Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 27 November 2014), Ordinary of Newgate's Account, August 1711 (OA17110808).

Ordinary's Account, 8th August 1711.

The ORDINARY of NEWGATE his Account of the Behaviour, Confession, and Last Speech of Andrew Baynes, who was Executed at TYBURN on Wednesday the 8th Day of AUGUST, 1711.

AT the Sessions held at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily, on Wednesday the 4th, Thursday the 5th, and Friday the 6th of July last past, Six Perons that were found Guilty of several Capital Crimes, did receive Sentence of Death, which was accordingly executed upon one of them, who (with another condemn'd in the Sessions before) suffer'd on the 18th of the same Month. As for the rest, they were respited at that time. And among them there were two, whose Reprieves were limited, viz. the one to this Day, and the other to the 11th instant.

As it is my Custom to preach two Sermons in the Chapel of Newgate, every Lord's Day through the whole Year; so (during the long time of their lying under this Condemnation) they had the Opportunity to hear many, by which their Souls might have been benefited, had they been sensible of their approaching Death; but the mischief in these Cases is, That generally speaking, the more time is allow'd such Persons to prepare for Death, the more their Thoughts are intent upon the putting it off from them; making it their chief, if not their only Business, to be contriving Ways and Means to save their Lives here, instead of improving their Time and all the Instructions and Exhortations given them, towards their obtaining of a better Life elsewhere.

Those Instructions and Exhortations I renew'd and reenforc'd, and that the more constantly upon the greater Opportunity I had lately given me of doing it with some probability of Success therein, by an Order that came from above, That they must expect no further Reprieve. Then it was, that I found the Passages more open to convey into their Minds, and their Hearts become softer and fitter to receive, the Impression of those good Things which I offer'd them and laid before them out of the Book of God, having them brought up to Prayer in the Chapel twice every day, that I might more conveniently (both for my self and them) attend upon my great Care of their Souls.

And to that End, on the last Lord's Day, the 5th instant, I preach'd to them upon particular Texts, suitable to the important Work then before us, which was for me to teach them, and for them to learn, How to return to God by Faith and Repentance, and prepare themselves for another World. So, my Text in the Morning was this; Isa. ch. 55. v. 6 & 7. Seek ye the Lord, while He may be found; Call ye upon Him, while He is near. Let the Wicked for sake his Way, and the Unrighteous Man his Thoughts; and let him return unto the Lord, and He will have Mercy upon him; and to our God, for He will abundantly Pardon.

These Words I first paraphras'd at large, and then did from them take occasion to press the Duty of Repentance, upon my Auditory in general, and the Condemn'd in particular; shewing them,

1st. The indispensable Necessity of Repentance.

2dly. How it ought to be performed.

3dly. The desperate hazard which Sinners run, by their neglect of it.

4thly, and lastly, The great and unspeakable Benefits they shall receive, both in this World, and in the next, who in due time and in good earnest, shall have apply'd themselves to the discharge of this most important Duty.

I distinctly spoke to each of these Particulars, and concluded the whole with proper and suitable Exhortations to all my Hearers, especially those under my more immediate Cure.

And again in the Afternoon I preached upon Deut. 32. 29. Oh! that they were wise, that they understood this, That they would consider their LATTER END.

From which Words (first explain'd in general, with their Context) I laid before them these following Considerations.

I. That Man's Life is but short, tho' it were not cut off (as it often is) by some one accidental stroke or other; but did extend to the utmost Natural Period and Limit, to which it can possibly attain.

II. That upon this account, every Man should be so wise, as to take continual Notice of his continual Drawing nearer and nearer to his Latter End; i. e. to his Death in this World, and to his Judgment in the next.

III. and lastly, That if it be (as it really is) the greatest Concern, which all Men can have in this Mortal State, to be continually looking and preparing for their Death and Judgment, at any Age or Time of their Life here, it certainly imports them, in a more especial and urgent manner to make this necessary Preparation without delay, who are visibly come towards the End of their Days in this World, and have so much to do to provide for their Everlasting State in the World to come.

These I explain'd and apply'd; and endeavour'd to make them all (and particularly the Condemned) sensible of the great importance it was for them to attend (and act according) to the Advice in the Text; i. e. To be so wise, as to consider in due time, That they must die very soon, and, That Death would make a mighty Change in their Condition, either to the better or to the worse, both unspeakably and eternally.

On this Subject (chiefly) I entertain'd them in all my daily Discourses to them, that being once made thoroughly sensible of their approaching Death, they might in good earnest apply themselves to a due and happy Preparation for it.

In my private Conferences with Andrew Baynes, who is the sad Occasion of this melancholy Paper, I receiv'd from him the following Account.

This Andrew Baynes was condemn'd for assaulting and robbing Mr. John Storer, upon the Queen's Highway between London and Islington; taking from him two Gold-Rings, some Money, and other Things, on the 22d day of May last past. He readily own'd the Fact and the Justice of his Sentence, and also acknowledg'd, That he had deserved Death long before. He said, That he was about 27 years of age, born at Old Sandford near Saffron Waldren in Essex: That he had been Apprentice to one Vintner in London, and a Drawer to another: That afterwards he had served some Merchants in the Capacity of a Butler : That he had kept two Publick-houses , viz. one that was a Victualling-house in Thames-street, and another, viz. the Sign of the Bear and Ragged-Staff, (a Tavern and Inn) at Lambeth: And, That he was at that time endeavouring to get his Livelihood in an honest way; but meeting with some Disappointments in his Affairs, and falling into bad Company, he was drawn away and allured to the Commission of several Thefts, which at first he could not have thought he should ever have come to be guilty of.

I putting him in mind of his having once received Sentence of Death, viz. on the 10th of March 1708-9, for breaking open the House of Mrs. Elizabeth Copley at Stepney, and taking thence two Gold-Chains and other Goods, to the value of above 30 l. on the 19th of January before; he at first deny'd, but at last confess'd, he was guilty of it; and, that he was the only Person (besides the Receiver of those stoln Goods) concern'd in that Fact. Then I mention'd to him another of a later Date, and that was the great Robbery committed by him and others in Octob. 1709, in the House of the Right Honourable the Earl of Westmorland, for which he had also received Sentence of Death the 14th of January following, and one of his Accomplices therein had justice done him for it about that time, viz. the 16th of Dec. 1709. Here he readily acknowledg'd his Guilt, and likewise the Justice of that his Sentence; which was not executed upon him, by reason of his obtaining then a gracious Reprieve, and some time after a Pardon; and that was upon condition, That he should within 6 Months from that time transport himself into some Parts beyond the Seas: Which as he did not; but remained all the while in England, so he was press'd into the QUEEN's Service , and carry'd to Gaunt in Flanders, from whence he deserted, and return'd hither, and to his vicious and wicked Practices; having, since that time of his Return, committed the Fact for which he is now to die, and about 8 others, which he call'd small Robberies; tho' one of them was of no less than 32 Guineas, which he and two such other Persons with him (who cheated him of his Share) took from a Gentleman that was then upon going beyond the Seas, whom they met and assaulted near Holloway, about 15 or 16 Weeks ago; the Gentleman being on Horseback, and they three on Foot.

He said, he had since his Confinement and Condemnation endeavour'd to make, and in some Cases had effectually made, Reparation to most of the Persons injured by him & his wicked Associates; being made sensible, that this was absolutely necessary for him to do, in order to his obtaining, not only their Pardon, whom he had injur'd; but God's Pardon also, who had been greatly dishonoured by his wicked and loose Life, that had of late years been attended with all manner of Lewdness and Debauchery; for which he now felt a Grief and Bitterness of Soul, much superiour to all the Pleasure he formerly had in his Sins.

At the Place of Execution, to which he was carry'd from Newgate in a Cart this Day, I attended him for the last time. I pray'd by him, and gave him such Exhortations, as I usually do in the like Cases. I made him rehearse the Apostles Creed, and sung some Penitential Psalms with him. I pray'd again, and finally having recommended him to God's Mercy, I withdrew, and left him to his private Devotions, for which he had some time allow'd him. He spoke a few Words to the People there to this purpose, viz. That he wish'd they would pray for him, and take Warning by him, who by his Extravagances and Sins, had brought himself to this shameful End. He advis'd them to be wiser than he had been, and live another Life than he had done, that they might not come to such a sad and untimely Death, &c.

Some time after this, the Cart drew away, and he was turned off; expiring with these and the like Ejaculatory Expressions in his Mouth: Lord have mercy upon me a vile Sinner! Lord I repent! Lord forgive! Lord, receive me. Open me the Gates of Heaven! Lord, let me enter in! Lord receive my Soul. Lord JESUS, receive my Spirit! &c.

In these Prayers he shew'd great earnestness and fervor of Spirit, and spoke (as it appear'd) from his Heart.

This is all the Account here to be given of this dying Person, by me,

PAUL LORRAIN, Ordinary .

Wednesday, Aug. 8. 1711.

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