Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 26 October 2014), Ordinary of Newgate's Account, September 1710 (OA17100915).

Ordinary's Account, 15th September 1710.

The ORDINARY of NEWGATE his Account of the Behaviour, Confessions, and Last Speeches of the Malefactors that were Executed at TYBURN, on FRIDAY the 15th day of SEPTEMBER, 1710.

AT the Sessions held at Justice-Hall in the Old-Baily, on Wednesday the 6th, Thursday the 7th, Friday the 8th, and Saturday the 9th Instant, Eight Persons, that were then try'd for several Capital Crimes, and found respectively Guilty of them, did accordingly receive Sentence of Death: Six of them having obtain'd a gracious Reprieve (which it greatly concerns them to improve to the Glory of God) the other Two only are now order'd for Execution.

All the time they lay under this Condemnation, I visited them constantly, and had them brought up to the Chapel of Newgate twice every day. There I pray'd with them and taught them the Word of God; explaining those Portions of it that were then read to them, and drawing from thence such Inferences, as I thought most proper to bring them to Repentance.

And on the Lord's Day the 10th Instant, I preach'd to them, both in the Morning and Afternoon, upon 2 Pet. 3. 9. The Lord is not Slack concerning his Promise (as some Men count Slackness) but is Long-suffering to us-ward; not willing that any should Perish, but that all should come to Repentance.

Which Words I first explicated in general; and then proceeded in particular to shew, That they contain or imply these Two Points.

I. The Destruction of Jerusalem and of the People of the Jews; which came to pass 40 years after Christ's Prediction of it (Mat. 24 chap.) for their Impiety and Unbelief.

II. The general Destruction and Judgment of the whole World; for which (as St. Paul told the Athenians, Acts 17.31) God has appointed a Day; which Day is certain, though unknown to us.

From which two Points I raised this Proposition, viz.

[That as sure as CHRIST JESUS (by the Hands of the Romans) destroy'd the Jews, as they were a People, and by that mean severely Punish'd them for their Incredulity and Hardness of Heart; so sure it is, That every individual Person shall hereafter (both in Body and Soul) stand before the Judgment-Seat of CHRIST; and there receive his Sentence, either of Absolution or Condemnation; according to what he shall be found to have done, whether it be good or bad; as the Apostle declares, 2 Cor. 5. 10.]

And then, for a farther Explanation of the Text, I made these Observations from it; viz.

I. That the LORD, who has promised and declared, That He will come one Day to judge the World; and, That He will receive the Good and Penitent to Himself, and destroy the Wicked and Impenitent, is able to make good this his Promise, to the uttermost.

II. That He, who has thus promised and declar'd, and can make it good, is yet Long suffering to us-ward: He is pleas'd to bear with us, and forbear us for a time, (yea, a long time too) in that He does not (as He justly might) hastily bring this his final Judgment upon us: Thus dealing patiently with us, in Mercy; tho' [1st] His own Honour seems to suffer by it, from the Ungodly Speeches of Prophane Scoffers; and from the Impious Lives of Wicked Men: And tho' [2dly] They, or any of us, yea, the very best of Men, deserve no such Favour: And tho' [3dly] Our Happiness can be no real Addition of Glory to Him.

III. That one great Reason why the Lord dispenses such Mercy of Long-suffering to us-ward, is, That None of us might perish.

IV. and Lastly, That the Mean to prevent this final Perishing (tho' not that Judgment) is REPENTANCE.

I enlarg'd upon all these; and concluded, at both times, with a particular Application, and suitable Exhortations to the Persons condemn'd, who seem'd to be pretty attentive to what was then deliver'd.

As I taught them in publick, so I discours'd them also in private; where (as being more agreeable to their present Temper, and therefore more apt to work upon 'em) I expos'd to 'em the Heinousness of their respective Crimes, endeavouring to make them sensible, and truly penitent, of them.

The Disposition which the Two Persons, who are now to die, seem'd then to be in, the Reader may collect from what they respectively declar'd to me; which is, in Substance, as follows, viz.

I. Jane Forest, condemn'd for Murthering her Male Bastard-Child, on the 2d day of August last. She said, She was about 40 Years of age, born at a Place call'd Links, seven Miles beyond Edenburgh in Scotland; That she had liv'd above 20 Years in or about London, and for the most part of that time been imploy'd in spinning Flax , to make Sail-cloth for HER MAJESTY's Ships; and, That tho' she had thereby got an honest Livelihood, yet she could not but own, that she had not been honest in every respect; for at the same time she denied the Murther of her Child, saying, that he was still-born, she confess'd, That she was guilty of the odious Sin of Whoredom; to cover the Shame of which, she did not call any body to her help when in Travail, but endeavour'd to conceal the matter; and so, some few hours after the Child was born, she took an Opportunity to carry him into the Fields beyond Rosemary-lane, and there laid him upon the green Grass. She was a poor ignorant Woman, could not read, and knew very little in Religion; but seem'd to be very desi

rous of my Prayers and Instructions, which she had, and from which (as she said) she receiv'd great Comfort. She acknowledg'd the Judgment of GOD upon her to be just, and cry'd mightily for his Mercy. At first, she said, her Heart was lock'd up, and she could not pray at all; but afterwards she felt, that GOD had soften'd it, and melted it into Repentance; saying, I am now willing to die, rather than live: For I hope I shall do very well. Those were her own Words.

2. Charles Dean, condemn'd for breaking open the House of Mr John Stone, in the Parish of Shipperton, on the 7th day of June last. He utterly disown'd the Fact, and said, He was not in the House, nor in any wise guilty of it. But he declaring himself a Roman Catholick , and having Priests of his own Perswasion, that came to him, and advis'd him not to be directed by me, I am apt to think, that he thought himself so far from being under an Obligation of making any Confession to me, that his refusing to do it was a Duty which his Religion, or at least his Teachers, requir'd of him. He was (as he told me) about 26 Years of age, born of good Parents in the County of Montgomery in Wales, and brought up to the Law in London, where he had liv'd from his Youth, as far as he could remember, and was for some time an Attorney's Clerk , and, for these two Years past, had kept a Chamber in the Temple, and done Business for himself.

This is the Account he gave me of himself; wherein I observ'd he was cautious of opening his Mind to me in any thing, which might have a tendency to the clearing his Conscience, reserving his Confession of that to be made, as I suppose, to his Father-Confessor.

At the Place of Execution, whither they were both carried this Day from Newgate in a Cart, I attended them for the last time. I exhorted them to be free and ingenuous in their Confessions, and not to die with a Lye in their Mouths: Upon which Charles Dean said, He was not guilty, nor the Person, viz. Crouch, committed for the same Fact; and further he declar'd, That he died a Roman Catholick.

As for June Forest, she persisted in what she had said before concerning the Murther of her Child; and mightily lamented her sad and shameful End, and cry'd bitterly: And by that, and other outward Demonstrations, shew'd the inward Grief of her Heart.

After this, and some further Exhortations given them, I pray'd with them, and desir'd them to rehearse the Apostles Greed, and sing some penitential Psalms with me. Which done, I commended them to GOD's Mercy, and so withdrew. They had some time allow'd them for their private Devotions; then the Cart drew away, and they were turn'd off, all the while calling upon GOD to have Mercy on their Souls.

This is all the Account here to be given of these Dying Persons, by me,

PAUL LORRAIN, Ordinary .

Friday, Sept. 15. 1710.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

Books set forth by Paul Lorrain, Ordinary of Newgate .

A Guide to Salvation, or the Way to Eternal Bliss: Being a Collection of Meditations and Prayers, suited to the Exercise of a Devout Christian. Printed for W. Meadows at the Fann in St. Paul's Church-yard,

The Last Words of the Lady Margaret de la Musse. And, The Dying man's assistant. Both Printed for, and Sold by John Lawrence at the Angel in the Poultry.

A Preparation for the Sacrament: with Moral and Divine Maxims. Printed for B. Aylmer at the 3 Pidgeons in Cornhil.

ROBERT WHITLEDGE, who formerly lived at the Bible in Creed-Lane, is removed to the Bible and Ball in Ave-Mary-Lane near Ludgate, where all Booksellers and others may be furnisht with Bibles and Common-Prayers of all Sorts, with Cuts or without, Ruled or Unruled, Bound in Turky Leather or Plain. Mr. Strut's Cuts Curiously Engrav'd; also other fine Cuts fitted for all Sizes and Common-Prayers. The Welsh Bible, Welsh Common-Prayer, and Welsh Almanack. The Duty of Man's Works of all Sizes. The Duty of Man in Latin. Latin and French Common-Prayers. Tate and Brady's New Version of Psalms, with the New Supplement. Dr. Gibson on the Sacrament. The Statutes at large, in Three Volumes. Washington and Wingate's Abridgment of them. The Lord Clarendon's History of the Rebellion, in Folio and Octavo. The New Translation of AEsops Fables. Also Bp. Beveridge's Works, in 5 vol. And Dean Stanhope on the Epistles and Gospels, in 4 vol. All which Books and Cuts are likewise sold by J. Baker in Mercers-Chapel

Lately publish'd for the Use of Schools,

Vocabularium Latiale; or, a Latin Vocabulary in two parts. The First being a Collection of the most usual and easie Latin words, whether primitive or derivative; with their signification in English, after the order of the Eight parts of Speech, giving a Specimen of each, and most naturally shewing the gender, increase, declension and motion of Nouns and Pronouns, with the Conjugation-Preterperfect Tense and Supine of Verbs both Simple and Compound. The Second, shewing the variation and declining of all the declinable parts, both regular an irregular. By Tho. Dyche, School-Master in London, Author of a new Spelling-book, entitul'd, A Guide to the English Tongue. Printed for S. Butler, at Bernard's-Inn-Gate, in Holbourn, J. Holland, near St. Paul's Church-yard, and A. Collins, at the Black-Boy in Fleet-street. Price 1 s.

Just Publish'd,

The Fifth & Last Part of Vulgus Britannicus, or British Hudibrass: Price 6 d. Where may be had all the other Four Parts; Being the History of the Mob, &c. in Burlesque Verse, in Ten Cantos. 1, and 2. The Disorders of the Rabble, the Folly, Hypocrisy and Moderation of the Times. 3. On the Mobs pulling down Dr. Burges's Meeting-House, and the other Disorders in the Street. 4. On the Mobs Revels round their Bonfire in Lincolns-Inn-Fields. 5. On the Burning of the Clock, and a Speech of a Holy Brother to the Poor Machine, before it was committed to the Flames. 6. Their further Mischiefs, and suppressing of the Rabble by the Guards. 7. Capt. Tom's Speech to his Dispersing Brethren. 8. The Beating up for Trainbands: The Citys Preparation for Raising the same; the Watch and Ward, with their Character and Deportment. 9. The Peoples Clamours at the Charge of Warding and Trainbanding. 10. The Battles, Disputes and Squabbles of different Parties in a Tavern-Kitchin, near the Exchange. With several other things, both pleasant and diverting. All Written by the Author of the London Spy; and sold by J. Woodward, in St. Christopher's Church-yard, Thredneedle-street; J. Morphew near Stationers-hall, and by most Booksellers in London and Westminster.

London Printed, and are to be sold by J. Morphew, near Stationers-Hall.