Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 21 December 2014), Ordinary of Newgate's Account, March 1714 (OA17140310).

Ordinary's Account, 10th March 1714.

THE Ordinary of NEWGATE HIS ACCOUNT OF The Behaviour, Confessions, and Last Speeches of the Malefactors that were Executed at Tyburn, on Wednesday the 10th of March, 1713/1714.

AT the Sessions held at Justice-Hall in the Old-baily, London, on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, the 24th, 25th 26th, and 27th of February last, Fifteen Persons, viz. Fourteen Men, and One Woman, who were all Try'd for, and brought in Guilty of several Capital Crimes, did receive Sentence of Death accordingly. But the Woman being found pregnant, and Two of the Men having obtain'd the QUEEN's most gracious Reprieve (which I pray GOD they may have Grace duely to improve) Twelve of them are now order'd for Execution.

While they lay under this Condemnation, I constantly visited them, and had them (twice every day) brought up to the Chapel of Newgate, where I pray'd with them, and read and expounded the Word of God to them; instructing them in the Duties of the Christian Religion, and endeavouring to perswade them to the sincere Practice of them, from the weighty Considerations, first, of God's severe Judgments to obstinate and harden'd Sinners; and, secondly, of his boundless Mercy to them that truly repent.

On the Lord's Day, the 28th of February last, I preach'd to them (and others there present, who were many) on Ephes. 5. 1, 2. being part, both of the Epistle appointed for the Day, and of the 2d Lesson for that Evening-Service, and the Words these, Be ye Followers of God, as dear Children; and walk in Love, as Christ also has loved us, and has given Himself for us, an Offering and a Sacrifice to God, for a sweet-smelling Savour.

These Words I first explain'd in general; shewing that they contain,

I. The plain Matter of our Christian Duty. And,

II. The true Ground of our Christian Hope.

Which I then made out, by speaking to the several Points following, viz.

1st, Who it is we are to imitate, i. e. GOD; which the Apostle shews in these first Words of the Text, Be ye Followers of God.

2dly, Wherefore we ought to imitate Him; and that is, because we are his Children; yea, his dear Children.

3dly, Wherein we should imitate God, viz. in Love; for, says the Text, Walk in Love. Which includes Kindness in Giving, Mercy in Forgiving, Holiness in our Lives and Conversations, and Sincerity in our Endeavours to discharge all Religious and Christian Duties.

4thly, and lastly, How, and in what manner we are to take Pattern for our Imitation of GOD in Love; and that is, Even as Christ also has loved us. Which is to be understood as to the Nature or Manner, not in the Measure or Extent of that Love; for, in this latter Sence, the Love of Christ is immitable, it passeth all Knowledge and Understanding; and is such indeed as no Tongue, either of Men or Angels, can express: For, saith our Apostle in the Text, CHRIST so loved us, that He gave Himself for us, an Offering and a Sacrifice to God, of a sweet-smelling Savour.

Upon these I enlarg'd, and then apply'd; shewing, How much we are oblig'd constantly to discharge this great Duty of Love towards all Men, the want of which being the Cause of all the Evils and Mischiefs committed in the World, and the Troubles and Miseries consequent thereupon.

On the Lord's Day the 7th instant, I preach'd again to them, both in the Forenoon and Afternoon, upon Luke 18. 1, being part of the Second Lesson for that Morning-Service, and the Words these: And He spake a Parable unto them, to this end, That Men ought always to pray, and not to faint.

Having in general open'd and illustrated these Words of our Blessed Saviour's, (both in Text and Context) I then proceeded to discourse in particular on this important Subject of Prayer; shewing,

I. The Necessity of Prayer.

II. Whom we ought to pray to.

III. What we ought to pray for.

IV. The due Qualifications for Prayer.

V. and lastly, The Blessed Fruits and Effects of Prayer, both with respect to our Bodies, and to our Souls.

And on the Day following, being the 8th instant, (the Anniversary of our most Gracious QUEEN's happy Accession to the Throne) I did again preach to them, taking my Text out of the Epistle appointed for that solemn Day, viz. 1 Pet. 2. 13, 14. Submit your selves to every Ordinance of Man, for the Lord's sake; whether it be to the King, as Supreme; or unto Governours, as unto them that are sent by him, for the Punishment of Evil-doers, and for the Praise of them that do well.

This Text I first explain'd in general; and then I consider'd in particular these three Things resulting from it, and the great Import of them.

I. The Subjection and Obedience we owe, and are to pay to, our Superiours, viz. to the King, as Supreme; or unto Governours, as unto them that are sent by him; saith the Text.

II. The Civil and Religious Obligation incumbent on us thus to submit, and to obey, as being what God himself has appointed, and is imply'd in these Words, For the Lord's sake; i. e. according to the Lord's Will.

III. and lastly, The Reasonableness and Usefulness of our exact Performance of this Duty, and the excellent Advantages accruing from it, both to the Publick, and to Private Persons; in that a good Government (which cannot well subsist without Mens Obedience to it) is for the suppression of Sin and Vice, and the promotion of Religion and Virtue. And this is evident from the Text, wherein the Apostle

declares, That Governours are ordain'd both for the Punishment of Evil-doers, and for the Praise (i. e. the Encouragement and Support) of them that do well.

On these I largely discours'd, and then observ'd how much we (of this Church and Nation) are bound to praise God for his having, as on this Day, bless'd us with so Pious, so Just, and so Excellent a Princess, to reign over us; and (according to our most indispensable Duty) heartily pray for Her MAJESTY's Long Life, Encrease of Health, and Everlasting Prosperity.

After I had a little more enlarg'd upon this Subject, I apply'd my self with particular Admonitions and Exhortations to the Persons condemn'd; in whom I endeavour'd to raise a due Sense of the great Miseries they had brought on themselves and the much greater they were in danger of falling into hereafter, by their presumptuous Transgressions of he Laws both of GOD and of the Queen.

These Considerations I often press'd upon them, both in my publick Discourses and private Admonitions to them; of whom I am to give the Accounts following.

1. Thomas Grey, convicted of, and condemn'd for committing three Robberies on the QUEEN's High-way. First, For Assaulting and Robbing Mrs. Baxter as she was coming from Hampsted towards London in a Coach, which he stopt near the Halfway-house, taking 3 s. from her, on the 11th of January last. Secondly, For a like Robbery he committed upon Mrs. Wilson, as she was riding (with other Passengers in a Coach) to Hampsted, taking some Money from them, on the 15th of January last. Thirdly, For such another Robbery by him committed on the same Day, upon the Person of Mr. Samuel Harding, from whom he took 9 s. in Money, about the Halfway-house on the Road to Hampsted. There was also another Robbery, which he was not Try'd for, but had committed in company with Edmund Eames (one of his Fellow sufferers) and one William Biggs, hereafter mention'd, who stopt a Coach coming from Hampsted, and took from the Passengers that were in it about 28 s. on the 2d of January last. At first indeed he was very unwilling to speak out his Guilt in these Matters, and in his faultring way of Speech went about to excuse himself, protesting his Innocency: But I exhorted him, and at last perswaded him to confess; which he did with this seeming Extenuation of these his wicked Facts, That he would never, have committed them, had he not been prompted to (and assisted in) them by William Biggs, a wicked Person, who had formerly receiv'd Sentence of Death twice, viz. once at Maidstone in Kent, and another time in the Old-baily, London. He said, he was above 50 years of age, born in the Parish of St. James Clerkenwell: That he had kept a Publick House in the City of Oxford for several Years, and of late a Salesman's Shop in Monmouth-street in the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields; and, That tho' in former time (i. e about 20 years ago) he had done ill things, and was then burnt in the Hand for the same, yet he had not committed any Fact worthy of Death till Christmas last, when his Poverty and Incumbrances with Debts (as he pretended) had made him comply with the wicked Insinuations of bad Men, and embrace the unhappy Opportunities of doing those Mischiefs to honest People, which he must now account and suffer for. I found him very stubborn, and very unwilling either to be ask'd, or to resolve any Question: And when I plainly perceiv'd that he prevaricated in many things, and would not shew any Remorse or Sorrow for his having liv'd to these Years, not to the Glory, but (far from it) to the Dishonour of God and Religion, I refus'd to administer the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper to him: Upon which he curs'd me to the Pit of Hill, and said, That he would certainly kill me, if ever I durst venture to come to pray with him and the rest in the Cart at Tyburn. In answer to this his Threat, I told him, That I would nevertheless do my Duty to his Soul to the very last; and tho' he Curs'd, yet I pray'd God to Bless both Him and Me, and lay not this additional Sin to his charge; adding, That I heartily pray'd for his Conversion and Salvation; and, That I much pitied him, but fear'd him not in the least.

2. Edmund Eames alias Edward Aimes, condemn'd for 3 several Robberies by him committed on the Queen's High-way, viz. 1st, For Assaulting and Rob

bing Mrs. Rogers, at Pancras-Wash, on the 20th of January last, stopping the Coach wherein she was, and taking Money both from her and other Passengers with her. 2dly, For a like Assault upon Mr. Edward Yarborough, stopping the Wakefield-Coach, in which he was, near the foot of Highgate-hill, and taking 5 s. from him, on the 23d of the same Month. 3dly, For another Fact of the same nature, viz. his Assaulting Mrs. Shutter, as she was in a Coach going down the Hill near Pancras, and robbing her of 3 Gold Rings and some Money, on the 19th of February last. He said, he was this very Day (being the 10th of March) just entring upon the 32d Year of his age; That he was born at Dunstable in Bedfordshire, and there serv'd 8 Years Apprenticeship with a Surgeon ; That when he was out of his Time, he came up to London, where he exerted his Art for a little while, and then went to a Gentleman's Service : That afterwards he listed himself a Souldier , and at last arriv'd to the Post of a Surgeon's Mate in the 2d Regiment of Guards. He at first said, he did not commit the former, but the two latter Robberies aforemention'd; yet at last he confest all, & likewise 3 or 4 more of the same nature, and about the same time; for he had not been engag'd long in that wicked Course, having enter'd upon it but since Christmas last; and that too not so much by his own Inclination, as by the pernicious Instigation and Perswasion of one William Biggs, an old Offender, (not yet taken) with whom he had robb'd a Coach coming from Hampsted, and taken from 3 or 4 Passengers in it about 28 s. in Money, which was divided among them two and Tho. Grey, before mention'd, who was concern'd with them in that Robbery, on the 2d of January last, being Sunday; and on the Tuesday following he robb'd also some Passengers in a Coach on Newington Road, and took from them 22 s. And on or about the 14th of the said Month, he set upon a Worthy Justice of Peace (an ancient Gentleman) as he was riding on Horseback towards Hampsted, taking from him a Watch and some old Gold; which, with his robbing a young Man of Half-a-Crown on the High-way near Uxbridge, on Thursday the 7th of the said January last, were all the Robberies he could reme he ever committed. And now he said, That he was very sensible that for all his unjust Practices, into which he had so foolishly suffer'd himself to be deluded, and by which (as it often happens) he had got but little (not 6 l. in all, he said) he justly deserv'd the shameful Death he was now condem'd to; and thereupon begg'd Pardon of GOD, and of the Persons he had wrong'd, earnestly imploring the Divine Mercy, thro' the Merits of JESUS CHRIST. And to this his Confession (which he had before told me was all he had done of this nature) he did (for the clearing of the Truth, and his own Conscience, as he pretended) add this, " That he was the only Person who robb'd Mr. James " Boys upon the Queen's High-way between Pancras and Kentish Town, on the 19th of January " last; taking from him an old Watch in a Tortoise-shell Case, and 11 s. in Money: And, " That since the time he lay under this Condemnation, he had consider'd how to make what " Amends he could for the Injuries done by him, and therefore had sent several times to Mr. " Boys, to let him know where he might have his Watch again; which when he took, Mr. Boys (as he said) told him, he was very loth to part with it, tho' it was an old Thing that would yield but little Money, not 3 l. but he valu'd it much more upon some particular Account.

This specious and artificial Speech and formal Declaration he thought I would take as the pure Effect of an awaken'd Conscience, that was now willing to discharge itself of its Guilt, and do Right to all the World: And indeed I was at first doubtful in the matter; but I at last discover'd that herein he prevaricated; I taxed him with it, and reprov'd him for it, shewing him what a dangerous thing it was for him thus to add Sin to Sin, and how presumptuous he was, to desire (as he did) that I would administer the Holy Sacrament of the Lord's Supper to him, who solemnly attested a Lying Story to be true, at such a time when he was just going to be call'd before the dreadful Tribunal of Christ, there to give an Account (to Him who knows the inmost Thoughts of Men's Hearts) of all his secret Imaginations, as well as Overt Acts. With that I startled him, but yet could not make him plainly confess, that John Collins (as I knew) had perswaded him to charge himself with this Robbery, by telling him it would now do him no hurt, but himself a great deal of service, in that it might save his Life. This he (the said Edmund Eams) could not absolutely deny: And so I told him, I wondred that Men under such Circumstances as theirs, whose Business it was to prepare for Eternity, would imploy their Thoughts and precious Time in such wicked Machinations, by which, instead of pacifying the Wrath of God, they provoked him more and more to let them perish in their Sins. On this I enlarg'd, but could get no great Satisfaction from him herein; therefore I shall say no more of him here, but proceed to my Account of the other, viz.

3. John Collins alias Collinson, condemn'd for breaking the House of Mr. John Holloway at Chelsea, and stealing thence 2 Exchequer Notes, value 100 l. each, 237 l. 10 s. in Money, and 194 l. in Gold, on the 23d of January last. And he was also at the same time convicted of a Robbery, on the High-way, committed upon the Person of Mr. James Boys, whose Silver-Watch, with 10 or 12 s. were taken from him, between Pancras and Kentish Town, on the 19th of the said Month of January. He said, he was not at all concern'd in this latter Fact, but Eams was the Man had done it, as he told him himself since they were condemn'd. And as to the former, he own'd thus much of it, viz. That he robb'd Mr. Holloway's House, and took thence 107 l. (or thereabouts) in 100 l. Bag, and another smaller Bag, and no Gold, nor Money-Notes, nor any thing else: Adding, That he had spent some part of that Money before his being apprehended, but most of it, viz. 90 l. and upwards, was then taken from him, which he suppos'd Mr. Holloway has, or will have again; wishing he were able to make up his whole Loss. He said, he was 42 Years of age, born at Faustone near Hull in Northumberland; That he was brought up to no Trade, but had been a Footman to several Gentlemen, both in the Country, and here in London, and was some time a Coachman to one of them: That he had also been a Souldier for 6 Years together, and attain'd at last to the

Office of a Sergeant in Colonel Wing's Regiment; and little thought then, that he could ever have done such a thing, as should bring him to such a shameful End. He said, he heartily repented, and begg'd Pardon of GOD. And this I will say of him, That when he came nearer the Day of his Death, he outwardly behav'd himself somewhat better than I thought at first he would have done. But I discover'd him to be a great Hypocrite; who put Edmund Eams upon charging himself (as I have observ'd before) with the Robbery committed on Mr. Boys, for which the said Collins was condemn'd. I told him that I could not look on him otherwise than as a great Impostor, who endeavour'd (and that too at such a time, and under such Circumstances) to impose upon Justice, and GOD's Minister, and be so presumptuous also, as to desire to receive the Blessed Sacrament, which upon the same Account was desir'd by, and I refus'd to Eams, and so I did to this Collins; resolving to administer it to neither of them; because I found them most unworthy of it. And this my Dealing with them (which was according to the Practice of the Primitive Church) I wish may be a Warning and Terror to other Sinners, who will not betimes repent as they should do, but erroneously fancy, that if they outwardly partake of that Divine Ordinance, they shall be safe enough, tho' not altogether so well prepar'd as they might be either for it, or for Death. And on this occasion I must here declare, That when Malefactors (whoever they be) if any shall come under my Cure, and shall not at first open and clear their Consciences, and give me full Satisfaction, that they do truly repent, I shall never admit them to the Holy Sacrament, whatever they may do, or desire when just upon their Departure out of this World. And if they be not satisfy'd with such a Proceeding of mine, let them consult any other Orthodox Divines in the Matter. But as to this Collins, what I shall further say of him here, is that he did Yesterday attempt to poyson himself, for which I reprov'd him; shewing him the Wickedness of such a Fact, or such an Attempt.

4. Charles Weymouth, condemn'd with Christopher Dickson, and John Gibson, for assaulting and robbing Mr. Thomas Blake, Mr. Samuel Slap, and Mr. John Edwards (who was dangerously wounded by Weymouth) taking from them several Goods and Money, upon the Queen's High-way in Stepney Parish, on the 8th of February last. This Weymouth, who (it seem'd) had endeavour'd to make himself an Evidence against his Accomplices, being disappointed therein, was very uneasy and restless, and shew'd himself all-along of a stubborn and rough Behaviour, giving little sign of Repentance, and making (as it outwardly appear'd both to my self and others) no great Preparation for Death, till he was upon the very brink of it. What Account he gave me of himself, was only this, That he was born at Redriff, and had been brought up to the Sea , and serv'd the Queen on Board some of Her Majesty's Men of War for several Years off and on; That he was 25 Years of Age, and that he had fallen into wicked Courses only by the Inducement of others, more wicked (as he said) than himself. I told him, he should not answer for their Sins, if he were not the occasion of them; but must expect to be call'd to a very strict and severe Account for what himself had done wickedly, if he did not now undo it (as far as he could) by all possible Reparation, Repentance, and Amendment of Life. Now whether any thing that was then offer'd to him from Reason and Scripture, did work any Reformation upon him, I could not perceive, but pray'd GOD to convert him; and so left him to His Mercy, which he did not seem much to desire; or to his Judgment, which he had greatly deserv'd. This wicked Person also threaten'd to be the Death of me before he dy'd: Upon which I said to him, as I did to Thomas Grey, That I was sorry to see him in such a furious Temper, and heartily pray'd GOD to turn his Heart, for I greatly pity'd him, but fear'd him not.

5. Christopher Dickson, condemn'd for the same Robbery wherein he was concern'd with Charles Weymouth. He confess'd the Fact, and behav'd himself much better than Weymouth; and by what I could perceive, I may say, that what he told me might be true, viz. That he never did commit such Facts before. He said, he was about 22 Years of Age, born in the Parish of St. Mary Whitechappel: That he had serv'd 5 Years of Apprentiship with a Baker , and then by consent parted with him: That afterwards he was a Journeyman to another Baker , but staid not long there bad; Company (that easily wrought upon his corrupt Nature) drawing him away, and bringing him into a vicious Course; which, he said, he now heartily repented of; and I hope he did, for he seem'd very much affected, and greatly to abhor his past sinful Life, and earnestly to implore God's Forgiveness and Mercy in Christ.

6. John Gibson, condemn'd for being concern'd also in the Robbery before-mention'd with Charles Weymouth and Christopher Dickson. He said, he was about 20 years of age, born at Newcastle under Line; and he readily own'd his being Guilty of this Fact; but said it was his first; which I could not gainsay. Only I advised him to look back upon, and seriously examine his past Life between God and his own Conscience, and tell me how he found himself, and what he thought of himself. Upon this, he confess'd, That he had been a loose Liver, much addicted to Swearing, excessive Drinking, Lasciviousness, and suchlike Vices, too too common among Men of his Profession, he being a Seafaring Man , that had for these several years past been employ'd both in the Queen's Royal Navy, and Merchant's Service at Sea; and, that he had little minded or regarded the wonderful Works of God in the Deep; for which he was now very much grieved, and wish'd he had been wiser and better; praying God to forgive him his Sins, and have Mercy upon his Soul, and (to that end) give him a New Heart.

7. Alexander Petre, condemn'd for privately stealing a great quantity of Copper of the value of 20 l. out of the Warehouse of Mr. Thomas Chambers, on the 26th of January last. He readily confess'd, That he was guilty of this Fact; but told me it was his first, and that one Powell (the Evidence against him) was the Person that induc'd him to the Commission of it. He said, That he was (as it appear'd) but a young Man, about 22 years of age; yet acknowledg'd, that he had Years, Descretion, and Understanding enough to know, That what he did ought not to be done; and therefore asked Pardon of God, and the Persons he had any ways offended; praying for Mercy and Forgiveness. The place of his Birth, he said, was Newcastle upon Tyne, his Calling a Sailor , who had for these 12 years past been employ'd on board several of Her Majesty's Men of War; and the last of them on board which he served, was the New Advice, a 4th Rate. He was very tractable, and seem'd to be Penitent.

8. Thomas Koome, condemn'd for breaking open the House of Mr. John Garret, and stealing from thence a Riding-Hood, a Suit of Curtains, and other Goods, on the 17th of January last. He said he was 21 years of age, born at Hackney near London, and had served at Sea , sometimes in the Royal Navy, and at other times in Merchant-Men, for the most part of his Life. He confess'd the Fact for which he was condemn'd; but said it was his first. For which saying I reprov'd him, knowing he had

lately been whipt for a Felony he was then convicted of; which he was forc'd to acknowledge, saying, that the keeping of bad Company had heretofore been the Occasion of his committing many Sins, and now proved his Ruin. I perceiv'd his Friends had given him good Education, and I hope it was not quite lost upon him; for it dispos'd him so much the better to understand the Things of Religion that were laid before him, and to apply himself to the Practice of them, while under this Condemnation. Yet I cannot say, that he made at first so good use of his time as he might have, and I wish he had done.

9. Samuel Denny, alias Appleby, condemn'd for stealing a Gelding from Mr. John Scagg, and robbing him of 27 s. in Money, on the Queen's Highway, the 31st of January last. He said, That he was 23 years of age, born at Braintree in Essex, and a Wheelwright by his Trade; but had served four years as a private Sentinel in the Army . He own'd the Fact he was to die for, (which he said was the first he ever committed) and pray'd God to forgive him, both that and all other his Sins, and give him Grace so to repent that he might be saved. By what I could all-along observe in him, or get from him, I found he had not been a greater Offender than now he appear'd a Penitent: And therefore, at his earnest Desire, I administer'd the Holy Sacrament to him yesterday: Which I also did, at the same time, to the Three last mention'd, viz. Christopher Dickson, John Gibson, and Alexander Petre; whose Behaviour, from first to last, was (to the best of my Observation) such as became true Penitents.

10. John Winteringham, condemn'd for stealing a Gold-Watch, a Perruke, some Linnen and Apparel out of his Master ( Thomas Wynn Esq; ) his Lodgings, and some Plate from Mr. James Montjoy, the Landlord of the House where his said Master lodg'd. He own'd himself Guilty of this Fact; but said he never committed the like before; and that he had been (at times) a Servant to other Gentlemen before he came to live with Mr. Wynn, and never wrong'd them to the value of a Farthing; and that being brought up to no Trade, he had for the most part of his Life been a Domestick-Servant in several worthy Families, both in the Country and in London. He said he was but 25 years of age, born at Pomfret (or rather Pontefract) in Yorkshire, and little thought once he should ever come to end his Life in this shameful manner, which (however) he could not but acknowledge was what he had wilfully brought upon himself, and did highly deserve. It seems he was the first Person condemn'd upon the Act lately made against such wicked Servants as rob their Masters. Which I hope will be an effectual Warning to others, so as to teach them to be wiser and more just.

11. Christopher Moor, condemn'd for Burglary in Breaking open the House of Mr. Thomas Wright, and taking thence a pair of Silver-Branches, 8 Tea-Spoons, 2 Tea-Pots, a Lamp, and a large quantity of other Plate, on the 13th of February last. He said, he was but 20 years of age, born in the Parish of St. Giles in the Fields; That for the most part of his Life, he had been a Servant in some Victualling-Houses in and about London, had lived a very loose Life, and done many ill things, besides the Fact he was condemn'd for, which he confess'd; but would give no particular Account of any thing else he had been guilty of, nor discover where the Plate he had stoln might be found, that the right Owner of it might have it again: And when I press'd him to make such Discovery, if he could, he did not so much alledge his Incapacity, as he plainly shew'd his Unwillingness of doing it; saying, that tho' he could do it, yet he would make no such Discovery, if he were sure he should be damned for it: So desparately wicked he then shew'd himself to be, on whom no Admonitions could at first prevail: But I hope he did at last come to understand better Things. And yet this I must say of him, That his Obstinacy in Iniquity, and Impudent Behaviour towards myself and others, were such, as I never met with the like in any of the Malefactors, whom I have had under my Cure for almost these 14 years I have been in this melancholy and difficult Office. When he saw that he must certainly die, then he remembred what I had told him of another World, and of our necessary Preparation for it. Now he seem'd to be willing to do something to clear his Conscience, and save his Soul; giving attention to my Admonitions, and the Information desir'd of him about the Plate he had stoln. And here (among other things) he told me, That about a Month ago, at Night, he robb'd a House in Grey-Fryars, near Christ-Hospital, by lifting up the Sash-Window, and entring the Parlour, and taking from thence 6 Silver Tea-Spoons and a Strainer, with a Silk-Handkerchief Ell-wide, which he sold for 3 s. tho' it was worth more: And that as for the Plate, he sold it with a larger Parcel (amounting to 100 ounces) for 4 s. per ounce. And further, he said, that he had wrong'd Mr. Johnson, a Working Silver-Smith, and begg'd his Pardon (before me) for his having (about 18 Months ago) falsly sworn against him, That he the said Mr. Johnson had bought of him and Roderick Awdry, some Plate, which they had stoln out of my Lady Edwin's House; praying God to forgive him such his Perjury, which I endeavour'd to make him sensible was a most heinous Crime.

12. Daniel Hughes, condemn'd for the Fact last mention'd, in which he was concerned with Christopher Moor, and own'd he was so. He said, he was about 16 years of age, born at Gravesend in Kent, and brought up to the Sea , and that he had been a very loose young Man, addicted to many Vices. He was very stupid, foolish and unconcern'd, and gave no great Signs of his Penitence for his Offences against God and his Neighbour, nor of the Punishment he deserved for them, both in this World, and in the next, till he came within the Borders of Death.

At the Place of Execution, to which they were this Day carry'd from Newgate, in four Carts, I attended them for the last time, and endeavour'd to perswade them (who had lived such vicious Lives) throughly to clear their Consciences, and strive to obtain God's Grace, to make a good End in this World, that they might be received into that State of Bliss and Glory in the next, which shall have no end. To this purpose I earnestly spoke to them, and pray'd for them. Then I made them rehearse the Apostles Creed, and sung some Penitential Psalms with them; and finally having recommended their Souls to God, I withdrew from them; leaving them to their private Devotions, for which they had some little time allow'd them. And after that, the Cart drawing away, they were turn'd off: all of them bitterly crying unto God to have Mercy upon their departing Souls.

Before they were turn'd off, I thought (as I exhorted them) that some of them should make a further Confession, but they did not: Only those that had been rude to me, and threaten'd my Life, begg'd my Pardon, and thank'd me for the Pains I took for their Souls: And all of them declar'd that they dy'd in Charity with all the World.

This is all the Account here to be given of these Dying Malefactors, by me,

PAUL LORRAIN, Ordinary .

Wednesday, Mar. 10. 1713-14.

London Printed, and are to be Sold by J. Morphew near Stationers-hall.

Just Publish'd, The Third Edition of the 1st and 2d Volumes of the History of Highwaymen, Footpad, &c. And next Week will be publish'd a 3d Volume, continued to this last Sessions.