Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 28 November 2014), Ordinary of Newgate's Account, August 1749 (OA17490804).

Ordinary's Account, 4th August 1749.

THE ORDINARY of NEWGATE'S ACCOUNT of the Behaviour, Confession, & Dying Words Of the SEVEN MALEFACTORS Who were executed at TYBURN On Friday the 4th of AUGUST, 1749.

BEING THE Fifth EXECUTION in the MAYORALTY OF THE Right Honble Sir William Calvert, Knt . LORD-MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON.

NUMBER V. For the said YEAR.

LONDON:

Printed for, and sold by T. PARKER, in Jewin-street, and C. CORBETT, over-against St. Dunstan's Church, in Fleet-street, the only authorised Printers of the Dying Speeches.

M.DCC.XLIX.

[Price Six-pence.]

THE ORDINARY of NEWGATE'S ACCOUNT of the Behaviour, Confession, &c.

By Virtue of the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER, and TERMINER, and Goal-Delivery of Newgate, held before the Right honourable Sir WILLIAM CALVERT , Knight , Lord-Mayor of the City of London; the Right Honourable the Lord Chief Baron PARKER, Mr. Justice FOSTER, RICHARD ADAMS , Esq ; Recorder , and other of his Majesty's Justices of OYER, and TERMINER, for the said City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex, at Justice Hall in the Old Bailey, on Wednesday the 5th, Thursday the 6th, Friday the 7th, Saturday the 8th, and Monday the 10th of July, in the 23d Year of his Majesty's Reign; JOHN STEWART, JOHN POE, WILLIAM SHEPPHERD, JOHN FRYER, MARGARET HARVEY, JOHN GRAY, VALENTINE GODWIN, JAMES JOHNSON, JOHN PALMER, URIAH CREED, RICHARD MAPESDEN, and ANTHONY DUN, were capitally convicted, and received Sentence of Death accordingly.

While they have been in this unhappy Situation from the just Censures of the Law, I was constantly wont to be at Prayers with them in the Chapel every Day which they seemed devoutly to attend; And after Prayers one or other of them in their turns had such Admonition and Instruction given them, as to the best of my knowledge appeared to be necessary and proper for bringing them to a Sense of their Sins, a Reformation of their Lives, and to such Preparations for Death as might expunge the Sting thereof, and mollify its Poison; as might heal their Corruptions, and render them fit for enjoyment of the Presence and Favour of God in the Life everlasting.

On Wednesday the 26th of July the Report of ten Malefactors was made by Mr. Recorder to his Majesty, when

He was pleased to order the seven following for Execution, viz. John Stewart, John Gray, Valentine Godwin, James Johnson, John Palmer, Uriah Creed, and Richard Mapesden, on Friday the 4th Instant.

Poe , Shepherd , and Fryer were respited , till his Majesty's Pleasure concerning them be further known, Margaret Harvey pleaded her Pregnancy , and Anthony Dun , a Lad about 13 or 14 Years of Age died in the Cells of Newgate in a few Days after receiving Sentence .

1 John Stewart , was indicted for that he in company with 2 others not yet taken, on the King's Highway, did make an Assault on Dedrick Jacob Hane putting him in bodily Fear, and taking from his Person one Man's Hat, value 2 s. and 8 s. in Money his Property , June 23 d.

2 JOHN GRAY , late of St. Paul's Shadwell, was indicted for Felony and Murder, on the 21st of May, on Anne his Wife , that he with a certain Knife made of Iron and Steel, that he held in his right Hand, on the Throat of the said Anne did strike, and cut, giving the said Anne one mortal Would, length 5 Inches, depth 3 Inches, of which she instantly died. He also stood charged on the Coroner's Inquest for the said Murder .

3. 4. VALENTINE GODWIN and JAMES JOHNSON , were indicted, for that they in company with William Lacy and William Tidd , on the King's Highway, upon one Henry Aplen , did make an Assault, and put in corporal Fear and danger of his Life, and did steal one man's Hatt, val. 1 s. one silk Handkerchief, val. 2 s. and 3 s. and three-pence half penny in Money, from the Person of the said Henry Aplen , June 25th.

5. JOHN PALMER , late of St. Andrew's Holbourn, was indicted for stealing out of a dwelling House, one silver Tankard, val. 20 s. 2 silver Castors, val. 20 s. 3 silver Salts, val. 20 s. one silver Candlestick, val. 5 s. 6 silver Spoons, and 2 salt Shovels, the Goods of Richard Jackson , Gent. July 3d,

6. URIAH CREED, alias Morgan , late of Hawkhurst, was indicted, for that he, in company with divers others, to the number of 30 Persons, were assembled together in the Parish of Reculver, being armed with fire Arms, and other offensive Weapons, in order to be aiding and assisting in running and landing unaccustomed Goods , on the 30th of March 1747.

7 RICHARD MAPESDEN , late of Reculver in the County of Kent, was indicted, for that he, together with divers others to the number of 30 Persons, were assembled together, in the Parish of Reculver, being arm'd with fire Arms, and other offensive Weapons, in order to be aiding, and assisting in running and landing unaccustomed Goods , March 30th, 1747.

1 Richard Mapesden , aged 24, born at Lamberthurst in Sussex, was a young Fellow of a pretty good Family, whose Father dying when he was about 9 Years of Age, he was not to be controuled by his Mother. In his Father's Life-time he was kept to School, but in a short time after his Death he became too

headstrong, and would go just where he pleased, neglecting all means of Education. He was bred to no Business, but as far as I can find, took on with Smuglers early, and followed the Trade some Years. That he had been used to deal in unaccustomed Goods he had the Conscience to own, but denyed to the last, having been at Reculver at the Time sworn against him, aiding and assisting in company with Uriah Creed .

As to Particulars, he was very reserved, nor would he declare any one Scene of Action of that kind, he had been concerned in; tho' there is no doubt he had been in many. He was mentioned to be one of the Gang in the Indictment with John Cook , executed July 1747, for unlawfully and feloniously assembling together at Folkstone in Kent, arm'd with fire Arms, &c. against the Statute. And is reported to have been one of those desperately wicked Fellows, who threatned the Lives of noble Personages, and others who endeavour'd to suppress their riotous and unlawful Practices.

Being ignorant and unlettered, 'twas my frequent Usage to converse with him, but could by no means persuade him to be communicative. His Behaviour however, I may venture to say, (for I saw him almost every Day) has been quiet, and decent, becoming a Man in his unhappy Circumstances, since Conviction, nay, ever since his Confinement in Newgate.

2 Uriah Creed , aged 37. was born at Swineshead in Huntingdonshire, and lived in that Neighbourhood, till he was about 17 Years of Age. His Occupation was a Labourer in Husbandry affairs, and he got his Livelihood in an honest and lawful Way. Being a stout young Man, he laboured very hard for little Wages, and began now to be tired of that way of Life, which thinking to change, he applied himself to a Brother of his, who countenanced him in this way of thinking, and advised him to come up to Town to him, who at that Time kept the Nag's Head Inn, in Leather Lane, Holbourn. Accordingly he embraced the Opportunity, came to London, and was with his Brother in Capacity of an Hostler several Years.

This Inn, it seems, was at that Time, a Place of resort for the Smugglers. When they had any Goods to bring to Town, there they were generally first lodged, and from thence sent out to their Customers in Parcels. Seeing Creed a stout Fellow, the Smugglers look'd upon him to be a proper Man for their Service, and often endeavoured to persuade him to go down with them into Sussex, and Kent, telling him he should live very well, and have good Wages. But as yet he liked living in his Brother's Service very well, and refused to comply with their Solicitations. It happened, however, in process of Time, that a noted Smuggler bought a Horse of his Brother, which Creed had been used to take Care of, it being not quite broke, he was desired to ride it down into Kent, and so he did. Having brought the Horse pretty quiet, he was minded to return to London, but, before they let him go, they wanted him to try how the Horse would behave in the Smuggling Business. Accordingly one Day he rode with a Gang of them to the Sea-side, in order to fetch away someGoods, and brought away 200 l. of Tea upon this Horse, besides what the rest brought away.

Afterwards he came again to London and his Brother being in his Absence provided with another Hostler, Creed went to Service in Red-Lyon Street, Holbourn, first to a Gentleman, as helper in his Stable , and then to a Person that let out Coaches, &c. in the same Capacity, and lived very well in those two Places for some Time. Afterwards he returned again to live with his Brother, and was employ'd in carrying smuggled Goods to Grocers and Chandlers Shops, &c. as the Owners gave their Directions. But, as yet, he had never been concerned in buying or selling upon his own Account.

Afterwards he went to live with a Gentleman of the Army in Westminster, to look after his Horses, &c. and was there nine Months absent from his Brother's House, having no Knowledge of, or Society with Smugglers during that time. But his Brother having a mind to embark in that Trade, sent for Creed again, and by much Persuasion got him to be his Rider, as they call it, to fetch and carry run Goods, and to look after his Concerns in the smuggling Way. He had not been more than a Journey or two, he says, upon his Brother's Account, before somebody, he knows not who, informed against him; and being a very useful and busy Man in the Business, he was afterwards many Times inform'd against, so that he was now in great Danger of being apprehended. His Brother finding the Case to be so, left off dealing, and Creed had a new Master to seek. He found himself under a Necessity, he says, of continuing in the same Way; to go to Husbandry was dangerous, left he might be discovered and taken, so he thought it best to keep among them for Safety, as well as Employ, to provide Maintenance for his Wife and Children.

There was at that Time a Chief of the Smugglers confined in Newgate, whose Wife, by the Assistance of Creed to manage for them, carried on the Trade during his 2 Years Imprisonment. This Man happening to get his Liberty, return'd home, and left off the Trade entirely; so Creed was once more left in the Lurch, and to seek for a Master.

He now hired himself out to his original Labour with a Farmer at Cranbroke in Kent, and staid with him for some time. But his former Master advised him to return again to the smuggling Business, and now to encourage him, lent him Money to help him to carry on a small Trade for himself. And, he says, he has 4 or 5 several Times bought run Goods, and carried to Hawkhurst, and other Places, but such Qantities only as he might get 5 or 10 Shillings by perhaps at a time; tho' he owns he has been concern'd in running, and carrying away large Quantities for other People.

At last he became Rider for one Gingles, and on the fatal Morning, the 30th of March 1747, he says, he went by his Master's Orders down to a Place on the Kentish Coast, known by the Name of the Two Sisters, (upon account of two Churches that stand near one another, suppos'd to be built by two Sisters) to do Business for him. The Folkstone Men had been there before,

and were returning Home loaden with their Booty, as Creed and his Company were going down. They met about nine o'Clock in the Morning, and got to the Place about eleven. They had been there some Time loading their Horses, not thinking of any Surprize: But on a sudden they heard a Noise of Persons above coming towards them, which proved to be some Custom House Officers, and others, whom Creed call'd the Militia of the adjacent Country. They had a Sort of an Engagement for some Time, but no Mischief ensued. The Smugglers were at last obliged to give Ground, and rode away as fast as they could, leaving their Goods behind them, which the Officers seized, being upwards of 3000 Weight of Tea. Creed was taken particular Notice of, and Information once more lodged against him, and not surrendering according to Order, he became an Outlaw. And now,

He began to think of Providing for his Safety. In order thereto, thinking it best to leave the smuggling Countries, He went into Essex, with his Wife and all that he had, and lived at Upminster, maintaining a Family, (his Wife having brought him 2 Children during his abode there) by the Labour of his Hands, and the Sweat of his Brow; and for the better secreting himself had changed his Name to that of Morgan. But with all his Caution he could not escape the Search of those who have the Management of bringing such Offenders to Justice. For upon a Day as he and the Person with whom he lived were above in a Chamber together, Creed observed a Posse of People coming towards the House. His Landlord was very much alarmed, and wondered what might be the Meaning of it. But Creed says he knew at first Sight what they were come for, and accordingly told his Landlord, that he had been a Smuggler, and was outlaw'd, and these People were come to take him. So when they came to him, he says, he accosted them in this Manner

"Gentlemen, you need not

"be in a Hurry about me, I was

"just coming to you. I found you

"had made a dead Set of me, and

"'twas to no Purpose to endeavour

"to secret myself now, or to make

"any Resistance. Here I am, do

"what you please with me. I may

"look upon myself from this Day

"as a dead Man." So he was handcuffed, brought to Town, and confined in the little Tower Goal. A Day or two after being examined before a Justice of the Peace, he thought proper to commit him to Newgate. He acknowledges the Justice of his Sentence and endeavours to meet his Fate with Christian Patience and Resignation trusting in the Lord for his Portion in the World to come.

3. John Stewart , aged 24, was born at Glasgow in Scotland, lived there with his Parents till about 15 Years old, and then was put Apprentice to a Collier , whom he served only two Years. When the Ship being at London, and just entered into the Transport Service, he took it into his Head to leave her, thinking he might do better in the Navy , as 'twas then in the Time of the late War; so he entered himself on Board the Maidstone Man of War, a fifty Gun Ship. He says, she had a roving Commission,

and sailed where the Commander thought proper, and that she had the good Fortune to take as many or more Prizes, than any single English Ship during the whole war; but had the Misfortune at last to be cast away upon the Island of Almonteer, a desolate Island, opposite to Bourdeaux. At which Time upwards of forty Hands were lost, besides Spaniards, and French Prisoners, and the whole Ship's Crew were in great Danger. Those that were saved, were carried in Boats to the Main, and made Prisoners; but Stewart made his Escape from Prison, and travelling 250 Miles on Foot, came to St. Maloes, where he was again made Prisoner, and brought Home by a Cartel Ship to England. He and the rest of the Maidstone's Crew were turned over, when they came Home, to the New Anson; which after he had helped to rigg out, and she was ready to go abroad, he gave her the Slip. Having some Prize-money for the Maidstone to receive, he thought it was best to stay at Home, and spend that first, before he went to work for more. But now he laments his Folly, and says, he thinks it had been better for him to have continued in the Service.

He has left off going to Sea, these twelve Months past, and has lived a very wicked Life, in drinking, cursing, and swearing, &c. and was concerned in two Robberries, besides what he is convicted and suffers for.

He was in Company with two others, when they robbed a Gentleman in Cullum Street, and took from him a gold Watch, &c. and the Gentleman thinking one of them was going to stab him, catched hold of the Weapon, and received a Cut by its being drawn through his Hand. Another Person was robbed by the same three, near Broad Street, of a silver Watch. These two Robberies were committed by them about four or five Nights before the Robbery in St. Swithin's Lane, which was the 23d of June. The Watches were immediatly sold for what they could get, and Stewart says, he had about 10 s. to his Share.

As to the Robbery for which he suffers he says, he had been rambling, and got drunk, that he saw not the Accomplices that Day: But about 11 o'Clock at Night, reeling homeward towards Whitechappel, where he lived, thro' Cannon Street he met them. One of them had been his Shipmate, who asked him to drink, but he says, he refused, because he had got enough. While they were talking together, he says, the other two ran from him of a sudden, and seized the Prosecutor, and robbed him. They were presently pursued, but run away towards Lombard Street, and he, being in their Company, thought proper to run towards Walbroke, but being in Liquor, fell down, and was presently taken. He was carried to the Poultry Counter that Night, and being examined before an Alderman, he thought proper to commit him to Newgate.

Stewart persisted for a long while to say, that he had never been concerned in any other Robbery, but what he was convicted of; but on the first of August, he confessed the other two, saying, his Conscience would not suffer him to keep the Secret any longer. He heartily begs Pardon of those he has had a Hand in injuring, and hopes for Mercy thro' Jesus Christ.

4. Valentine Godwin , aged 24, born in the Parish of St. Martins in the Fields, was at a proper Time put Apprentice to a Barber and Peruke-maker in Chancery Lane. His Parents, he says, had lived very reputably in the above Parish for many Years, and had given him a tolerable Education, but were reduced by Misfortunes. When he had served about four Years of his Time, his Father being left alone, and grown infirm, wanted somebody to be with him, and perswaded the Son to come Home to him, which he did, and between them they kept a little Chandler's Shop . The Father dying, he took Care to have him decently interred, and then thought it best for him to go abroad into the World, as keeping that Shop would not be sufficient Employ for him.

Immediately, therefore, after his Father's Death, he went to work at a Glass-house in the Minories, which belongs to one of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace, who lives in that Neighbourhood, and has worked there, off and on, as he calls it, about seven Years.

At the Sessions held at the Old Bailey, July, 1747, he was admitted Evidence for the King, against John Studder , and William Newman , indicted for a Burglary, and Robbery in the dwelling House of Elizabeth Akens , in the Parish of Wapping, and stealing eight Yards of Flander's Lace, value 48 s. and twenty-eight Yards of brown Stuff striped, value 32 s. In which Burglary and Robbery he was an Accomplice, but having the good Fortune to be taken first, he impeached the other two, and so for that Time escaped in a whole Skin, and the other two being found guilty of the Robbery, but not of the Burglary, were transported.

The Gentleman to whom the Glass-house belonged, where he had worked before, believed him to be seduced by evil Company, and as he had been a good Servant, and behaved well while with him, was willing to take him again and did so. And Godwin says, he has worked there since that Time, till he was taken up for being concerned in the Fact for which he suffered. One of the Accomplices, being lame, was not able to make his Escape, and being taken told who were with him at the Time of the Robbery, and that Godwin worked at the Glass-house and might be found there. Some People upon which went to see for him, but not being there, one of his fellow Labourers shewed them to his Lodgings, and they took him out of his Bed, He acknowledges the Justice of his Sentence, and dies in Charity, and good-will to all the World, expecting Salvation thro' Christ's Merits, as he has used his Endeavour to make Peace with his God.

5. James Johnson , aged 28, was born in Nottinghamshire, had a pretty good Education, was bound Apprentice to a Baker , at Mansfield, to whom having served seven Years, his Fancy led him to see London, and accordingly without the Consent of his Parents came to Town. Here he has been a Journeyman he says, to several Bakers, viz. he served one Master in St. John's Street, another in Long Lane, Smithfield, a third in Red-Lion Street, Holborn, and the last he lived with was in Petticoat Lane. But this last Master's House being in the Liberties of the City, and he being no

Freeman, was summoned out, as he says, and obliged to leave his Master just upon Christmas; which taking highly in dudgeon, he left off all Thoughts of following that Trade any longer. And this roving Disposition led him to Sea , on board the London Privateer, in which Service, as far as I can find, he did no good for himself, nor any body else. He can give no Account of any thing worthy Remark he did on board, unless that he begun his Acquaintance with the Person who, as he says, led him into this unfortunate Scrape, for which he forfeits his Life.

He says they were 16 Children in the Family, and he is the only Prodigal as far as he believes, and that his Name is not James Johnson, but Francis Otter is his real Name. He was the youngest, and his Mother dying while he was an Infant, his Grandfather, at his Death, provided particularly for him: He left Money to support and bring him up till he was of Age, and 50 l. to set him up when he was out of his Apprenticeship: That Money too he received, and squandered away, having never had the Grace to put a Farthing of it to the Use for which it was designed by the Doner. He says, he has been a loose, idle and profligate Liver, in Drunkenness, and other Debaucheries, (in which the present Age does too much abound) but protests against ever having been guilty of Robbery before. This, he says, was never premediated by him, but talks of one William Tidd, (who was formerly his Shipmate, and was an Accomplice, if not chiefly concerned in this Robbery) being the Instrument of his undoing. Johnson says, being then in Liquor, June 25, he met Tidd and two others in White-Chapel, and they went and committed this Robbery: which when they had done they went round the Field to Stepney. But Johnson escaping for that Time from the Pursuers, was afterwards taken for Robbing a Barber's Shop, and being examined before Sir Samuel Gore, was committed to Newgate; and appearing to be one of the Gang that robbed the Man driving Sheep, near White-Chapel Mount , was indicted and found Guilty, and for that Crime was justly doom'd to Death.

6. John Palmer , aged 28, was born in the Parish of St. Giles's Cripplegate, and was put Apprentice to a Founder , with whom he served but one Year, and as far as I can understand from that Time entered upon all idle, dissolute, and wicked Courses, His Deportment was sullen, to converse with he was obstinate, and scarce would he give himself Time to listen to such Instructions and Admonitions as were proper for him, but was always in a Hurry to fly from them, I frequently endeavoured to perswade him to consider his past evil Days; to repent, and do those Things which were convenient and necessary for him, but to all Entreaty he seemed deaf, and dumb to every Question put to him concerning his Life and Conversation. I did not so much as get an Answer whether or no he was guilty of the Fact for which he was convicted; but he would still prevaricate, or be silent upon that Point, till the very Morning of his Execution: And, I told him to the last, I fear'd his Life and Conversation had been such

as he did not choose to look back on himself, or he would not be so very reserved. To which he would only reply, he knew best.'Tis reported of him, that he has been transported some 4 or 5 Years agon, and returned before the Expiration of the Term of 7 Years, and not without Foundation; yet he would not own any Fault he had committed before; and even this for which he suffered, he used all the Art and Chicanery he was Master of, to take off all Imputation upon Account of it.

But, who that reads his Tryal, to see the Evidence urged against him, will not think the Man to be well versed in these Things, that without any Assistance could reduce to Practice such a wicked Scheme as he must have laid, and commit such a Robbery so artfully, as not to be surprized in the Execution of it? He was plainly proved to be the Man, as the Nature of the Case would admit, unless he had been actually detected while he was taking the Plate out of the Room. A Day or two before Execution he seem'd to take a little more Concern than before he had been wont to do, and left the Stage of the World with some seeming Marks of Contrition.

7. John Gray , aged 37, born at Newcastle upon Tyne, was bred to the Sea from a Child, and served 7 Years Apprenticeship to a Collier . He afterwards continued in that Employ, till the late War brokeout, when he was minded to try his Fortune in that Way, and entered on board the Portmahon Man of War. She was then on the Bristol Station, cruizing upon the Enemy betwixt that Place and the Lizard for the Space of two Years. In which Ship they had the good Fortune to take a French Prize called the Golden Lion, very rich, and carried her into Bristol. Being turned over from that Ship to the Lenox, he went in her to Jamaica, where he was taken ill; and being put on Shore, he catched the Country Distemper, which brought him almost to Death's Door. The Ship sailing, left him there, and when he was a little recovered, he had his Choice given, whether he would be sent Home as a disabled Man, or take his own Way to get Home. He made his Choice to go on board a Merchant Ship for England, but was taken by the French and carried into Bayonne. He lost his Ticket for Wages due to him, during his continuing a Prisoner there, and was brought over Pennyless, and almost starved, in a Cartel Ship to Dartmouth. From thence he came to London, and went on board a Merchant Ship to Jamaica again, and at last came Home in the Milford. His proper Place of Abode, he says, was Bristol, where he married his Wife, and left her there when he went abroad. She hearing of his being in London, came up to him; and not finding him in such a Condition as perhaps she expected, occasioned some Difference, and Words arising between them, ended in the unhappy Murder of her: The Account of which you have in the Copy of his own Letter to a Friend, annexed.

August 3, 1749, from my Cell in Newgate,

A Copy of a Letter, which John Gray sent to a Friend of his, the Day before Execution.

THIS is the last Account and Confession of John Gray, which is to satisfy and convince the World, that whatever reports have been rais'd and spread Abroad, concerning my unhappy Affair with regard to my poor Wife, 'tis quite false, and this I hope, may convince the World of the Mistake. For conscious I am; and very easy in my own Mind with regard to her, as for Virtue, Honesty, Sobriety, and Industry, and I am the unhappy Man, that does say, there is but few such left behind. As for that dreadful Scene, that has happened, which I am to dye for, it did not proceed from Jealousy, as the censorious thought it did. If there was any Jealousy, it was of her Side, for I now speak before God, and my own Conscience, to whom I now must shortly appear, that I never had any Occasion to suspect her either in her Actions, Conduct or Behaviour, she never was the Woman, that ever put it in my Power, or any Persons in the World to blame her of being guilty of the least Indiscretion.

The Reason of the dismal Scene happening is as follows. I have been unfortunate at Sea for these 4 Years last past, tho' I have endeavoured to the utmost of my Power. But my poor dear Wife being unacquainted with a seafaring Life, used to reflect upon me, and that it was thro' my Negligence I had no better Success. Indeed my Wife has upon Account of my Misfortunes, said that I had no Love for her, therefore told me 'twas much better to Part, which gave me more Uneasiness and Concern then I ever met in my Life before, for she was dearer to me than my own Life. After my poor Wife made use of that Expression concerning our parting, it almost put me besides myself but I have since found that it did not come from her Heart, by Reason of her hiding my Cloaths, which was to prevent my going. But I not knowing that, and hearing her talk to me in such a Manner, it put me into Confusion, which caused some Words to arise betwixt us, which was the Reason of that cursed Knife passing between us, with which I gave her the fatal Stroke; tho' God knows my Heart not with Design to take away her Life.

It grieves me to think that this Accident should happen in the House of Mr. Murray, who, I am sure, both he, and his Wife are very honest People, and wished me and my Wife as well as if we had been their own Flesh and Blood; and I hope that God will reward him for the Trouble and Expence, they have been at upon both our Accounts. I now freely from the bottom of my Heart forgive them who have injured and wronged me, as I hope the Lord will forgive me at the last Day, and I beg forgiveness of all those whom I havewronged.

MURDER is surely a Crime of so barbarous and inhuman a Nature, that it shocks the Mind of every Person, to whose Ears the Perpetration of such a Fact does ever arrive. This is always the Case, where the Seeds of Humanity are not totally eradicated; while the Man retains any Thing within him worthy the Dignity of his Nature, and becoming the End of his Creation. If a Man commit Murder on the greatest Stranger, all Nations, even the Heathen hath condemned the Fact, and admitted the Murderer to be deserving of Death. But when a Man lays violent Hands on his Friend, his nearest and most intimate Companion, the Guilt increases with the Proximity of the Relation in the natural Notions of Men, but much more so when we have Respect to the Laws and Commands of God. Nor can there in strict Justice any Excuse be framed, that shall be of any avail in the Sight of God, whatever Man may think of the Matter. Whosoever sheddeth Man's Blood, by Man shall his Blood be shed. But if the Murderer meets not his deserved Fate in this World, what Fear, left his Sufferings be intolerable in that which is to come? For whatever the Provocation may be, he is not allowed to revenge himself nor would Reason teach him so to do, but Religion absolutely forbiddeth it.

Gray intimates in his Letter, that he loved his Wife, as well as his own Heart nor had she given him any Reason to think Evil of her: What then could occasion his doing so detestable a Sin? Nothing but the most extreme Degree of Madness. And this was unfortunately his Case, being overcome with Passion and Liquor, he was not himself. Had his Reason been present with him, his Love towards her would have stept in to her Assistance, and prevented the execrable Deed. If his Senses had not been overpowered, he protested several Times, he never could have been cruel enough to have hurt her. His Behaviour was very decent all the Time of his laying under Sentence of Death, even to the last, his Countenance rather chearful than dejected; and the Reason he gave for it was, that he was a Man of a pleasant, and good Humour, nor would any Body that had known him in his Days say to the contrary. He said he never had wronged Man, Woman, nor Child, to the best of his Remembrance; yet having been guilty of this most cruel Deed, he looked upon himself as a most vile Sinner, but had Hopes as it was not done with Malice and Design, as he was truely and heartily sorry for what he had done amiss in this Affair, and every other Circumstance of his Life, that God would have Mercy on him, and admit him to some Share in the Merits of Jesus Christ.

At the PLACE of EXECUTION.

On Friday Morning, August the 4th, between 8 and 9 o'Clock, John Stewart , John Gray , Valentine Godwin , James Johnson , John Palmer , Uriah Creed , and Richard Mapesden , went in 3 Carts from Newgate to the Place of Execution. The 3 first in one Cart, Johnson and Palmer in the second, and in the 3d Creed and Mapesden. They were attended by a strong Party of Guards; and, while the Executioner was getting ready, they prayed by themselves, and afterwards with me very devoutly, and till the Cart drew from under them, they continued calling on the Lord to have Mercy on them.

Mapesden's Body was taken away the next Morning, by a Party of Horse-Guards, to be deliver'd to the Sheriff of the County of Sussex, where he is to be hanged in Chains.

The Bodies of the rest were disposed of by their Friends.

This is all the Account given by me, JOHN TAYLOR , Ordinary of Newgate.

This Day is publish'd, In Two large handsome Octavo Volumes, (Price bound, gilt, and letter'd, 8 s.)

THE DIVERTING JUMBLE: Or, THEY SHALL BE SAVED. Being a Collection of Pamphlets on various, Subjects, which have been heretofore published, and tho' well received by the Publick, might have perished in Grocers, Cheesemongers, and Chandlers shops, had they not been carefully preserved and collected together,

By OBADIAH BOOKWORM , Secretary to the Bibliopoles, and Fellow of the C. C. Society.

VOL. I. contains, I. An Explanation of those four Emblematical Political Prints called the European Race.

II. The Humours of Whist. A Dramatic Satire.

III. Orestes. A Dramatic Opera. Acted at Lincoln's Inn Fields. Wrote by Mr. Theobald.

IV. The First Book of the Lamentations of Nathan Ben-Saddi, a Jew.

V. Antonius Musa's Character represented by Virgil in the Person of Iapis. By Bishop Atterbury.

VI. An Historical View of the Principles, Characters, Persons, &c. of the Political Writers of Great Britain, particularly the Names and Characters of the Authors of our publick News-Papers.

VII. The Judgment of Paris. A Pastoral Ballad Opera.

VIII. A Woeful Voyage Indeed: being a full and particular Account of the Voyage, Adventures, and Distresses of the Crew belonging to the Nimble Nancy.

IX. A New Journey to the World in the Moon.

VOL. II. Contains, I. Tansur's Poetical Meditations on the Four last Things, Death, Judgment, Heaven, and Hell.

II. The Genuine Trial of Charles Drew for the unnatural Murder of his own Father, his last Dying Speech, &c.

III. The first Book of the Lamentations of Charles the Son of James for the Loss of the Battle of Culloden; with his Farewell Speech. IV. The Chinese Orphan. An Historical Tragedy.

V. The True Englishman's Miscellany. In Two Parts. Part I. The False Guardian Outwitted, A Ballad Opera. Part II. A Collection of dismal Songs; pleasant Stories, bitter Encomiums, terrible Poems, Epigrams, Epitaphs, &c. Never before publish'd.

VI. Popery and Slavery Displayed. Containing the Character of Popery, and a Relation of Popish Cruelties.

VII. The humble Address of an old distressed and discarded Courtier, vurgarly call'd Common Honesty.

VIII. The Rape of Hellen. A Mock Opera. By Capt. Breval. IX. The True History of the Life and sudden Death of Old John Overs, the rich Ferryman of London.

Printed for Tho. Harris, Fleet-street: and sold by all the Booksellers.

Just Publish'd, Price 2 s. the Third Edition of HEAVEN OPEN TO ALL MEN: or, a Theological Treatise, in which without unsettling the Practice of Religion, is solidly proved by Scripture and Reason, That all Men shall be saved, or, made finally happy. London: Printed for Jacob Robinson, at the Golden-Lion, in Ludgate-Street.

Books lately publish'd, printed for Charles Corbett at Addison's Head against St. Dunstan's Church Fleet-street.

I. A Compcat System of Geography, with a new Set of whole Sheet Maps of the World, two Volumes, Folio. Price 4 l. 10 s.

II. Watson's Clergyman's Law, Fol. Price 1 l. 5 s.

III. Boyer's French and English Dictionary in 4 to. Price 18 s.

IV. Boyer's French and English Dictionary, 8vo. Price 6 s.

V. Turkish Spy, eight, Volumes. Price 16 s.

VI. La Bella Assemblee, 4 Volumes. Price 10 s.

VII. A Collection of Poems, 3 Vols. call'd Dodsley's Poems. Price 9 s.

VIII. Bailey's English Dictionary. Price 6 s.

IX. Jacobs's Law Dictionary. Price 1 l. 5 s.

X. The Child's new Play-thing. Price 1 s.

XI. Browne's Roman History. Price 2 s.

XII. Milton's Paradise Regain'd, a neat Letter, in 1 amo. Price 3 s.