Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 24 November 2014), Ordinary of Newgate's Account, April 1725 (OA17250430).

Ordinary's Account, 30th April 1725.

THE ORDINARY of NEWGATE his ACCOUNT, Of the Behaviour, Confession, and dying Words of the Mslefactors, who were Executed on Friday the 30th of April last at Tyburn.

AT the KING’S Commission of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery of Newgate, Held (before the Right Hon. Sir George Merttins, Knt . Lord Mayor of the City of London, Mr. Justice Tracey, Sir William Thompson, Knt . Recorder , Mr. Serjeant Raby, and several of His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace, for the City of London, and County of Middlesex) at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily, on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, being the 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th days of April, in the eleventh Year of His Majesty’s Reign; nine Men and Four Women were by the Jury found Guilty of Capital Offences, and received Sentence of Death.

Of these Thirteen Persons, with Three others who were Capitally Convicted at the preceeding. Sessions Six received His Majesty’s Reprieve. The Others finding themselves included in the Warrant for Execution, began then to drop those Expectations, which, till the Report is made to His Majesty, Malefactors constantly flatter Themselves with. During their Continuance under Sentence of Death, I instructed them from these Words, Heb. II. latter part of the 6th, ver. He that cometh to God, must believe that be is, and that be is a Rewarder of them that diligently seek him.

They were also shown the principal Branches of the Law of Nature, from the following Words of St. Paul, which follow after the Apostle has blamed and accused the Generality of the Heathens for not Glorifying the Deity as God, after they had learned his eternal Power and Godhead, from the Works that are seen, the wonders of Creation; but on the Contrary, turning aside to Stones, and Four-footed Beasts, and creeping Things.

For when the Heathen, which have not the Law, do by Nature the Things contained in the Law, These having not the Law, are a Law unto Themselves; their Conscience the mean while bearing Witness, and their Thoughts either accusing, or else excusing one another.

The Sunday preceeding their Execution, they were shown the Nature of Just and unjust Actions, the Original of Right and Property, and how lawful Punishments are thence deduced; from a Passage in the first Chap. of the Prophesy of the Prophet Esaiah, part of the 16th and 17th ver. Where God, by the Mouth of the Prophet, after blaming the Jews for their vain Oblations, Sacrifices, New-Moons, and appointed Feasts, directs them in the following manner.

Put away the Evil of your Doings from before mine Eyes; Cease to do Evil, Learn to do Well, &c.

They were also instructed in the Nature of the Holy Sacrament, from the eleventh Chap, of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians; where the Apostle faith, verses the 20, and following; For when ye come together therefore into one Place, this is not to eat Lord’s Supper. For in Eatings every one taketh before other his own Supper, and one is Hungry, and another is Drunken. What? Have ye not Houses to eat and to drink in? Or despise ye the Church of God, and shame them that have not? What, shall I say to ye? Shall I praise ye in this? I praise ye not, &c.

While Instructions were given them, from these and other Places of Scripture, the hearty Signs of Repentance, which have always been judg'd requisite in Men so near their End, did not appear; especially in them who had committed the greatest Crimes: But the Carelessness which was particularly observed in these Malefactors, will seem less strange, if we consider the great Number under Condemnation, and how much their own Inclinations naturally lead them to be remiss and negligent in their Devotions, whenever any Let or Hindrance offers itself in the way of their Duty; notwithstanding, they had a Person who continued with them, in order to excite them to their Duty, especially Night and Mornings, The continued Distempers of Jones, Marshal, and Lloyd, (for it pleased God to afflict with Sickness the former two of them for many Weeks successively some of the others complain’d were also an uneasiness to them, and an hindrance in the performance of their Duty.

On Wednesday the 28th Day of April, the Report of the 14 Malefactors under Sentence of Death (2 Women, viz. Elizabeth Doyle and Isabella Williams having being found pregnant) being made to his Majesty in Council, 6 of them, viz. Claudius Anjou, Will. Martin, Mary Stephens, J. Lloyd, W. Moore, and J. Jones, received his Majesty's Gracious Reprieve, and the others were ordered for Execution; viz. James Campbell, William Marshal, Thomas Lloyd, Mary Hanson, Vincent Davis, William Eaton, John Guy, and Bryan Smith. If any of the Magistrates upon the Bench, or any of the Jury, or of those who appear’d as Evidences against the Prisoners upon their several Tryals,, are desirous of being inform’d by an Account somewhat more particular, concerning their Behaviour, or Confessions, before their Deaths, or at the Time of it, what we can say farther for their Information is as follows.

1. JAMES CAMPBELL and 2. WILLIAM MARSHAL, of the Parish of St. Mary Islington were condemn’d for assaulting George Bass and Hannah Ward, in a Field near the Highway, on the 21st of March last, and taking from them a Frock value 30s. a Hat 6s. a Handkerchief 2s. and about 12 s, 6 d. in Money.

When I enquired of the former of these Prisoners what Education his Parents had afforded him, what he had read in the Old or New Testament, and what he understood of the Religion he was bred up in? He said his Mother was a Woman in mean and low Circumstances, and not able to give him any Learning, and that what he understood of God and of Jesus Christ, he had learned by his own Care and Industry; but as that was when he was very young, his wasting his Time about Islington, Hoxton, Moorfields, &c, by Drinking and idle Diversions, had almost worn out the Remembrance of it: But he at the same time promised to apply to all his Friends, in order to their furnishing him with the Whole Duty of Man, the Practice of Piety, the Christian Sacrifice, and such other Books as were accounted Necessary, and which his Companions in Distress were not furnish’d with. Though upon his being told, before the Warrant for Execution was sign’d, that he very much wrong'd and injured himself, in fancying he should not be included in the said Warrant, he appear'd to be more serious and more concerned than before, yet 'twas to be feared that his Concern was not occasion'd by a Sense of his having offended God and Jesus Christ; because almost to the last of his Life, a strange and uncommon Spirit of Revenge and Rancour was lodg'd in his Mind against the Persons who give Evidence against him; tho’ it was represented to him, that no Christian ought to continue or retain Malice, Revenge, and Ill-will, even towards Persons who have wrong’d and injured him, if he expects Forgiveness from God: And that much less ought a Malefactor to bear an Enmity towards Persons who had acted according to Law, had taken away a Life that was forfeited by vicious Practices, or rather had discovered the Truth, and thereby given the Law an Opportunity of taking it away, and which if they had not done, they had injured fie Society whereof they are Members, and been themselves guilty of an Offence: Notwithstanding this, it was certain that he did not lay aside his Malice and Resentment; and this sufficiently appear'd from his Behaviour at the Chapel on the Sunday before he suffered; for mistaking a Person there present for his Accuser in the Court of Justice, he express'd his want of a proper Instrument to dispatch him immediately, nor could the Prisoner rest till the said Person was put out of the Chapel, after which he seemed at attend very earnestly and very carefully to the Service of Religion, and the Duty for which he was carried thither. Before he dy’d he was Instructed more fully in the Nature of Christianity, and the chief Requisites of Repentance, William Marshal, who was the Companion of Campbell in the Robberies above-mentioned,,and also in a Robbery committed on the Person of Mr. Lush in the Parish of St. James Clerkenwell, was visited with much Sickness during his Confinement, which encreas'd till the Time he suffered Death. I was assured that he most carefully attended to the Person who read to him, as well by Night as Day, in the Condemn’d-HoId,

and show'd the utmost Signs of Repentance. This Malefactor did not deny the Robberies which they were by the Jury found gusty of; but Campbell seem’d to prevaricate about the Matter, and to some Persons directly deny'd the Robbery.

3. WILLIAM EATON, of St. Sepulchers, was indicted for assaulting John Evilhay in Charter-house Lane, and robbing him of a Suit of Cloaths, viz. Coat, Wastcoat, Breeches, Shirt, Stockings, Shoes Hat,Wig, &c. on the 27th of March last. It appearing that the Prisoner with one R. Dowland and another, threw down the Prosecutor and took the Apparel from him, the Jury found him guilty of the Indictment.

Upon his Tryal he had not any Friends to appear for him, nor after his Condemnation to afford him Cloaths or other Necessaries; but he said the extream Poverty and Misery that appear’d in his outward Condition, did not lessen his Application to God, according to his Capacity, for.tho’ he could not read, he constantly attended the Prayers, and regarded the Scripture when read, with the utmost Seriousness and Care. He said he was continually repeating the Creed and the Lords Prayer, which was all that he could remember. He express'd his readiness to suffer Death for the Crime he had committed, desiring Favour from God alone.

THOMAS LOYD,of Thistleworth, was indicted, together with Katherine his Wife and Mary Stephens, for breaking the House of Joseph Clements in the Night time, and taking thence 30 l. in Money, a Gold Ring, a Coral, a sattin Gown and Petticoat, a pair of Sheets, 6 Yards of Holland, &c. on the 15th of July last. It; plainly appearing from the Evidence, that Mary Stephens had admitted Lloyd and his Wife into her Master's House, during his absence at Uxbridge, and that he robb’d the House when the other Servant , Harris, was gone to Bed; the Jury found Lloyd and Stephens guilty of the Indictment, but acquitted Katherine Lloyd, as being under the Power and Direction of her Husband. As this Prioner was very much visited with Sickness, while under the Conviction of the Law, he said he could not pray to God; but by his Behaviour and all his Expression he appear’d to be Delirious; during the Intervals, and before he was so Afflicted, he applied himself carefully to his Duty, acknowledging he merited Death for the Offence he had committed.

5. JOHN GUY, of Tuddington, was indicted for hunting and killing certain Fallow Deer, the Property of Anthony Duncomb, Esq ; in his Paddock or Pk, after the 1st of June, 1723,viz. on the 1st of September last. It appearing from the Evidence of Charles George the Keeper , and others, that this Prisoner and one Biddesford (who was killed in the Pursuit) were standing arm’d in the Park, and three Deer near them worry’d and kill’d; that in their flight they turn’d upon the Pursuers, and threaten’d to shoot them with their Pistols if they did not desist and leave them, together with other Circumstances, he was found guilty of the Indictment. But his Conviction was very much contrary to his Expectation; and after Sentence was pass’d upon him, tho’ he was far from denying his Guily, he was also far from believing he should suffer Death: So that altho’ he seemed to have a true and thorough Notion of Religion and of his Duty, he nevertheless appear’d Indolent and Remiss, till the Warrant for Execution left him no

hopes that he should escape the Law. Before he died, he with many Tears lamented his Distress, and express'd the dangerous Condition of his Soul.

6. MARY HANSON, of St. Katherine’s, was convicted of mortally wounding with a Knife, near the Right Pap, Francis Peters, (a distant Relation by marriage) on the 7th of March last. After the recovered of her Sickness, this Prisoner took very great Pains in informing herself of her Duty, and for that End did not once absent from the publick Worship of God in the Chapel. The Despondence of Mary Stephens (who had much Uneasiness and many Doubts, because she had received the Holy Sacrament and afterwards committed Robberies) put this Prisoner, while she continued with her, upon many serious Reflection and Considerations, and Enquiries. She said she merited more than Death for Murder, and for murdering a Person who had taken her under his Roof, afforded her a comfortable Subsistance, and been particularly civil to her; expecting only in return what she could with Ease and Satisfaction do for his Advantage. She advised all Women, she said, to avoid Drunkenness, as the leader to various Misfortunes; adding, that she did not think her Drunkenness and Passion an Excuse but an Aggravation of the Crime she had committed, and which she desired the Law might punish her for, that her Soul might be saved in the Day of the Lord. She was particularly earnest and desirous before she suffered, to be inform’d in the Nature, the End, Design and Benefits of the Sacrament, which she receiv'd agreeable thereto.

7. VINCENT DAVIS, of St. James Clerkenwell, was indicted for mortally wounding in the Breast Elizabeth his Wife , on the 15th of March last. It appearing from the Depositions, that it was the Prisoner's Custom to beat, cut and abuse the Deceas’d, as well as to associate with other Women, and that he had purchased a Knife, threating that he would destroy her, &c. He was found guilty of the Indictments.

Though this, Malefactor, immediately after the commission of the Murder, either as being terrify’d and alarm’d, or as. hoping it might afterwards avail him, appeared to be greatly concern'd and sorry for the Fact, yet after he had been visited in Newgate, and had regaled himself for a few Days, a very strange and sad degree of Prossigateness usurp'd the Place of Sorrow, such as I forbear here particularly to mention; and though he was carried to the Chapel before his Condemnation, when the other Prisoners were not admitted thither, he behaved in a manner very different from what was expected from him. After his Condemnation, his Deportment did not alter; he seem'd desirous to appear like a bold Man, and as one who could gaze on Death with unconcern. But not withstanding this, when; the Warrant for Execution was sign'd, his Behaviour chang'd at once, and his very Countenance and Heart seem'd strook with Consternation even, to the last; he did not indeed ever look in a Book at the Chapel, but at last show’d a vast Concern: Yet he could not be convinced that he had done any great hurt in killing his Wife, saying, she deserv’d it, and

if he had not destroyed her Life, she would have destroyed his Soul, for even her very sight rais’d Malice, and Abhorance, and Hatred in his Soul, and whatever is contrary to Christian Love and Charity, from the Time that she had him committed to New-Prison. During his Consinement he not only sent many Letters to all his former Friends and Acquaintance to form a Company, and prevent the Surgeons in their Designs upon his Body; but at the Chapel strove to conceal his Looks from those whom he suspected to be such: So great were these Apprehensions that he should be Anatomiz'd, that I was told he desired and wish'd he might be hang'd in Chains to prevent it, and with that view affronted the Court of Justice.

BRYAN SMITH, was convicted of feloniously Writing an extorting Letter to Baron Susso, threatning to murther him or burn his Country House, unless he paid to an appointed Person a Sum of Money therein mentioned, &c. This Prisoner acknowledged the Offence whereof he was convicted, and append observant of his Duty, according to his Sentiments, for he profest himself a Roman Catholick ; adding, that he was born in Ireland.

At the Place of Execution.

Campbell desired the Spectators to take Notice, that he denied his beings guilty of the Crime laid to his Charge; and during the Prayers appeared with a very strange and uncommon Carelessness and Unconcern, requesting them to put him speedily out of this World, for he thought them very tedious. But the violence of the Crowd hindering the Horses from proceeding, gave a long Stop to Death in the moment of their Suffering, and rendered it more difficult, Bryan Smith, who had attempted to make his Escape amidst the Crowd, being prevented in his Shrowd, seem'd to leave Life with great Difficulty, and with an uncommon Agony.

This is the Account given by me T. PURNEY Ordinary and Chaplain.

LONDON: Printed by JOHN APPLEBEE, a little below Bridewell-Bridge, Black-Fryers.