Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 24 November 2014), Ordinary of Newgate's Account, December 1710 (OA17101215).

Ordinary's Account, 15th December 1710.

The ORDINARY of NEWGATE his Account of the Behaviour, Confessions, and Last Speeches of the Malefactors that were Executed at TYBURN on Friday the 15th day of December, 1710.

AFTER a happy Interruption of this Paper, by the Mercy which the Condemn'd obtain'd the last Sessions, it now appears again, upon the melancholy Account of the Two Persons, who (of the Four that lately receiv'd Sentence of Death at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily) are now appointed for Execution.

While they were under this Condemnation, I attended them every Day (both Morning and Afternoon) in the Chapel of Newgate; where I read Prayers, and the Word of God, which I expounded to them; shewing them both their Duty and Interest to make their humble Petitions to Almighty God for Faith and Repentance; as being the Conditions, on which Salvation is promis'd and obtainable.

On the last LORD's Day, the 10th Instant, I preach'd to them, and others there present, both in the Morning and Afternoon, upon part of the Gospel for the Day, viz. Luke 21. 27. And then shall they see the Son of Man coming in a Cloud, with Power and great Glory.

From which Words, first explaiu'd in general, with their Context, I then proceeded more particularly to speak to these two or three things, viz.

I. The Certainty of CHRIST's Coming to Judgment.

II. The Uncertainty of the Time when He shall come in a publick solemn manner to judge the World.

To which I added, by way of Application,

III, and lastly, The nearer, or (at least) more visibly approaching Judgment, which is pass'd (privately) upon the Soul of every Man at his Death, and is to be (publickly) confirm'd, and extended to his Body also at his Resurrection; shewing from this Consideration, the indispensable necessity of our being always as free as possibly we can, from all manner of Sin; keeping a good Conscience void of Offence towards GOD, and towards Man.

In the Close of these my two Discourses, I apply'd my self in particular to the Condemn'd, whom I exhorted to Self-examination, Prayer, and Repentance; giving them Directions for the performance of those Duties, and the clearing of their Consciences, and making their Peace with God, to the present Comfort and Satisfaction of their Minds here, and the future Everlasting Salvation of their Souls hereafter.

As they seem'd attentive to my publick Exhortations, so they receiv'd, and exprest their Desire to comply with, my private Admonitions; and freely gave me the Account of their past wicked Lives, and present Dispositions, as follows.

I. John Crudleigh, condemn'd for breaking open the Houses of Mr. Edward Hobart, and Mr. George Man, and taking thence, viz. out of Mr. Hobart's House, a Bellmetal Portage-pot, as also a Goose, and some other Fowls; and out of Mr. Man's House, a Copper, and other Goods, upon the 30th of November last, in the Night-time. He said, he was about 32 Years of age, born near Shrewsbury; That about 14 Years ago he came up to London, and serv'd his Apprentiship with a Mason that was a Freeman of this City; but when his Time was out, not intending yet to set up for himself, he did not take up his Freedom, but work'd at his Trade with a Master, as a Journey-man, for a while; and afterwards left off working, and addicted himself to loose and wicked Courses: Insomuch, that in the Year 1704, viz. on the 2d Day of March, he was (by the Name of Thomas Mars, his right Name) try'd for, and convicted of, a Felony, viz. the stealing of 200 pound weight of Lead, belonging to the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral Church of St. Paul; for which Fact (whereof the Jury then brought him in guilty, to the value of 10 d.) he was order'd to be (and accordingly was some time after) severely whipt, by the Executioner, round the said Church: And yet this Correction did not reform him, nor deter him from the wicked Way he had enter'd into; for in the Month of December, 1705, he was again arraign'd at the Old-Baily for a Felony, of which tho' he was (upon his Tryal) acquitted, by reason the Indictment was laid amiss, yet at that same time he was again indicted of a Misdemeanour, for breaking the Mill of Mr. Hugh Merchant, and taking thence 322 pound weight of Iron, and two Brass Barrels: Which Fact being then fully prov'd, he had a Fine of 20 l. laid upon him for it, and remain'd a Prisoner in Newgate till that Fine, which he could not pay, was remitted him, in May last, at which time being discharg'd out of Newgate, he listed himself a Soldier in the second Battalion of HER MAJESTY's Foot-Guards, under the Command of Major-General Holmes: He confess'd the Facts he now stood Condemn'd for, and the two other for which he had receiv'd Correction before; and said, He had been a very great and incorrigible Sinner, and found, by his own woful Experience, that one Sin wilfully committed, easily draws on another, and that more; and a Man cannot tell when or where to stop, till it end at last in a sad and shameful Death; as it prov'd now with him: And therefore he advis'd other Wicked Livers to reform betimes, and be wiser than he had been, who, while abroad, never thought of amending his Life, but went on still in the practice of his old belov'd (but most destructive) Sins, of Swearing, Drunkenness, Whoredom, Profanation of the Lord's Day, and many (tho' no great) Thefts, for which he now express'd himself to be heartily sorry; and that the more, because he could make no just Reparation and Amends for them; praying GOD to forgive him these and all other his wicked Deeds, for Christ's sake. He seem'd to be sensible of the miserable condition he was brought into, by his wicked Life; which now appear'd to him so heinous and so terrible, that he could not but own, that unless GOD would please to shew extraordinary Mercy to him, he was lost for ever. As he could not deny but that he had attempted to commit Murder upon the Persons that pursued and apprehended him, immediately after his commission of those Facts, by his offering to let off a Pistol he had in his Hand, which (contrary to his Intent) did not take fire; so I endeavour'd to make him sensible, that he was really guilty before GOD, of the Crime of Murther, and ought therefore to beg Pardon for it, and give GOD Thanks, that by his Good Providence he had prevented the actual Commission of it. Upon this my Endeavour of awakening him to a serious Consideration and Repentance of that enormous Offence, and pressing him to reflect impartially upon himself, which if he did, he would find, (as our Blessed Saviour tells us, Joh. 10. 10.) that the Thief comes not, but for to steal, and to ill, and to destroy; he acknowledg'd, That (indeed) that heinous Crime of Murther might be justly laid upon him by Almighty GOD, if he were extream to mark what amiss had pass'd, or might have pass'd, from him; adding, That he own'd himself to be so much the greater Sinner, by how much he had made an abuse of Mercy, and of those Warnings and that Knowledge he had, and might further have had, if he would have attended to, and comply'd with my Admonitions to him, when in Newgate before, and when those things that belong'd to his Eternal Peace were offer'd to his Consideration and Choice; but he would not then receive them, chusing rather the miserable empty Pleasures of Sin, than the solid Joys and Comforts of Religion and Virtue: Which Blindness and Hardness of

Heart, then in him, were now the Cause of his great Troubles and Fears.

2. Henry Norris, condemn'd for the same Facts by him jointly committed with the aforesaid John Crudleigh. This Norris said, That he was above 40 Years of age, born at Bickerstaff in Lancashire, and that his right Name was Henry Halson, by which Name he was formerly try'd, and found guilty of 2 Indictments for Felonies and Burglaries, which, on the 14th of December, 1708, he (together with his Wife) had committed in the Houses of Mr. Andrew Hartshorn and Mr. John Moss; taking out of the first, 2 Boilers, 2 Bell-metal Skillets, 12 Pewter-Dishes, 30 Pewter-Plates, a Drugget-Coat, &c. and out of the other, 6 Pewter-Plates, 3 Pewter-dishes, a Brass-Kettle, and several other Goods. For which Crimes having receiv'd Sentence of Death on the 18th of the January following, he then obtain'd the Mercy of a Reprieve, and after wards (viz. in June 1709) that of a Pardon; which he took no care to improve, as he should have done, to the Glory of GOD, and the good of himself and others: For being order'd to the Work-house in Clerkenwell, he broke out of it, with an itching desire to return to his old ways; but he was taken and put in there again; and there he remain'd till June last, at which time he was discharg'd of his Confinement and severe (as he thought) Correction, (viz, Working) but he was not deliver'd from his Vices, which he acknowledg'd to have been very great, as Adultery, Excessive Drinking, Profane Swearing, Sabbath-breaking, Thieving, and the like. It seems, when he went abroad again, he alter'd his Name, but not his Mind; for he had still the same vicious Inclinations, and follow'd the same wicked Practices as before. He said, that when he liv'd where he was born, in the Country, he was an Husbandman , and then led an innocent Life; but coming up to London, about 20 Years ago, and following the Employment of drawing Drink in Ale-houses, as he did for a considerable time, he at last grew very loose, by means of the ill Company he came to be acquainted with, who drew him into the Way of Sin and Destruction. He further said, That for some time he got his Livelihood by mending old Shoes, which he had taken to of his own Ingenuity, and could turn his Hand to any thing, and needed not to have gone a thieving to get a Maintenance for himself; his Wife getting her own by begging about the Streets. This is what he declar'd to me; expressing all-along abundance of Grief for having led such an idle and wicked Life. He readily confess'd the two Burglaries for which he was condemn'd, but deny'd his having any the least Intent to kill, but only frighten away (and secure himself from) the Persons that came to apprehend both him and Crudleigh, when he took a Pistol out of his own Pocket, and made as if he would discharge it at them; but he neither design'd to do it, nor did it; tho' the other, who also had a Pistol in his Hand, did attempt to fire; but his Pistol did not go off. A good Providence! which (no doubt) those honest Men that were thus preserv'd, are most thankful for; as himself (viz. Crudleigh) seem'd afterwards to be, who had been so happily disappointed therein.

When this Day of their Execution was come, both these Malefactors were carried from Newgate, in a Cart, to Tyburn, where I (for the last time) attended them, and pray'd with 'em, and farther exhorted them still to stir up themselves, and excite all their Affections, more and more to GOD, in Faith and Repentance. I did like wise sing some Penitential Psalms with them, and made them rehearse the Apostles Creed: And wishing them that Forgiveness of Sins, and that Life Everlasting, which they had now profess'd to believe, I commended their Souls to the Mercy of GOD in CHRIST, and so withdrew from them; who then spoke to the People to this effect, (viz. John Crudleigh) I desire you would all take Warning by me, and that you would repent, while it is call'd to day, and remember your Creator in the days of your Youth, that you may not come to such a shameful End. Here are, I know, a great many Offenders, but I need not name them; I wish they may all repent in time, and all good People here would pray for me. I ask their Pardon whom I have offended, and I declare, I die in Charity with all Men, and wish I could make Persons injur'd by me.

This Man (viz, Thomas Mars) confess'd, among oth Crimes, That about six weeks ago, he bb'd Mr. John Southworth's House at Hampstead, and took from thence some Pewter, Brass, &c. but he would by no means brought to declare how he had dispos'd of those Goods; and who bought 'em saying, That the were not new to be had again; and, That if he could help the Owners to 'em, and give them any real Satisfaction herein, he would heartily do it. He deliver'd me a Paper which (upon his Dying Word) he asserted to contain the Truth, and nothing but the Truth; wherein he confesses, That he and another (not yet taken) were the only Persons that murther'd Mr. John Stone of Shipperton; for which he was very full of Grief, and earnestly pray'd for Pardon.

Henry Norris also thus deliver'd himself to the Standers-by, I have been a great Offender, but I do repent, and I hope God will shew me Mercy, I know and see some here that are as wicked as I have been. I desire they would take Warning by me, and repent in due time, lest they bring at last destruction upon themselves. Sinners that go on in their wicked ways, are like Birds upon Lime-twigs, who though they may sometimes escape, yet they must expect to be taken at last. May those concern'd in such ways reform betimes, and avoid their Ruin. I desire all your Prayers, and all I have wrong'd to forgive me, as I forgive all the World.

When they had made an end of their Speeches, they betook themselves to the private Devotions, for which they had some time allowed 'em: Then the Cart drew away, and they were turn'd off, expiring with these, or the like Ejaculatory Words in their Mouths: Lord, have Mercy upon us, miserable Sinners, and receive us, for christ's sake, &c.

This is all the Account I have here to give of these Dying Persons.

PAUL LORRAIN, Ordinary .

Friday Dec. 15. 1710.

To which I shall add,

A LIST of the Number of all the Malefactors who have been Condemn'd, Repriev'd, and Executed (as likewise of those that Dy'd in Newgate between the Day of their Condemnation and that of the Execution) in London and Middlesex, from the time of my being admitted Minister and Ordinary of Newgate (which was in Novemb. 1700) to the close of the late Mayoralty.

NB. When I first enter'd upon this arduous and melancholy Office, in the Beginning of the Mayoralty of the Right Honourable Sir Thomas Abney Kt . I found no less than 65 Persons that had lain for a great while before under Condemnation, viz. 52 Pirates (who were for the most part Foreigners) and 13 other Criminals. Of the Pirates, 24 were hang'd at one time at Execution-Dock in Wapping; and of the 13 other Malefactors, 8 were executed at Tyburn.

In the Mayoralty of 1. Sir Thomas Abney, Kt . - Condemn'd 118 Repriev'd. 48 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 4 Executed. 66 2. Sir William Gore, Kt .- Condemn'd 49 Repriev'd. 36 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 0 Executed. 13 3. Sir Samuel Dashwood, Kt . - Condemn'd 38 Repriev'd 20 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 0 Executed. 18 4. Sir John Parsons, Kt . - Condemn'd 35 Repriev'd. 18 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 0 Executed. 17 5. Sir Owen Buckingham, Kt . - Condemn'd 44 Repriev'd. 28 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 0 Executed. 16 6. Sir Thomas Rawlinson, Kt . - Condemn'd 33 Repriev'd. 28 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 0 Executed. 5 7. Sir Robert Bedingfield, Kt . - Condemn'd 23 Repriev'd. 5 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 0 Executed. 18 8. Sir William Wither, Kt . - Condemn'd 34 Repriev'd. 16 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 0 Executed. 18 9. Sir Charles Duncombe, Kt . - Condemn'd 39 Repriev'd. 29 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 0 Executed. 10 10. Sir Samuel Garrard, Kt .Bart . - Condemn'd 36 Repriev'd. 28 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 0 Executed. 8 Total - Condemn'd 449 Repriev'd. 256 Died after condemnat. & before the day of Execut. 4 Executed. 189

London Printed, and are to be sold by J. Morphew, near Stationers-Hall.