I live at 17, Ewer Street, Union Street, and am a potman at the Roebuck in Union Street—I know the prisoner since I have been at the Roebuck, which house the prisoner uses as a rule—on 9th November, Lord Mayor's Night, about 4 o'clock, I went for a ride with him in Mr. Wilshire, his governor's trap—we met a couple of girls, and went up Fleet Street, by King William's statue, up the Haymarket and Regent Street, past the illuminations, and then down Oxford Street—we called at two public-houses—we turned off down Theobald's Road, and went to see the ruins of the fire in Wilderness Row; then we drove round St. Paul's, and over to Southwark, arriving back about 8 o'clock—the prisoner drove me up to the Roebuck, and left me there to attend to my duties at 8 or half-past.

Cross-examined. We started to drive from the Roebuck—I got leave of absence—the prisoner came in the Roebuck on Monday and asked me to have a drive—it was a traveller's trap employed by Mr. Wilshire—we got the two young ladies from Gravel Lane—I knew them before—one is a barmaid—the prisoner drove—I went into the Pelican—the prisoner was not with me—it was after 10 o'clock—I have been in once or twice there, not with the prisoner—I have been to see the landlord, Mr. Arms—I have not asked him if he remembered my coming to his house with the prisoner on the 9th—the inspector has been to see me about this—I did not tell him that I had been to the Pelican on the Monday with Pollard, or that I held the door open for Pollard to enter—I have never been to the Pelican with the prisoner—we started from the Roebuck for this drive about four—the Pelican is from 200 to 250 yards from the Roebuck—it was difficult to get through Fleet Street—we walked the horse—I did not tell Mrs. Pollard on 18th November that I was in the Pelican about 7 o'clock with Pollard on Lord Mayor's Day—I don't understand what you are referring to.

Re-examined. I had no conversation with Mrs. Arms on the 18th—I don't know that I was there on the 18th.

By MR. POLAND. I did not go to the Pelican at all on the 18th.

Witness in Reply.

MRS. ARMS (Re-examined). On the 18th, about five minutes to 11, Gardiner came to the Pelican, and had something to drink—he stopped some time, and as he was going out he said, "I shall come and see you to-morrow evening"—my husband did not know what it meant—I said, "This is the witness for Pollard"—Mr. Arms said, "I do not know anything of the case; I was not at home when it happened"—Gardiner said, "Don't you remember my coming here with Pollard and two girls on Monday night, and having some bread and cheese"—Mr. Arms said, "No; I don't remember anything about it"—Gardiner said, "We were here just before seven."

By MR. BLACK. This was Wednesday, the day that the prisoner was committed for trial—I had not seen the prisoner with Gardiner—I did did not know Gardiner till I saw him at the police-station.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Strongly recommended to mercy on account of his previous good character.— Discharged on his father's recognisances in 30l, to come up for judgment when called on.

163. JOHN WILLIAMS, (21) , Unlawfully uttering counterfeit coin.

MR. GOODRICH Prosecuted.

THOMAS SKEETS . I am a tobacconist, at 207, Waterloo Road—on 5th December, at six p.m., the prisoner came into the shop and asked for half an ounce of tobacco, and tendered a florin in payment—I threw it down and said, "This won't do for me"—he then took a good one out of his purse—I gave him 1s. 6d. and 4d. in coppers change, and he went away—later in the evening a man named Lumb, from my other shop lower down the road, brought the prisoner in, and said he had tendered a bad coin there—I said he was in my shop an hour ago—I am quite sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. I said to the policeman, "He has got a black eye since he came into my shop before"—to the best of my belief you are the man—it was about a quarter to six when you came in—you are the man.

THOMAS GEAR . I was in the last witness's shop on Saturday, the 5th—I saw the prisoner come in—when he left I followed him outside the door—next day, the 6th, I was taken to the Southwark Police-court and picked him out from several others—to the best of my belief he is the man.

Cross-examined. It was about six o'clock I saw you at Mr. Skeets's—he sent me to see if any one was with you.

ELIZA SKEETS . I am the wife of Thomas Skeets, and manage the shop at 162, Waterloo Road—between seven and eight on 5th December the prisoner came in for half an ounce of tobacco, and tendered a 2s. piece—I went inside to see if the children were there, as I thought I would send for a policeman, because I thought it was the same man that gave me one on Wednesday—I came back to the shop, and said, "You gave me a bad 2s. piece"—he did not answer—I said, "You gave me one here on the Wednesday, a half-crown"—he said, "I might have been in on the Wednesday, but it was not me who gave the bad money"—Mr. Lumb, a friend, came in—I said, "This man has just given me this 2s. piece, which is bad, and I believe he is the one that gave the girl the one on Wednesday"—the prisoner ran out of the shop as fast as he could, and Lumb ran after him—I saw the prisoner again at the police-court on the Monday—I am sure he is the man that came in on Saturday—I am not quite sure about the Wednesday; on that day my daughter was serving.

Cross-examined. When I told you it was bad on the Wednesday you paid with a good shilling—you picked up the change and ran away—I could not swear you were in my shop on the Wednesday—I have seen you in my shop before, I cannot swear whether with bad money.

RICHARD LUMB . I live at 14, Penfold Road, Hackney, and was staying with Mr. Skeets at Waterloo Road—on this night I entered, the shop and saw Mrs. Skeets and the prisoner there—when I got behind the counter she put the two-shilling piece into my hand and said, "This man has passed a bad two-shilling piece"—I said, "Are you sure?"—she said "Yes," and gave it to me—the prisoner put his hat on and ran out of the shop; I ran after him and caught him—he said, "Here you are, old boy," and put a purse and half an ounce of tobacco into my hand—I gave the florin to the policeman.

Cross-examined. You went quietly with me till I got a policeman.

WILLIAM HINES (Policeman L 21). On this night, about half-past 6,

I met the prisoner and last witness, who gave the prisoner into my custody for tendering a bad florin—he gave me the bad florin—I found on the prisoner a piper and a pen, no further bad money—I found a purse on him with 6d. in silver and 4d. bronze—Mr. Skeets said he was the man who had uttered a bad florin to him earlier in the evening—when charged the prisoner said Skeets had denied his having a black eye when he came into the shop earlier; the prisoner said he could prove he had had it before—the prisoner replied "All right" to the charge.

Cross-examined. I found you gave your lodging address correct—I inquired there about your having a black eye.

WILLIAM JOHN WEBSTER . This is a counterfeit florin.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the shop that evening. I got too much to drink, and got a black eye because of it.

THOMAS SKEETS (Re-examined by the COURT ). The coin tendered to me was light, and had a peculiar greasy feel.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. I cannot say that this is the same two-shilling piece.

GUILTY .*— Nine Months' Hard Labour.

Before Mr. Recorder.

164. CHARLES SCOTT (34), JAMES HYETT (36), and FREDERICK ELLIS (32) , Feloniously forging and counterfeiting on a silver-gilt watch case the mark of the Guardians of the Standard of Wrought Plate in Birmingham.

MESSRS. POLAND and MEAD Prosecuted; MR. BURNIE appeared for Hyett,

and MR. GEOGHEGAN for Ellis.

CHARLES PHILLIPS . I am a warehouseman at Commercial Road, Lambeth—I did live at 24, Commercial Road—I know Ellis as coming there five or six months ago buying the old sacking which was useless, and which was used in our business—he came on November 9, towards evening, and after speaking generally about the stock, he said "I know a party who has got a good gold watch; you had better buy it," and next evening he brought Hyett, and said "I have got the man here with the watch"—I did not know then there was a confederate outside—I said "Wait till I have done, we will go over to No. 29," that is my parents' house—I live at 24—when I had done work I went to my mother's house with Ellis and Hyett—we went down into the front kitchen, and Hyett produced this watch—they both said that it was 18 carat gold, and any one who got it had got a good gold watch—they pointed out the hall-marks—Hyett said that he had made several watches at Lord Mayor's show, and had often made some—I handled the watch, but did not make an offer for it at that time—they said they could get 3l. 10s. for it by putting it in the pot down the Lane, and they thought I was an old dealer—they said they had taken watches down the Lane before and got the money put into their hands, what they liked—Hyett said "I must give a little to this man; I share the money with him"—my mother came in while they were there and went to the copper, but went out again—soon afterwards I told them to go to No. 24; that is a coffee shop, and I would follow them there—another man who is not in custody joined them there—he said it was a good gold watch, 18 carat gold, and offered them 2l. for it, but only 5s. down that night; they said "No," and I paid for the tea and left them, and between 8 and 9 o'clock in the morning I spoke to

Police-sergeant Ward—I afterwards wrote a letter to Ellis; he had left his address on a previous occasion—I saw him again on 13th November it the office—he said "They are here with the watch"—I said "All right"—he stood some time outside the place, and asked me if I was not coming to see it—he waited till about six o'olock—I said, "Wait till I am done"—he suggested a meeting at the Glasshouse public-house, because it had a double entrance—that is near where I work—I went there with Ellis and Scott, and Hyett was there—that was the first time I had seen Scott—Hyett produced the watch and said it was a good gold watch, and Scott and Ellis—I said, "Is it the same watch as you gave me the other night?"—Ellis used bad language and said, "Do you think we should deceive you?"—they asked 5l. 10s. for it; I offered them 4l. 10s.—it was opened in the public-house, and the marks shown in Scott's presence—they all kept round to keep it close—they all said it was 18 carat gold—I put it in my left pocket, walked out into the street under the lamp, and looked at the hall marks there, and we all looked at them—they again assured me that it was an 18 carat gold watch—I walked forward with my hand in my pocket, as though I was going to pay the 4l. 10s., and shouted out, "I have got it," and put one hand on Hyett, and Boswell took him—I put my hand on Ellis; he tried to shake me off, but the sergeant blew his whistle, and a man in uniform brought him back—Boswell detained Scott and Hyett, and they were taken to the station.

Cross-examined by Scott. I do not remember seeing you with the watch in your hand, but you saw it when it was shown to me, and you said it was an 18-carat watch.

Cross-examined by MR. BURNIE. When I went with Ellis first I did not intend to buy a stolen watch; if it had been a good gold watch I could not have bought it then because I had not got the money—I am sure I remember the exact words that Ellis said, but I do not remember what I told the Magistrate—I told him the same as I have told this morning. (The witness in his deposition stated that Ellis said "I know a party who hat got a good gold watch.") They both said it at my mother's house, that it was a good 18-carat watch—I cannot say whether I said before the Magistrate that Hyett said it was an 18-carat watch—I did not say it so many times as they said it, but they reiterated it—they sometimes said "Good gold" and sometimes "18-carat gold"—I told the Magistrate that they said it once at my mother's house—there is a lot which I did not tell the Magistrate—I told the Magistrate that they said at my mother's house that it was an 18-carat watch—when they said they got it at Lord Mayor's Show I made up my mind to communicate with the police—I did not think it was not gold then; I did not suspect in was not gold until they were in custody—when Hyett told me he made it at Lord Mayor's Show I was rather surprised at his offering to take 2l. for it—I have since ascertained that it is only worth 10s.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. I did not know the detectives Ward or Boswell before—this is the first time I have ever given information to the police about a case—I believed all through it was a gold watch until they were in custody—I am wearing a watch and a pin, but it does not make a man know what jewellery is to wear it—this is a Blue Ribbon pin I have on; I always wear that on principle—I had no opportunity of testing this watch—I have known Ellis about four years,

and we have done business together in buying sacks; he has been to the foreman; I am head servant; he has come to sell books—I was not surprised at his coming to sell this to me, because he seemed to think I was connected with those who go about making watches—I cannot say whether I had this pin on then.

Re-examined. I do not wear this pin when I am at work—I said at the police-court in answer to Hyett, "I did not say it was a silver watch, I said it was 18-carat gold."

FANNY PHILLIPS . I live with my husband at 29, Commercial Road, Lambeth; the last witness is my son—I went into the kitchen on November 10th and saw him there with two men—Ellis is one of them—Ellis had a gold watch in his hand, and a man with a red necktie showed my son the marks on it, that he might be sure it was a gold watch—he said, "It is a gold watch, you may be sure," pointing out the marks, and I went down to the kitchen and said, "Come away, Charley, what are you doing there?"—they afterwards left.

FRANCIS BOSWELL (Police Sergeant). I called on Phillips on 13th November, heard a communication from him, and followed him into Broad Street, Commercial Road—he went into the Glasshouse, and after a little while came out with the three prisoners; they went under a gas lamp, and I saw them examining something—I saw Phillips put something in his pocket; he came towards me, pointed to Hyett, and said "That is the man"—I seized Hyett, and Ellis and Scott ran away—Hyett struggled very much, took something from his pocket and tried to put it into his mouth—I snatched it from him, and put it in my pocket, and said "Where did you get that watch?"—he said "I shan't tell you"—they struggled, and used every effort in their power to get away—Scott was brought back by a uniform man, and when we had just entered the station Scott said "I bought it at Johnson and Dymond's; I deal in them"—Hyett said "I bought them at Johnson and Dymond's under the hammer; I am a jewellery dealer; I have plenty of such goods"—Scott said "I never came over here before to-night"—Sergeant Ward said "How much did you give for the watch?"—Hyett said "I decline to give you any information, I don't want to sell it"—I pulled from my pocket the paper he endeavoured to put into his mouth; it was two Bank of Engraving notes and a gilt farthing—he said "Oh, they are nothing, I would not give a penny for them"—I said "It will be necessary for me to make inquiry at Johnson and Dymond's; when did you buy this?"—he said "Last Friday, a week ago"—this was on a Thursday—I searched Hyett and found 14 pawn tickets, a metal chain, a pair of metal ear-rings, and several scraps of paper; and on Scott five pawn tickets—Hyett gave his address, 8, North Street, Cambridge Heath—I went there and searched and found this watch (produced)—it has a silver bow—it is marked 18/18✗, and two marks which I don't understand—I took two pawn tickets which I found on Hyett and redeemed the property—I redeemed this ring; it is marked with an anchor—that is genuine; I have seen several rings like it—I have been round to several pawnbrokers, who produced rings with the same mark pawned for 3s.—next day, as Hyett left the Court, he turned round to me and the prosecutor and said "I told him it was silver, and he knew it"—they were merely charged with unlawful possession of the watch—I did not think the marks were forged.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. I never heard of the Company offering a reward for a conviction, not even in London, where the Gold-smiths' Company prosecute—I have seen the watch they tried to sell at Phillips's—it is silver.

ROBERT SMITH (Policeman L 167). On 13th Nov. I was on duty in Commercial Buildings; I heard a whistle from Broad Street, and a cry of "Stop him"—I saw Scott running down Broad Street—a gentleman stopped him, and I ran and took him—before I spoke he said,"All right, Sir, I am not guilty"—I took him back about 200 yards to where the others were standing, and then to the station.

Cross-examined by MR. BURNIE. I noticed that the prisoner had a revolver, but I did not hear him say that he had one—it was said after he ran away.

FRANCIS BOSWELL (Re-examined.) I heard the prisoner say that he had a revolver, and he had one.

ALFRED WARD (Police Sergeant L). On November 10th Phillips made a communication to me, and I was at the station on the 13th when Boswell brought in the prisoner—I said to Hyett, "What have you given for this watch?"—he said, "I decline to give you any information, I don't want to sell it"—Scott then said, "The watch is worth 5l., you can purchase any amount of them at Dymond and Johnson's"—Scott said next day on the conclusion of the magisterial hearing, "The watch is a silver gilt one, and worth 30s. "—I saw the tickets found on Hyett, I redeemed one of the articles pawned for 3s.—this is it: it has the Birmingham anchor—this is a correct representation of the Birmingham Hall mark.

HENRY WESTWOOD .—I am warden of the Birmingham Assay Office, New Hall Street, Birmingham—the name of the Society is "The Company of the Guardians of the Standard of Wrought Plate"—the duly is cast upon them to mark gold watches and other articles—the marks on this watch produced by Phillips are an imitation of those we used 10 years ago—we now use the crown and "18," that shows that it is 18-carat gold—the anchor is the mark which the Birmingham Society are authorised to use—we have a letter for each year, and the letter Z which I see here indicates 1874-75—those marks are forged—the anchor and the letter and the "375" on one of these rings is genuine, but the letter is so bad I cannot read it—that is not the letter for this year, but for some years ago—we are now using K in another alphabet—these are genuine marks—the figures show the standards, 15 carats; we do not put the crown for anything under 18—I see "18" on the bow of this watch (Found at Hyett's)—I have compared it with the "18" on Phillips's watch, and I think they are marked by the same punch.

Cross-examined by MR. BURNIE. Both the marks are genuine, there-fore, of course, they are genuine 15 carat gold—the letter on one is indistinct, and I cannot speak to it, but it is "V" and not "Z"—these are six Companies altogether authorised to assay gold and silver; five besides the Goldsmiths' Company; each has its own mark, the letter of which varies from year to year—we have a cycle of 26 years according to the alphabet, and then we begin over again.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. The crown is not the special mark of our Company; it is common to all—I agree with Mr. Robinson that the special property of the Goldsmiths' Company is the crown; that

is the local mark—we only use it in combination with the figures 18 and 22—Sheffield is the crown alone—they do not use the leopard's head and a letter; that is the London mark—the London Company use the crown; this is the local mark—I come from Birmingham—I have seen a good deal of electro-plate; it bears several marks—the probable reason for stamping it is to give it a resemblance to silver—the large firms, like Mappin and Webb, and Elkington, do not make an imitation of our mark—it is a question of degree whether we prosecute, whether it resembles our own—I believe the watch is silver; it does not bear the usual silver marks—the anchor is impressed on silver, and it is here—the Queen's head is not impressed on silver watch cases, nor is the crown—the marks on this watch case are the crown, 18, the anchor, and a letter—the anchor is probably the silver mark—the crown is not rightly on it, because it is only placed on 18-carat gold—in this combination the lion is the distinguishing silver mark, but that only denotes the standard—it is very simple to tell whether the marks are real or not—I have heard that the Goldsmiths' Company in London offer a reward; the other Companies do not to my knowledge.

Re-examined. Mappin and Webb do not put the anchor on electro-plated goods, or the crown on silver—firms sometimes put their own initials but not these particular marks.

WILLIAM STOCKER . I am a watch maker and jeweller of 169, Waterloo Road—this watch of Phillips's is worth about 10s.—I believe it is silver-gilt—it is worn out—if it was gold it would be worth about 5l.—I have examined it carefully—there is a trace of a silver mark, where the lion was the crown is now, and it is my firm belief that the lion has been removed and the crown put in its place—it is marked "18" on the bow—I agree with Mr. Westwood that they are done with the same punch—the second watch is common brass, not silver.

Cross-examined by MR. BURNIE. The second watch is only stamped 18, ordinary persons would imagine that that meant 18 carat gold—I have seen some gold chains with 18 stamped on each link, but they have not always been 18 carat gold.

Cross-examined by MR. GEOGHEGAN. I have seen men selling gold chains for one penny; they are sometimes stamped "18" but not with the lion; you can't buy watches and chains stamped quite in the same way in Clerken-well—I have seen this ring, it is apparently a diamond, the gold is genuine, it is worth 2s. or 3s.

Re-examined. "18" signifies 18 carat gold.

JAMFS CLIFFORD . I am a porter at Johnson and Dymond's the auctioneers; they have periodical sales of jewellery and other things—I produce their catalogue of Friday. November 6th; there is not a silver-gilt watch in it; there is only one gold watch, that has the name of Johnson on it, and Jones is on this watch; that watch was not sold, therefore it cannot be this one.

Cross-examined by MR. BURNIE. They sometimes add lots to the catalogue—I only speak from looking at this catalogue—hundreds of people come to the auction rooms, and what they buy of us the majority of them buy under the hammer, but people sell to one another in the rooms.

Cross-examined by Scott. I know you—I never saw you buy anything spurious in your life—I have seen you buy under the hammer.

Re-examined. I was in charge of this sale on Friday—I went by the

catalogue—I have no memorandum on my catalogue of that sale of such a watch as this.

WILLIAM MUSGROVE (Policeman P). I have known Scott about ten years as a dealer in spurious jewellery, and a seller in pawn-tickets, and Hyett about the same time, he follows a similar occupation during the winter.

Cross-examined by Scott. I never saw you buy any bad jewellery, but I have seen you with some at Hopkins's—I never knew you in trouble.

Cross-examined by Hyett. I never knew you to be in trouble.

Scott's Defence. I met these people coming over Waterloo Bridge; they said they were going to sell a watch, and asked me to accompany them. Mr. Phillips came in and treated us to some ginger beer. He went downstairs and I followed him, and saw him with the watch. He pulled out a revolver, and that is what made me run.

SCOTT and HYETT— GUILTY .— Twelve Months' Hard Labour each. ELLIS— NOT GUILTY .

165. ALEXANDER COLE (37) PLEADED GUILTY to feloniously forging and uttering a security for payment of 165l., with intent to defraud. (He received a good character.)— Twelve Months' Hard Labour. And

166. DAVID JOHN CRICHTON (42) to feloniously marrying Isabella Martha Scarf, his wife being alive.— [Pleaded guilty: See original trial image.] Judgment respited.

ADJOURNED TO MONDAY 11TH, 1886.