Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 25 October 2014), Ordinary of Newgate's Account, December 1717 (OA17171220).

Ordinary's Account, 20th December 1717.

THE Ordinary of NEWGATE HIS ACCOUNT OF The Behaviour, Confessions, and Last Speeches of the Malefactors that were Executed at Tyburn on Friday the 20th of December, 1717.

THE melancholy Papers relating to the Criminals executed in this County, having, the Session before this, receiv'd a happy Interruption, through an extraordinary Accident, which then happen'd, and is well known to the Publick; They now come out again, to give an Account of such of the Malefactors, lately condemn'd, as are the sad Subject of them.

At the general Sessions held at Justice-hall in the Old-bailey, on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th days of December, 1717; Eleven Persons, viz. Nine Men, and Two Women, that were Try'd for, and Convicted of, several Capital Crimes, receiv'd Sentence of Death: But the Two Women's Judgment being respited for their Pregnancy, and Four of the Men repriev'd by HIS MAJESTY'S most gracious Mercy (which I hope they will take due Care to improve) Five of them only are now order'd for Execution.

While they lay under this deplorable State of Condemnation, I constantly visited them, and had them, twice every day, brought up to the Chapel in Newgate; where I pray'd with them, read, and expounded the Word of GOD to them, and instructed them in those Points of Religion, which were most proper for them both to know and to practise; endeavouring to make them sensible, and to repent, of their past Sins and Follies, and to pray for that Grace, by the Divine Power whereof they might be happily rescued from under the Slavery of Sin and Satan, and admitted into the Glorious Liberty of the Children of GOD. This was the Drift and Purpose of my daily Admonitions to them, both in publick and private. And,

On the Lord's Day, the 8th instant, I preach'd to those Condemn'd Persons, and many others there present, both in the Forenoon and Afternoon, upon Luke 21. 27. being part of the Gospel appointed for that Day, and the Words these: And then shall they see the Son of Man coming in a Cloud, with Power and great Glory.

From this Text and Context, first explain'd in general, and illustrated by parallel Places, I shew'd in particular,

I. The Certainty of Christ's Coming to Judge the World. And,

II. The Uncertainty of the Time when He shall come.

To which I added,

III. ult. The weighty Consideration of the nearer or more visibly approaching Judgment, which is privately pass'd on the Soul of every Man at his Death, and will be publickly confirm'd (and extended to his Body also) at the Last Day, when Christ shall come, attended with Myriads of Angels, to raise the Dead.

Again, on the last Lord's Day, the 15th instant, I preach'd likewise to the Condemn'd, &c. and my Text was Numb. 35. 31. Moreover ye shall not take Satisfaction for the Life of a Murderer, which is guilty of Death: But he shall be surely put to Death.

After a general Explanation of these Words, I shew'd from them in particular,

I. The heinous Nature of the Crime of Murder; the irreparable Evil of it, and what has a near Relation to it, and may well be comprehended under it.

II. The Severe Punishment due to it.

III. & lastly, The great Necessity of that Man's sincere and hearty Repentance, who is Guilty of this, or of any other Sin whatsoever, according to the Degree thereof.

Having enlarg'd upon all those Points, I concluded every Sermon I then preach'd to the Condemn'd with proper Admonitions to them: And here shew'd them particularly, That any wicked Act wilfully committed, whereof the Consequence might be the shedding of Blood, was Murder in the Sight of GOD; and that (according to the Apostle's Conclusion) Whosoever hateth his Brother is a Murderer; adding these peremptory Words, Ye know, that no Murderer has Eternal Life abiding in him, 1 Joh. 3. 15.

From which Consideration, I endeavour'd to make them sensible of the absolute Necessity there was for them (and accordingly exhorted them) to search their own Heart to the bottom, that they might find out their Sins (the Cause of their Troubles and Fears) and so truly repent of all they had done amiss, and of whatever Mischief their Crimes might have further been attended with, in this World; as to prevent their dismal and dreadful Effects in the World to come.

To these Exhortations they seem'd very attentive; and in my private Examinations of them, they gave me the respective Accounts following.

1. Thomas Bingley, convicted upon 3 Indictments, for assaulting, wounding and robbing, on the King's Highway near Acton, these 3 Persons, viz. 1st, Silvester Proud; 2dly, Jonathan Chapman; and, 3dly, John Blackwell, on the 11th of November last: On which Day, at the very same Time and Place all these Facts were committed by him, with the Assistance of two others hereafter nam'd. He said, he was 25 Years of age, born at Doncaster in Yorkshire: That while he liv'd with his Father (a Malster and Distiller ) he serv'd him in his Business: But upon a Difference happening between his said Father and him, about a Twelvemonth ago, he then

came up to London, where he had not been long, before he was listed in the first Regiment of Guards , under the Command of Colonel Townshend. He freely confest the Facts he now stood condemn'd for; but said he had done no such things before, and that those (which were his first) would be also his last, were he to live never so long. When I told him of his Barbarity to the Person of Mr. Proud, whom he violently assaulted, being not contented only to rob him, but using him most cruelly, even to his endeavouring the taking away of his Life: He answer'd, That in his Heat and Haste (being under Fear) he knew not well what he did, but now considering what he had done, he was very sorry, and begg'd his Pardon for it, thanking GOD, that the Wounds he had given him, proved not Mortal. Here he said, That though he never was a Robber before, yet he had been otherwise a very bad Young-man, he having liv'd a loose Life, and been very extravagant, a great Spendthrift, and withal a most undutiful Son, who had given his Father a great deal of trouble: All which he now was very much griev'd at, being sensible of the Evil and Misery his Follies had justly brought upon him in this World, and of the greater Punishment he deserv'd to undergo in the next: And therefore earnestly pray'd to GOD for Mercy, and his Father, and all others he had offended, for Pardon; and wish'd all Young-men might take Warning by him, and be more dutiful to GOD and their Parents, than himself had been; and so avoid such a sad and untimely End, as this he was now come to. When Yesterday the Death-Warrant was come down, and he found by it, that there was no hope at all for him to live much longer in this World, he then (upon my exhorting him to make a full Confession of his Sins, and clear his Conscience) own'd (though he had deny'd it before) that within these 4 or 5 Months he had committed several (but no great) Robberies on the Highway, sometimes about Paddington, and at other times in and about Whitechappel, as also in other Places further from London; and, That once he had begg'd a Furlow of his Officer, under pretence of seeing his Friends in the Country for a few Days; but it was upon no such occasion; his only Design being then to have more Time and Opportunity to do Mischief (as he did) to honest Men: Which wicked Course of Life is now a great trouble to his Soul, who heartily wish'd he had not been so wicked. He implor'd again and again GOD's Mercy and their Pardon whom he had any ways injur'd: And that was all the Satisfaction he could make.

2. Joseph Sherrier, condemn'd with the 'foresaid Tho. Bingley, for being concern'd with him in the 3 Facts above specified, He said, he was 22 Years of age, born at Alresford in the County of Suffolk, and a Lock-Smith by Trade: That since his coming up to London, which was in May last, he work'd with a Smith near Drury-lane, when he had time to work, he being in the same Service, and in the same Regiment and Company with Bingley, who (he said) was the Man that put him upon these Facts, which he would never have thought to commit, had he not been enticed thereto; adding, That when he saw the said Bingley had so barbarously (as he had) cut the poor Man's Head in diverse places, he cry'd to him, Why have you done that? And he further told me, he was very sorry to

see it, and if he could, would have prevented it; but standing then at some distance, he could not. At first he said, this was the only time he ever engag'd in such wicked Facts as these were, which the said Bingley induced him to, and that were he to live never so long in this World, he would not be guilty of the like, or any other Crimes; but afterwards he confess'd, That about June or July last, Bingley perswaded him to go upon the Highway; and, That within that time he had committed several small Robberies with him, for which (to his great Grief) he could now make no Satisfaction, but thank'd GOD he had never shed Blood. He seem'd to be very Sensible and Penitent.

3. Edward Motte, alias Popham (the former being his right Name) condemn'd with the two former, viz. Thomas Bingley and Joseph Sherrier, for being an Assistant to them in the Facts before mention'd. He said, he was 21 Years of age, born at Boxted in Suffolk: That he was a Blacksmith by Trade, and wrought at it ever since he came up to London, when his Service in His Majesty's Foot-Guards (in which, and in the same Company, he was with Bingley and Sherrier) permitted it. He own'd his Guilt of the Facts he stood condemn'd for, and said, That Bingley had brought him into the commission of them; and, that he had no hand in the Personal Hurt that Mr. Proud receiv'd, and wish'd he could have hinder'd Bingley from doing a thing of that nature; for himself abhorr'd such Cruelties: Neither would he, of his own accord, have gone in this manner upon the Highway; but the said Bingloy forced him to it. He acknowledg'd his Crime was great, in complying with that wicked Man's Solicitations; and said, this was the first time he had offended the Law; but when the Death-Warrant was come, he acknowledg'd, That within these five months past he had been engag'd with the said Bingley and Sherrier in some Robberies on the Highway, he could not tell how many; yet hoped, that tho' he was to suffer by it in this World, yet he should find Mercy in the next, for he heartily repented.

4. James Dickenson, alias Robinson (the former his right Name) condemn'd for breaking open the House of Mr. Thomas Bevis, and stealing thence Linnen to the value of 30 s. on the 31st of October last. He said, he was about 26 Years of age, born in Goodmans-Fields, in the Parish of St. Mary White-Chapel, and by his Occupation a Packthread-Spinner , by which he could maintain himself and Family well enough; but not being contented with that honest way of living, he fell into that which prov'd at last his Shame and Ruin. At first (indeed) he stifly deny'd the Fact he stood condemn'd for; alledging this common and worn-out Excuse, That the stoln Goods found on him, were given him by an unknown Hand, to carry to a certain Place: But at last he confess'd himself Guilty. And he also acknowledg'd (upon my putting him in mind of it) That he had formerly committed other ill Facts, and was once burnt in the Hand, and sent to the Bridewell in Clerkenwell, there to be kept at hard Labour for a Twelve-month; and yet (as it prov'd) this Correction did not cure him of his Thievish Distemper; who own'd, That he had committed several ill Facts, which were never found out, and which he cannot now to any purpose discover, nor make any Satisfaction for. He was a poor ignorant Person, who knew nothing of Religion, could not read at all, nor so much as say the Lord's Prayer.

5. John Monstieurs, condemn'd for the Murder of John Henrick Rule, on the 17th of October last. He said, he was 27 Years of age, of good Parentage, and born at Enwegen in Gelder-land: That he had been brought up in the Business of Merchandizing ; and the chief Commodities he commonly dealt in, were Wines and Brandy, which he bought in the Low-Countries, and imported into England. The Religion he profess'd was that he call'd the Roman Catholick . As to the Fact he was Try'd and Condemn'd for, he at first stifly deny'd it, and would fain have perswaded me, that he was perfectly ignorant and innocent of it; and that

he was a Person of a good Life and good Reputation in his own Country. Upon which, I told him, That tho' I could not charge him with other Crimes (as having no knowledge of him before) yet this, for which he now stood condemn'd, was so evident, and so fully prov'd upon him, that I wonder'd he durst deny it; considering (too) that such a Denial could not clear him before GOD, nor before Men, neither would be of any the least avail to him as to his present State in this World, but should greatly aggravate his Sins and Condemnation in the Sight of GOD, and make him infinitely the worse as to his future State in the other World. Being inform'd that some time ago he intended to have marry'd a Dutch-woman, a Protestant; and that one of the Conditions of the Contract to be made between them, was; That he should leave the Church of Rome, and embrace the Protestant Religion; I ask'd him, Whether it was so: To which he reply'd, It was. Then asking him further, Whether he was still in the same mind; that is, Whether he would now (as to this Change) do for the good of his Soul what he promis'd to perform for his Love's sake, and would be a Protestant whether he liv'd or died? He answer'd at first, That he would; but sometime after this, said, That as he suppos'd both Religions were good, and he was to die so soon that now he had neither time, nor indeed any proper or free Disposition of mind (under his present distraction and disquietude) to attend to any Instruction relating to those Points or Principles, wherein they differ'd the one from the other, and considering also that he was born in the Roman Communion: So he thought it not fit to renounce it, and embrace another; which (for ought he knew) he might have done, were he to have liv'd longer in this World; for he was inclinable enough, from the Instructions he had receiv'd of me, since his Confinement in Newgate (both before and after his Condemnation) to believe, That of the two, the Protestant Religion was the better. He so far agreed with me, that he profess'd, He rely'd on the alone Merits of JESUS CHRIST for the Pardon of his Sins; and, that he look'd upon Him as the only Mediator between GOD and Man, and hoped to be sav'd by Him. Here (after some further Instructions to set him forward in the right way) I press'd him to a free Confession, as of all his Sins in general, so particularly of this enormous Crime of Murder, which had brought him to this shameful and untimely Death. Whereupon he (tho' he had positively deny'd it before) now own'd, that He was Guilty of it; but said, That the Deceased having first began a Quarrel with him, they both (by consent) went out together, to decide the Difference by dnt of Sword: This he alledging for his Pretence as a legal (or at least allowable) Way, to ask and receive Satisfaction for Affronts and Injuries given; was presently shewn his great Mistake herein, and his indispensable Duty and Interest to repent. Besides, I old him, That if that was a Duel, I greatly suspected him to be the Aggressor; but indeed could not think other, but that this Murder was by him committed without Provocation, and with all the Aggravation of Baseness and Barbarity imaginable. To which he said little or nothing but this, I am now to satisfie the Law for it, and pray God to have Mercy on my Soul. Then I went on, exhorting him to Repentance; and such a Repentance too, as might be proportionable to his high Crime, crying with David, Ps. 51. 12. Deliver me from Blood-guiltiness, O God! &c. Before I parted at that time, when I had a long private Conference with him (which was the next day after I had preach'd (chiefly) against Murder) and I found he was something mov'd, and seem'd to relent, I desir'd him for GOD's sake, and for his Soul's sake, to tell me what Crimes of that nature, or what other heinous Sins, he had committed before, either in his own Country or any where else. To which he reply'd, that he had formerly fought several Duels with Officers and other Gentlemen, wounding some of 'em, but never kill'd any; and that, as to other Matters, he had liv'd like other young Gentlemen, not so well (he must needs confess) as he should have done; for which he implor'd GOD's Mercy and Pardon. Being not fully satisfied with his Confession, I further desir'd him to declare freely and ingenuously, what was the true Cause of his committing that Murder. To which he giving no Answer, his Silence put me upon asking him this plain Question, which I press'd him to answer positively one way or other, viz. Whether he did not kill the Deceased with an intent of having his Money and other his Goods? Whereto he made this only Reply, Sure enough; and would say no more, nor express that Sorrow he should have had for the great Evil he had done, and the Guilt he thus had contracted by his Commission of such an inhumane and bloody Fact. I endeavour'd all I could to make him throughly sensible of his Sin and Misery. How affected he was with what I said, and what were his inward Thoughts, I know not: But his outward Appear

ance discover'd his not being much concern'd. And this hard Temper I was afraid would continue with him to the time of his Death; but thro' GOD's great Mercy it did not; for at the nearer approach of that King of Terrors I found that what had been laid before him to bring him to Repentance, began to make some impression on, and mollify, his obdurate Heart. Then he exprest his Grief for all his Sins, and particularly the heinous Crime that had brought this severe (but condign) Punishment upon him; and he fully confest, That he was Guilty of wilful Murther: That the Person he kill'd had not in the least provok'd nor challeng'd him to it; and, That out of a covetous, malicious, and cruel Heart he did it; thinking to find with the Deceased a great deal of Gold, Money, &c. but he was disappointed therein, for he found but little of that about him. The manner of his committing that barbarous Murther (which he said none but himself knew any thing of, or was concern'd in) was by a Hammer he carry'd in his Pocket for that wicked Purpose, and with which he struck him in divers places on the Head, and other Parts. When he had made an end of this his Confession, I represented to him the horrible nature of that Fact, and the greatness of his Guilt; earnestly exhorting him duly to consider it, and take it to Heart, to the end he might so repent of it, as to obtain GOD's Pardon for it; without which he must be eternally miserable.

With such Exhortations as I thought most proper to move him, I endeavour'd to reclaim him out of his dangerous State. And this I did till he was carry'd to the Tree; where I attended him, and the rest of the Dying Criminals, for the last time; and after the usual Performance of my Ministerial Office to their Souls, I left them. When I was withdrawn from them, and they had desir'd the Standers-by to take Warning by them, and pray for their departing Souls, they apply'd themselves to their private Devotion, for which they had some Time allotted them: Then the Cart drew away; and they were turn'd off; while each of them was earnestly calling upon GOD for the Pardon of his Sins, and the Salvation of his Soul, in these and the like Ejaculations: Lord! have Mercy upon me! Lord, save me! Lord JESUS, receive my Spirit!

This is all the Account here to be given of these Malefactors, by me,

PAUL LORRAIN, Ordinary .

London, Friday, Dec. 20. 1717.

To which I shall add,

A SUMMARY of all the Malefactors who have been Condemned, Repriev'd, and Executed, (as likewise of those that Dy'd in Newgate between the Day of their Condemnation, and that appointed for their Execution) in London and Middlesex, from the Time of my being chosen to be the Minister and Ordinary of Newgate, (which was in November 1700) to the Close of the late Mayoralty.

NB. When I first enter'd upon this arduous and melancholy Office, in the Beginning of the Mayoralty of the Right Honourable Sir THOMAS ABNEY, Knight , I found no less than 65 Persons that had lain for a great while before under Condemnation, viz. 52 Pirates (who were for the most part Foreigners) and 13 other Criminals. Of the Pirates, 24 were Hanged at one time at the Execution-Dock in Wapping, and of the 13 other Malefactors, 8 were Executed at Tyburn.

In the Mayoralty of 1. Sir Thomas Abney, Kt . Condemn'd. 118 Repriev'd. 48 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 4 Executed. 66

2. Sir William Gore, Kt . Condemn'd. 49 Repriev'd. 36 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 13 3.

Sir Samuel Dashwood, Kt . Condemn'd. 38 Repriev'd. 20 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 18 4.

Sir John Parsons, Kt . Condemn'd. 35 Repriev'd. 18 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 17 5.

Sir Owen Buckingham, Kt . Condemn'd. 44 Repriev'd. 28 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 16 6.

Sir Thomas Rawlinson, Kt . Condemn'd. 33 Repriev'd. 28 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 5 7.

Sir Robert Bedingfield, Kt . Condemn'd. 23 Repriev'd. 5 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 18 8.

Sir William Withers, Kt . Condemn'd. 34 Repriev'd. 16 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 18 9.

Sir Charles Duncomb, Kt . Condemn'd. 39 Repriev'd. 29 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 10 10.

Sir Sam. Garrard, Kt. & Bart Condemn'd. 36 Repriev'd. 28 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 8 11.

Sir Gilbert Heathcote, Kt . Condemn'd. 36 Repriev'd. 23 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 13 12.

Sir Robert Beachcroft, Kt . Condemn'd. 43 Repriev'd. 28 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 15 13.

Sir Richard Hoare, Kt . Condemn'd. 60 Repriev'd. 35 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 25 14.

Sir Samuel Stanier, Kt . Condemn'd. 108 Repriev'd. 48 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 1 Executed. 59 15.

Sir Will. Humphrys, Kt. & Bart Condemn'd. 76 Repriev'd. 38 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 38 16.

Sir Charles Peers, Kt . Condemn'd. 122 Repriev'd. 52 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 70 17.

Sir James Bateman, Kt. & Bart Condemn'd. 132 Repriev'd. 77 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 0 Executed. 55

Total - Condemn'd. 1026 Repriev'd. 557 Dy'd after Condemnation, and before their Execution. 5 Executed. 464

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