Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 01 October 2014), Ordinary of Newgate's Account, October 1715 (OA17151028).

Ordinary's Account, 28th October 1715.

THE Ordinary of NEWGATE HIS ACCOUNT OF The Behaviour, Confessions, and Last Speeches of the TRAITORS that were for High Treason Executed at TYBURN on Friday the 28th of October, 1715.

AT the Sessions held at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily, on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, the 12th, 13th, 14th, and 15th, and adjourn'd to Tuesday the 18th instant, Seventeen Persons, viz. Fourteen Men, and Three Women, being Try'd for, and found Guilty of, several Capital Crimes, did accordingly receive Sentence of Death, i. e. Fourteen (on Saturday the 15th) for Robbing and Stealing; and Three (on Tuesday the 18th instant) for High-Treason. Of these Seventeen Persons, the Three Women being first Repriev'd, because reported to be pregnant, and then Four of the Men by His Majesty's gracious Mercy, which I wish they may duly improve, the others (Ten in number) are order'd for Execution, viz. Three of them on this Day, and Seven on Monday next.

While under this Condemnation, I have constantly visited them, sometimes in the Dungeon, the Place where they are kept close confined, and oftener in the Chapel of Newgate, praying with them, and reading and expounding the Word of God to them, in order to make them sensible of the heinousness of their Sins, and raise their Repentance to the degree and height of them, so that it might bear a due Proportion to those grievous Offences which had justly brought them to this their shameful and untimely End.

On the Lord's Day the 16th instant I preach'd to them, viz. in the Morning upon these Words of Our Saviour's, St. Mark, chap. 1. the latter part of the 15th Verse, - Repent ye, and believe the Gospel.

From these Words (which I explain'd in general with their Context and parallel Places) I shew'd,

That they contain'd the whole Tenor of the Gospel, in which is requir'd of us, and propos'd to us as the Terms of our Salvation, viz.

I. Faith.

II. Repentance.

And upon these important Points I largely and distinctly discours'd, after I had first taken notice, That these being the first

Words of the first Sermon preach'd by our Great Master JESUS CHRIST, they do well deserve our utmost Regard, Attention, and Obedience.

And in the Afternoon I preach'd upon Eccl. 11. 9. Rejoice, O Youngman in thy Youth, and let thy Heart chear thee in the Days of thy Youth, and walk in the Ways of thy Heart, and in the Sight of thine Eyes: But know thou, that for all these things God will bring thee into Judgment.

This Text I first explain'd in general, and then proceeded to shew from it in particular,

I. That there is a Judgment to come, which will be very strict and severe against Obstinate and Impenitent Sinners.

II. That every Man shall be brought to that Judgment.

III. That He who shall bring them to that Judgment is GOD, the great and uncontrolable Judge of the whole World.

IV. That the Matter of that Judgment which Men shall be thus brought to, are the Ways of their own Hearts, and these are their Thoughts, Words, and Deeds.

V. ult. That all this is most certain and evident from this Positive Expression in the Text, Know thou, [not Think or Believe, but know] that for all these Things (i. e. for thy Evil Thoughts, Wicked Words, and Sinful Actions) God will bring thee into Judgment.

After I had largely discours'd upon these Points, I concluded the Whole with a particular Application to the Condemn'd, whom I exhorted to take such Care of themselves, as (by a lively Faith in Christ, and true Repentance of all their Sins) they might avoid the Severity of that Judgment, and be absolv'd and clear'd from all Guilt, when they shall come and stand before God's Tribunal, there to be judg'd.

On the last Lord's Day, the 23d instant, I preach'd again to them (both in the Morning and Afternoon) and took for my Text these Words of the Revelation of St. John, Chap. IX, the former part of the 20th Verse: And the rest of the Men, which were not kill'd by these Plagues, yet repented not of the Works of their Hands.

Which Words I first explain'd in general, with their Context, and then laid down and examin'd in particular this Proposition arising from them, viz.

That notwithstanding the visible and terrible Judgments of GOD upon some grievous Sinners, others that are spared, and should thereby take Warning and reform, do (instead thereof) often neglect themselves to such a prodigious degree, as not to use the least Endeavour for the prevention of their own Ruin; though at the same time they may be satisfy'd they can no otherwise avoid it, than by their repenting, renouncing, and forsaking of those wicked rebellious Courses and base Practices, for which they have seen (or heard) others have been severely and justly chastis'd.

To illustrate this Proposition, I observ'd,

I. The Strangeness of such Impenitence, consider'd according to Common Reason.

II. The Frequency of it, apparent from daily Experience.

III. and lastly, The lamentable Consequence thereof, which they must expect to see and to feel in a dreadful Punishment and final Destruction, who are such obstinate and incorrigible Sinners, as will not be perswaded nor compel'd to reform their Lives, either by the Mercies indulg'd to Themselves, or Judgments inflicted on Others.

Having enlarg'd upon these, I appl'yd my self with particular Admonitions to the Condemn'd, whom I earnestly exhorted to clear their Consciences, and purge their Hearts from all Filthiness of Sin, by Faith, Confession, and Repentance; exciting themselves to a perfect Abhorrence of all their Crimes, especially those of the deepest die, as that of Rebellion and high Creason certainly is, which some of them were Guilty of. This I often laid before them, both in my publick and private Discourses to them; endeavouring to inform their Judgments, and bring their Minds into a better Frame and Disposition, so as they might give Glory to GOD, and do Justice to Men, obtain the Pardon of all their Offences, and depart in Peace.

What the Persons that are now to suffer declar'd to me, and I said to them in my private Examinations of them, the Reader may see in the following Lines.

1. Joseph Sulivan, alias Silver, condemn'd for High-Treason, viz. for levying War against our most Gracious Sovereign Lord King GEORGE, and his Government, in listing Men into the Service of the Pretender. He said, he was 29 years of age, born in Ireland; That in the late Reign he serv'd 9 Years in the Royal Marine Regiment , and when that Regiment was broke, he went into France, and there serv'd for the space of 6 Months in Dorrington's Regiment; then quitting that Service, he came into England again. He declar'd himself to be of the Romish Religion ; and, that as he was born, so he resolv'd to die in it. He at first deny'd the whole Fact he stood condemn'd for, but afterwards own'd it in part, acknowledging that he had been somewhat concern'd in those Traiterous Practices which had brought him under this Condemnation. I endeavour'd to make him sensible of the heinousness and baseness of his Crime, who at the same time he had listed himself into the King's Service, and receiv'd His Bounty Money and Pay, he did (underhand) carry on such wicked and hellish Designs against His Majesty's Sacred Person, Royal Family, and whole Government. This indeed he could not deny, yet would not fully confess his Guilt; which I prest him to do for the clearing of his Conscience; but he said, he would confess where it was proper for him to do so, and no where else: For tho' he were (which he disown'd to be) guilty of all that was alledg'd against him, it would now avail him nothing to make a publick Declaration of it; and therefore desir'd me to ask him no more Questions about it, nor offer any further Advice to him, but let him die

in his own Way. To which I reply'd, That he must give me Leave to do my Duty, and also to ask him a plain Question, to which I desir'd his positive Answer: And the Question was this; Whether he thought it lawful for any Man to attempt the Dethroning King GEORGE, and thereby involve these Kingdoms in Blood and Ruin? At this he made a Pause, and seem'd to be surpriz'd, as not knowing at first what to answer: But at last he said, He meant no such thing. I told him, That whatever his Meaning was, his Actions naturally tended to that, and if it had not been prevented by the Over-ruling Providence of GOD, the Wisdom and Justice of the King, and the Watchfulness and Loyalty of his Ministers, and other good Subject, Things had (by this time) been much worse than ever we can conceive: How many innocent Persons, both Men, Women, and Children, would have been destroy'd! - Who can think of this without Horrour, that has any thing of Humanity left in him? Pray consider, (said I to him) and let me have a positive Answer to my Question, viz. Whether it be lawful to Dethrone King GEORGE, &c. To which he reply'd, He could not tell whether it was lawful or not. Upon this I endeavour'd to inform him better, offering some Arguments to convince him of his Error, but he would hear nothing of that, and seem'd resolv'd to persist in his Obstinacy to the last.

NB. Yesterday, after Evening-Prayer, in the Chapel of Newgate, Joseph Silver read the following Paper, and deliver'd it to me, declaring, that it contain'd nothing but Truth; which he also asserted at the Tree this Day.

A COPY of Joseph Silver's Paper, before mention'd.

I Joseph Sullivane, alias Silver, being now under the Sentence of Death, and having no other View or Consideration at present, but to discharge my Conscience, do hereby solemnly declare in the Presence of GOD, that Joshua Paul, Colonel of the first Regiment of Foot-Guards, is not in any Respect guilty of Acting for the Pretender's Service, (to my Knowledge) or ever employ'd Me to that End. And I do further declare in the Presence of GOD, and to all Mankind, that the Furlow found on me when I was apprehended in St. Martin's Parish in the Fields, and sign'd Josiva Paul, was not sign'd by the said Colonel Paul, or with his Privity or Consent, directly or indirectly. Given under my Hand at Newgate this 27th of October, 1715.

Joseph Silver, alias Sullivane.

2. Felix Hara, condemn'd also for High-Treason, in listing himself into the Pretender's Service. He said, he was about 30 years of age, born near Dublin in Ireland; That he serv'd his Apprentiship with a Vintner in that City, and afterwards did set up there for himself; but for want of a sufficient Stock to carry on that Employment, being forc'd to quit it and the Place, he came to London, where he liv'd with two or three Vintners alternately. He declar'd himself (as the former had done) to be a Roman-Catholick , and desir'd to have nothing offer'd to him, that might make him doubtful of his being in the right Way; for as he had no time, so had he no mind, to receive any Instructions contrary to his first Principles, and was resolv'd to die in that Religion, he had been brought up in, and

always profest. Finding him in that Disposition, I only laid before him, in general, the Doctrine and Duties of Christianity, and also endeavour'd to bring him to a free Confession of the Crime he was condemn'd for; but I found him very hard to be mov'd upon that Point; he plainly declaring, That he would make no Confession to me, as not being of the same Perswasion. However I prest him (as I had done Silver) to tell me, Whether he thought it lawful to levy War against King GEORGE? To which he thus readily answer'd, I cannot determine that: I leave it to better Judgments. I told him, he might (if he would) be clearly inform'd in the Matter. But he reply'd, That he desir'd no such Information.

3. Robert Whitty, condemn'd for being concern'd in the same Fact of High-Treason with the two foregoing Criminals. He said, he was 55 years of age, born within 20 Miles of Dublin in Ireland: That in the late Reign he serv'd in Colonel Harvey's Regiment then in Spain; and, That having receiv'd many Wounds in that Service, he was admitted one of the Out-Pensioners belonging to Chelsea-College . He said, he was not heartily for the Pretender, but for King GEORGE; and that if he listed himself into the Service of the said Pretender , he did not know what he did, for he had at that time been made so drunk with Geniver, and other strong Liquors, that he was not sensible of what he did or said. He acknowledg'd it to be a great Fault in him to have thus Unmann'd himself, and by that be drawn away; for which and all other his Sins, that were many and great, he declar'd he repented from his Heart, and begg'd Pardon of GOD. Upon my desiring him to recollect himself, and call to mind, and tell me what pass'd between him and the two others condemn'd with him in the Matter that had brought him to this Trouble, he said, He could say no more of his own Knowledge; but Silver could tell a great deal on't if he would. He did, from the first almost to the last, profess himself a Protestant, and a Member of the Church of England [not a Low Churchman, but one of the high-Church] as he express'd himself: But at the Place of Execution he declar'd himself to be of the Romish Religion ; thinking (I suppose) that to be the best Religion for such a Criminal as he was.

At the Place of Execution, to which they were this Day carry'd from Newgate on a Sledge, I attended them for the last time, and exhorted them to clear their Consciences by a free and full Confession, and sincere Repentance of their wicked Deeds. But they would say no more: Only Silver read a Paper, wherein he pretended to justifie his Fact; and Hara said much to the same purpose in his own behalf. I pray'd with them, sung a Penitential Psalm, and would make them rehearse the Apostles Creed, but they gave very little Attention to what was then perform'd by me. When I had done my Ministerial Office to their Souls, I retir'd, and left them to their own private Devotions, for which a pretty considerable time was allotted them. Then the Cart (into which they were put at their arrival there) drew away, and they were turn'd off, all the while calling upon GOD to receive their Souls.

This is all the Account here to be given of these Dying Malefactors, by me,

PAUL LORRAIN, Ordinary .

Friday, Octob. 8. 1715.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

THis is to give Notice to all Gentlemen, Booksellers, and others, That there is lately publish'd a new Sett of Cuts, adapted to several sizes of Commonprayers, all new Designs by Mr. Gocree of Amsterdam, engrav'd by P. Vandergucht. Likewise Mr. Sturt's Cuts. Sold by ROBERT WHITLEDGE, at the Bible and Ball in Ave-Maria-Lane, near Ludgate, where may be had all sorts of Bibles, either in Folio, Quarto, Octavo, Twelves, or other sizes; Common-prayers in Folio, for the Use of Churches; Commonprayers in Octavo and Twelves. A New Edition of the Book of Homilies in Folio; all neatly bound. The Duty of Man's Works of all sizes. Duty of Man in Latin. Latin and Welsh Commonprayers, Tat and Brady's new Version of Psalms, with the new Supplement. Dr. Gibson on the Sacrament. Mr. Clutterbuck on the Liturgy. The Statutes at large in 3 Volumes. Bp Beveridge's Sermons and private Thoughts, &c.

At the Red Ball in Queen-street, Cheapside, near the Three-Cranes Landing-place,

LIveth a Gentlewoman that hath a most incomparable Wash to beautify the Face, which far exceeds all that are extant, as abundance of the greatest Quality have found by Experience, to their great satisfaction. It takes out all manner of Wrinkles, Freckles, Pimples, Redness, Morphew, Sunburn, Yellowness caus'd by Mercurial Poisonous Washes; it also plumps and softens the Skin, making it as smooth and tender as a sucking Child's; the young it keeps always so, and the Old it makes appear fair and young to admiration. It has nothing of Paint in it, neither doth any Person know the Secret; you may have from half a Crown to Five Pounds the Bottle. You may have Pomatums, White-pots, the like not to be compar'd with; also Powder for the Teeth, which makes them as white as Snow. She hath a most excellent Secret to prevent Hair from failing, causing it to grow wherever 'tis wanting. She alters Red or Grey Hair to a delicate light or dark Brown in a few Days, which will never change; she shapes the Eyebrows, and makes 'em beautiful; she hath a delicate Paste to whiten the Hands, and a red Pomatum to colour the Lips, and prevents their chapping in Winter. She hath a certain and infallible Cure for the Toothach without drawing, that the Pain shall not return. She is but lately remov'd from the Cheshire Cheese in Walbrook.

On Wednesday next will be publish'd,

The Court of Venus; or, Cupid restor'd to Sight, being a History of Cuckolds and Cuckold-makers; contain'd in an Account of the Secret Amours and Pleasant Intrigues of our British Kings, Noblemen, and others; with the most incompatable Beauties and famous Jilts, from K. Henry II. to this present Reign. The Whole interspers'd with curious Letters of Love and Gallantry; in 2 vols, with a Rey to Both. By Capt . Alex. Smith. Also the Works of Mr. Hickeringill, containing the History of Priests and Priestcraft. The Black Nonconformist. The Ceremony-monger; and all the rest of his Works, in 3 vols. Likewise the History of the Wars of the Kings of Israel and Judah, in 2 parts. Publish'd by Order of a Committee of the House of Commons 1641, at the beginning of the Civil Wars of England. Printed for John Baker in Pater-noster-row, R. Burleigh in Amen-corner, and M. Dod at Temple-bar.

THE 3d Edition of the posthumous Works of Mr. Sam. Butler, written in the Time of the Grand Rebellion, and the beginning of the Restauration, in Prose and Verse; with a Key to all his parts of Hudibras, by Sir Roger L'Estrange, in 2 vols.

The 3d Edition of Mr. Street's Astronomy, or his Tables and Rules for calculating of Eclipses; with Dr. Edmund Haley's Observations on the Moon and Planets.

THE Works of his Grace George Villiers, late Duke of Buckingham , in 2 Vols, containing a compleat Collection of all his Dramatick Pieces that were acted, with several design'd for the Stage, from the Original MSS. Also his Poems, Dialogues, Satyrs, Letters, and his Speeches in Parliament. To which is added, a Collection of the most remarkable Speeches, Debates, and Conferences of the most eminent Statesmen on both sides in the House of Lords and Commons, from the Year 1640, to the present Time. The Third Edition, with large Additions, adorn'd with Cuts. Printed for Sam. Briscoe, and Sold by R. Burleigh in Amen-Corner.

The Works of Mr. Tho. Brown, in 4 neat Volumes; on an Elzevir Letter, serious and comical, in Prose and Verse, the 4th Edition, with large Additions never before publish'd. The 3d Edition of the Posthumous Works of Mr. Sam. Butler, written in the time of the Grand Rebellion, and the beginning of the Restauration, in Prose and Verse; with a Key to all his Parts of Hudibras, by Sir Roger L'Estrange, in 2 vols. The Works of Sir Cha. Sidney, in one Vol.

The 3d Edition of the History of the Lives of the Highwaymen, Footpads, Housebreakers, &c. for 50 Years past, by Capt . Alex. Smith, in 3 vols.

The 2d Edition of the Works of Lucian, translated from the Greek, by Sir Hen. Sheers, Walt. Moyle, Esq ; Cha. Blount, Esq ; Mr. Tho. Brown, Mr. Lawr. Echard, Dr. Drake, Mr. Vernon, Col. Blount, Mr. Hill, Capt. Sprag, Capt. Ayloff, Mr. Savage, and Mr. Jos. Washington, both of the Middle-Temple, James Tyrrel, Esq; Mr. Phillips, and several other Persons of Learning and Quality. To which are added, Two Dialogues, translated from Greek MSS in the Vatfcan Library, and not extant in the Paris Edition, nor Variorum. By the Right Honourable the late Earl of Dorset and Middle-sex; with the Life of Lucian, a Discourse of his Writings, and a Character of some of the present Translators. By J. Dryden, Esq; in 4 vols.

The Works of Dionysius Longinus, translated from the Greek, by Mr. Welsted.

Mr. Ward's British Hudibras, in one vol. with Cuts.

London Printed, and are Sold by J. Morphew, near Stationers-hall.