Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 27 November 2014), Ordinary of Newgate's Account, January 1733 (OA17330129).

Ordinary's Account, 29th January 1733.

THE ORDINARY of NEWGATE, His ACCOUNT of the Behaviour, Confession, and Dying Words, OF THE MALEFACTORS, Who were EXECUTED at TYBURN, On MONDAY the 29th of this Instant JANUARY, 1733.

BEING THE FIRST EXECUTION in the MAYORALTY OF THE Rt. Hon. JOHN BARBER.

Number I. For the said YEAR.

LONDON:

Printed and Sold by JOHN APPLEBEE, in Bolt-Court, near the Leg-Tavern, Fleet-street. M.DCC.XXXIII.

[Price Six-Pence.]

THE ORDINARY of NEWGATE, His ACCOUNT of the Behaviour, Confession, &c.

AT the King's Commission of Oyer and Terminer and Gaol-Delivery of Newgate, held (before the Right Hon. Sir FRANCIS CHILD, Knt. Lord Mayor of the City of London ; the Hon. the Lord Raymond, Lord chief Justice of the King's-Bench; the Honourable Mr. Justice Denton, the Worshipful Mr. Serjeant Urlin, Deputy-Recorder of the City of London; and others of his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, for the City of London, and Justices of Gaol-Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex) at Justice-Hall in the Old-Bailey, on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, being the 11th, 12th, and 13th of October, 1732, in the Sixth Year of his Majesty's Reign.

Three Men, viz. John Jenkins, Richard Marshal, and John Booker; and One Woman, viz. Catherine Sanders, were by the Jury convicted of capital Felonies, and receiv'd Sentence of Death.

At the King's Commission of Oyer and Terminer and Gaol-Delivery of Newgate, held before the Right Honourable JOHN BARBER, Lord Mayor of the City of London ; the Honourable Mr. Justice Page; the Honourable Mr. Baron Carter; the Worshipful Mr. Serjeant Urlin, Deputy Recorder of the City of London; and others of his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer, for the City of London; and Justice of Gaol-Delivery of Newgate, (holden for the said City and County of Middlesex) at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily, on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday

and Monday, being the 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, and 11th of December, 1732, in the Sixth Year of his Majesty's Reign.

Six Men, viz. William Roberts, alias Hampton, Henry Neal, Ebenezer Dun, James Ingram, William Heath and William Macklaughlan, were by the Jury found Guilty of capital Offences, and receiv'd Sentence of Death.

At the King's Commission of Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol-Delivery of Newgate, held (before the Right Honourable JOHN BARBER, Lord Mayor of the City of London ; the Right Hon. the Lord Chief Baron Reynolds; the Hon. Mr. Justice Probyn; Mr. Serjeant Urlin, Deputy-Recorder of the City of London; and others of his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer for the City of London, and Justices of Gaol-Delivery of Newgate, (holden for the said City and County of Middlesex) at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily, on Friday, Saturday and Monday, the 12th, 13th and 15th of this Inst. January, 1733, in the Sixth Year of his Majesty's Reign.

Six Men, viz. Thomas Banks, Samuel Thomas, John Alexander Emmerton, alias Cromwit, alias Mears, John Ackers, John Walton, and William Booth, were by the Jury found Guilty of capital Crimes, and receiv'd Sentence of Death.

While under Sentence, I instructed them in the essential points of our holy Christian Faith, from those words. But as many as receiv'd him, to them gave he Power to become the Sons of God; even to them who believe on his Name. St. John 1. 12. I show'd them that receiving of Christ and believing in him, were phrases of an equal import, and that they signified one and the same thing; and this we understand by a paralel place of Scripture. As ye have therefore receiv'd Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk ye in him. Col. 2. 6. From this Text, I took occasion to explain to them, the true and genuine nature of a saving Faith in Christ, that it was not a meer profession of Christianity, or a general Faith that Christ was the Son of God, and that he died for Sinners, for as St. James says, the Devils also believe and tremble. That it was not an adherence to parties, not a pretended Zeal and

flight for Religion, which commotions proceed rather from a violent Passion, than any firm Resolution of a perserverance in the Faith, which prov'd one to be an unfeign'd Votary of the Holy Jesus; but in order to obtain a true Faith in Christ, I exhorted them to a deep Sight and Sense of their Sins, for until we are duly affected with the evil Nature and dreadful Consequences of Sin, it cannot be supposed, that we will seek after a Saviour. And then I exhorted them diligently to cry to God for the illuminations and directions of his Holy Spirit, without whose concurrent aid, we can do no Good of our selves so as to be accepted of God. Since it is God that worketh in us, both to will and to do his good Pleasure. Phil. 2. 13. I took occasion also to show them, that this saving Faith in Christ is the special Gift and Grace of God's Holy Spirit, as we understand from these Words, For by Grace are ye saved through Faith; and that not of your selves: It is the Gift of God. Eph. 2. 8. I also illustrated this affair to them, in the Case of Lydia; whose Heart the Lord open'd, that she attended unto the Things which were spoken of Paul, Acts. 16. 14. This Case is also clear from the Instance of the Jailor, who in great Consternation said to Paul and Silas, Sirs, what must I do to be saved? To this they readily gave Answer, Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved, and thy House. Acts. xvi. 30, 31. As for this Faith in Christ, I told them, that it was always attended with good Works, for Faith without Works is dead, being alone. St. James, ii. 17. And that it may be certainly known, if we love God, with our whole Heart, Soul, Strength and Mind; if we delight in him above all Things; if we chose him for our only Portion, despising all the Vanities and Grandure of this World, as a Thing of no Value; with Moses, Choosing rather to suffer affliction with the People of God, then to enjoy the Pleasures of Sin for a Season: Esteeming the reproach of Christ, greater Riches then the Treasures in Egypt. Heb. xi. 25, 26. And as a Proof of our Faith in Christ, we will reflect much upon the infinite love of God in giving his Son for us, as St. John saith, Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the Propitiation for our Sins. 1 Jo. iv. 10. and as we love God, so ought we to love Christ the Son of God, and the only Saviour of Men, who hath given himself unto the Death for our Sins, a Sacrifice of Attonement, of a sweet Smelling Saviour, to satisfie the Justice of his incensed Father. We ought to say with the Apostle St. Paul, Yea doubtless, and I count all things but loss, for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: For whom I have suffer'd (or am willing to suffer) the loss of all things, and count them but Dung that I may win Christ. Phil. iii. 8. &c. And as the same Apostle says elsewhere, Who shall seperate us from the Love of Christ? shall tribulation, or distress, or persecu

tion, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or Sword? Nay in all those things we are more than conquerous, through him that loved us. For I am perswaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature shall be able to seperate us from the Love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord. Rom viii. 35, &c. And as we are thus to love God and Christ, so we ought to love our Neighbour, who is made after the Image of God. Thus St. John enjoins us, If a Man say I love God, and hateth his Brother, he is a liar. For he that loveth not his Brother whom he hath seen, how can he love God whom he hath not seen? And this Commandment have we from him, that he who loveth God, loves his Brother also, 1 Jo. iv. 20, 21. And I told them, that one special Sign of true Christianity is, that we obey Gods commands, studying after universal Holyness in Heart and Life, approving ourselves with consciences, void of offence towards God and towards Men; as, our blessed Saviour expresly Admonisheth us, If ye love me, keep my Commandments. St. Jo. xiv. 15. And John xv. 14. Ye are my Friends, If ye do whatsoever I command you.

Then I inform'd them, that the Course of their Lives having been most irregular, vicious and abominable, tho' they could not in the miserable Circumstances they were then in, prove themselves the real Disciples of the Holy Jesus, by a continued Tenor of doing good, and living in the Fear of God, as sincere Christians do; yet their duty was to double their Diligence, in working out their Souls to Salvation, and in coming as near as possible to the fixed Rules of Christianity; that since they had no time left them to pass a holy Life and blameless Conversation, they might at least wish, that it were in their Power to make amends for the Errors of their past Life, and to make a Solemn Vow to Almighty God, if their Lives were spar'd, whereas formerly they had liv'd to the dishonour of God, from this time and foreward they should live to his Honour and Praise, dedicating themselves wholly, Souls and Bodies, to the Service of Almighty God. And as for their Sincerity, God being the only Searcher of the Hearts and Trier of the Reins of the Children of Men, I advis'd them to pray to God, who searcheth Jerusalem as with Candles, that he by the Illuminations of his Holy Spirit, would make them sincere and candid in their Purposes and Intentions, that so they might become the upright Servants of God; in Consequence of which, they might assure themselves, that they should have their Souls for a Prey. Having exhorted them to a sincere and hearty Repentance, to mourn over their Sins, to hate, detest and abhor themselves in Dust and Ashes because of them, and to resolve by the Grace of God, as they had done Iniquity and Sin, they would do so no more: I then took Occasion to show

them the great Evil of Theft and Robbery, how that they who are guilty of such vile Practices have declared themselves avowed Enemies to God and Man, and that for those Crimes they are liable to the highest Punishments can be inflicted by human Laws, the most shameful and ignominious Death; and that further, they are obnoxious to the eternal Wrath and Vengeance of Almighty God, for the same Crimes, if their Faith in Jesus Christ, and a sincere Repentance for all their Sins, do not prevent the same.

Samuel Thomas being convicted of Murther, I exhorted him to repent of that most atrocious and greatest of all Sins, from the Case of Cain and Abel, as we have it recorded in the iv. Chap. of Genesis: I showed him, that this is the first Instance of that stated Enemity between the Seed of the Woman, i. e. the true Messias, and the Seed of the Devil, whence we ought to take Notice, what a heinous Sin that of Murther must needs be. I also let him see the great Aggravation of his Guilt, since his Crime was committed upon the Wife of his Bosom, whom we are oblig'd to love and cherish, by the Laws of Nature and Religion: And therefore, I desir'd him seriously to consider, what a great and heavy Guilt was lying upon his Soul; because in Case of Murther the nearer the Relations is, so much the greater must the Guilt contracted needs be, especially where the Relation is conjugal, the Wife being a Part of a Man's own self; upon which Consideration and for many other Reasons; I earnestly exhorted him to repent of all his Sins, particularly that of Murther, that God for Christ's Sake, who shed his precious Blood for the Expiation of our Sins, would pardon all his Offences, and grant him a Right to eternal Life, through Jesus Christ, our Lord, &c.

I instructed them in the Knowledge of the Christian Sacraments, how that they were initiate and entered into the Church by Baptism, wherein they renounc'd the World, the Flesh, and the Devil, and engag'd themselves in the Service of God, promising to obey the Laws of our Saviour Jesus Christ in every thing; they having been notoriously guilty of the Breach of their baptismal Vows, I exhorted them to renew themselves by Repentance; and particularly by preparing in a right manner to receive the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper, wherein they were again to consecrate themselves to the Service of God, and in which Sacrament Christ communicated his love to the Minds of his faithful People, to whom it is an assured Pledge of everlasting Life, and of those Rivers of Pleasure which are prepared at God's Right-Hand, for all them who sincerely love and obey him.

When those and many like Instructions were proposed, they all attended punctually in Chapel; and Richard Marshal, John Jenkins, and John Broker made regular responses; Catherine Sanders was all the time afflicted

with violent Sickness and Weakness, but, saving two or three times, she never failed to come to Chapel, and always declared a sincere Penitence for all; especially the scandalous Sins of her Life. All of them behaved decently and gravely, and with an outward Profession of Repentance, but not with that Seriousness, Fervour and deep Concern, as is expected of Persons in their miserable Case.

The Six Men who were convicted last, behaved very decently and gravely in Chapel, and all of them declared that they were penitent, and appeared to be so, though not so much concerned as would have been desired; and such as could read, viz. Hampton, Dun, and Heath made regular responses; Neal and Ingram could not read, MLaughlan was a Papish, and attended only sometimes, where he sat very quiet. Both these who were first and last convicted, were to appearance serious in time of Prayers, and very attentive to Exhortations, and all of them behaved much better, than at several Times, many such miserable Wretches have done, or use to do.

The other Six Men who were convicted last of all, behaved also very decently and with apparent Seriousness made regular responses, and declared themselves truly Penitent for all the Offences and Crimes of their Lives. Thomas Banks, a few Days after Sentence had the Gout, and a great Swelling and Inflamation in his Legs and Feet; his Irons were taken off, but he was still tormented with Pains and lay in a most miserable Condition in the Cell, oppressed with Nakedness, Poverty and Sickness; when I visited him, he was very attentive to Prayers, declared a deep Penitence, a vast contempt of this World, and that he was altogether regardless of Life, not desiring to live any longer, but rather choosing to die, seeming glad to hear when the Dead Warrant came out against him.

On Sunday the 21st of this instant January, when the Prisoners were gone to Chapel, Mr. Alstone, one of the Head Turnkeys, went according to custom, to view and search the empty Cells, and found in the Cell wherein Ebenezar Dun lay, an Augur and two Chissels fixed under his Table, and a Line of 19 Yards long with a leaden Plummet to it, upon which when Dunn came down from Chapel, he was carried into the condemned Hold, and being searched, a Compass Saw was found in his Pocket, and then he confessed that he had a Design of attempting to break out in the Manner following, viz. on the Night the Dead Warrant came down, he was to bore with the Augur many Holes round the Lock of his Door, and then with the Compass-Saw, cut the Lock entirely out, by which Means with his Arms, he could reach to undo the Bolts, and so get into the Passage; which done, he was to let down his Line thro' the lower-most Slit in Newgate-street, which gives Light to the said Passage; and his Comrades

who were to be waiting there, were to fix to the End of the Line an Iron Crow, a long Rope, and what other Materials they should think Necessary for the Work; with the Crow he designed to wrench off the Locks of the other Cells, and when they were all out of their Cells, to endeavour to get out at the Top thro' the Ceiling, tho' that Attempt would have been in vain, by reason we are credibly inform'd that upon the Beams over the Ceiling, thick Oak Planks are nail'd down with large spike Nails, upon which Plank are nine or ten Course of Brick Work, and then leaded.

Upon Thursday the 25th of January, Report was made to his Majesty in Council, of the above sixteen Malefactors under Sentence of Death, in the Cells of Newgate, who were capitally convicted at the said three last Sessions of Oyer and Terminer, holden in the Old-Baily, &c. when John Jenkins of St. George's in Middle-sex, for privately stealing 6 s. 3 d. the Money of Robert Hornby, from the Person of his Wife Ann Hornby; John Brooker of St. Mary Matfelon, alias White-Chappel, for privately stealing a Silver Snuff-box, value 13 Shillings, the Goods of Samuel Collet, from the Person of his Wife, Elizabeth Collet, October the 4th; William Roberts, for breaking and entering the House of Henry Fry, and stealing 150 Yards of Saggathy, value 10 Pound, 90 Yards of Duroy value 5 Pound, 80 Yards of Serge value 6 Pound, and 50 Yards of Kersey value 7 Pound 10 Shillings, December 1st, about 7 o'Clock at Night; and Catherine Saunders of St. Dunstan's in the West, for stealing 7 Holland-Shirts value 10 Pound 10 s. 7 Neckcloaths value 17 s. 6 d. four Silk Handkerchiefs value 4 Shillings, 3 Silver-spoons value 15 Shillings, a Dimity Wastecoat value 5 Shillings, 3 shaving-cloaths value 7 s. 6 d. and 1 Pair of Sheets value 20 Shillings, the Goods of Nicholas Harding, Esq ; in his House, September the 16th, received his Majesty's most Gracious Reprieve. The remaining Twelve, viz. Richard Marshal, Henry Neal, Ebenezar Dunn, John Ingram, William Heath, William M'Laughlan, Thomas Banks, Samuel Thomas, John Alexander Emerton, alias Cromwit, alias Mears, John Achers, John Welton, and William Booth, were all ordered for Execution.

Richard Marshal of Clerkenwel, was indicted for breaking and entering the House of Henry Carry, and stealing one Silver Spoon value nine Shillings, five Brass-candlesticks value five Shillings, 14 Pewter Plates value ten Shillings, 2 Pewter Dishes value five Shillings, two Swords, a Coffee Pot, a Tea-kettle, a Pestol and Morter, a Pewter Pint Pot, a Pewter Cover, a Copper Pot, two Sheets, a Table-cloath, a Horn-box, three Pair of Shoes, a Ham and six Pounds of Cheese, the Goods of Henry Cary; fix Shifts and six Aprons, the Goods of Mary Chapman; an Apron and a Bermudus

Hat, the Goods of Henry Harrison, and a Hat, the Goods of Thomas Haltwel, September the 6th about the Hour of Two in the Night.

Richard Marshal, with his Wife and another Woman, who were also in the preceding Indictment, was a second time indicted, for breaking the House of Thomas Robe, Esq ; and stealing a Feather Bed, value 3 l. two Bolsters, two Blankets, eighteen Pewter Plates, six brass Candlesticks, one china Canister, two china Tea Cups, one silver Tea Spoon, two copper Tea Kettles, one copper Coffee-pot, one copper Chocolate-pot, three Sauce pans, one Porringer, one pair of Snuffers, six Knives, six Forks, and one Table Cloth, the Goods of Thomas Robe, Esq ; August the 31st, 1731, about the Hour of Two in the Morning.

1. Richard Marshal, about 30 Years of Age, of honest Parents, who gave him good Education at School, and when of Age put him to a Barber and Perriwig-maker ; he serv'd his Time Honestly and with Approbation of his Master; and some time after that he set up for himself at Cow-Cross, married a Wife, and had pretty good Business, which enabled him to maintain his Wife and Children, in an indifferent Way, becoming one of his Station; but his Ruin was, that he lov'd Idleness, neglected Business, and addicted himself to bad Company. He said, the Evidence who appear'd against him was the only Person who first corrupted and advised him to Evil Courses. They first began with stealing Hens and Cocks, for which he was taken up, imprison'd, and punish'd according to his deserts. Being at Liberty again, but his Character lost, few People were willing to countenance or employ him. Then he with his old Companion, and some Women who assisted them in their enterprizes, apply'd himself close to House-breaking, at which way of Business he continued for two or three Years, and liv'd merely by stealing, thieving and robbing all the time; till at last he was taken up for breaking Mr. Carey's House, and taking the Things mention'd in the Indictment, and when he was in New-Prison it was found pon him, that he was the Person who broke open Justice Robe's House at Islington, August 31st 1731. Both these Robberies he own'd as they were sworn against him; and when all hopes were past, that he was as forward to execute these mischevious Exploits, as his Neighbour John Griffin was, and that the one was no more to blame than the other. He appear'd to be a sober, well looking Person, but own'd, that he was of a vitious Inclination, loving to idle away his time with Thieves, Whores and such desperately wicked People, so that he lost all Credit and Conscience, and gave himself up to loose and disorderly Practices. He own'd the Crimes of which he was convicted, and that he suffer'd most justly according to Law; only he sometimes complain'd upon his long and tedious Imprisonment under Sentence. He always behav'd very

decently and christianly, profess'd a deep Repentance, an unfeign'd Faith in Christ, and that he dyed in Peace with all the World.

William Macklaughlane and Jane Murphy alias Macklaughlane, were indicted for stealing a velvet Purse, a silk Purse, Eighty-eight Guineas, and four Half Guineas, the Goods and Money of Henry Green, in his House, November the 2d, the Woman, upon supposition of being married to Macklaughlane, was accquited, and Macklaughlane found Guilty. Death.

2. William Macklaughlane, as he said, about Twenty-seven Years of Age, of honest Parents near Belfast in the Kingdom of Ireland, who gave him good Education at School, in Reading, Writing and Accompts, to fit him for Business; and when of Age put him to a Perriwig-maker in the City of Dublin: He did not love a confin'd Life, but soon left his Apprenticeship, and chose rather to be a Gentleman's Servant : In this Station he went abroad to France, and staying there some time, he serv'd several Gentlemen, particularly some Captains in the Irish and French Regiments. Being of a roving Disposition, he travell'd over France, Germany, Holland, Flanders, and the Highlands of Scotland, and a great Part of that Kingdom; still following after some Body or other; he also went to Sea, and hath been in the West-Indies, the Streights, and many other Parts of the World; and as he added, in all these Scenes of Life, he was acceptable to his Masters, and was honest and upright in his dealings. The last Service he made was with a young British Gentleman, at his Travels in France, with whom he came to London last Year: He had been but a few Nights in Town, when he went to visit a certain Woman of his own Country, and his old Acquaintance, at whose House he lodg'd all Night; when he return'd next Day, his Master and his Friends would not receive him into the Service again. Altho' he receiv'd a considerable Sum of Money, and three Suits of Cloaths from his Master; yet that lasted him but a very short time, for he married a Wife, and is to be fear'd, they had no good Advice to give each other. It was reported, that he serv'd Messrs. Cray and De Vic, who were lately Condemned and since Transported. He said, that he was not their Servant, but having been acquainted with young Cray who serv'd in an Irish-Regiment at Paris, and hearing that he was in Newgate, he went to visit him there, and during their Imprisonment he did them all the Service lay in his Power. He at first deny'd the Fact for which he dyed; and for the Money that he and his Wife had about them, he pretended that 17l. had been remitted him from his Brother in Ireland; but when all Hopes were past, he own'd the stealing of the Ninety Guineas as was sworn against him. He appear'd to be a headstrong, conceited, deceitful Fellow. He dy'd in Peace with all the World, and in the Popish Communion.

Ebenezer Dun, was indicted, for breaking and entering the House of Sarah Loyzado, and stealing four Pewter Dishes, a Stew-pan, a Saucepan, and a Coffee-pot, November the 22d, about the Hour of One in the Morning.

Ebenezer Dun, Twenty Two Years of Age, of honest Parents in this City, who gave him good Education at School, in Reading, Writing, and Accompts, and had him instructed in Christian Principles; when of Age, they put him to a Periwig-maker, but he took no great Pleasure in his Employment, and prov'd but an insufficient Servant, being addicted to idle Company, and loving Morefields better than any settled Employment; when out of his Time, he serv'd others, and sometimes work'd for himself; and he married a Wife, whom he commended as a virtuous Girl, and altogether ignorant of his way of Life, and indirect Practices; he said, that he went to Church sometimes, 'till of late, getting in to a Course of habitual Wickedness, and joining the most notorious Gangs of Whores and Thieves about Town, he quite lost all Sense of Virtue and Religion, and gave himself up to commit all manner of Uncleanness with Greediness. His Parents and Relations were griev'd and asham'd, to see his vile Miscarriages; he own'd the Fact of breaking the House of Sarah Layzado, as sworn against him, and that he had committed many Robberies, and innumerable petty Thefts. Gaming, Whoring, Drinking, and vile Company keeping ruin'd him. When at Freedom, he came often to the Chappel, to visit those who were under Sentence, which was an Evidence that he was too well acquainted with such wicked dispos'd People. He always behav'd well, so far as I observ'd; declar'd himself Penitent for all the Errors of his Life, and that he believ'd in Christ his only Saviour, and died in Peace with all the World.

John Ingram, was indicted for breaking and entering the House of George Cure, and stealing one Suit of Point-Lace Head clothes, value 5l. two Cambrick lac'd Heads, value 3l. two Silver Spoons, a Velvet Hood, a Velvet Mantle, a Hat, a Candlestick, and a pair of Snuffers, the Goods of George Cure; and a half Pint Silver Mug, and two Table-cloaths, the Goods of Jane Wall, November the 12th, about Twelve at Night.

John Ingram, as he said, was upwards of Twenty One Years of Age, born in Staffordshire, of honest Parents; his Father a Farmer, in a remote Place of the Country, had not Opportunity of putting him to School, so that he had no Education; the Father dying, his Mother soon married again, which (as he said) put him to his Shifts. He came to Town at the Age of Fourteen, upon the Promise of an Uncle to do for him, but in this he fail'd. Afterwards having no Friends, he serv'd a Brewer , and at last understanding something of their Business, he gave him

Twelve Shillings per Week, and next, coming to the Age of Seventeen, he married a Wife, and for the Time they liv'd together, as he said, he was a good Husband, till his being acquainted with that young Man, who was Partner with him in the Burglary, for which he died, who first advis'd him to go out upon villainous Enterprizes. As to the Fact of which he was convicted, he said, that he had been drinking all that Day, which was the Lord's Day, with that young Man, who over-perswaded him to go out upon that unlawful Expedition; accordingly when it was pretty late, they went out together, and the other Person who got into the House, and handed out the Goods in the Indictment to him, with which in his Possession he was immediately taken by the Watchmen at Covent-Garden. The other young Man desir'd him to carry the Goods to his House, where they were to be divided, but after that he never saw his Partner. This (as he said) was the first and last Fact of Theft and Robbery he had committed. He said, that he was sober, and behav'd well formerly; and that he kept the Church always before that Time. When all hopes were past, he own'd, that he was equally guilty with the other Fellow; and that as to other wicked Actions, he was of a covetous Temper, and had frequently stolen small Things, but never any Thing of Value, or that infer'd capital Punishment, He always behav'd well, declar'd himself Penitent, that he believ'd in Christ, and died in Peace with all Mankind.

Henry Neal, of St. Giles's Cripplegate, was indicted for breaking and entering the House of William Graves, and stealing a pair of Breeches, a Hat, a pair of Shoes, two Gold Rings, a Guinea and a half, and two Shillings and Sixpence, the Goods and Money of Richard Sims, and a pair of Leather Breeches, the Goods of Thomas Cecil, November the 16th, about Ten at Night.

5. Henry Neal, Twenty Years of Age, his Father a Porter at Billingsgate died, and left him young, and his Mother being a poor Old Woman, could give him no Education at School, after he was Four Years Old; since which time he was forced to Work for his Bread at One Shilling per Week, and as he advanc'd in Years they gave him more. He commonly serv'd the Carters and Scavingers, till about Seven or Eight Months ago a Cart run over his Leg, which disabled him for Work. He own'd the robbing of Mr. Graves's House, as was Sworn against him, but with a variation of Circumstances; for he said, that he only took the Hat, Breeches, and some small Things; but as to the Rings, the Guinea and a Half,

he never saw them, as he said. He said, that he kept the Church, and was not very wicked, neither did he know the vile ways usually practis'd by such wicked People; and that what he did was merely for poverty and want, he having been disabled for Work, having fasted for three Days, and every body refusing him Charity. This is the Account he gave of himself, but as to the truth thereof, we leave it to others to judge thereupon. He was a poor ignorant Fellow, and knew but little of Religion. He declared himself Penitent for his Sins, that he believ'd in Christ his only Saviour, and that he died in Peace with all the World.

William Heath, of Hackney, was indicted for assaulting Martha, the Wife of Richard Plumber, in a Field, or open Place, near the Highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her four Shirts, a dimity Waistcoat, a Cap, a Pillow, a Handkerchief, a Bib, a Pin-cushion and Three-Pence Farthing, the Goods and Money of Richard Plumber, December the 5th.

6. William Heath, between 18 and 19 years of Age, of honest Parents, who gave him good Education at School, in Reading, Writing, &c. his Father died, and left him Young, but the Mother a sober Woman, was very careful of him. He was of no particular business, but went to Sea, and to the West-Indies, but weary of that, and loving better to be at Home; he gave some Money to one to teach him to make Shoes; having attain'd some knowledge that way, he took a Stall and ett up for making and mending of Shoes. While industrious, he got his Bread very well that way, by the assistance of his Mother, who took special care of him: He also kept the Church and some Morning Lectures, till about half a Year ago. As to the Fact of which he was convicted, he said, that for three Days he had nothing for to do, upon which he did not know how to support himself; at last being hurried by a violent temptation of the Devil and his own wicked Heart, without any design or forethought, he went on the Highway, and meeting with a Woman, he rob'd her, as they swore against him. He acknowledg'd that he put the honest Woman in great fear, so that she shreek'd and cry'd out terribly; upon which those Men who were nearest hearing an out-cry of murther, immediately pursued and apprehended him. It

was so plainly prov'd upon him, that he had not the face to deny it, especially because it was his first adventure of that kind. He was much afflicted with Sickness, but always attended in Chappel, excepting a few times; and receiv'd the Sacrament oftner than once, very earnestly and devoutly. He always behav'd with a great deal of Christian devotion and decency, declar'd that he was sincerely Penitent for all his Sins, particularly the scandalous offence for which he died, that he believed in Jesus Christ, as the Son of God and our only Saviour; and that he heartily forgave all injuries, as he expected forgiveness from God.

Samuel Thomas, of St. Giles's without Cripplegate, was indicted for the murther of Elizabeth his Wife, by throwing her on the Ground, and striking and kicking her on the Head and membrane of the Brain, and thereby giving her several mortal Bruises, of which she instantly died, on the 4th of January. He was a second Time indicted on the Coroner's Inquisition for the said murther.

7. Samuel Thomas, Twenty-two years of Age, of mean Parents, who gave him little Education at School, and what he got that way, he being of a mean disposition, was mostly obliterated. He was put to no business, but was one of them who went on Errands; till at last he took up with what they call Night-men , and as he said, serv'd them and got in that way of business, what was sufficient to maintain him. He married that unfortunate Woman, whom he had the misfortune to Murther, whom as he said, he dearly lov'd and respected above all the World, and with whom he liv'd with good amity some time. He confess'd that she was an industrious Woman and got a good deal of Money, but added that she was one that was given to Drinking, and the most extravagant Creature upon Earth; and that when in Liquor, she was ready to yield herself in Whoredom to any Person whatsoever, who would offer himself to her. He said further, that she often took what Money he had, and spent or drank it in a very extravagant manner. Having frequently found her in these faults, it occasioned many broils and discontents between them. As to the particular fact for which he died, he said, that his Wife having been out and lying by the Door very Drunk, he endeavoured to bring her into the House, but

she was unwilling to go along with him; and that as he strugled to drag her up Stairs, and she opposing him, he believed she received several hurts, but that he in that affair intended no harm to her, and he alledg'd, that the Women, who appear'd against him, were all her Companions, and had no good Will for him. I exhorted him upon the highest considerations, not to diminish, but freely to confess his Crime. He appeared an obstinate, obdur'd and ignorant Sinner. I endeavour'd what I could to convince him of his folly, but he presisted in his own perverse way of thinking. He said, that he was never wicked in any notorious Crimes; he Confessed that he had been a great Sinner, for which he beg'd God and the World Pardon. He declared himself Penitent, that he believ'd in Christ our only Saviour, and that he died in Peace with all Mankind.

Thomas Banks, and Elizabeth Banks of St. George in the East, were indicted for breaking and entering the House of Thomas Kemp, and stealing a Clock, four Sheets, three Blankets, a Pewter Dish, two Plates, three Shirts, two Stocks, two Towels, three Napkins, a Boxiron, and a Saucepan, January the 5th, about Eight at Night.

8. Thomas Banks, above Fifty years of Age, born in the Country of honest, creditable Parents, who gave him good Education at School, in Reading, Writing, Latin, Greek, Accompts, and other Things proper to accomplish him for business: But all this he made little account of, for he follow'd no business, and went to no Trade, but liv'd on a small Estate his Father left him, married a Wife in Yorkshire, and in a short time run out his Estate; and then he kept a Publick Inn in the Country, where he had very good Business, the best People in that Place frequenting it; but this did not last him long, for he very soon broke and had no more Business. Then he was put to his Shifts and followed indirect Courses, which speedily brought him to his Ruin. He spoke of 16000 l. which he lost by the breaking of an eminent Person, of which he never received one Farthing, altho' it was all his Property. Several People came to Newgate while he was under Sentence, and enquired after him, who gave him a very bad Character, and said, that he was a notorious Thief and did a deal of Mischief; but as to the Things they wanted he

denied all of them; particularly the Robbing of a Gentlewoman not far from the Bridge, and the stealing of a Silver hilted Sword guilded, out of a Coffee-house in Holborn. He was much afflicted with the Gout in his Feet and Legs and with Sickness, while under Sentence; and when I visited him in the Cell he shewed a great Desire after Prayers, and declared himself very Penitent for the scandalous Sins and Offences of his Life; but he was a little Light-headed, and spoke a deal out of the Way, reflecting on some of his own Friends, and that he was wrong'd by one of them of a House of a considerable Value. He confessed that he was a Man of a most scandalous Life, ungrateful to God and Man for the Benefits bestowed upon him, and that he suffered most justly for his notorious Villainies. He declared himself Penitent, his Faith in Jesus Christ, as the Son of God and our only Saviour, and that he forgave all Men.

John Ackers, John Welton, and William Booth, of St. James's Westminster, were indicted for assaulting Richard Harvey on the Highway, putting him in fear, and taking from him a Pen-knife, and Thirty Five Shillings his Goods and Money, and an Iron Key, the Property of John Shute, Esq ; December the 12th.

William Booth, aged Nineteen, born in the Parish of St. Giles's in the Fields, of honest Parents, who sent him to School, where he learn'd to Read, Write, and Arithmetick, and was instructed in Christian Principles; and when of Age, was put Apprentice to a Hat-maker in Monmouth-Street, he serv'd only Twelve Months, as not liking two Masters, for there was a Partner taken in. After this, he liv'd with a Brother-in-law a Butcher about Twelve Months, who employ'd him in going to Smithfield to assist in his Business. He afterwards was put by his Father to serve in a Publick-house at Tottenham-Court, there he continued about Three Quarters of a Year, and not liking to stay any longer, he came home to his Father's House, who being just married to a second Wife, she did not care he should continue there, on which, rather than make a Disturbance between his Father and Mother-in-law, he quitted the House, and took to the Streets; and about a Week after he met with Charles Patrick, who had been his School-fellow, and having run away from his Mother, after some Discourse, they agreed to go a Thieving together. He

gave a short Account of some of their Robberies, viz. that with Mead and Sutton they stopped a Woman, near the Lord Bingley's in Cavendish-Square, from whom they took a Hoop-petticoat, and a pair of Silver lac'd Shoes, she crying out, Patrick broke her Head with a Pistol; next, near the same Place, they took a Silver Snuffbox, and one Penny in Money from Mary Cooling. Again, they rob'd Dorothy Blackstone in Grosvenor-Street, of three Guineas and her Pocket, she crying out, Patrick knock'd her down. Then they rob'd a Frenchman at Maryle-Bone Bason, of, three Shillings and Six-pence, his Silver Shoe Buckles, his Hat and Watch, which he refus'd to deliver; Booth put his Foot on his Throat, and took the Watch out of his Fob; then they rob'd the Reverend Mr. Smith of Kentish-town, for which Mead and Patrick died upon the Evidence of Booth. About two Months ago, he became acquainted with Mascall, Welton, Goodman and Ackers, with whom he committed two Robberies, viz. Mascall and he stopped a Coach in the King's Road near Gray's-Inn-Lane, and rob'd two Gentlewomen of a Guinea and one Shilling in one Purse, and Six-pence in another Purse. The other Robbery they were all concern'd in, for which Welton and Ackers died, upon the Evidence of Mascall and Goodman, upon a Sunday Night. Booth, Mascall, Welton, Ackers and Goodman stopped two Gentlemen in black, about six Weeks ago, under Lincoln's-Inn-Fields-Wall, but fearing Mascall would not stand true, they let them go without robbing them. Booth had been an audacious, ill-natur'd, surly young Fellow, and full'd vers'd in all manner of Thefts and Robberies, and other Debaucheries, common to such abandon'd Wretches. He behav'd modestly under Sentence, made regular Responses, declar'd himself Penitent for his notorious wicked Life; that he believ'd in Christ our only Saviour, and died in Peace with all Mankind.

John Ackers, 20 years of Age, was born in London of honest Parents, who educated him at School in Reading, Writing and Accompts to fit him for Business, to which he had no Inclination, being an idle, ill-dispos'd young Fellow. His Parents liv'd mostly at Oxford, so that he never was much at London till of late. He was not put out to any Business, but learn'd to make Shoes with his Father and Brother, and in that Employment

he took no delight in, neither did he ever come to understand much of it. He married without considering what way he was to provide for a Family. Loving a loose rambling Life, he made it his business to get acquainted with the most notorious gangs of Thieves and Robbers about Town, who very speedily brought him to his deserved destruction. His Robberies were in common with Booth, and others already mention'd. He behav'd very Christianily and Penitent under his unhappy Misfortunes; acknowledg'd the Justice of his Sentence, that he had been a most notorious Lewd, wicked young Fellow, and that he Suffer'd most deservedly. He declar'd his Faith in Christ, his Repentance for the many Sins of his Life, and that he died in Peace with all the World.

John Welton, nineteen Years of Age, of honest Parents in Westminster, who gave him Education at School, in Reading, Writing and Arithmetick, and had instructed in Christian Principles. He went to no particular Business, but did any little thing for his Mother, who got her living by Washing for Persons who was so kind to Employ her. He being idle, and wou'd do nothing, but frequent the Skittle Grounds and such like Places, where wicked People resort, and there he got his Acquaintance with the most notorious young Rogues, who hurried him a-pace to his Ruin. He was addicted to Whoring, Drinking, Gaming, Swearing, and such other Vices, as are incident to these unhappy Wretches. The heinous Offences he committed were done in Company with the two last mention'd Malefactors: They were all guilty of innumerable petty Thefts, and stealing whatever they could lay their Hands upon, on all occasions, and had no way of subsisting themselves, but by Picking of Pockets, stopping People in the Streets, and Robbing them of what they had about them. Welton behav'd very well under his Misfortunes, and declar'd himself sincerely Penitent for his many Offences, that he hop'd for Salvation thro Christ, and died in Peace with all Mankind.

John Alexander Mears, alias Cromwit, alias Emerton, was indicted for stealing a deal Box, value 6d, three gold Rings, value about 20s. two silver Spoons, value 12s. a silver Ladle, value 20s. nine Guineas, eleven Shillings, 2 pair of silver Buckles, a Napkin, a silk Hood, two Fans, a Penknife, a case-knife, a pair of Gloves, and a pair of Shoes, the Goods and

Money of William Holder, in his House, December the 16th,

John Alexander Mears, alias Cromwit, alias Emerton, Ninteen Years of Age, whose true Name was Emerton, of honest creditable Parents, who gave him good Education at an eminent School, where he was taught Latin, Greek, &c. as he said, till he was fit for the University: His Friends intended him for a Scholar to Study Law or Divinity, but then he disobliged his Parents and Relations and went to Sea , where he kept the Captain's Accompts, who was very kind to him, and gave him a Present of some Guineas when they came to their Port, which was Leghorn. There he engaged to serve an English Merchant, whom he serv'd faithfully for some Time, till he fail'd. Then Emerton was put to his Shifts, went some Voyages to Sea, to Sicily, Alicant, Lisbon, and several Ports, and as he said, he behaved well and to the Satisfaction of his Captains; at last he came home to London, where he loiter'd about and applied himself to no Business. As to the Fact of which he was convicted, he confessed the same, and that he was most ungrateful to the poor old Woman, whom he robbed of her Box and Things, as was sworn against him, who had been very kind and harbour'd him about her House, when he had no-body to do for him. He behaved very decently and gravely under his Misfortunes. He said, that he was ashamed to call his Friends to his Character, otherwise he thought if they had appeared, he might have got off for Transportation, it having been the first and only Criminal Fact he ever committed in his Life. After Conviction he wrote to some Friends in the Country, but neither his Father nor any of them answer'd him, nor came to Town to do for him. He had been an idle, drunken Boy, and had disobliged his Friends in such a Manner, that they all disown'd him. He declar'd his Faith in Christ, that he repented of all his Sins, died in peace with all Men, and an unworthy Member of this Church.

At the Place of EXECUTION.

THey all appeared very devout. Marshal own'd his robbing one Mr. Tabbery a Cabinet-maker at the Golden-Cabinet, in Clerkenwell, of several Glasses to the Value of about five Pound, another Person was to have been concerned with him, but he not coming according to his Promise, he broke open the Shop himself; and likewise he own'd that he sold Mr. Justice Robe's Bed, and other Things belonging to it, for 32 or 33 Shillings to one on Saffron-Hill. Samuel Thomas just before the Cart drew away, begged of his Friends who was in the Cart with him, that he might be buried by his Wife. Welton said, that there were wicked People about Town, who got Youths to engage in Robberies, and then made it their Business to give Information against them, in hopes of a Reward, and that was the Way how he was first engaged to Thieving and Robbing. The rest of them said, that they freely forgave all Men, and died in perfect Peace with every Body. All of them expressed hope of Salvation, through the Mercy of God in Christ: They went off the Stage crying out, God have Mercy upon us, Lord Jesus receive our Spirits.

This is all the Account given by me,

JAMES GUTHERIE.

Ordinary of Newgate.

The following Account was delivered by John Alexander Emerton, to the Printer, the Morning of his Execution, in the Chapel of Newgate.

IT is a Custom, I have observed, for those unfortunate Wretches, who are Condemn'd by the Laws of their Country, to yield up their Lives as an Attonement for the Facts they have Committed, and are convicted of; to give some Account of the course of Life, that they have lead, and make a relation of the Crimes they have been Guilty of. I have farther observed that when some have departed Silent, and willing that the World should take no Notice of them, there are those who have made it their Business, for the sake of filling a Sheet of Paper, to say something either True or False, concerning those Persons of whom they have had no knowledge, and of whose Affairs they have been altogether Ignorant. To comply therefore with the former Observation, and to avoid the Inconveniencies of the Latter, I have thought it proper to spare an hour or two in letting the World know the most material Circumstances and Accidents of my Life from my own Pen, to prevent a too censorious Report of me from my Enemies and Strangers, or a too favourable One from my Friends and Acquaintance.

I was Born on the 10th, Day of August in the Year of our Lord, 1712, and have no other Reason or Motive for concealing the Names of my Parents, (who ever liv'd in great Credit and Repute, and I hope will continue to do so long after my Death,) but to avoid the Reproaches and Reflections which the more malicious part of Mankind might be apt upon my Account, to cast upon that Innocent Family which Un-worthily I belong to. My Parents in my Minority took all the Care of me, that a tender Father and Mother can take of their most beloved Child; I being as dear to them as the Apple of their Eye, and the darling of all the Family. At five years of Age, I began to learn the Rudiments of the Latin Tongue, wherein my Friends seeing me make a quick Proficiency, removed me to Merchant Taylor's School before I was eight Years Old: My Father, upon my strick Application to my Studies, and the delight I took in Literature and Reading, design'd me for Oxford; with the view thereof of being made a Minister of God's holy Word. I continued at that honourable School

(where Virtue and Honesty is Taught, and the fundamental Grounds of the true Religion are Explained to all those Youths who are there Educated) the space of ten Years, but in the tenth Year, I instead of making myself fit to admonish others of their Sins and Wickedness, I fell into the Snares of Satan my self; neglected my School, and sometimes my Father's House, to follow that most pernicious and destructive Vice of Gaming. I sold most of my Books to supply my self therein; Translated Homer and Demosthenes, into Cards and Dice, and left my old Companions Virgil and Horace, for Pam and Knave Noddy.

By keeping Company with Gamesters, and persuing these ill Courses, I at length lost the Favour of my Master, the Rev. Dr. Smith, and perceived that the Affection my Father had formerly bore for me, began to decay; I then entirely left the School, and drank deep of that bitter Fountain which I had but sipped at before; I mean that I entirely devoted, and wholly gave myself up to the Pursuit of all sorts of Games. When I had thus forfeited the Love and Regard which my Parents had for me before, and found that they wou'd no longer look upon me as a Son; I made my Application to an honourable Gentleman near St. Alban's in Hertfordshire, who interceeded for me, and so far prevailed upon my Father, that he fitted me out, and sent me to Genoa, Leghorn, Naples, Messina, Melazzo, and other Places within the Streights of Gibraltar, under the Care and Tuition of a worthy Gentleman, to whom I was very well recommended, both by my Father and other Gentlemen that knew me.

Upon my return Home, I could not forsake my old Companions, whom I with some Difficulty found out, and followed Gaming till I had lost all that I had; upon which, loosing all, I committed the Robbery for which I die for; which was the first Fact that I ever was guilty of. I desire all young Men (in particular) not to give their Minds to any manner of Gaming, which was the entire Cause of my Ruin, and bringing a Load of Sorrow on myself, and my unhappy Parents.

Witness,

Jo. Alex. Emerton.

Newgate Cells Jan. 29. 1733.

The following Verses were made by the above Malefactor, with a Design to send to Her Majesty.

FROM dismal Cells where horrid Thoughts invade,

My trembling Soul that craves your Royal Aid;

Where Groans and ratling Chains seem to foretel,

The threatned Tortures of approaching Hell.

Where Phoebus won't afford one kindly Ray, But from our Crimes and us flies far away; And gloomy Night usurps the Place of Day.

A Wretch opprest with Misery and Care,

To Thee great Queen directs his humble Prayer:

Where should this Wretch sunk down with weight of Woe, For saving Mercy, and Compassion go, But unto Thee, from whom whole Springs of Mercy flow.

My Verse I am sensible is Sick and Dull as well as myself, but this is only a rough Draught of what I intend to write, which must be polish'd, the Stile amended, and the whole interspersed with handsome Thought and apt Similies: If the Water of Newgate, instead of Mount Helon, will inspire my addled Brain, I believe I can prevail upon my Prosecutrix to Sign my other two, this to the Queen being an uncommon one, needs no Name but my own, and proper Means to be delivered.

When I came from Chapel just now, I was sat down in a melancholy Mood, meditating on the Hardships I go thro', and considering that I Dine on Paper Dyet as I had Breakfasted; but your kind Letter Sir, and the Present from Mr. Chatmeus and Mr. Webster reviv'd my Spirits, dispelled Part of the Mist before me and gave me new Life like another Reprieve; my hearty Thanks to those Gentlemen, and I pray to God that they may never know the want of a Shilling; at the Sight of it, I confess my Thoughts were changed, and that excellent Poem of Mr. Philips's on a splendid Shilling enterr'd my Mind. Pray Sir give my humble Service to Mr. Tomlinson, and I return him Thanks for his Favour which has alone preserved my Life hitherto. You

inform me Sir, that Mrs. Williams gives her kind Love to me; let me trouble you once more Sir, to acquaint her that I return mine as kindly to her, I desire Mr. Chalmers to take care of her. if it should be their Fate to go to Virginia together, but I hope they may have better Luck. I observe that Mrs. Williams says she is glad her Prayer Book is given to One, who is in so much want of the same as I am; I have it not as yet, but shall be very thankful for it when she sends it me, the sooner the more acceptable; I return you all thanks in general, and Gentlemen I pray God to continue in a good State of Health and prosper all your Undertakings; a Line or two (if not too troublesome) from either of your Hands Gentlemen would be entirely Welcome to your obliged Servant,

J. A. EMERTON.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

This Day is Publish'd, Price 3 s. 6 d.

With a Frontispiece of the famous Jack Shepherd's Escape out of the Condemn'd Hole of Newgate.

THE LIVES of the most remarkable Criminals, who have been condemn'd and executed, for Murder, Highway, House-breaking, Street Robberies, Coining, or other Offences, from the Year 1720 the present Time: Containing particularly, the Lives of, Mrs. Griffith for the Murder of her Maid; Kennedy the Pyrate; Molony and Carick, Highwaymen; Brindsden who murder'd his Wife; Levee, and the rest of his Gang, Street Robbers; Capt. Massy for Pyracy; Roch for Pyracy and Murder; a full Account of the Waltham Blacks; the famous Jack Shephard; his Companion Blueskin; and Towers who was hing'd for setting up the new Mint. Collected from Original Papers and Authentick Memoirs. To which is prefix'd, a Preface, containing a general View of the Laws of England, with respect to Capitals Offences.

Printed and sold by John Applebee in Bolt-Court, Fleet Street; A. Bettesworth, and C. Hith, at the Red-Lion in Pater Noster Row; John Pemberton, at the Golden Back against St. Dunstan's Church. J. Isted, at the Golden Ball near Chancery-lane, in Fleet-street; E. Symon in Cornhill; R. Ware, at the Bible and Sun in Amen-Corner near Pater-Noster Row; W. Mears, at the Lamb the Corner of Bell Savage Inn on Ludgate Hill; and Richard Wellington, at the Dolphin and Crown, without Temple-Bar.

The Publick may depend on the Account publish'd in this Work, as containing a just and faithful Narration of the Conduct of these unhappy Persons, and a true State of their respective Crimes, without any Additions of feigned and romanick Adventures, calculated meerly to entertain the Curiosity of the Reader.

N. B. Vol II. is in the Press, and will be Publish'd with all convenient Expedition.

Where may be had of the Printer of this Paper,

The Life and Actions of JOSEPH POWIS, who was Executed on Monday the 16th of October last at Tyburn Written by himself, during his Confinement in the Cells. Price 1 s.

The Original, Inestimable, Angelical ELECTUARY:

Being a speedy Cure for Coughs, Colds, Asthma's Ptisicks, Wheezings, difficult Breathings, and Shortness of Breath.

A Preparation, not only to be had in Esteem from the great Skill of all medicinal Composition, but also from the choiceness of its Ingredients, every one of them contributing, by their particular Virtues, to make it the most effectual Medicine in the whole Republick of Medicines. It daily overcomes the most grounded Coughs, tho' of never so long standing, and perfectly cures them in a very little time; its found to be the most sure Help, and the only Medicine in the World for old Consumptions, Pisicks, Colds, Wheezings, Asthma's shortness of Breath, and all other Diseases of the Breast and Lungs, restoring those that are left off by Physicians, remaining in uter Despair under the Burthen of their miserable Lives. It cures all husky and dry Coughs; dissolves congealed Phlegm in the Thorax; takes away the tickling in the Aspera Arterea; heals rawness and soreness of the Lungs Breast and Stomach, causing easy Expectoration, cures vehement Catarhs, Distillation of Rheum, and all Fluxes of Humours, falling upon any of the Noble Parts. It gives immediate Relief as soon as taken, in the severest of Coughing, and so perfectly frees the Patient at once. Several Persous that were turn'd out of the Hospitals as Incurable of Asthma's Consumptions, Ptisicks, and shortness of Breath, have, by the Use of this choice Medicine, been perfectly restored to their former Health.

Prepared and Sold by the Author, a Chymist, at his House the Second Door on the Right hand in Bride Lane; next Fleet-street. Likewise So'd at Mr. Robotham's Toyshop by Whitechappel-Bars; at Mr. Neal's Toyshop opposite the White hart-Inn in the Borough of Southwark; at the Mite in Jewin street, at Mr. Greg's Bookseller, next Northumberland-house, Charing Cross, at Mrs. Gbert's Simple Water Shop in White Row near Spittle Fields Church. At one Shilling a Pot, seal'd with two Dragons and the Author's Name, as above to prevent Counterseits.

Note, This is the Electuary by which several thousands have been cured of the aforesaid Distempers; and not one Person ever used it but had intire Satisfaction. It will keep its Virtues Years, for it will neither dry or mould, being a perfect Balsom for the Lungs.

Dr. R. NELSON, being well known to have made the Cure of SEMINAL and GENITAL Imbecilities his chief Study and Practice for above 30 Years, does recommend his most Noble Cleansing and Strengthning Elixir, which Thousands of People (many of them of high Rank) have happily experienced, and is by Numbers of Physicians and Surgeons approv'd, as the only BALSAMICK HEALING and RESTORING Medicine to be depended upon in the World, For GLEETS and WEAKNESSES, The Bane of Virility or Manhood, in the one Sex, and Destroyer of Fertility or the Bearing of Children in the other, whether from ill cur'd Venereal Infections (than which nothing is more common) or from inordinate Coition or Self Pollution (that cursed School Wickedness,' which spoils all our Youth, by nipping their Man-hood in the Bud) or from involuntary Emissions a nights in the Sleep, or in the Day time, upon Stool, or with the Urine; or from Falls, Blows, Strains, Wrenches, or the like, which drain and dry up the Seminals, and wither, as it were, the Generative Faculties, causing Impotency in Men, the Fluor Albus, or Barrenness in Women (or but a weakly, sickly Off spring if any); and in the long Run (by impoverishing the Blood and Spirits) Melancholly, Vapours, Decays of Nature and Consumptions.

No Medicine can be more pleasant to take, nor any Thing upon Earth more effectual for the Purpose; for let the Imbecility be ever so great, or of ever so long standing, and be either in the Parts, Spermatick Vessels, or Bck, with Pain or without, it certainly Cures, by revving and enriching the Blood and Spirits, comforting, nourishing, and replenishing the Reins and Seminals, and strengthening, and restoring the Genital Parts in both Sexes, how much soever weakned, rendered cold, or deadned, and bringing them to their natural Force, Warmth, and Vigour, by thickening and fertilizing the Seed, which before was thin, waterish, or yellowish and consequently insufficient, either for Procreation or the Act of it.

All Disorders of the Urine, as Difficulty in the making or retaining it, or its dribbling away hot orsmarting, or foul, slimy, thready, greasy, or stinking, whether from Gravel, Stone, Strangury or a Venereal Cause, are likewise speedily cured by it, and the Water made to be held as strongly, and yet brought away as freely, easily, full stream'd, and clear as ever.

These are the real Vertues of this great Medicine, which could all who stand in need of it, (but have not yet tried it) be made as sensible of as those Numbers of People are, who have tried it, they would gladly, and quickly too, have recourse to it.

Price 5 s. a Bottle, Prepared by the abovesaid Author and sold only (sealed up with Directions how to take it and how to discover whether the Gleet or Weakness be Venereal or not) at Mr. ISTED's, a Bookseller, at the Golden Ball, between St. Dunstan's Church and Chancery-Lane End in Fleet-Street, asking only for a s. Bottle of Elixir.

This Day is published, (in large Octavo)

Curiously Engraved by the best Hands on 73 Copper-Plates, and neatly printed on a Genoa Royal.

THE Young Clerk's ASSISTANT: Or, PENMANSHIP made Easy, Instructive, and Entertaining. Being a Compleat Pocket Copy-Book for the Practice of Youth in the Art of Writing, Together with a Supplement, consisting of Select Poems on several Occasions, Moral and Divine. Extracted from the most celebrated English Authors, viz. Waller, Dyden, Addison, Pope, Gay, &c. for the Amusement of the Fair Sex. To which is added, a curious Drawing Book of Modes, designed by the Famous Bernard Pcart, and engraved by G. Bickham, jun. &c. for the early Improvement of young Gentlemen and Ladies, in the Practice of Pencil, as well as Pen

Sold by R. WARE, at the Bible and Sun in Warwick lane.

Also may be had just publish'd,

II. A DESCRIPTION of Three Hundred ANIMALS, viz. Beasts, Birds, Fishes, Serpents and Insects. With a particular Account of the Whale Fishery. Extracted out of the best Authors, and adapted to the Use of all Capacities, especially to allure Children to read. Illustrated with Copper Plates, whereon is curiously engraven, every Beast-Bird, Fish, Serpent or Insect, described in the whole Book Price 2 s. 6 d.

III. EMBLEMS for the Entertainment and Improvement of Youth, containing hieroglyphical and enigmatical Devices relating to all Parts and Stations of Life; together with Explanations and Proverbs in French, Spanish, Italian and Latin, alluding to them, and translated into English. The whole curiously engrav'd on 62 Copper Plates. Price 2 s. 6 d.

IV. THE ART OF HERALDRY: containing the Original and Universality of Arms and Ensigns, with their Use and Necessity, their Blazon, Distribution, Abatements, and Rewards of Honour, embellish'd with forty Copper Plat, containing above 900 Coats of Arms of the Nobility and Genty of Great Britain and Ireland, curiously engraven, with their Description: espers'd with natural History of the several Species of Birds, Beasts, Fishes, Vegetables, &c. also all the Terms used in the Science or Heraldry, T. which is prefix'd, an Alphabeticl List of the Names of the Families whose Coats are delineated in the Book. Price 2 s. 6 d.

ELectuarium Mirabile; or the Admirable Electuary, which infallibly cures all Degrees and Symptoms of the Secret Disease, with more Ease, Speed, and Safty, than any Medicine yet published. Any old Running, &c. tho' of several Years standing, whether occasion'd by an Overstrain, Weakness of the Seminals or the Rcts of a former Infection, is certainly cured in a short Time, without a Minutes Confinement, Suspicion, or the Use of Astringents; being a Medicine so wonderfully pleasant and easie in its Operation, that the nicest Palate, or weakest Constitution may take it with Delight. Two Pots are generally sufficient to compleat a Cure in most Cases. To be had (with Directions at large) only of the Author, Dr. CAM, a gra

duate Physician, who has published it Thirty Years, and is constantly to be advised with at his House, at the Golden Ball in Bow Church-yard, Cheapside, at Half a Guinea the Pot.

N. B. Since nothing is more requesite, in the Cure of any Distemper, than for a Patient to have free access to his Physician; therefore beware of buying Medicines from Toy shops, Book sellers shops, &c. the Authors of which are always conceal'd, and not to be Spoke with on an Occasion. And tho' by their specious Pretences) you are promised a cheap Cure, you'll certainly find it very Dear in the End.

Verbum sat Japienti.

See his Books lately publish'd viz. His Rational and Useful Account of the Secret Disease. Price 1 s. His Practical Treatise; or Second Thoughts on the Consequences of the Venereal Disease. In Three Parts viz. I. On the Simple Gonorrhaea, Gleets and other Weaknesses, whether from Venereal Embraces, Self-pollution, improperiy call'd Onanism, or Natural Imbecility. II. On the Virulent Gonorrhaeas, or Clap. III. On the Veneral Lues, or Grand Pox, &c. Price 2 s. His Essay on the Rheumatism and Gout. Price 6 d. His Discourse on Convulsions. Price 6 d. And his Dissertation on the Pox. Dedicated to Sir Hans Sloane. Price 1 s. 6 d. All sold by G. Strathan in Cornhill, E. Midwinter in St. Paul's Churchyard, and at the Author's House before menioned.

Taken by Execution, and to be SOLD On Thursday the 1st of February. (The very lowest Price being fix'd)

ALL the Houshold Goods, together with all the rich Stock, in Trade, of Mr. Thomas Tennant, an eminent wholesale Dealer in all Manner of Houshold Furniture : The Whole consisting of Standing Beds and Bedding, fine large Glass sconces, Pier Glasses and Chimney Glasses in carv'd and gilt Frames; ditto in plain Walnut tree Frames, and Dressing Glasses of all Sorts; fine Walnut-tree, Mahogany, and other Deks, Book Cases with Glass Doors; several Walnut-tree Chests upon Chests Walnut-tree Writing Deks, Buroe Dressing Tables, Walnut-tree or Mahogany; fine Walnut tree Quadril Tables, and several curious Tables of Divers Sorts not yet expos'd; Mahogany, Dining Tables of all Sizes, Breakfast Tables Bx Tables, Corner Tables and Night Tables, Marble, Tables of all Sorts and Dumb Waiters; several fine Mahogany Chests for Cloaths; a large Quantity of fine and course Chairs, Walnut-tree, Mahogany, &c. from one Shilling a Chair to five Pounds; several fine Dressing Chairs, Shaving Chairs, Closestool Chairs, Easy Chairs, Settees and Settee Beds, fine white Callico Quilts and printed Quilts of all Sorts fine new Whitney Blankets of all Sizes; several very good new Eight Day Clocks, Table Clocks, Stove Grates, Carpets and Pictures: And, for Conveniency of Sale, the Goods are brought from Mr. Tennant's Ware-houses in Long Lane, to Surman's Great House in Soho Square, St. Anne's. At the same Place is Sold the very best new white hard Metal Pewter, call'd French Pewter, or change new for old; and for conveniency of the Buyer the Goods shall be safely deliver'd to any part of the Town on Board any Ship, or to any Inn or Place, according to Directions, within three Miles of the Place of Sale, without any Charge to the Buyer. Likewise at the same Place any Merchant or Dealer may be furnish'd with any Quantity of any of the Goods abovemention'd or truck for Mahogany Carpets or China.

N. B. If any Gentlemen, Ladies, or others, have a House of Goods to dispose of, or any Parcel of Houshold Goods. Plate, Linnen, Pictures or China, by directing to Surman's as abovementioned, you may have a good Price and ready Money. Likewise he changes new Goods for old.

Note, He sells for ready Money, and the Sale will continue the Winter Season.

D. BENJAMIN GODFREY'S, GENERAL CORDIAL.

OF so universal Benefit for the present Distemper of Coughs and Colds, attended with a Shivering, and all Manner of Pains in the Bowels, Fluxes, Fevers, Small-Pox, Measles, Rheumatism, and Restless in Men, Women and Children; and particularly for the Help of weakly Women, and Relief of young Children in the Breeding their Teeth.—This Cordial for the Distempers 'tis design'd for, is now become the most approved, sovereign, universal Medicine in Europe, sold wholesale and retail at my original Warehouse in Bishopsgate-street, London; and is sold in most Cities, Boroughs, and Market Towns throughout Great Britain and Ireland, and most pblick Streets in London, about 3 Ounces in a Glass so 9 d.

Note, To prevent the publick from being impos'd upon by Counterfeits, I have put my Christian Name on the Top of the Bottles, as here-there being counterfeit Sorts sold with the Title of GODFREY's CORDIAL on the Top of the Bottles, and in the Bills given with the Bottles, the Names of the Impostors who prepare it are not mention'd.

Prepared by

BENJAMIN GODFREY, M. D.