Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 23 October 2014), January 1734, trial of James Macdowald (t17340116-38).

James Macdowald, Violent Theft > highway robbery, 16th January 1734.

48. James Macdowald , was indicted for assaulting Susan Cox , on the Highway, putting hera in Fear, and taking from her a silk Purse, Guinea, and a Queen Elizabeth's sixpence , Dec. 27 .

Mary Bales . On the 27th of December, between 8 and 9 in the Morning, I was going with Mrs. Cox, in Dr. Mead's Coach from Kensington, to St. Albans - Near Kensington-Gravel-Pits , the Prisoner rode up to the Coachman, and bid him stand, which the Coachman not minding, the Prisoner call'd out again, Stand! and then the Coachman stopt, and the Prisoner came to the Coach-door with a Pistol in his Hand, and demanded our Money and Watches; we were in a great Fright. Mrs. Cox said, Pray Sir be easy, you shall have what we have, and pulling out a red Silk-purse, she gave it him; but I don't know what was in it. I know she had a Queen Elizabeth's Six-pence, which she us'd to carry in that Purse, but as the Purse was not open'd, I did not see it then - The Coach glass was half up when he came to the Door, but he bid us put it down, and I did, and then, as I said, he demanded our Watches; Mrs. Cox told him she had none; and I said I had none neither, for I was but a Servant. He answer'd, God damn you, I saw your Watches in the Morning - When he had got the Purse, he look'd both Ways and went off. I cry'd, Stop Highwayman: Mrs. Cox's Servant rid after him - A Ploughman threw his Staff at him, and he was taken soon after - I am sure this is Mrs. Cox's Purse, and this is her Queen Elizabeth's Six-pence, for I have often seen them both, and am positive the Prisoner is the Man.

John Keen . I was on Horseback before the Coach - The Prisoner rid up to the Coach door, before you come to Bay's-Water by the Gravel-Pitts, I heard him demand their Watches, and I am certain he's the Man that robb'd my Lady, Mrs. Cox - When he left the Coach, they cry'd, Highwayman, and I pursu'd him to Brompton, where he quitted the Horse, and was taken by a Farmer and another Man in a Garden - Indeed my Horse tumbled, and I lost fight of him for a little while, but I saw him again just after he had dismounted.

James Hutchins . Coming from Little-Chelsea, on Thursday in Christmas Week, I saw Thomas Ruberry riding hard over the Field; What's the Matter, says I, A Highwayman! says he. Then I saw the Prisoner run to the Pallisades of a Garden and get over, and when I came to the Pallisades, he he was creeping under some Elm tree Boughs to hide himself. I got over, and he came to me, and said he was my Prisoner, and a dead Men. I collar'd him, and led him four Rod by myself, and then Perrin and Tarrant came to me. We search'd him, and found this red Silk-purse in his right Pocket. There was a Guinea, a Queen Elizabeth's Sixpence - I believe this is the same - and some other Silver in it - Going to the Justice's he begg'd me not to let the Justice see the Purse.

Prisoner. You took more Money from me Twenty Shillings out of my Coat Pocket.

Hutchins. The Money was all put together before the Justice.

John Perrin . As I was going home, in Ayre's Court, in Kensington Parish, I heard a Noise of Highwayman! and mounting my Horse, I pursu'd and got Sight of him in the Garden. I quitted my Horse, and leap'd over the Pales - Hutchins was with me, and the Prisoner said he was our Prisoner, and desir'd us not to abuse him.

Joseph Griffin . The Lady's Servant follow'd the Prisoner up Earl's-Court-Lane, by Holland-Walk, but his Horse falling, he lost sight of the Prisoner, and I made the best of my way to the Turnpike to give Notice.

Joseph Biggs . I was at Plough at Bay's-Water-Hill. A Lad ( Robin Spencer ) stopt his Cart, and said, There's a Highwayman! I turn'd about, and saw the Prisoner's Head in the Coach, and coming from it he put his Hand in his right Pocket. I catch'd up my Plough-staff and made up to him, and coming pretty near I threw my Staff at him; he bob'd his Head, and off dropp'd his Hat and Wig. I am not sure hit them off, but if he had not bob'd I should have knock'd him down - There's the Hat with the Dirt upon it, but I did not take up the Wig. I ask'd the Lady, If she was robb'd? She said, Yes, of a Purse and some Money. Why then, says I to the Servant, for God's Sake, why don't you follow him, for he can't go far? And so he set Spurs to his Horse - The Prisoner had a Pistol in his Hand when he pass'd me, but he dropped it 20 or 30 Yards beyond me by the white Gates, and a Waggoner took it up - After the Prisoner was taken he own'd this to be his Hat.

William Atwood . The Case is this - I live at Brompton. And as my Man Sanders and I were at work in my Yard, we heard Words. Two Women were with the Prisoner, and he was discoursing them to take his Mare. So I goes up to him, and he was very dirty and his Mare too, and says he, I beg of you, Sir, to take my Mare, and my Whip, and my Great-Coat, and I beg you, Sir, not to say which way I am gone, for I am a dead Man. So I took care of the Whip and the Great-Coat, and gave the Mare to my Man to put into my Stable, and then I pursu'd the Prisoner, and found he was taken in the Garden by Perrin, and Hutchins, and Tarrat - He had no Hat nor Wig on, but only a red Cap. There was a Guinea, a Crown, a half Crown, a Queen Elizabeth's Six-pence, and some other Silver - Here's the Coat and Whip.

Prisoner. Did not I fling a Watch, some Silver, and a half Guinea upon the Great-Coat?

Thomas Tarrat . The Lady's Man stopp'd at our Door, and enquir'd if we did not see a Highwayman upon a grey Mare. Says my Wife, There he goes. Perrin jump'd over the Pales, and seiz'd him first, and Hutchins took hold of him soon after *. A silk Purse was taken from the Prisoner with a Guinea, a Crown, a half Crown, Six pence and three Farthings.

* Hutchins swears that he himself was the first who seiz'd the Prisoner.

Edward Banks . Riding from Kensington Gravel-pits, I saw the Lady's Servant pursuing the Prisoner, and he call'd out for God's sake stop him. And the Prisoner cry'd, for God's sake let me pass, which I did, as fearing he had Fire-arms, tho' when he had got about 100 Yards, I follow'd, and thought I should have overtaken him, but he turn'd up Earl's-Court-Lane, and made towards Brompton a Village about a Quarter or a Mile from thence, and I lost Sight of him.

Robert Chester , Constable. I follow'd the Prisoner to Brompton, and took him into Custody; he pray'd me to keep him from the Mob, and lend him a Bible. I told him I had none about me, but he should have one, and other good Books at my House. I carry'd him before Justice Vincent, who made his Mittimus to Newgate. I thought it was then too late, and unsafe to carry him thither that Evening, and so I kept him all Night in my own House, and next Morning carry'd him in a Coach to Newgate. By the Way he own'd to me that he had robb'd Mrs. Cox - There was a Report that one Downs a Baker who had done it, but that was a Mistake.

The Jury found him guilty . Death .