Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 23 October 2014), Ordinary of Newgate's Account, January 1718 (OA17180127).

Ordinary's Account, 27th January 1718.

THE Ordinary of NEWGATE HIS ACCOUNT OF The Behaviour, Confessions, and Last Speeches of the Malefactors that were Executed at Tyburn on Monday the 27th of January, 1717/1718.

AT the general Quarter-Sessions held at Justice-hall in the Old-bailey, on Friday the 10th, Saturday the 11th, and Wednesday the 15th of January, 1717/1718; Eleven Persons, viz. Six Men, and Five Women, who were Try'd for, and found Guilty of, several Capital Crimes, did accordingly receive Sentence of Death: But Two of the Women that pleaded their Pregnancy, and were (by the Verdict of 12 Matrons) brought in to be with Quick Child, having their Judgment respited, and the three other Women, with three of the Men, being (by HIS MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY's great Mercy) Repriev'd, together with John Hall alias Clark, who was also Repriev'd last night, but for 8 days only, (which Mercy I wish they may duly improve) but Two Men are now order'd for Execution.

While they lay under this Condemnation, I constantly visited them, and to that Purpose had them brought up, twice every day, to the Chapel of Newgate, where I pray'd with them, read and expounded the Word of GOD to them; giving them from it such Instructions and Admonitions as I judg'd most suitable to their weak Capacities and deplorable Circumstances, thereby endeavouring to bring them to a State of true Repentance and a happy Change of Life, both here and hereafter.

On the Lord's Day, the 12th instant, I preach'd to them and others there present, both in the Morning and Afternoon, upon part of the Epistle appointed for that Morning-Service, viz. Rom. 12. 1. I beseech you, Brethren, by the Mercies of God, that you present your Bodies a Living Sacrifice, Holy, Acceptable unto God; which is your Reasonable Service.

After a general Explanation of which Words, I shew'd the great Import of them, under these Particulars;

I. The Preface, which is most emphatical, moving, and perswasive. I beseech you, Brethren, by the Mercies of God.

II. The Exhortation to the Performance of this great and comfortable Duty, viz. That you present your Bodies a Living Sacrifice, Holy, Acceptable unto God.

III. ult. The Argument here us'd by the Apostle, shewing the Reasonableness of this Duty, in these last Words of the Text: It is your Reasonable Service.

Having enlarg'd upon those Points, and drawn such practical Inferences as naturally result from them, I concluded at both times with suitable Admonitions to the Malefactors that were (within a few days thence) to receive Sentence of Death; which accordingly was passed on them the next Wednesday after, viz. the 15th instant. And,

On the Lord's Day, the 19th instant, I did preach to them again (both in the Morning and Afternoon) on part of the Epistle for that Day, viz. Rom. 12. 10. Be kindly affectioned one to another with Brotherly Love.

From which Words, first explain'd in general, I shew'd;

I. How Christian Love is here recommended to our Practice.

II. The Excellency and Usefulness of this Duty.

III. The great Motives we have to it, and the transcendent Advantages accruing from it; which chiefly consist of the Good it procures, and the Evil it prevents, in this World, and in the next.

When I had largely and distinctly discours'd on these Heads, I then (in the Conclusion) directed my Auditory to do these two Things; viz.

1st, To compare their former Practice with the Precept in the Text, of being kindly affected one to another with Brotherly Love. And,

2dly, To rectifie all past Miscarriages, and regulate their future Lives and Actions according to it.

Again, I preach'd Yesterday (both in the Forenoon and Afternoon) the 26th instant, and the Third Sunday after Epiphany, on Isaiah 55. 6, 7. being part of the First Lesson for that Morning-Service, and the Words these: Seek ye the Lord while He may be found: Call ye upon Him while He is near. Let the Wicked forsake his Way, and the Unrighteous Man his Thought; and let him return unto the Lord, and He will have Mercy upon him, and to our God, for He will abundantly Pardon.

In discoursing upon this Text, and for the Illustration and setting forth of the useful Doctrine herein contain'd, I shew'd,

I. That in it we have an Exhortative Command, which is, to Seek the Lord while He may found; and what is imply'd by that Phrase.

II. The Import of this repeated Exhortation and Command, couched in another Synonymous Expression, which immediately follows, viz. this: Call ye upon Him while He is near.

III. The proper Disposition requisite for our effectual Seeking and Calling upon God; and that is, our Return to Him in Faith and Repentance.

IV. The happy Success we shall have in so doing; for (says the Prophet in the Close of the Text) The Lord will have Mercy, and He will abundantly Pardon.

After I had severally spoke to these, I concluded with pressing Admonitions (chiefly directed) to the Condemn'd to Repent, and make their Peace with GOD, and be reconciled to Him through JESUS CHRIST, the great Lover of Souls, and Saviour of all Penitent Sinners.

The sad Account I am to give of the miserable harden'd Wretches hereafter named, is as follows.

1. John Stone, convicted of High-Treason, for Counterfeiting the Current Coin of England, by making False Shillings and Half-Crowns, on the 2d of November last. He said, he was 22 Years of age, born in the Parish of St. Margaret Westminster: That before he had attain'd to 12 Years, his Parents bound him Apprentice to a Vintner , who kept the Ship-Tavern in Princes-street near Leicester-fields: That when he had liv'd there about 4 Years, his said Master dying, and soon after his Mistress too, he then went to serve (but not as an Apprentice) other Vintners alternately, viz. One, that kept the Kings-head-Tavern near Hicks's Hall; and another, the Tun-Tavern near Hungerford-Market in the Strand: That, after this, he went to Hampstead, in the Summer-Season, and liv'd sometimes at Mother Huff's, and at another time in another publick House there; and, That when he was out of Business he went to his Mother, who then maintain'd him as well as she was able. As to his Morals and Religion, he could give but a slender Account thereof, as having liv'd a very vicious Life, which he acknowledg'd in general; yet was so obstinate, as to refuse the Discovery of those things he had most offended in, and even deny'd the plain Fact he was justly condemn'd for. Of this particularly I often endeavour'd to bring him to a Confession, shewing him the Necessity of answering me in a Matter wherein the Publick was so nearly concern'd; but he said (and that with Anger too) That whether he had done any thing in it or no, he would not tell it me. Then said I to him, From this very Answer you give me, I infer that you are guilty: I am sorry to find you so harden'd, and withal so rude; I pray God melt you into true Repentance, and Amendment of Life, before Death (which is now near at hand) remove you into another State, wherein you shall not be able (if you don't take care now) to Repent.

2. Henry Chickley, condemn'd for assaulting Mr. Charles Brown on the King's Highway, and taking from him a Silver-Watch, a Pocketbook, and a Bank-Note of 25 l. on the 16th of July last. He said, he was 21 Years of age, born in the Parish of St. Mary in Warwick: That he had serv'd a Tobacconist in that Town for 5 Years together, who imploy'd him in cutting and making-up Tobacco: That when he left his said Master, he came up to London, and follow'd the same Imployment with a Tobacconist here, whom he serv'd two Years: That he had been for three Years in the Sea-Service , viz. two on board the Roebuck, and one in the Torbay, both Men of War. He own'd he had (for the greatest part of his Life) much neglected the Service of GOD, and committed many Sins, such as Lewdness, Debauchery, &c. but never was guilty of Theft or Robbery. And here he positively deny'd his being concern'd in the Fact he stood condemn'd for. But when afterwards I shew'd him how he ought seriously to consider, that if he was guilty of it, and endeavour'd to cover it with a Lye, e should be so far from getting any Advantage by such a Denial, that would but aggravate his Crime, and render him so much the more guilty before GOD. Upon this he said, That if he had done it, he was sorry for it: And that was all I could then get of him.

At the Place of Execution, to which they were this Day carry'd from Newgate, viz. John Stone on a Sledge, and the other in a Cart, I attended them for the last time; and with such pressing Exhortations and Prayers, as I judg'd most proper to use for them, I endeavour'd to work them into a due Sense of their miserable Condition by Sin in this World, and of the infinitely greater Misery (if they died in Impenitence) which they should undergo to all Eternity in the next. Then I ask'd them severally, What they had to say before this their Departure; and, Whether they could still persist in the Denial of their respective Facts? To which they

answer'd, viz. John Stone, That He should make no Confession to me, nor to any-body else: And Henry Chickley, That he would tell me nothing.

After this, I gave them some further Admonitions, and pray'd again, sung a Penitential Psalm, made them rehearse the Apostles Creed, and wish'd their Souls might be sav'd. Then I retir'd from them, and the Cart drew away, and they were turn'd off; praying for that Mercy which they had so much abus'd, and so often rejected: But I cannot think otherwise than that they came short of it, considering all these things; 1st, That they had been great Offenders, guilty of many ill Facts, and would not particularly own any of them. 2dly, That all the time they were under Condemnation they could not be made sensible of their miserable Condition, nor be perswaded to apply themselves to GOD with all the Powers of their Souls for Help and Mercy; but instead thereof, even when at Prayer in the Chapel, they could not forbear playing with one another, and were ready, upon any Call, to go out to the Chapel-door, and drink there. 3dly, That this very Morning, when I had them in the Chapel, and told them I was now come to meet them for the last time there, and hop'd they had been (and were still) considering how they might obtain GOD's Favour, the Pardon of their Sins, and the Eternal Salvation of their Souls; and that to this purpose I was come to pray with them, &c. they did not seem at all affected; but when I was at Prayer, Stone took out of his Bosom one of those creeping Creatures, with which I suppose he abounded, and put it upon an open Book that lay before Chickley, and said, See how he is galloping over the Prayers.

NB. When they were come to the Tree, just before their being turn'd off, they exclaim'd against me, for not administring the Holy Sacrament of the LORD's Supper to them; which indeed I thought them not in the least fit to receive: But upon my telling the People that were about the Cart, of their wicked and unheard-of Behaviour, I do believe every

Man of Reason and Religion was satisfied, that that Sacred Ordinance ought not to be given to such prophane and impious Wretches as they were.

This is the melancholy Account here to be given of these micked Malefactors, by me,

PAUL LORRAIN, Ordinary .

Monday, Jan. 27. 1717-18.

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