Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 01 September 2014), October 1831 (18311020).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 20th October 1831.

SESSIONS' PAPER.

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR JOHN KEY, BART., MAYOR.

EIGHTH SESSION, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON THURSDAY, THE 20th DAY OF OCTOBER, 1831, AND FOLLOWING DAYS.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND,(BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) BY H. BUCKLER.

London: PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, BY GEORGE TITTERTON , No. 74, CORNHILL; AND PUBLISHED AT G. HEBERT'S LIBRARY, No. 88, CHEAPSIDE,

1831.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS on the king's Commission of the peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right, Honourable SIR JOHN KEY , BART, LORD MAYOR of the city of London; Charles, Lord Tenterden, Chief Justice of His Majesty's court of Common Pleas; John Ansley , Esq; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, Bart; Christopher Smith , Esq; John Thomas thorpe, Esq; Robert Waithman , Esq, and Matthias Prime Lucas, Esq, Aldermen of the said city; Newman Knowlys Esq, Recorder of the Said City; Sir Peter Lamle Knt; Chartes Farebrother, Esq; Henry Winchester , Esq, and Thomas Kelly , Esq, Aldermen of the said City; charles Ewan Law , Esq, Common Sergeant of the said City, and William St . Julien Arbin, Sergeant at Law; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and the County of Middlesex.

LONDON JURIES.

First

Andrew Smith .

Wm. Philip Atkins ,

John Besmer ,

Henry Brittian ,

Thomas Appleton ,

Thomas Brown ,

Rob. Major Holborn ,

Jacob Parker ,

John Ward ,

James Bond ,

William Puckeridge ,

James Davies .

Second

George Phillips ,

Francis Phene ,

John Matthewson ,

William Heath ,

William Murrell ,

Edward Kennard ,

James Robson ,

James Stone ,

Walter Muncaster ,

Robert Williams ,

William Ward ,

Henry Munn .

MIDDLESEX JURIES.

First

Edward Jones ,

Thomas Tupp ,

John Keating ,

Richard Kelsey ,

William Kemp ,

William King ,

Charles C. Lavender ,

James Lan ,

William Lee ,

Thomas Little ,

William Lovell ,

Thomas Lucey .

Second

William Harris ,

John Hill ,

Moses Hayter ,

Fred. Radolph Hay ,

Francis Hamilton ,

Richard Horsepool ,

Samuel Harper ,

William Wright ,

Peter Leland ,

Henry Groombridge ,

Charles Foster ,

George Tremain .

Third

Richard Lyford ,

William John Eales ,

Joel Edwards ,

William Edwards ,

Thomas Edmonds ,

John Fisher,

Robert Fisher ,

Samuel Freeman ,

Joseph Gibbons ,

Joseph Gardner ,

Andrew Gall ,

John Gorton .

Fourth

James Edbury ,

William Edmead ,

Walter Efford ,

William Fountain ,

Daniel Fox ,

Henry L. Freeborn ,

Joseph Friskley ,

William Gent ,

Richard Gllbert ,

Robert Glendeaning ,

George Godding ,

William Grey .

Fifth

Edward Gye ,

James Hackett ,

Omar Hall ,

Francis Harrison ,

Walter Geo. Head ,

William Hayward ,

John Hughes ,

William Hunter ,

Thomas Hunt ,

David Ivall ,

William Jenkins ,

John Living .

SESSIONS' HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, OCTOBER 20, 1831.

KEY, MAYOR. - EIGHTH SESSION.

CAPITAL CONVICTIONS.

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1957. EDWARD SCOTT and JAMES DAVIES were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Drake , on the 14th of October , at Christchurch, and stealing therein 4 musical-boxes, value 4l. 18s.; 380 guard-chains, value 18l; 8 handkerchiefs, value 2l.; 66 combs, value 6l. 10s.; 24 dozen of purse-slides, value 3l. 10s.; 24 necklaces, value 8l.; 1 diadem, value 7l.; 56 gold-rings, value 21l.; 48 pursetassels, value 12s.; 8 boxes, value 24s.; 1 work-box, value 9s.; 72 dozen of children's rings, value 12s.; 2 ozs. of gold, value 7l.; 2 pairs of bracelets, value 8l.; 1 watch, value 4l.; 2 snuff-boxes, value 25s.; 1 gold medal, value 30s.; 5 brooches, value 7l.; 1 cross, value 4l. 10s.; 13 ear-rings, value 8l.; 4 waist-buckles, value 40s.; 36 precious stones, value 3l. 10s.; 36 pieces of coin, value 36s., and 19 sovereigns , the property of Ferdinand Leroux .

FERDINAND LEROUX , (through an interpreter.) I live in the house of Mr. Francis Drake, a blacking merchant , at No. 41, Newgate-street - I have lived there fifteen months, and deal in all sorts of fancy goods; I occupy the warehouse down stairs, and pay rent to Mr. Drake. On the 14th of October, about half-past three o'clock in the morning, Mr. Drake awoke me; I had shut the warehouse up myself the night before, and had seen all my goods safe - when I was awoke I missed the articles stated in the indictment (enumerating them,) amounting in value to about 140l.; they were all taken from the warehouse; I sleep on the third floor - I am sure the warehouse was fast when I went to bed; when I came down I found the street door open, and two watchmen guarding it - the house had been entered by the cellar; they could get from the cellar through a trap-door in the floor of my shop, without opening the shop door - that trap door was shut down at night, but it does not fasten; I saw my goods at the watch-house about six minutes after I was alarmed - the prisoner Scott was in the watch-house, and the other prisoner was at another watch-house, but I did not see him till the next day, at Guildhall.

Q. Did you see all your goods at the watch-house? A. No, only eighteen sovereigns and some silver buckles- I have not recovered all my property; I have seen Davies several times at my warehouse, and think I have seen Scott.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Is Francis Drake the landlord of the house? A. Yes; I have no partner in my business.

THOMAS NEVELL . I am a watchman; Mr. Drake's house is on my beat, and in the parish of Christchurch. On the 14th of October, about a quarter after three o'clock in the morning, I saw two men come out of the street door of that house - I did not know them before; each of them had a bundle, and suspecting all was not right, I crossed over the way up to the door, and found it standing wide open - I perceived a dark-lantern with a light in it, on the floor, and at that moment Ganer, my partner, came up to me; we both went after the men about twenty yards, and as they turned the corner of St. Martin's-le-Grand, as we had left the door open, I turned back to close it - I rang the bell, and alarmed the house, but did not go in; Ganer returned to me, and brought the two bundles - the men had not been secured then; the two bundles were left with the constable of the night- I never saw the contents; I could not distinguish the men, only that one was taller than the other - I saw Scott in the custody of an officer coming down the street, but was not near enough to say whether he was the man, or not; when Mr. Drake came down I went into the house, but did not examine to see how the persons had got in.

EDWARD GANER . I am a watchman - Mr. Drake's house is on my beat, and in the parish of Christchurch. I came on my beat about two o'clock in the morning, and examined all the fastenings - I found them all right; Mr. Drake's house was secure then - I was afterwards standing at No. 38, on the opposite side, and saw three men coming out of Mr. Drake's shop door; two of them had each a bundle - I did not observe any thing with the third man; I went up to the door, and saw a dark-lantern with a light in it on the floor, just at the entrance into the shop- I directly went after the men, and had a clear view of them down St. Martin's-le-Grand; I then sprang my rattle, and they immediately dropped the two bundles - I had got as near to them as possible when I sprang my rattle; they got into Aldergate-street - I did not see them secured; our inspector came up to me - I picked up the bundles, took them to the watch-house in King-street-passage, and left them with the constable of the night; I saw both the prisoners before the Alderman the next morning.

Cross-examined. Q. You thought it time to look out when you found the door open, and the two men had got away? A. I did not let them go out of my sight till they were detected - I did not see them secured.

HENRY MARTIN . I am a watchman of St. Martin's-le-Grand. I heard a rattle spring in Newgate-street, and saw two men turn down St. Martin's-le-Grand, one on each side of the way; I did not see Ganer - I stopped the prisoner Davies, who came down on my side; I took my staff out, and went to hit him a blow, which knocked his hat off - he struck me in return, and out of his hat tumbled some of these watch-guards; I delivered them to the inspector at the watch-house - I picked up the property, and sung out Stop thief! the man on the opposite side of the way came over to my assistance, and I sprung my rattle - I did not see him secured; I am certain Davies is the man - I saw the prosecutor the next day; he claimed the goods which fell from Davies' hat - I did not see Scott secured; I saw him in custody at the watch-house ten minutes after - nothing was found on him, in my presence; when Scott got into Maiden-lane, I saw him take his hat off and throw it away: I saw it picked up, and there was some property in it, but I did not see what - Boddy took possession of the hat.

Cross-examined. Q. This was in the middle of the night? A. Yes, about twenty minutes after three o'clock in the morning; I had never seen Davies before, to my knowledge.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am a watchman - my beat is in Little Britain. About a quarter after three o'clock in the morning I heard a great cry of Stop him! and rattles springing; I went to the corner, stood there about two minutes, and Davies came up Little Britain, from Aldersgate-street, running very fast, without his hat, and I collared him - I held him about two minutes; the watchman came up, and said, "That is him," and with his assistance we took him to Aldersgate watch-house, which is in Little Britain - he gave no account of himself; he did not speak a word.

THOMAS BATES. I am inspector of the watch of Aldersgate ward. I was on duty at the watch-house about a quarter after three o'clock, and heard a noise of rattles, and by the gates leading to Little Britain, a man passed me without his hat; I turned the corner of the watch-house gate, and he was secured by Thompson - it was Davies; two hats, with property in them, were brought to the watch-house - one contained a great quantity of gold and silver watch-guards, and the other a quantity of gold rings; Martin brought in the hat containing the watch-guards, and Boddy that containing the rings; the prosecutor saw the property at the watch-house within a quarter of an hour - he claimed it there, and also before the Alderman; I did not see Scott - Davies did not account for being without his hat; he said nothing whatever; he was very much exhausted with running, and quite out of breath, in a perspiration - he could not speak for ten minutes, and asked for cold water; I searched him at the watch-house, and found a quantity of gold and silver guards in one of his coat pockets - Leroux saw them that night at the watch-house, and claimed them, and also some snuff-boxes which I found in his breeches pocket; I found a pearl ornament set in gold in his waistcoat pocket, which the prosecutor claimed - Davies did not account for his possession of the things.

WILLIAM WHITTING. I am inspector of the watch of Farringdon ward. I was in Newgate-street about a quarter after three o'clock, and heard a rattle spring; I went up to the door of No. 41, and saw Nevell standing there -I told him to stay there while I pursued after the prisoners, but I did not come in sight of them to be able to identify them - I met Ganer with the bundles, which the prosecutor claimed; I went to Aldersgate watch-house, and assisted in searching Davies; I found in his breeches pocket more gold and silver watch-guards, besides those found in his coat pocket - all the property was claimed by Leroux.

JOHN BARKER . I am a watchman of Cripplegate ward. About half-past three o'clock on Friday morning, the 14th of October, I was in Cateaton-street, and heard an alarm of Stop thief! in Wood-street; I ran up Lad-lane, and met the prisoner Scott without coat or hat - I endeavoured to stop him, but he jumped on one side, and ran by me; I turned round, and struck him with my stick - the next watchman came up, and secured him instantly, in my presence; he was taken to the watch-house - I saw him searched by the inspector, and a gold watch taken from his waistcoat pocket, and about a dozen or more silver watch-guards from his breeches pocket; directly we stopped him a young man ran up with a coat, and said the prisoner had thrown it away - he gave it to Knight, a watchman; the coat was searched at the watch-house; it contained a great quantity of jewellery and snuff-boxes - the coat was not claimed by any body, in my presence, nor was it fitted on; Scott gave no account of himself - he did not say a word; Leroux claimed the property found on Scott, and that which was in the coat pockets - he saw it about an hour and a half afterwards.

THOMAS PITTMAN . I am inspector of Cripplegate watch. I was present when Scott was brought to the watch-house, without either coat or hat; I found a gold watch in his waistcoat pocket, and some watch-guards and other property in his breeches pockets - the prosecutor claimed them; he did not account for being without coat or hat.

JOHN FORD. I am a constable. Scott was brought to the watch-house without coat or hat; I know nothing more than Pittman has stated; the coat was not tried on Scott - he remained without coat or hat.

JOB CUTTS. I am constable of the night of Farringdon ward. At a quarter-past three o'clock I was fetched from the watch-house to the prosecutor's house, in Newgate-street - the persons appeared to have entered by the grating in Queen's Head-passage, which I found broken open; that would enable persons to get into the cellar, and the trap door would admit them to the shop; they had wrenched the shop door - a crow-bar was found in the street, and a phosphorus-box and dark-lantern were in the shop.

FRANCIS DRAKE. I am owner of the house - Mr. Leroux rented part of it; it is in Christchurch parish - the house was all safe when I went to bed; I alarmed Mr. Leroux on being called up; I found the house broken open.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you live in the house? A. Yes - I have no partner; the lease is my own; I manufacture blacking, and sell lace and silks - I only let the warehouse and a back room; the prosecutor sleeps on the third floor; there is no separate communication to his part of the house - there is a private door in Queen's Head passage open to us both.

JOHN BODDY. I am a watchman of Aldersgate-ward. Between three and four o'clock in the morning I heard an alarm of Stop thief! I was in Foster-lane; I ran into Maiden-lane, and saw a hat laying in the street - I took it up - it contained ring-drops and rings, which the prosecutor claimed - I delivered them at Aldersgate watch-house.

JAMES SMITH . I am a watchman. I was on my beat in Noble-street, and heard a rattle spring in St. Ann's-lane, and the cry of Stop him! I ran to the end of Noble-street, and saw a man run across into Maiden-lane; I pursued, and he turned up Gutter-lane - I spring my rattle; he turned into Huggin-lane; I lost sight of him there, and did not see him again till he was in custody - when I first saw him cross the street he had a hat and coat on; I did not see what was done with the hat, but when he was taken he had neither hat nor coat - I saw a hat and coat at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q.You never saw his face? A. No, not till Cheney stopped him.

WILLIAM KNIGHT . I am a watchman of Cripplegate. Just before half-past three o'clock in the morning I was in Wood-street; I heard a rattle spring - I went up Maiden-lane, and within eight yards of Gutter-lane I distinctly saw the prisoner Scott pass the lamp, without a hat - he had an olive coat on, and there appeared something heavy in the pockets as he ran; I saw him taken - he had no coal on then; I had not seen him throw it off; I had lost sight of him - the coat was given to me by a young man who picked it up; I am quite certain of Scott's person.

GEORGE CHENEY . I am a patrol of Cheap ward. I was on duty in Cateaton-street, and heard a rattle spring in Lad-lane - I saw Scott turn down Aldermanbury, without coat or hat, and immediately secured him - I took him to the watch-house, and saw the other property found on him.

FERDINAND LEROUX . I have seen all this property, and am quite certain it is all mine - this gold medal, which has been produced by Ford, is a medal of honour given to my son, who was killed at Brussels; the property recovered is worth more than 100l.

The prisoners made no Defence. Three witnesses deposed to Scott's good character, and two to that of Davies.

SCOTT - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

DAVIES - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 25.[Oct. 21.]

First Middlesex Jury,

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

1958. HENRY BUNCE, alias SIBLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , at Hendon, 1 gelding, price 10l. , the property of George Hepburn , the younger.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE HEPBURN . SEN. I live at Chesham, in Bucks- my son's name is George. On Tuesday, the 20th of September, he was possessed of a gelding, which was in a meadow belonging to me, very near the town of Chesham ; I saw it there about five o'clock that evening - it had been turned out there for two or three months; it was without shoes - we missed it in the course of the next day; after making enquiry, I went to Edgware on Wednesday or Thursday, before the Magistrate; a gelding was shown to me there by the ostler, at a stable - Warren was there when I saw it; it was my son's gelding, which I had seen safe on the Tuesday evening; it was a valuable one - it had shoes on when I saw it at Edgware.

JAMES BROYDEN . I am an ostler, at the Swan, at Hendon. On Wednesday morning, the 21st of September, the prisoner came to our house, about a quarter-past six o'clock - he had no horse with him; he asked me if he could have half a pint of beer, and asked if I had any stabling to put a horse in - I said Yes; I took the key of the stable, unlocked the door, and put a saddle and bridle in, which laid at the door, when he came- he said he was late, and had to get to town by six o'clock, but he must go to Highgate; I took a halter out of the stable, went down the road with him towards Barnet, and saw a horse there - I asked if that was his horse, and why he could not come on; he said, Yes, that the horse was knocked up, and had no shoes on, and he could get no further; I said there was a farrier lived near, who would shoe him; he said, "Well, the man must have him shed where he is going to," and he might as well have him shod there - I called the farrier out of bed; his name is Sutling - I took the horse to the stable, and while I was at breakfast it was taken out of the stable to the farrier's; the horse appeared very much distressed, as if it had been ridden very hard; the farrier lives two doors off - I afterwards saw the same horse in the farrier's shop, being shod; I saw it again when it was shod - I saw White coming up the road behind Mr. Warren, who is a constable; they came to the stable where the horse had been brought back to - the prisoner went away before White and Warren came, but returned before Warren went away.

JOHN WARREN . I am a special constable of Hendon. On the 21st of September, about ten o'clock in the morning, I went to a blacksmith's shop, kept by Sutling, and saw a horse there, which was just shod; I did not see the prisoner then - the horse had been very much beaten on the off-side, and from the appearance of its feet, and the saddle and bridle, I had my suspicions, and took it to the Swan; I had it locked in the stable, and took possession of the key - I remained there till the prisoner came, which was not till about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon; I opened the stable door when he came, and let him go up to the horse - I saw him pay the farrier for shoeing it; I heard the prisoner desire it to be saddled - I then asked him where he brought it from; he said, "Three miles on the other side of Barnet;" I asked him who from there - he said a man named Smith gave it to him as he was walking in the road, about three o'clock in the morning, to take over Westminster-bridge; I asked if he knew Smith - he said he had seen him before; I asked if any body had seen Smith give it to him - he said, "Yes, a hay-cart man; I asked if he knew the hay-cart man - he said No; I asked where he had been since he had left the horse at the farrier's - he said he had been to Vauxhall-bridge; I asked what for - he said to see the hay-cart man; I said, "You said you did not know the hay-cartman;" he made no answer - I said, "I consider this horse to he stolen, and I shall take the horse and you into custody," which I did; he stood about a minute, and then said he was thirty, that he had had salt beef for dinner; I asked where he had dined - he said in Holborn; I said,"Did you not go to Westminster-bridge then;" he said No. - I asked where he came from; he said he had got no home that he went about with horses and cattle - I asked where he was on the Tuesday; he said at St. Albans - this was on the Wednesday, and that on the Monday he was at Hemel Hempstead fair; I detained the horse, saddle, and bridle - here is the saddle and bridle; I took him before a justice the same day - the saddle, bridle, and horse were shown to Mr. Hepburn that day week, at Edgware; he identified the horse as his property, but not she saddle and bridle - the prisoner gave his name as Henry Bunce before the Magistrate.

JOHN SEDWELL . I am a publican, and live at Boxmoor, about eight miles from Chesham - I am also a farmer- I know the prisoner; he lived in my neighbourhood, as a servant, formerly - he lived at a cottage, about a quarter of a mile from my house, at this time. On Monday, the 19th of September, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, he came to my house, and asked if I could lend him my saddle and bridle; I asked what he wanted it for - he said he was going up to Mr. Curwood's, at Bovington, to take his own horse to come to London to fetch the money for two loads of hay; he went up to my farm, and I lent him the saddle and bridle, which are those now produced - I know Putts-cross; it is in the straight road from Boxmoor to Chesham - I saw him again on that Monday afternoon, at Hemel Hempstead fair, and on the Tuesday he came to my house and had a pint of beer, which he drank, and left between nine and ten o'clock in the morning - I have not seen him since till to-day; when I saw him on Tuesday I asked what was the reason he had not gone to London - he said he had been to the fair, and he was going in the afternoon; I afterwards saw my saddle and bridle at Chesham.

Prisoner. I did not take the saddle away - you gave it to your uncle, and he put it into the barn again. Witness. It was not put into the barn; I saw the prisoner go out of the gate into the lane with it, and did not see it again till I saw it at Chesham.

GEORGE HEPBURN re-examined. Barnet is not in the way from Chesham to Hendon; I should think not -Chesham is about eighteen miles from Edgware.

JOHN WARREN . The Swan at Hendon is about three miles and a half from Edgware.

DANIEL GLENISTER . I live at Hemel Hempstead. I saw the prisoner at Putts-cross about five o'clock on Tuesday evening, the 20th of September - it was about six miles from Chesham; I have known him sometimes by the name of Sibley, and sometimes by the name of Bunce.

JAMES HOBBS . My uncle keeps a public-house at Putts-cross, and I live there. I saw the prisoner there on Tuesday, the 20th of September; he went away about six o'clock in the afternoon.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been up to my master's at Bovington, to fetch a sample of hay to sell for him - I went to Putts-cross to have a pint of beer; he lives just by there - I left there, and came straight to London, and by Barnet I met Smith, who asked me to take the horse to Davies' livery stables at Westminster-bridge; I took it on the road - it got so lame it could not go further; I left it there to be shod, and returned again.[Oct. 20.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 26.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

1959. GEORGE KITCHING , JOSEPH LANGLEY and JOSEPH CLAYTON were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Waples , on the 9th of October , at St. Marylebone, and stealing therein 3 spoons, value 6s.; 4 salt-stands, value 20s.; 1 guinea, 1 half-guinea, one 7s. piece, and 2 silver pennies , the property of the said Francis Waples .

FRANCIS WAPLES. I live at No. 6, Hill-street, Boston-street, in the parish of St. Marylebone , and am the house-keeper . On Sunday morning, the 9th of October, a little after six o'clock, I left my house, leaving nobody at home - nobody but myself and my housekeeper live there- I locked the house up, and took the keys in my pocket; I had fastened the windows - I returned at ten minutes after eight o'clock at night; I found the outer gate bolted inside - when I unlocked it I could not get in; I got over the wall into the yard - I had locked the outer gate and the door of the house; I found the door of the house had been burst open, but it was bolted inside at the top the same as the gate - I could not get in; I hallooed Thieves! and kicked at the door - I heard persons inside bursting open my bed-room door, and then heard more than one person running down stairs; I had locked my bed-room door - I heard them go to the wash-house, and then they got on the roof of the workshop. I am a carpenter. After that two or three young men came into my yard - the Policemen came in directly after them; I got a ladder, and Smith, the Policeman, got over, and found the prisoners on the roof of the workshop; I did not go on the roof myself- I afterwards went into the wash-house, got a light, and examined the house - I found my desk broken open, which stood in the front parlour - papers were taken out, and from a little tin box in the desk they had taken a guinea, a half-guinea, a 7s. piece, three silver tea-spoons, and four salts, two of them were silver, and two plated, with glasses, also a case of instruments, and a pair of spectacles and case; they were all taken out of my desk - I saw some of them at the Police-office the next day; an old knife and key were picked up - I found my spectacles and case of instruments thrown down in the wash-house that evening; persons must pass through the wash-house to get to the back yard from the house.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. I believe you cried Thieves! as soon as you found the premises disturbed? A. Yes; I was alone - it might be nearly ten minutes before the Policeman came up; two or three young men jumped over the wall before that, but they did not get on the roof; they scaled the outer wall to get to the front door, and after the Policeman got over more persons followed him; I saw nobody on the roof.

ROBERT SMITH . I am a Policeman. On the Sunday in question I went to Waples' premises, hearing a cry of Thieves! I got there about four minutes after I heard the cry; I scaled the front wall, which is not above five or six feet - Waples put up a ladder, and I went over the roof of the workshop; I saw the figures of three persons running along the roof - it was dark; they dropped off the roof,which is about twelve feet high, into the garden of No.6, Taunton-place - I dropped also; they ran across that garden to No. 5; I followed, and saw three men going across the garden, but lost sight of one of them in the garden of No. 5; I ran some spikes into my hand in getting over to No. 5 - 1 saw the other two run into a passage from the yard at No. 5; it is a private house - I called out Stop thief! Stop them! and heard them say, "We are not the men;" I followed them into the house, and saw Letter, Captain Ruffley's servant, with a light in his hand, and at the same time I saw Kitching and Langley, and took them into custody; they said, "We are assisting you - we are not the men - we followed you;" they had not followed me; they were in front of me all the way - Captain Ruffley and another gentle man came out of the parlour to my assistance, and some ladies followed them; the prisoners were secured - I searched them both, and found on Kitching two silver saltstands, and glasses belonging to them in his trousers pocket- I also found on him two plated salts, and the glasses, a key and a knife; I searched Langley, and found on him a latch and a door key - there is nothing remarkable in them- I gave them in charge of the gentlemen while I went in pursuit of the other one, but did not find him; I returned and found Twiss and some more persons in the passage with them - we took them to the watch-house, and on the road they said they would have a coach, they would not walk, they would be d - d. if they would; they held by the iron rails of the houses, and kitching said if he had his liberty he would punish my bl - y head; Langley called Twiss a bl - y Irish b - r; he abused him all the way to the watch-house - I went with Twiss about seven o'clock on Monday morning, and searched the garden of No. 6, through which they had passed; the servant girl went with me, and I saw her pick up a jemmy, or small crowbar; the servant at No. 5 gave me nine skeleton-keys that morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. CLARKSON. Q. When you got to the house, some persons had already got over, besides the prisoners? A. No - there was nobody in the yard but the prisoners; nobody was in Captain Ruffley 's premises but the captain, a gentleman, and Letter - I am sure both the prisoners said, "We are not the men;" I believe Kitching was the only one who said he would not go without a coach - I know he said so.

WILLIAM LETTER . I am servant to Captain Ruffley. On Sunday night, the 9th of October, the back yard door of our house was open; I was going up the drawing-room stairs with the tea things in my hand, and heard somebody on the top of the wall saying "This is the way, Jem - this is the way;" they were on the wall between master's garden and the next house - I then went down stairs to the back door, and saw three men on the top of the wall; I went into my pantry, got my basket of plate, and carried it up as far as the drawing-room door- I opened the drawing-room door and said to my master, "Here are thieves, Sir, getting over the wall;" he had two gentlemen with him; we all came down stairs, and saw Kitching and Langley in the passage - they said, "We are not the man - we are not the men - we are after a drunken man - we are following the Policeman;" I had not seen the Policeman at that time - I heard the Police call out, "They are the men, stop them;" Kitching opened the front door, and went out - I and master went and pulled him in again; I bolted the front door, and went to the back door - the Policeman had then come into the passage at the back door; I went out at the back door, and saw a third man, who had fustain sleeves in his jacket - the other two had coats on; he got up the steps, dropped down on the other side of the wall, and I saw no more of him; the Policeman took the other two away, and after they were gone I picked up a phosphorus-box and matches in the passage, where Langley had stood; I gave it to the Policeman that night - the next morning I was going up stairs, I looked out at window, and saw these keys in master's yard; I gave them to the Policeman - I found them near the part of the wall where the man had got over.

JOHN TWISS . I am a Police-constable. On the Sunday night I went to Captain Ruffley's No.5 Taunton-place, and assisted in taking Kitching and Langley to the watch-house; I searched them, and in Kitching's trossers pocket I found two small coins and a bit of a spy-glass.

GEORGE FRANCIS . I am a Policeman. On Sunday, the 9th of October, in consequence of information, I went to the William the Fourth Public-house, in Exeter-street, Marylebone; it was very shortly after eleven o'clock - I saw Clayton sitting there, drinking; I knew him before - he was dressed in a fustian jacket, with a blue front, and black trousers; the sleeves of his jacket were fustain - I said, "Joe, I want you:" he asked what for - I said if he would come outside the room I would tell him; he came out, and I took him into custody, but did not tell him what I wanted him for - I took him into the parlour of the public-house, and searched him, but found nothing on him - he asked me at least three times what I took him for, but I did not tell him; I took him to the watch-house, and in Stafford-street he stopped, and requested I would tell him what I had got him for; I answered, "What have you done with the silver spoons?" he hesitated at first, and said, "Spoons? I know nothing about them;" there were three females following us, and on going up Harcourt-street one, whom he represented as his sister, said, "What have they got you in custody for, Joe, now?" he said, "For a burglary;" I directly turned to him, and said, "A burglary; how came you to know that I had got you for a burglary?" he hesitated and said, "I mean a felony. but I suppose they are both alike - I am not very learned; I don't know much about it; "I had not mentioned either felony or burglary to him - I searched him again, and found nothing, but observed that his trousers were torn in the seat, apparently by a tenter hook or spike.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The linings inside are not torn in the least? A. They are not, only the trousers are torn; it is just such a tear as I should expect to find if I hitched my trousers on a hook.

ANN NANTON . I am the wife of John Nanton , and live at No. 16, Hill-street. I was going by Waple's wall on Sunday night, between seven and eight o'clock, and saw three men standing there - I did not know them before, but I noticed them, and am sure Kitching and Langley are two of them; I did not so much notice the third man, as he stood rather behind, but he had a jacket on, the sleeves were like the sleeves of the jacket produced, and the body appeared black; I went to the public-house for some beer shortly after, and saw the same three men, but cannot say who the third was.

MASMARK YOUNG. I am servant to Mr. Lucas, a surgeen, of No. 9, Taunaton-place, On Sunday, the 9th of October, about eight o'clock, I was near Mr. Waple's premises, and saw three men there; I cannot swear to their persons - two were dressed in dark coats, and one had light trousers; the third man was in dark trousers, he had a dark body to his jacket, and light sleeves.

FRANCIS WAPLES. These salts are mine, and these coins are two silver pennies, which I had in my box with my guinea and half guinea, and this little glass; I think I have had the silver pence more than twelve years - I know the glass and coins well.

Kitching's Defence. Clayton was not in my company till after one o'clock on the day in question; I heard a noise, and followed over the wall the same as the rest - I picked up the things in the garden.

Langley's Defence. I was returning from Pancras - I heard an alarm of Stop thief! and saw a mob assembled; I went into the mob, and saw a Policeman getting over the wall - I followed, and when I got into the passage Kitching was apprehended; they asked what I wanted there - I said I was assisting the Police; I never saw Kitching till he was in the passage.

KITCHING - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

LANGLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

CLAYTON - NOT GUILTY .[Oct. 20.]

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenderden.

1960. JOHN KYBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , at St. Martin in the Fields, 1 dressing case, value 7l.; 2 razors value 10s.; 2 nail nippers, value 7s.; 1 pair of scissors, value 2s.; 4 cut glass boxes, value 8l.; 3 rings, value 20l.; 3 shirt studs, value 25s., and 2 shirt pins, value 50s., the goods of Charles Richard Bigge , in the dwelling-house of Charles Smith .

CHARLES RICHARD BIGGE . On the 4th of October I lodged at the house of Mr. Charles Smith , No.12 Cecil-street , I went out about nine o'clock that morning, and left my dressing case on the dressing-room table, locked up; it was mahogany, and brass-bound - it contained a silver tooth-powder box, a razor, nail-nippers, and a soap box with silver cover; there were plain glass boxes with silver tops - three rings, one of which was a diamond ring, worth 12l. alone; I think it would sell for that - it cost me that; there was a square seal ring with four stones, worth 5l., and another ring worth also 5l. - two onyx shirt pins, worth about 25s. each, and three shirt studs. I am in the house of Rundell and Bridge; the prisoner was a servant at Mr. Smith's and waited upon me; I came house about eight o'clock at night, but did not look for my dressing-case, and did not miss it - I then went out; I returned about one in the morning, and directly I went into my room, having occasion to open the case to get some keys out, I missed it; I had seen all these articles in the case in the morning.

CHARLES SMITH . I keep the house in Cecil-street, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields; the prosecutor lodged with me - the prisoner was my servant. Mr.Bigge communicated his loss to me on the morning of the 5th; the prisoner had left the house in the evening of the 4th, at least we missed him then - he had given no notice of his intention of leaving: on Wednesday evening, the 12th of October, he came to my house, and asked to see me - I asked what he had done with Mr. Bigge's dressing case - I did not use any threat or make him any promise; he said he had parted with it to a girl in the Strand for a sovereign, but he did not know her - he had been seven or eight weeks in my employ, and had lived with me previously; he came to me for a recommendation to be a porter in the Westminster hospital, and said he had lived with Captain Nishett - he did not succeed, and having behaved well with me before, he asked me to employ him, and I did.

WILLIAM LIGHTFOOT . I am a servant at the Cock and Bottle, in the Strand. I know the prisoner - he came to the house some days ago, and brought a mahogany case, brass bound; it was about nine o'clock in the evening - he took it into the tap-room, came out again with it, and went out of the house.

Prisoner's Defence. All I have to say is, I was very much intoxicated at the time I did it my Lord.[Oct. 20.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his youth and former good character.

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

1961. JAMES THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , at Finchley, 1 ewe sheep, price 20s. , the property of James Coleman .

SAMUEL PEGLER . I am a Policeman of the Hampstead division. Last Saturday morning I saw the prisoner in the New North-road, about half past one o'clock, going towards London, with a large bundle on his shoulder - I was in a field, and he in the road; I stepped into the road- he then threw down the bundle, and ran off; I pursued him - he got over some rails, and fell into the ditch; I had called to him to stop before he got over the rails-on his falling into the ditch I got over the rails, and secured him; I asked what he had dropped, and he said a bit of mutton which had been given to him, and he had brought it from St. Albans - I asked why he ran; he said for fear that we gentlemen might stop him, as it was a late hour, and he should not like to be stopped; I got over the rails and brought him half way back - another Policeman came up and I gave him in charge while I went on for the bundle; I found a smaller bundle in a white and blue handkerchief - I took it up, went on further, and found the large bundle which I had seen him drop; he was taken to the station-house - I carried the large bundle there, and my partner carried the other; on the way be stated that he went to St. Albans the day before yesterday, that he bought the mutton of a man who hawked meat, and gave him 5d. a lb. for it - he said there was a pluck and some fat in the smaller bundle, which he had given the same man 1s. for; he said he left St. Albans at three o'clock, and the mutton was conveyed by a country waggon to Finchley - that it arrived at Finchley about eleven, and from there he brought it; I opened the bundles at the station-house - the small one contained the sheep's pluck, some fat, and some rags, and the large one contained two hind-quarters of mutton; I found on his person a razor, a pocket-knife, a duplicate, and a comb; I returned to the spot where had found the large bundle, and near that spot I found this butcher's knife - it is a small knife; there is some fat on it - Mr. Coleman afterwardssaw the mutton, the pluck, fat, and rags; I left them all at the station-house, in charge of the serjeant - Coleman came there, but I was not present; he saw all the things I had picked up at High-street office the same evening - I had taken part of them there; I am sure he saw what I had found; I had marked them.

GEORGE BUSSWELL . I am servant to Mr. Coleman, who had some sheep in a field at Finchley. I counted them on Thursday evening; there were thirteen - I was not in the field on Friday; the field has a gate to it - any body might get in; I saw the skin of a dead sheep yesterday at Marylebone-office - I do not know who took it there.

JAMES COLEMAN . I am a salesman, at Smithfield - I have a field in the parish of Finchley, near Hampstead-heath; there are about two fields between mine and the New North-road. I went to the field on Saturday afternoon, between twelve and one o'clock, and found twelve sheep only - there is a shed adjoining the field between that and the lane; I examined that shed, and found some blood and fat on a post, where I suppose the sheep had been hung up to be dressed - the blood appeared as if a sheep had been stuck there, and in a hedge, in the field where the shed was, I found the skin; it was quite fresh and marked like the twelve sheep which were left behind - I brought the skin to the Spaniards public-house, at Hampstead-heath; I left it there- Pegler fetched it from there; I saw it at Marylebone office yesterday morning - it was the same skin; Soper went to the shed after I first went there - I found him there on the same day as it happened; I saw the mutton at Marylebone-office - the knuckles were left on the skin, and we matched them to the hind-quarters; it corresponded as near as could be, and fitted - the tail had some wool left on the skin, and that corresponded; the mutton was dressed as if by a butcher; it was very well done - I do not know the prisoner; there were the marks of the footsteps of one person about the shed - there were no footmarks in the field to enable me to say how many had been there, as people are often walking about the field; Busswell saw the skin at Marylebone-office yesterday.

JOHN BUSSWELL . I saw the sheep-skin at the office, and knew it to be my master's by the mark on it, which was the same as the others - it was an ewe sheep.

THOMAS SOPER . I am a Police-officer. I went to the shed with Mr. Coleman; I saw some blood in the shed, and found two pieces of rag; there was fat on the post-I found one piece of rag two or three yards from the shed with a piece of fat on it; the other piece of rag was in the shed - one was a piece of canvas, and the other part of a shirt-sleeve; I compared the piece of canvas with one of the pieces in the small bundle; it appeared that one had been torn from the other by the seam - the piece of rag was the top of a shirt-sleeve, and the other piece in the bundle was the bottom part of the sleeve - they are the same quality, and corresponded; they fitted together - one had been taken from the other; I fitted both pieces.

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased the mutton about a mile on this side St. Albans, at 5d. per lb. - I brought it to Finchley in a country waggon, and conveyed it on my shoulders to London.

SAMUEL PEGLER. I fetched the skin from the Spaniards, and produced the same to the witnesses.[Oct. 21.] GUILTY - DEATH Aged 31.

1962. CHARLES COOPER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , at St. Mary Matfellon, alias Whitechapel, 1 gelding, price 10l. , the property of Isaac Bassage .

ISAAC BASSAGE . I have been a fishmonger , and lived at Romford, in Essex - I had a gelding about sixteen hands high; it had only one eye. On the 23rd of September I employed the prisoner to take it to Whitechapel for me - I had known him about five weeks; I told him to take it to the Nag's Head livery-stables for me - I got there some little time before him; he brought it there, and I delivered it to the ostler to take care of for me; I left the horse there, and the prisoner went into the house to have some bread and cheese and beer - I left him there, and went to the top of the stable yard; I came down in about an hour and a half, and went into the public-house - I paid for the bread and cheese he had had; he was in the back parlour at that time; I went up to the top of the stable yard again, and in about half an hour or twenty minutes I went to the ostler for my horse, but it was gone - I had authorized nobody to take it away from the ostler; I went to Smithfield and saw my horse in the hands of a stranger, who is not here - he was showing it for sale; he told me who he had it from - that person was not authorized by me to sell it - in consequence of what he said I went in pursuit of somebody, but did not find him; I did not take my horse away as I did not know that I could; it is now in possession of Dorward.

Prisoner. Q.Did you not order the ostler to bring out the horse, and you put me on it yourself, and told me to go to Smithfield and sell it? A. No.

Q. Did you not say you would be there in an hour? A. No.

JOHN GLADDEN . I am ostler at the Nag's Head; Whitechapel - Mr. Bassage comes to our house two or three times a week. I remember the prisoner bringing a gelding there; it remained in my possession nearly two hours - the prisoner took it away; Mr. Bassage was not with him then - the prisoner did not ask me for the horse; I did not give it to him - I saw him riding away by the counting-house door, while I was at dinner - I did not see Mr. Bassage there; there are two ostlers to our yard.

MR. BASSAGE. I gave neither of the ostlers authority to have the horse rode away by any body.

DAVID DORWARD . I am a constable. I have the gelding, which I found at the Sun public-house, Walthamabbey; I do not know how it came there - I went there in consequence of information; a man named Nicholls was before the Magistrate, but not bound over.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman gave me the horse to sell for him, and said he would be at Smithfield in an hour - I was there five or six times inquiring for him at the Barley-mow; he never came - I got intoxicated, and spent part of the money.

MR. BASSAGE. I never received any money for the gelding.[Oct. 21.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 30.

Before Lord Chief Justice Texterden.

1963. ESTHER ELIAS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , at St. Paul, Shadwell, 1 watch, value 2l.;1 watch-chain, value 2s.; 1 seal value 1s.; 2 watch-keys, value 1s.; 1 bed-hook, value 1s.; 1 ring, value 5s.; 1 penknife, value 6d.; 1 pair of scissors, value 6d.; 2 thimbles, value 1s. 6d.; 1 box, value 6d.; 2 purses, value 1s.; 35 sovereigns, 8 half-crowns, 8 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the property of Charlotte Sophia Davey , in her dwelling-house .

CHARLOTTE SOPHIA DAVEY . I am a widow , and live at No. 68, New Gravel-lane, in the parish of St. Paul, Shedwell . The prisoner lodged at my house for nine or ten weeks. On the 30th of July, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I had occasion to go out to market, and left her in the house cleaning a stove; nobody else was in the house except my little boy, who is about ten years old, and he was down stairs, not in the same room with the prisoner - she was cleaning a stove in the parlour we usually inhabit - I was not gone above ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and on returning I found the parlour door locked, and the key outside the door, in the lock- my little boy was down stairs in the kitchen; I called to the prisoner to open the door, but she was gone - I unlocked the door, went in, and found the room all in confusion - the stove brush laid on the floor, and a large hammer laid at the corner of a chest of drawers, and a pair of scales were moved off a box, and I found the box broken open - I had left it locked; on examing it I missed a small leather trunk out of it, in which I had thirty-five sovereigns, a watch, and a ring, 29s. In silver, two purses, and some other things - I had seen the things in the trunk a few days before, and I saw the trunk in the box the day before; I made inquiry after the prisoner but did not see her for about a mouth afterwards, when I saw her at the George, on Snow-hill, kept by Percival; she was dressed very elegantly - she had a silk dress on - when she lived with me her dress was very mean and low; she was up stairs in a bed-room there, but not in bed - I said, "Oh, Esther are not you ashamed to be seen dressed as you are by robbing the window and fatherless?" I have three small children - she made no reply; a person opened her hand-box, in her presence, and took but of it my little trunk, and asked me if it was mine - I said Yes, I could take my oath of it was the trunk which had contained my money and other things - I brought it away with me, and afterwards give it to Aslett; she was not taken into custody at that time; she went out with me, as I asked her very particularly for my husband watch - she said she liad not got it, that she had pawned it for 18s., and she could get me the duplicate if I would go with her; I asked how far it was - she said not far; I went with her about three miles or more - she then turned back, and told me she did not know where it was; I did not know my way in the City-I followed her, expecting she would lead me back to Mr. Percival's house; she led me down by Hyde-park - I begged her to lead me straight to Percival's; as I did not know where it was I stopped and asked a young man if I was near Snow-hill; he said No, I was going away from it as fast as I could, and when I turned back to look for her she was gone - she came to my house afterwards; I asked if she was not ashamed of herself - she went away, after some conversation; I saw her again on the Sunday before the examination, in a house in Union-street; I had been directed to that house - I had heard she wanted to sell the duplicate of the watch; I begged of her not to sell it, but to give it to me - she then said if I would go with her she would get the duplicate; she told me to go and get my bonnet and shawl, and that it was not far - I said I would go without them, and she led me to the bottom of the Borough; I was afraid of being lost again, and said, "Is it much further?" She said No; I said, "Is it the next street?" she said No - I said."Is it the next to that?" the said No, and if I went with her I should see: the first Policeman I saw I desired him to ask her for the ticket of my watch, and he took her - that was Aslett.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not freely forgive me at Mr. Percival's house, and say you would not hurt me, and you took my clothes? A. I took some of her clothes - when I came to Percival's he asked what I intended to do with her- I said I was a window, and did not understand the law; he told me if I prosecuted her it would not me between 40l. and 50l., and I had not a farthing; I told her as it was not in my power to punish her, I hoped the great God above would, but I would forgive her freely if she produced my husband's watch, I would freely forgive her the rest.

THOMAS PERCIVAL . I keep the George, on Snow-hill. On Friday, the 12th of August, the prisoner came to my house by the Boston coach, with the guard; the guard asked if she could be accommodated with a bed - she staid five nights at my house; she was, then absent for two nights, and returned about seven o'clock on the Friday morning, with a Policeman and a watchman; I opened the door for her; I asked the watchman if she had done any thing wrong - he said No, that she was making her way to the canal, as he thought, for the purpose of drowing herself; she made no answer to that - I called the servant, who took her up stairs; I went up stairs in yourself in about two hours and a half, in consequence of what Ann Gould , my servant, had said - I asked her some question; she made scarcely any reply, except that Mrs. Davey lived in New Gravel-lane, and she wished to see her; Ann Gould then took a small leather trunk out of the prisoner's bundle - this is the same (looking at one produced by Aslett) - I and another person went to Davey, and she came to my house; the prisoner went out with her, and never returned.

ANN GOULD . I am servant to Mr. Percival. The prisoner was brought home by the watchman; I went up stairs with her to her bed-room - she appeared very much disturbed in her mind; when she went away two days before, she left a box and bundle, which she had brought there - they had remained safe in the room; she had gone away on the Wednesday, and was brought back on the Friday - when she left on the Wednesday she said nothing about whether she should return or not and as she did not come home at night I locked her room door; on the Saturday before she left she said she had to go to receive some rents - when she returned on Friday I asked her where she had been for the two last nights; she shook her head and did not tell me; she asked where her bundle was - I told her it was where she had left it, and that nobody had entered her room while she had been away; she took the bundle from under the bed, placed it on the bed, and asked me if I saw any thing move in the bundle - I said No. I did not see any thing move at all, and asked what she had been doing, if she saw something move for I did not; she said she had been doing quite enough to hang her - I asked if she had been doing any murder; she said No, that shehad been robbing a house that she lodged at; she untied the bundle, brought out this little box, and lifted up the lid; I said, "Have you been breaking open a lock?" she said, "I have, and this is not the only lock; I was obliged to break open another large box before I could get at this small turnk" - I asked her if there was any man concerned in the robbery; she said No, that there was a female concerned in it, her name was Mary, and that she lodged in the same street, and that Mary took a boat; she had not time to put on shawl or bonnet, and out of the thirty-five sovereigns and silver and things contained in the trunk, she had only ten sovereigns herself - I immediately went down stairs and called master.

JOHN ASLETT . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner in custody by the prosecutrix's desire; I produce the trunk, which I received from the prosecutrix.

GEORGE SAUNDERS . I am servant to Mr. Townsend, a pawnbroker, of Russell-court, Covent-garden. I produce a watch, with a silver chain and key, pawned on the 20th of August, in the name of Elizabeth Stokes; I cannot say by whom - I have no knowledge of the prisoner.

MRS. DAVET. This is the trunk which contained my money - this watch was in it; it is my husband's.

Prisoner's Defence. When Mrs. Davey came to me, Mr. Percival gave all the clothes I had into her hand; she left the house with me - I did not run away from her, and where I lost sight of her I do not know; my senses were gone from me - I did not break open the box, though I certainly participated in the robbery.[Oct. 22.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 23.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

1964. JOHN PATE , ELIZABETH MARTIN and WILLIAM HAWKINS were indicted for that they, on the 7th of October , at St. Mary Matfellon , alias Whitechapel, 3 pieces of false and counterfeit money, each made to the likeness of the good and legal current silver coin of line realm, called shillings, feloniously and traitorously did forge, counterfeit, and coin, against their allegiance, and against the Statute .

MESSRS. SCARLETT and GURNEY, JUN. conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer of Hatton-garden. On the 7th of October, a little after one o'clock, I went to No. 105, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel , with Edwards, Lloyd, and Reynolds; the street door was open - I went to the second floor back room; I forced the room door open without trying it - I found afterwards that it had been fastened by a lock; the hasp was knocked off with the force I had used - I saw the prisoner Martin sitting by the side of the fire, at the side of a table; Pate stood by the side, not far from her, and Hawkins was standing behind Martin, by the foot of the bed - Martin cried out,"O Lord!" and threw something into the ashes which she had in her hand; I afterwards saw Edwards take it up - it was a pair of plaster of Paris moulds, and they were very hot; Pate fell back a little - we then secured them all three; when we first entered the room Pate's right hand went towards the bed - I saw Lloyd search the bed as soon as they were secured, which was in five minutes, and saw him take a file and a bad shilling off the bed; on the part of the table at which Martin sat, I took four counterfeit shillings, which I produce, and a piece of a get, which comes out of the channel in a mould where the metal is poured in, and I found four other shillings on that part of the table where Pate stood - I have them; they are finished, but the first four are not - I searched Pate; he took out of his trousers pocket a good crown-piece, a good half-crown, and five good shillings; I compared the good shillings with the counterfeit ones, and found one of them was exactly the same impression as the counterfeit ones; I looked into a cupboard in the room, and found a paper bag, with a small quantity of plaster of Paris in it, and a tin band - Pate said he did not care so much for himself as he did for Martin.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I am a Police-officer. I accompanied Hall to the prisoner's lodging - I secured Pate and Hawkins; I searched Hawkins, but found nothing on him - when I entered the room I observed Martin throw something from her hand into the ashes; I took it up, and it was a handkerchief, which contained a mould made of plaster of Paris - I did not open it till I got to the office; I then found it contained a shilling not in its proper state, there not, being sufficient metal; I have the moulds here - there was rather a fierce fire, but not a very large one; the moulds were close together, with the handkerchief tied round them, as I suppose, to keep the heat from the hand, and they were nearly red hot - I called Hall to feel them, and Martin's hand was very much burnt indeed, it appeared just burnt; I got a doctor to her - when I had recured them I sent down stairs for the other officers.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a parish-constable. I accompanied the witnesses to Wentworth-street; I waited down stairs, in the yard, till a signal was given - I then went up, assisted in searching the room, and under the stove, in the ashes, I found this piece of pipe, with the bowl broken; there is a portion of white metal in the tube - on the floor, by the right-hand side of the fireplace, I found two small piece of white metal, and on the chimney-piece the bowl of a white metal spoon and a counterfeit sixpence; I took a cinder off the fire, with a portion of white metal on it - on the hob, on the left-hand side of the fire-place, I found a piece of iron plate, with some splashes of white metal on it.

ANDREW LLOYD . I am a Police-officer. I accompanied the officers to Wentworth-street - I remained below with Reynolds, and afterwards went up; I was directed to search the room, and on a bed in the room I found a counterfeit shilling, a file, and the blade of a case knife.

JAMES THORLEY . I rent the house in Wentworth-street, and let it out in lodgings furnished. The beginning of this month I let the two pair back room to the prisoner Pate - he lived there with the female prisoner; he paid the rent, and they lived there as man and wife - I have seen Hawkins before; he did not lodge in the house.

EDWARD JOSEPH POWELL . I am one of the inspectors of the Mist, and have had considerable experience in the examination of materials for counterfeiting coin, and of counterfeit coin; this pair of moulds are made of plaster of Paris for the purpose of casting a shilling; on the impression, on the reverse side, a portion of the plaster is come away, and I find, on an imperfect shilling, which has been produced by Edwards, precisely the same defect; here is the obverse part of the mould; that has also a trifling defect which is perceivableon the shilling - here is the get, which fills the nitch in the mould; here are four counterfeit shillings, finished as perfect as the mould would make them, but they require to be filed where the get has joined them - they are imperfect, and could not be passed in the present state; they appear to have been cast in the mould now produced, for on the obverse side is a small defect in the beading round the edge, and on the reverse side is a very trifling defect in the mould, between the line of the shield containing the arms and the garter which surrounds it, and immediately above the figure 4, in the date 1824, is a small scratch - the mould and the shilling correspond with these marks; the date and the rest of the impression corresponds - one of the five good shillings I have no doubt at all has been the shilling the mould was made with, because it has on it the peculiarities I have before described; here are four perfect shillings - they have all been made in the same mould, and resemble the pattern shilling which I have produced, and correspond with the mould; the rough sprey is taken off the shilling by a file; this file would do it - the only part requiring to be filed is where the get is; this white metal on the iron plate has been fused - the tin band is used to form the mould, the plaster of Paris being in a liquid state at first; this spoon is Britannia metal, which the coin is made of - a tobacco pipe is used to pour the metal from some larger vessel into the mould, and there is white metal in it - I have known it used to fuse the metal; there is plaster of Paris in this bag.

Hawkins' Defence. I was standing at the door with some songs when Moore came home with some fish; he asked me to come up stairs, and let him look at the songs; I had not been up stairs five minutes before the door was burst open.

WILLIAM BROWN EDWARDS . I did not see Hawkins with any songs; I saw some fish on the table - I had not been about the house any time before we went up.

ANDREW LLOYD . I saw no songs.

WILLIAM HALL . I saw two songs on one piece of paper- I gave them to Pate, and told him to put them into his pocket, as he might want them to read; they laid near Martin - I did not see them in Hawkins' hands.

MARY HANNAH MATTHEWS . My husband is a lawstationer - he and Martin's father are distant relations. I have known her since she was eight years old - I saw her last about six months ago; her father and mother were respectable farmers, and had an estate of their own - since her father was reduced she went to be governess at a boarding-school, at Camberwell; that is four or five years ago - she continued there, I believe, about twelve months, - she then went back to her parents to live, and remained with them till about six months ago; I have not seen her since - I believe she maintained a very respectable character up to that time.

One witness gave Pate a good character.

PATE - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 20.

MARTIN - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 22.

[Oct. 22.] HAWKINS - NOT GUILTY .

The Jury strongly recommended Martin to mercy, supposing her to he acting under the influence of Pate.

1965. WILLIAM HAWKINS was again indicted for feloniously having in his possession a mould, impressed with the obverse side of a good and lawful shilling , &c.

No evidence. NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

1966. GEORGE ALFRED GLOVER was indicted for that he, at the General Session of the Peace of our Lord the King, holden in and for the County of Middlesex, at the Session-house for the said County, on Monday, the 14th day of February, in the first year of the reign of William the Fourth, before Francis Const and others, Justices of our said Lord the King, assigned, &c., he was in due form of law tried and convicted upon a certain indictment against him, of being a common utterer of counterfeit coin, and thereupon it was considered by the Court that he should be imprisoned in the House of Correction at Clerkenwell, in the said County, and kept to hard labour, for one year, and at the expiration of that time that he should find sureties for his good behaviour for two years more, to be computed from the end of the said one year, pursuant to the Statue, &c.; and that he, having been so convicted, afterwards, on the 20th of September , in the second year of the reign of William the Fourth, at St. Luke, one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a piece of good and current money and silver coin of this realm, called a shilling, as and for a piece of good and current money and silver coin of this realm, called a shilling, unlawfully and feloniously did utter to one David Ewart , he, the said George Alfred Glover, at the time he so uttered the said last mentioned piece of counterfeit money, well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit; against the Statute, &c.

MESSRS. SCARLETT and GURNEY, JUN. conducted the prosecution.

DAVID EWART. I keep a coffee-stall at the corner of Atfield-street, Goswell-street . On the 20th of September, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner - he had a woman with him; he asked for coffee: I gave him a cup - he gave me a sixpence, and I gave him 5d. change; in about ten minutes they both returned - they had another cup; the prisoner gave me a shilling: I gave him a sixpence and 5d.; I put the shilling into my waistcoat pocket - I had no other money there; they returned a third time in about eight minutes - the prisoner asked for more coffee; I gave him a cup, and he gave me a shilling; I had it in my hand; my suspicions were awakened, and I told him it was a bad one; he said it was a new one, and a good one, and he could find me twenty-five more if I wanted them - I said it was bad; he said he would take it back; I gave it to him, and he put it into his pocket, keeping the good change which I had given him for it - he did not give me any other shilling: he then went away with the woman - I had looked at the shilling I had in my waistcoat pocket before he left me, and told him that was also bad; I described his person to Clarkson, the Policeman, about ten minutes afterwards, and saw him in custody in about twenty minutes - I saw Clarkson search him at my stall; he resisted violently - a shilling was found on him; I went to the station-house, marked the shilling he first gave me, and gave it to Clarkson; I received no payment for the last cup of coffee.

Prisoner. Q. Did the woman give you the shilling, or did I? A. He gave it me; nobody else was standing by the first time - I gave the shilling to a woman the third time, and told her to go over the way, and ask if it was bad.

Q. Why not detain me then? A.You went away - I am sure the shilling produced is the one you gave me, because I put it into my pocket, where I had no other money - it was the last shilling that I gave the woman to look at; she took it across to a light, brought it back, and gave it to me- I offered it to the prisoner, who took it and kept it.

JOHN CLARKSON. I am a Policeman. In consequence of information from Ewart I apprehended the prisoner in Golden-lane, about four o'clock in the morning; I took him to Goswell-street, to Ewart - I searched one of his hands, which he clasped very tight - I suspected he had something in it; he resisted very much: I at last got it open, with great force, and there was a shilling in it, which I produce; I took him to the station-house, searched him again there, and found one shilling, one sixpence, and 7d. in copper, all good money, on him - I took the woman, and found 9d. on her; I received a counterfeit shilling from Ewart, which I have had ever since - he marked it before he gave it to me.

DAVID EWART. Here is my mark on this shilling - it is the first shilling I received from the prisoner.

EDWARD JOSEPH POWELL . I am an inspector of counterfeit coin to the Mint. The shilling, identified by Ewart is counterfeit; the other is also counterfeit - they are both from the same mould.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I produce a copy of the record of the prisoner's former conviction, which I examined with the original at the office of the clerk of the peace at Clerkenwell - it is a true copy - (read.)

MR. GEORGE LAVAL CHESTERTON. I am governor of the House of Correction, Cold Bath-fields. I know the prisoner - he was in my custody, convicted in February Sessions, sentenced to one year in the House of Correction, with hard labour, and afterwards to find sureties; he was released on the 9th of August, by His Majesty's warrant, in consequence of a certificate of the surgeon of his ill state of health; I was present at his trial, and know him to be the person; his life was despaired of at the time the sentence was remitted.[Oct. 22.] GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 31.

Second Middlesex Jury, Before Lord Cheif Justice Tenterden.

1967. EMANUEL ANTONIO and ENACOE CAETANO were indicted for that they, on the 17th of October , at St. George, upon Jacob George , feloniously, unlawfully, and maliciously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument feloniously, &c. did strike and cut the said Jacob George , upon the right side of his body, his left thigh, and across his loins, with intent in so doing feloniously, wilfully, and of their malice aforethought, to kill and murder the said Jacob George, against the Statute .

2nd COUNT, stating their intent to be to disable him.

3rd COUNT, stating their intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JACOB GEORGE. I am a native of Calcutta - my father was an Englishman; I am a seaman - I was cast away at Bordeaux, and came to England; I lodged at Gold's barracks, Ratcliff-highway - it is a place where all the Indian born people and foreign seamen lodge - the prisoner Antonio lodged there, but in a different room to Caetano; Caetano lodged there some time before this happened, but not at this time - he had been sent on board. I played at cards with Antonio on Sunday night; it was a week ago yesterday - we had a quarrel, and some blows passed: some people came in, and parted us - he and I understood each other; he speaks Portuguese, and so do I - he came to my room next night; Caetano came first - he came into the room; I had not gone to bed; I was sitting down on a chest - the beds are hammocks, laying on the floor, and some are slung up; when Caetano came in he had something in his hand; it was a jack-knife - he said, "I will kill somebody in this room to-night;" he spoke Portuguese - they went away again, all of them.

Q.Did any body come in with him? A. Yes; there was one of his shipmates with him - they went away, and then I went to bed; after I was in bed Caetano came in again; I heard him say something about cutting a hammock down - Antonio then came and kicked the door open- he sat down on the floor, and I asked if that was the manner to come into a room; he said, "If you say any thing I will open your guts out;" he spoke in Portuguese- I then got out of bed, and we took hold of each other's collars; I was undressed, and he was dressed - we had a few blows; Caetano came behind me, and held my hands down, by putting his arms round my body, and while he held my hands down Antonio was cutting me with a knife, as I supposed, but it turned out to be a razor; he cut me on the thigh, on the right side, and he cut my body on the right side and in the left loin, nearly behind - I forced myself away, knocked Antonio down, and got away from them; he fell on the candle, and put it out; I then ran into the yard - Caetano was singing out, "Come out here, I will fight it out here;" he ran after me when I ran into the yard, and said, "Let us fight it out in the yard;" and then I saw Antonio come out into the yard; I then ran away, singing out Murder! I ran out towards the side door to go out of the way; it is a good long barrack - I then saw Antonio with a sharp instrument in his hand: he ran after me - I stumbled, and fell down by the step of the door, as I went to run up stairs, and while I was down Antonio was sticking me with the knife - he gave me a rip in my side; Collins then came, and took away the knife -Mr. Betson, the surgeon, saw me the same night.

SAMUEL COLLINS . I am a seaman, and lodge at Gold's barracks; Antonio slept in the same room with me - that is not where George slept. I saw Antonio in our room on Monday evening, about half-past ten o'clock, looking for something; I asked what he was looking for - he made no answer; I saw him take a razor off the shelf - he broke the handle off, took the blade in his hand, and went out of the room; there was a light in the room - in about ten minutes I heard a noise in the room George slept in; I went to see what was the matter, and when I entered the room I saw Antonio strike George twice; whether he struck with the razor or not then, I cannot say - they had a scuffle, and the candle went out: Caetano was in the room, but I did not see him do any thing - when the light went out George went out of the room into the yard; both the prisoners followed him - Antonio turned into the room again; he went out again, and I saw George run away from him - I then went into the yard; George was running away from him, singing out, "Knife! knife!" Antonio ran after him, and George fell by the Lascars' door; I saw Antonio make a plunge at him - I went there, collared him, and took fromhis hand the blade of the razor; I delivered it to George the next morning.

JAMES DAVIS . I am a seaman, and lodge at Gold's, in the same room as George. I was sitting in the room when Caetano came in - George was then in bed; I can speak Portuguese, but did not hear what he said - Antonio kicked the door open, and came in; it is a long room - five or six, and sometimes nine or ten people sleep there; there are only five beds there - George said to Antonio, "What manner do you come into the room, to kick the door open at this time of night?" they spoke in Portuguese, which I understood; George said, "I suppose you have come to make some disturbance;" Antonio said if he said any thing he would rip his guts out; George then got out of bed, went to him, and asked what he meant - Antonio collared him, fisted him, and said that was what he meant; George struck him again - after they had two or three blows Caetano went behind George, he put his arms round George, and confined his hands, and while he held him Antonio gave him two or three blows; soon after that George began to sing out, "He is striking me with a knife;" after he got loose he left the room, and ran out into the yard - the light was put out before they ran out; somebody fell on it - the prisoners both followed after George; I stopped in the room - I did not see any knife or razor; nobody could have stuck him besides the prisoners; nobody else was near him.

ANTHONY O'BRIAN . I am a Policeman. I was called into Gold's barracks about ten o'clock at night; they are in Middlesex, in the neighbourhood of Ratcliff-highway- Antonio was in the room, talking; I asked what he was kicking up that noise about - he said somebody had cut his finger, which was bleeding; somebody said, in his hearing, that his finger was cut by taking a razor out of his hand - that was said in English, and Antonio spoke to me in English, so that I understood him; I told him to go to bed, and he went quietly out of the room - I came away, and in about ten minutes I saw the prosecutor bleeding at the gateway, with nothing on but his shirt; I went into the barracks to search for Antonio, and found him, in about twenty minutes, in an empty room, by himself, and took Caetano the same night - I have the razorblade, which I received from George on Tuesday morning, the 18th.

JACOB GEORGE. I received the razor-blade from Collins.

GEORGE BETSON . I am a surgeon. I saw George on the Tuesday afternoon, about three o'clock, at the Thames Police, before the Justice - I examined his body, and found four wounds, which appeared to have been made with a sharp instrument; two were on his thigh, one on his loins, and the other on the right side - they were not very deep nor dangerous, quite superficial.

The prisoners being foreigners, had the whole of the evidence communicated to them by an interpreter, through whom they made their defences.

Antonio's Defence. I never had the razor in my hand with any bad intention; I only had it because I found my razor was spoiled by somebody - I never kicked the door so hard as they say; I only touched it, and it opened- I did not hit the man with any intent to use the knife; I only happened to have it in my hand when they asked why I opened the door so - I said because I liked, that was all.

Caetano's Defence. I only came in to bid him farewell, because I was going away; I only went on a visit- this man came in, and they said, "How came you to come in, in such a rough way?" he said because he liked it; the prosecutor then jumped out of bed - I went to part them; I did not know that he had any knife in his hand - I only took him away to keep him back; I do not know the laws of this country at all.

ANTONIO - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 34.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, being a foreigner.

CAETANO - NOT GUILTY .[Oct. 24.)

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1968. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , at St. Marylebone, 3 coats, value 12l.; 3 pairs of boots, value 15s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 4s.; 1 pair of breeches, value 10s.; 3 pairs of drawers, value 8s.; 2 waistcoats, value 6s.; 6 shirts, value 20s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 3 table-cloths, value 1l.; 2 bags, value 10s.; 2 forks, value 20s., and 3 knives, value 3s., the goods of George Reid ; 1 coat, value 4s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6s., the goods of Robert Jones , in the dwelling-house of the said George Reid .

ROBERT JONES. I am butler to Mr. George Reid, who lives at No. 8, Clarence-terrace, Regent's-park, in the parish of St. Marylebone , and is a gentleman . The prisoner came into his service as footman on the 22nd of June; he slept in the house, and left about five o'clock on Sunday morning last - he had received notice about the 29th of September, that if he did not like his situation he was at liberty to go, as he had made a complaint, but he gave no notice of his intention to go; the servants usually got up about seven o'clock - I got up at a quarter before seven, and he was then gone; I had seen my coat, trousers, and handkerchief on the Saturday; I brushed the coat about ten o'clock in the morning - it was safe in the servants' hall; I never gave him permission to use my things - the coat was worth 4s., the trousers 1s., and the handkerchief 6d., not 6s. - it was a black silk cravat, rather worn; the prisoner never came back - he had not received his wages; I have the care of my master's wardrobe, and when he left I missed the property stated in the indictment - this paper was found on the table in the hall after he left; I have seen him write, and believe it to be his hand-writing - I missed the articles stated in the indictment; (enumerating them) they were all taken out of the house at one time - they had been worn; I value them altogether at between 30l. and 40l., but I believe, in the indictment, I valued them at about 17l.; he was taken about eight o'clock that morning - Robertson, the headborough, brought part of the things to me, and Jacobs produced some others.

Prisoner. Q. Can you swear when you saw these things last in the wardrobe? A. I set the wardrobe to rights on the Friday, and did not miss any thing; to the best of my knowledge every thing was there then.

Prisoner. I had taken the things out of the wardrobe above a week before. (Paper read.)

I am a soldier brave and bold, as ever went to sea, And the few things run away with was for a spree.

JOHN ROBERTSON . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 23rd of October, in Worship-street, Shoreditch: I found a carpet bag, and apparently the cover of it, both filled with clothes - he was walking up Worship-street with them over his shoulder; one bag in front, and the other behind; they contained three coats, three pairs of boots, a pair of trousers, a pair of breeches, three pairs of drawers, two waistcoats, six shirts, a handkerchief, three table-cloths, a silver knife, a common steel one, and three common knives; he had in his pocket six sovereigns and 12s. 6d. - he told me he had left his place for a month, and that it was at No. 12, Berkeley-square - Jones claimed the things as his master's; I found a paper in his pocket, through which I found the owner.

JOHN JACOBS . I live at No. 246, Shoreditch - I buy and sell clothes. The prisoner came to my house on Sunday morning last; I never saw him before - he asked if I bought old clothes; I said Yes - he said he had got some at his lodgings; I went with him to a public-house opposite Shoreditch church - he brought out two bags, and told me he would come down to my house, and I should buy them of him; he brought the bags to my house about a quarter to eight o'clock that morning - the first article he showed me was an olive double breasted coat, quite new, and asked 30s. for it; I value it at 4l. or 5l. - he then showed me two coats, and asked 20s. each for them; I asked how he came by them; he said his master gave them to him - I said, "I think they have hardly been worn, and I think them too good for your master to give you;" I told him to put them all into his bag, and I sent for the headborough, who took him to the station-house.

Prisoner. He asked me first if I wanted to buy any thing; I asked if he bought old clothes, which I had to sell - I asked him a price for them, and he offered me 2l.; and because I would not take that, I suppose he fetched the officer.

ROBERT JONES. I am confident all these things are my master's - I have examined them; the bags are also his - he had a written character with the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) My Lord and Gentlemen, - I beg leave to assure you that so far from my being an old offender, or having and bad accomplices, I have only been five months in London, my native place being Market Overton, in the County of Rutlandshire. I had served two masters faithfully, and in all probability should have continued to serve the prosecutor with the same faith and industry, had I not been driven to despair by the bad usage of the butler, Robert Jones; it is true, I ought to have complained to my master, who I am sure would have seen me righted, but I was afraid to complain. I am, my Lord and Gentlemen, overcome with sorrow and shame- but I do trust that you will take into your consideration my youth, being only eighteen years old - that you will consider the respectability of my family, my father having been forty years high-constable of the County of Rutlandshire; my father died about three years since - my mother is alive, and will be heart broken when she hears of my disgrace. I do hope, my Lord and Gentlemen, you will consider these circumstances, and inflict as lenient a fine as the nature of the case can admit. My Lord and Gentlemen, I throw myself entirely upon your merciful consideration, in hope that my master will speak for me, and prove the character he received with me from Mr. Chapman.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth and good character.

LARCENIES, &c.

OLD COURT. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

1969. ELIZA TUBBY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Pearce , on the 27th of September , and stealing 1 gown, value 2s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s.; 1 petticoat, value 1d., and 1 piece of printed cotton, value 1d. , his property.

ELIZA PEARCE . I am the wife of Richard Pearce , who works for Mr. Rhodes, a brick-maker - we live in Castle-lane, Islington . On the 27th of September I went out about half-past five o'clock in the morning, and left my husband at home; I did not return till half-past six o'clock in the evening; I then missed these articles - I found them in pawn that evening.

RICHARD PEARCE. My wife left me at home; I left the house about one o'clock - the shutters, doors, and windows were fastened; I returned about six o'clock, and found the shutter taken down, thrown into a ditch, and the window put back; there was room for a person to get in: the glass was not broken - I unlocked the door, but missed nothing till my wife came home; the casement was hasped, but a pane of glass had been broken before, through which a hand could be put.

SARAH MEAD WARNER . I have known the prisoner some time. On the 27th of September, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I saw her opposite the Hare and Hounds, Hackney, with a bundle in her lap; I spoke to her, and am certain it was her.

CHARLES NEWMAN . I am servant to Mr. Jones, a pawnbroker, of Stoke Newington. On the 27th of September, about half-past six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pawned a gown, petticoat, and handkerchief, for 2s.

WILLIAM CHAMBERS . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner about eight o'clock on the 27th of September - I told her the charge, but she said nothing.

WILLIAM ATTFIELD . I am an officer. I went to the prosecutor's cottage; the casement window is about a yard from the ground - there is a ditch close by it; it would not be at all difficult for a female to get in; the shutter had no fastening.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not break into the house - I went down to get some stinging-nettles, and found the things in the ditch.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury,

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

1970. JAMES BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 1 watch, value 6l.; 1 seal, value 6s., and 1 key, value 2s., the goods of Charles Rogers , in the dwelling-house of Stephen Garard .

CHARLES ROBERTS. I am groom to Mr. Stephen Garard , and sleep over the stable; the prisoner assisted mein the stable. On the 4th of October, about noon, I left him there for about five minutes; he was gone when I returned - I missed my watch in about three hours - it was silver, and cost 6l. about two years ago, when new; Waldron brought him to me next day - I asked if he had taken my watch; he said he had, and had pawned it in Long-acre, but did not recollect the pawnbroker's name.

THOMAS WALDRON . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner on the evening of the 5th of October, at his father's house in Field-lane; he said he had stolen a watch from the bed-room of the man he had been working with.

HENRY FREAKS . I live with a pawnbroker in Longacre. On the 4th of October, between two and three o'clock, a woman pawned this watch for 25s.; it would not sell for more than four guineas - it might fetch 50s. at in suction.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 4l. only . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1971. WILLIAM KENT was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 1 watch, value 6l. 10s., the goods of John Elphinstone , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN ELPHINSTONE . I am a baker , and live in Lamb-street, Spital-square . On the 3rd of October, about twelve o'clock, I was in the bakehouse, and saw the prisoner in the shop; the parlour is in a passage leading from the shop to the bakehouse - he might have been there before I saw him; thinking him a customer I went to serve him - he asked for a penny worth of buttered biscuits, which I gave him: he immediately threw sixpence on the counter- I was going to give him change from the till; he said, in a hurried way, "Quick now;" I took the coppers in my hand, and from his speaking so hurried I turned round to see if my watch was on the parlour mantel-piece, and missed it; I immediately collared him, pulled him into the parlour, put my hand to his side, and felt the watch in his side pocket; I scuffled with him, and called for assistance- he got his hand into his pocket, and threw the watch to the other end of the parlour; my neighbours observed me, and went for a Policeman - one who was passing came in, and I gave him in charge; he denied having seen the watch, or knowing any thing about it - it was laying on the floor at that time; I gave 4l. for it about two years ago, but it was considered worth 6l. 10s.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 4l. only . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

1972. TIMOTHY GALLON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 3 blankets, value 5s.; 2 sheets, value 4s.; 1 quilt, value 3s.; 1 bolster, value 2s.; 1 pail, value 1s.; 1 saucepan, value 6d.; 1 chair, value 1s., and 1 pitcher, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Farland .

CHARLES FARLAND. I live in Orchard-street, Westminster - the prisoner and his wife lodged in my house for ten months; they had a room to themselves. On Sunday, the 18th of September, I met him in the street, with a chair - I ran after him, but lost sight of him; I saw him go into Gatenby's house - I went home, examined his room, and missed the articles stated in the indictment: he is a stone-sawyer.

ELIZABETH GATENBY . I live in Orchard-street. The prisoner came to me on Sunday morning, and sold me a chair for 6d. - Farland saw it, and claimed it; on the Tuesday before he brought two old blankets - I refused to buy them, because they were so old; I at last bought them for a shilling, and next day another for 6d. - I sold them for 1s. 9d.; my husband keeps a sale-shop - I sold the chair for 9d. while he was in the shop, and told the officer where to find it.

Prisoner. Q.Did I not ask you to keep the things to a future day for me? A.No - you said you should be glad to buy the blankets in the winter; I said I must sell them.

ROBERT GOOSE . I am an officer. I got the chair from a woman the witness sold it to - Farland saw and claimed it. GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1973. JOHN HALE & JOHN CLEMENTS were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 rule, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 6d. , the goods of Joseph Lacey .

JOSEPH LACEY . I am a tinman . On the 12th of October, between one and two o'clock, I saw the prosecutor at the Carpenter's Arms, at Hayes ; I had a handkerchief and rule in the side pocket of my coat, which I hung on a fence in the skittle-ground - I was drinking a short way from my coat, and saw Hale with his hand in my pocket; I was drinking at the time, and he went away - I followed him in doors, and asked him to give me my handkerchief and rule; he said, "D-n me, don't say I have got it;" I said, "You have" - he directly struck me, and swore he knew nothing about it; I went for an officer - he was searched, but nothing found; I said I had seen his hand in my pocket, and after that he said, "Well, come on one side, I don't want every body to hear;" he took me into a back place, and then declared he knew nothing about it - the officer said he should lock him up; I said he knew where it was - he said, "I have not got it, but that chap in the red waistcoat, who sits on the settle, has it;" the officer then took Clements, who had a red waistcoat - he denied all knowledge of it; Hale looked at him, and said, "You know where they are, and why don't you bring them forward?" Clements said, "Well, I can find them, and will go and fetch them;" the officer went with him to some hay - Clements said, "They lay there," and under the hay they laid with a jacket, which a carpenter owned.

JOSEPH HIGGS . I am an officer. I was sent for - I told Hale I must take him - he called me aside, and said,"I don't know why I alone should suffer, I took the things, but I gave them to a man who sits on the settle, in a red waistcoat," and that Clements wanted him to steal the coat and all; Clements was brought to me - he denied it, but at last he said he would find it, and pointed it out under something.

Hale's Defence. Lacey came into the tap-rooms, and said I had got his handkerchief; I said I had not - I did not say I had taken the things, but that I had seen them, and did not know where they were.

JOSEPH LACEY. I saw Clements about the groundbefore I was robbed - he did not appear acquainted with Hale.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

1973. THOMAS HORNCASTLE & ANN CHAMBERS were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 4 half-crowns , the monies of Francis Cassill .

FRANCIS CASSILL . I am a milkman . On the 10th of October, about eleven o'clock at night, I saw Chambers in the Commercial-road; I gave her some porter at a public-house, and accompained her home - she asked for gin; I gave her sixpence to fetch some, and while she was gone for it, I took my four half-crowns out of my pocket, and put them into my fob - she returned without any gin; we went to bed together - I told her I must go out by two o'clock in the morning, and to call me if I should fall asleep; I was awoke between two and three o'clock by the prisoner Horncastle pulling me by the arm- I had not seen him before; he said I should go out of the house, for I had no business there - I then missed my money, and said I would not go till it was returned; my trousers, which I had put under the bolster, were on the floor; I asked for the woman - he said there was no woman in the house, that I had no business there, and he would turn me out; he attempted to turn me out - we had an altercation in the passage; the door was opened to put me out, and the Policeman came in - he brought Chambers into the passage to me.

Cross-examined by MR. CRESWELL. Q.How far from your home did you meet her? A.About a quarter of a mile; she took me to a room one street from where I live- I wanted to be called at two o'clock, saying I had a cow to attend to that was ill, but I meant to go home; I am married, and have five children - I was a little in liquor; I was heavy to sleep, but had my recollection perfectly.

Q. Did you not say at the public-house, "Come, mistress, give me my change, for it is my last shilling?" A. I do not recollect it - if I did say so, it was not the case.

ROBERT RUSSELL . I was going along my beat, between two and three o'clock in the morning, and heard a loud talking - when I came to the door of this house I saw Horncastle, with a candlestick in one hand, endeavouring to get the prosecutor out; he said he had been robbed by a woman - Horncastle said there was no woman in the house; I searched the house, and found Chambers in the cellar, in her night clothes; she had no light, and said,"Oh, here you are;" she begged me not to take her, and she would do any thing in the world to make me a recompence - I took her to the prosecutor; she declared her innocence, but begged him not to press any thing against her - I found a sixpence and 15 1/2d. on her, and a half-crown and a sixpence on Horncastle.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you know her before? A. By seeing her in the street - I am given to understand the house is her own property, and believe it not to be a house of ill-fame; I did not know her as a prostitute - the prosecutor was tipsy.

NOT GUILTY .

1974. WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Lionel Prager Goldsmid , from his person .

MR. CRESWELL conducted the prosecution.

LIONEL PRAGER GOLDSMID, ESQ. On the 11th of October, about two o'clock in the morning, I was in Regent-street with Mr. Angerstein - we were coming from Warren's hotel, and in consequence of what Mr. Angerstein said to me, I observed the prisoner running away -I immediately felt in my pocket, and found my handkerchief was gone; I pursued, and just as I came up to him a Policeman stopped him, and asked if I had lost my handkerchief; he pointed to it laying in the mud, about five yards off, saying he had seen him throw it away.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES EDDS . I am a Policeman. I saw the prisoner running with the handkerchief in his hand; he was coming towards me - Mr. Goldsmid was in pursuit, and a few yards before he came up to me I saw him drop the handkerchief out of his hand; I immediately collared him, and Mr. Goldsmid took it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to the play, which made me out late - I saw a boy run from behind some gentlemen, and run between the coaches; as I came up the gentleman caught me - he said, "What have you been doing?" and thinking the boy had done something to them, I ran between the coaches after him.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

1975. GEORGE JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 14 lbs. of cheese, value 12s. , the goods of John Symons .

JOHN LAPTHORN . I am a Policeman. On the 17th of September, at half-past ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner on Saffron-hill, with part of a cheese under his coat, wrapped in an apron; I stopped him, and asked what he had - he said it was two quartern loaves; I found it was 14 lbs. of cheese, and asked where he got it - he said he did not know it was cheese, but that somebody gave it him in Holborn to carry somewhere - he could not tell where, but said the people would come by and by.

TIMOTHY McCARTHY . I am in the employ of John Symons, a cheesemonger , in Fetter-lane . This is his cheese; I had seen it safe between eight and nine o'clock that night; it has part of master's name on it - I sold the other half of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Holborn; a gentleman stopped me, and asked if I was willing to earn two or three halfpence - he told me to carry this, to put it into my apron, and he would follow.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Confined Six Months .

First London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

1976. ELIZABETH HAYCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 shirt, value 5s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of Benjamin Thomas Surmons , her master; to which she pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 48. - Confined Two Months .

1977. WILLIAM ORAM was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Harriot Bullock , on the 21st of September , and stealing 1 pair of spectacles, value 2s.; 4 shirts, value 2l.; 1 night-gown, value 1s.;1 cravet value 6d., and 1 yard of calico, value 2d. , her property.

HARRIOT BULLOCK . I am a widow , and live in Old Fish-street-hill - I am a laundress . On the 21st of September, about half-past four o'clock, I was at home, on the ground floor; I never open the front room door -I heard a noise, as if something stumbled; I opened the door quick, and the prisoner stood in the passage, close at the street door, trying to open it, with my clothes at his feet, which had been on my ironing table in the back room - I had seen them there a quarter of an hour before all safe; when I opened the door he said, "Have not you got a cellar to let?" I looked down, and said, "What do you do with my ironing clothes?" he said he had not touched them; he was going away, but I saw my spectacles in his waistcoat pocket - they had been taken from the inside room, by the side of the ironing clothes; he was a stranger - the street door is always kept shut, but not locked; it fastens with a spring - five families lodge in the house; I saw the door shut a quarter of an hour before.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I was called for, and took the prisoner in charge; I found three padlocks, two keys, and a latch-key on him - the keys fit the locks, except one, which is a square one.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The spectacles are my own; I am a leather-dresser, and lately discharged from the army- I saw a bill in her window, and went to ask about it; directly she opened the door she asked if the things were mine.

MRS. BULLOCK. The spectacles are mine - I saw them a quarter of an hour before.

GUILTY of stealing only . Aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

1978. HENRY ALLEN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Rice , on the 17th of September , and stealing therein 1 can, value 6d., and 5 quarts of rum, value 18s. , his property.

JAMES RICE. I keep a public-house , in Tenter-steet, Moorfields - the prisoner was at work on my premises, as a bricklayer's labourer , for about three months; he was at work on a piece of ground by the side of my house, where the cellar-flap is. On Saturday morning, the 17th of September, about ten o'clock, I received information, and missed a can; it is impossible to say whether I lost rum - the can was found buried in the ground where the prisoner worked, with a board laid over it; the cellar was fastened with a hook - there was an outer door to be opened, and then any body could get in without opening the flap - the door was shut on the 16th when I went out of town, and left the bar-maid at home; I returned next day, and on Saturday was informed of the loss of rum.

BENJAMIN HUSTWAYTE . I am a bricklayer - the prisoner worked for me. He was cleaning old bricks on the 16th - about four o'clock in the afternoon I went into the waste ground to make some lime-white, and found the cellar door barricadoed with some old doors, which had been over some bricks; I found the cellar door open, and saw the prisoner drinking out of the can - I do not know what was in it; I suspected he had been in the cellar, and on Saturday morning I requested him to call Mr. Rice's servant, and while he was gone I found the can, with about a pint and a half of rum in it - I had asked the day before what he was drinking, and he said water; between eight and nine o'clock the same Saturday afternoon I found him in Rice's cellar - he said he had been for some sand to make morter; I said, "We have no use for morter;" there was no reason for his going there - he denied all knowledge of the can; it was afterwards found buried.

WILLIAM LAWSON . I was passing the prosecutor's house on the 17th - the prisoner called me, and asked if I would have a drink of rum; I went to the side of the house, and drank out of a small stone bottle - he had the can, dipping water in the yard.

GEORGE LOCK . I am an officer. Rice gave me this stone bottle - the rum in it was in the can.

JAMES RICE. This is my can - I had rum of that description.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a person brought a can of rum into the yard, and gave it to him, that he put it into a stone bottle, and his master and others drank with him.

NOT GUILTY .

1979. ROBERT SAWER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , 2 pairs of shoes, value 12s.; 2 half-crowns, 2 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the property of Thomas Bowtell , his master.

MR. BALL conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS BOWTELL . I am a shoemaker , and live in Skinner-street - the prisoner was in my service. In May last Captain Fitzhenry bought a pair of shoes at my shop; I gave them to the prisoner, with 8s. change, to take to Captain Fitzhenry; he never returned - I heard no more of him or the shoes.

There being no evidence that the prisoner had not fulfilled his instructions, he was ACQUITTED .

1980. GEORGE HULME was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, 4 half-crowns, 8 shillings, and 2 sixpences, the property of Frances Lewis , from her person .

FRANCES LEWIS. I am single . On the 19th of September, about half-past two o'clock, I was standing at the corner of St. Paul's church-yard , to allow a carriage to pass - I felt a tug at my reticule; I thought it was gone, and on taking it up my keys dropped from it; I found the bottom of it had been cut, and my purse and money gone - at the same time my sister, who was with me, had the heel of her shoe trod on; she looked back, and called my attention to the prisoner, who was walking away, and she detained him - I have not found my purse; it was safe in my bag when I left Norwood at nine o'clock in the morning, and contained the money.

ELIZA BLANDON . I was with my sister, waiting for a carriage to pass - she caught hold of her bag, and said her purse was gone; I turned round, as the prisoner trod on my heels, and I saw him draw his hand from my side - there were two others with him, but they went away; I am positive he drew his hand from my sister - he was the nearest person to her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He must havebeen very near you when he trod in your heel? A. Yes- I turned round instantly; I kept my eyes on him, from the time I saw him move his hand, and I took him.

Q. Could he have done any thing without your seeing him? A. Not that I am aware of; I kept hold of him for a few minutes, till an officer came up - no purse was found on him, nor any instrument to cut with; he could not have given either knife or purse to any body after I saw him.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found on him four half-crowns and 12s.

Cross-examined. Q. You searched him minutely? A. Yes; I found no knife on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my cousin's in Drury-lane, when the lady laid hold of me; I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

1981. GEORGE HASLAM was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , 44 lbs. of veal, value 24s. , the goods of Robert Pocklington .

WILLIAM COOMBS. I am a labourer to Mr. Claxton. On the 23rd of September, about twenty minutes past eight o'clock, I saw the prosecutor's truck in Paternoster-row -I saw the prisoner go, and take a hind-quarter of veal out of it, and go away; I followed, knocked him down, and took him in charge with it.

ROBERT POCKLINGTON . I am a butcher , and live in Old' Change. My man had taken a quarter of a call from the market in the truck, and left it in Paternoster-row; I have known the prisoner some years - he is a buthcer, and often dealt with me; he had no business with this meat.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Transported for Seven Years .

The prosecutor stated that the prisoner was connected with a party who infest the market.

1982. WILLIAM SHARP was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 1 snuff-box, value £2., the goods of Calvert Bowyer Vaux , from his person .

CALVERT BOWYER VAUX. I am a surgeon . On the 7th of October I was in Laurence Pountney-lane , about twelve o'clock, and had a snuff-box in my coat pocket; I felt a twitch, turned round, and saw the prisoner and another shuffling my box between them - I saw it distinctly in the prisoner's hand; they were just across the lane, about ten yards from me - the prisoner ran away, the other remained; I followed the prisoner, calling Stop thief! down Cannon-street and Laurence Pountney-hill - the street-keeper joined in the pursuit, and opposite Suffolk-lane I saw the prisoner throw the box out of his hand- I took it up; the street-keeper followed, and very shortly brought him to me.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it? A. I felt my pocket move, and saw it in your hand.

JOSHUA EVANS . I am an officer. I received the prisoner in charge.(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Laurence Pountney-lane, and saw the box laying under a window - I took it up, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran a little way, and immediately flung it away; I saw an officer following me, and immediately stopped for him to take me.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Life .

1983. ELIZABETH HURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 watch, value 5l.; 1 chain, value 1l.; 1 seal, value 10s., and 3 keys, value 10s., the goods of Watkin Lloyd , from his person .

WATKIN LLOYD . I am a porter . On the 18th of October, about eleven o'clock at night, I was going home, perfectly sober, and met the prisoner at the lower end of Bishopsgate-street - she came against me, laid hold of my arm, and asked where I was going; I said home - she asked me to walk with her; I said No, and just at that time I felt my watch going out of my fob - I felt, and is was gone; I caught hold of her, and said she had my watch - she denied it; I called a watchman, who came instantly, and she immediately popped it into my waistcoat pocket - she had taken it from my fob; I did not know her before, and had given her no encouragement.

ROBERT DIXON . I am an officer. I was passing Bishopsgate-street, and saw a young man, a comapanion of the prisoner's, peeping round the corner, and saw the prosecutor struggling with the prisoner; I could see part of the chain hanging down in her hand - as soon as the young man round the corner saw me he ran away; I ran up, secured the prisoner, and saw her put the watch into Lloyd's waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner. The prosecutor was quite in liquor; my sister came to the watch-house, and saw him - he could hardly stand. Witness. He was perfectly sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I met him in Bishopsgate-street quite in liquor - I spoke to him, and we turned up Skinner-street; he asked where I lived, and said he would go home with me, but all in a moment he said, "Stop, I have lost my watch;" I said he had not lost it in my company - he said he had, and struck me, and it was I that called the watchman, who came up; I said he had charged me with robbery - he felt, and said his watch was in his pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Life .

1984. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES WARD . I am a manufacturer of plaster of Paris , and live in Jewin-street. The prisoner was five months in my service - he collected orders and small accounts; he had 18s. a week: it was his duty to settle with me every night - he kept no book.

WILLIAM CHALMERS . I am a grocer. I owed Mr. Ward 12s. 1 1/2d., which I paid the prisoner on the 17th of September, and have the receipt, which I saw him sign -(read) - I gave him a sovereign, and he gave me change.

JAMES WARD . He never accounted to me for this sum- I discharged him on the 26th, and discovered this next day; he received money after the 17th, which he accounted for - I never mentioned this sum to him.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q.Did not the prisoner himself tell you of this deficiency? A.He did acknowledge it, but when he was about to do so I warned him not; when the officer brought him to my house he said there were two amounts he had received; I told him I did not want to hear it, and left the counting-house - I had a good opinion of him.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy, believing it to be his first offence.

Confined Three Months .

1985. CATHERINE FLANAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 basket, value 1s., and 3 pocks of apples, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas Jolley .

THOMAS JOLLEY. I am a fruiterer , of Farringdon-market . On the 20th of September Evans came and asked if I missed a basket of apples, which I did, on looking round - I went with her, and saw some apples shot from my basket into another; they appeared to be my apples, and I knew the basket to be mine - the prisoner left them in care of Ryan till she had done her business in the market, and when she came for them I took hold of her, and asked where she bought these apples - she said, "I did not buy them;" the basket contained three bushels.

JANE EVANS . I attend the market. I was by Jolley's warehouse, and saw the prisoner take to another woman a basket full of apples; she emptied them into a sieve, and then took the basket outside the rails - she left it there; I went and told Jolley.

MARY RYAN . I attend the market. The prisoner brought me a basket of apples, and told me she would pay me for minding them - when she came for them Jolley took her.(Basket produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought a basket of apples at Jolley's, and paid for them - while I went round the market to buy something the basket was taken away.

THOMAS JOLLEY . She bought no basket of apples of me, and if she had she should have returned the basket, instead of throwing it away in Stonecutter-street, and when I took her she said she had not bought them.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

THOMAS JOLLEY. I have inquired her character, and am informed it is bad; she does not get her living by selling fruit.

1986. MATTHIAS WOOLBERT was indicted for embezzlement .

SAMUEL APPLEBY . I am a fancy trimming-maker , and live in Botolph-street, Bishopsgate. The prisoner was my porter ; he boarded and lodged in the house, and had 2s. 6d. a week. On the 4th of October I sent him to Mr. Barren, who keeps the Anchor, in Tooley-street, for 10l., which was due to me from Sheerness - he was to return directly; he did not come back - I saw him eight days afterwards, and found him in custody: I had told the Police to look after him - he lived about three months with me; I have not received the money.

JOHN BARREN . I live in Tooley-street, Borough. On the 4th of October the prisoner brought me a letter from Mr. Appleby, for a customer who had remitted me ten sovereigns from Sheerness - I said he ought to have brought a receipt for the money, but he said he had been before from his master; I detained the letter, and paid him ten sovereigns.

Prisoner. I happened to get a drop too much, and was drawn away by a bad woman.

SAMUEL APPLERY . When I saw him I asked what he thought of himself; he said he was very sorry - that he had got a little drink, and went to Brighton, Worthing, and Maidstone, spent all the money, and came home quite destitute; I had a very good character with him, and believe it is his first offence, and that he is not a very strong mind - he gave himself up to the officer.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

1987. EMANUEL MICHAEL was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 15 pairs of gloves, value 36s. , the goods of Samuel Scowen .

SAMUEL SCOWEN. I am a hosier , and live in Cheapside . On the 27th of September, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in with another young man, who asked to look at some coloured shirts; I showed them a great many - the prisoner brought in a bag- neither of them bought any thing; while I was showing the shirts I had seen the prisoner sweeping the gloves off the counter into his bag - his companion held the shirts before him, to conceal him; I took no notice - they said none of the shirts would do; the prisoner said he would call to-morrow, and have a dozen or two, and said, "We want a pair of stockings;" they bought one pair, which the prisoner paid for, and when they got to the door I jumped over the counter, and collared the prisoner - he slipped out of his coat, and ran out, across the road; I pursued, and caught him by the cravat - we had a struggle; I brought him into the shop, and on opening the bag there were fifteen pairs of gloves in it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Are you sure he is the man who had the bag? A. I waited to see how many he would take - he kept sweeping them into his bag- nobody else was in the shop; I saw him sweeping them into his bag.

WILLIAM HENMAN. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

NEW COURT. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

1988. HENRY ACKHURST was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 2 bridles, value 8s.; 2 horsecollars, value 8s., and 1 pair of reins, value 4s. , the goods of Sir Rowland Hill , Bart.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Thomas Colley ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 36. - Confined Six Months .

1989. THOMAS BARTIN BURTON was indicted for stealing, 1 half-crown, and 4 shillings , the monies of Richard Mills and another, his masters; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy, for his contrition and good character.

Confined Six Months .

1990. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 1 mahogany case, value 5s., and 1 flute, value 30s. , the goods of Edward Baylis ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Confined Six Months .

1991. RICHARD BECKENHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of September , 10 sovereigns , the monies of John Goodered , his master; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 19. Confined Six Months .

1992. WILLIAM PASCO was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 shirt, value 9d.; I frock, value 6d., and 1 pair of reins, value 1s. , the goods of William Bonsy ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

1993. JOHN GARNHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 sovereign, 2 half-crowns, 10 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the property of Henry Charles Moreton Dyer , Esq.

HENRY CHARLES MORETON DYER , ESQ. The prisoner was my father's footman ; it was his duty to brush my clothes. On the night of the 28th of September, on going to bed, I left my purse on the table in my dressing-room - it contained a sovereign and 16s. in silver; the next morning, on going into the room, I missed my purse - I sent for Avis, the officer, and in his presence asked the prisoner about taking it - I had occasion to go out, and on my return I heard something; I went down to the prisoner, and said, "John, how is all this?" he said, "Sir, I will tell you all about it;" I had not made him any promise or threat - he said he had gone into the dressing-room, seen the purse laying on the table, and took it - he did not know what he was about, that his mind was disturbed, or something of that sort.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer. On the 28th of September I was sent for to Mr. Dyer's house, in Devonshire-place - I saw the prisoner, and told him Mr. Dyer had lost his purse, containing a sovereign and 16s.; he said he had not seen it, and knew nothing about it - he proceeded to search the dressing-room with me; I then went into the hall, where the prisoner slept, and searched his pockets - he then expressed a wish to speak to Mrs. Dyer; I called her aside, and told her not to make him any promise - I then searched the prisoner's person, and found in his hand this purse, containing a sovereign and 16s.; he said he was very sorry, that he did not know how he came to do it, and hoped Mrs. Dyer would speak to Mr. Dyer to forgive him.(Purse produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to get the clothes, and was going to brush them; the purse fell from them - I took it up, and laid it on a trunk, with the full intention of returning it, but I had got up late, and was in a hurry; I took up the clothes, and forgot the purse - I did not think more of it till one o'clock, when I was called up, and asked if I had seen it; in consequence of the officer being there I did not like to say any thing about it - I meant to give it to Mrs. Dyer, and the officer seized hold of my hand.

MR. DYER. The purse laid separate from my clothes on the table; I arose about nine o'clock, and sent for the officer about twelve.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

1994. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of August , 1 coat, value 12s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., and 1 pair of trousers, value 6s., the goods of Joseph Collins , from the person of John Edward Bruce .

JOHN EDWARD BRUCE . I live in Artichoke-court, Cannon-street. The prisoner and another person named Ladd used to sleep on the ruins by the new bridge; I used to take them bread and food: on the 2nd of August I was sent with a bundle - I told Hall and Ladd I was going with it; as I went along Ladd snatched the bundle from me - the prisoner was with him; the parcel belonged to my uncle, Joseph Collins - the prisoner and Ladd ran away with it.

ISABELLA BRUCE. I am the wife of John Bruce , of Artichoke-court. I pinned up the bundle, containing a blue coar, with a velvet collar, a waistcoat, a pair of trousers, and a napkin; they were my brother-in-law's, Joseph Collins - I gave them to Bruce to carry.

JAMES GRAHAM . I am a Police-officer. I apprehended Hall - in consequence of what he said, I went to a pawnbroker's shop in Rosemary-lane, but I did not find the things.

JOHN EDWARD BRUCE re-examined. Q. Are you quite sure you did not make an arrangement with these boys that they should take the bundle from you? A.No, my Lord - they told me they would take it from me, but I did not go that way that they might take it; I was going along Little Earl-street , and Ladd came behind me, and knocked my bundle out of my hand - I had been to them on the ruins that morning, and told them I was going to my aunt's - Ladd said, "What a lark it would be if I was to run away with your clothes - you would never catch us any more - we should be down in the country;" I had told them I was going to Little Earl-street, Seven-dials.

NOT GUILTY .

1995. THOMAS CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , 1 coat, value 16s. , the goods of John Macdonald .

THOMAS DENT . I am pot-boy at the Cherry-tree public-house, Kingsland-road. On the afternoon of the 25th of July. I was opposite the prosecutor's shop; I saw the prisoner and another man in his shop- the prisoner took something from the shop, but I could not see what it was; he and the other man then ran away.

WILLIAM MACDONALD . I am the son of John Macdonald ; he lives in Kingsland-road , and is a tailor . I received information, and followed the prisoner and another, who were about twenty yards off - when they had got about one hundred yards I saw the prisoner hand a coat to the other man, and it dropped; I saw it laying in the street - I lost sight of the prisoner and the other man in Haberdasher-street, but caught sight of them again at the corner of Plummer-street; they were then walking -I went up, and took hold of the prisoner; he struck me- Mr. Bluck was coming up the street, and assisted me; the prisoner struck him, and they fell; I did not pick up the coat, but it was brought back to the shop - I had seen it safe a quarter of an hour before.

JOSEPH BLUCK . I live in Chatham-gardens, Hoxton. I was in Plummer-street; I heard a cry of Stop thief: -I turned, and saw the prisoner; he ran up and struck me on the side of the head - we both fell down; Mr. Macdonald came up, and took him off me.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am a headborough. I received charge of the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have been here four months,and had a severe illness; I hope you will take it into your consideration.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

1996. JAMES BROCKENDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 5s. , the goods of William Matthews .

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a shoemaker , and live in Charles-street, Westminster . On the evening of the 3rd of October I saw the prisoner loitering about my stall; he appeared to be watching me - he then came and placed himself on the window, and looked down on me; I had a pair of shoes which I had blacked round the edge, and put up to dry - I stooped for another pair, then I missed the first pair, and the prisoner was gone one door from my stall - he was walking till I called Stop thief! he then sprang into the road, and I picked up one of these shoes on the spot.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Were you in your stall? A. Yes, but my head was above ground.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS , JUN. I saw the prisoner at my father's stall. I saw him go away; I followed him - I picked up one shoe, and my father the other.

Cross-examined. Q. Where were you? A. I was coming out of the door of my father's house; I saw the prisoner walk away, and my father called Stop thief! - the prisoner got into the road.

FRANCIS MALLOLIENE . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoners received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 4 Months .

1997. THOMAS BROWNING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 3 candlesticks, value 5s. , the goods of Edward Fowler .

JANE KNIGHT . I am sister to Edward Fowler , who keeps the Duke of Cumberland public-house, in the New-road, St. George's . On the afternoon of the 26th of September, the prisoner came there, and had a pennyworth of gin - he drank it in the tap-room; I then heard him go out of the parlour into the street - I went and missed three candlesticks from there; I followed, and found him - I called an officer, and gave him in charge; the prisoner produced the articles from his pockets.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you see him come into the house? A. Yes, he went into the tap-room- I did not see him go into the parlour; I could not see the parlour door from the bar, but I heard him go out - I would not swear that he was sober.

One witness gave the prisoner a good character, and engaged to employ him.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Confined Six Months .

1998. JAMES BISHOP was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of Nicholas Morritt .

FREDERICK HINGSTON . I live with Mr. Nicholas Morritt , a pawnbroker , in King-street, Westminster . On the forenoon of the 19th of September, I went out, and saw the prisoner in the street - he was running; I stopped him, and found on him this handkerchief, which is my employer's; I had seen it safe half an hour before when I hung it in the shop.

JOHN BARKER . I am a Police-officer. On the forenoon of the 19th of September I heard an alarm in York-street; I saw the prisoner pass me running - I followed, and stopped him in the presence of the shopman; I took this handkerchief from him.

ELIZABETH YATES . I am the wife of Christopher Yates. On the 19th of September I was at our window, and saw several handkerchiefs hanging at his door - among the rest was a black one; the prisoner came up, looked at them, and put the black handkerchief behind a quilt which was there; he then pulled it down, took it from under the quilt, and put it under his jacket - I gave information at the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the street, outside the door.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

1999. ROBERT CALEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , 8 half-crowns, 20 shillings, and 20 sixpences , the monies of Jeremiah Woollard , his master.

JANE WOOLLARD . I am the wife of Jeremiah Woollard ; he keeps the Duke of Clarence public-house , North-street, Lisson-grove - the prisoner had been six months in his service, as pot-boy . On the evening of the 5th of August he asked me for 2l. 10s. in silver, to take to Mrs. Kendall, a laundress, to give her women change; I delivered him 2l. 10s. in silver - there were half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences; he was to have brought me two sovereigns and a half, but he never came back.

ANN KENDALL . I live in North-street, opposite the prosecutor. I am in the habit of having change at their house; I employ several women as laundresses - I did not desire the prisoner on the night in question to get me any silver, to my recollection; he did not bring me any, nor did I give him any gold.

MICHAEL CANNON . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner on the 5th of October - I said he was my prisoner; he said he knew he was, and he knew what it was for.

Prisoner's Defence. When the officer came to me, he asked if I did not live with Mr. Woollard - I said Yes; he asked what I took from him - I said Nothing; he said,"I believe you did," and I must take you into custody -I said, "Very well;" Mrs. Woollard had often threatened that she would send me over the water - I owed her a few shillings, and I was afraid she would give me in charge; I left her - I did ask for this money, but not in any name.

MRS. WOOLLARD. He did ask for it for Mrs. Kendall- it was a regular rule to take her women's beer at six o'clock, and at that time he asked me for 2l. 10s. for her to pay her women; I gave it him - he came back, and said she was very busy, and would send the gold by her little girl.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

2000. THOMAS HEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 jacket, value 3s., and 1 waistcoat, value 2s., the goods of Edward Allison ; and 1 handkerchief, value 4s. , the goods of William Collins .

WILLIAM COLLINS. I lodge in Bath-street - the roof of the house has been repaired. The prisoner worked there for his father - the job was finished on the 20th of September; I saw him there on the morning of the 28th, and on the Friday following I missed some things, and among the rest a handkerchief, which had been kept in my hat in my box in the front attic.

EDWARD ALLISON . I lodge in the same house, and am apprentice to Mr. Collins. I lost a waistcoat and a jacket on the 24th of September, out of my box, on the attic landing-place.

WILLIAM ATTRIDGE . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner on the 26th of September - I found on him three duplicates, by which I traced the handkerchief, jacket, and waistcoat; these are them.

FREDERICK LINDNER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in York-place. I have a jacket - I do not know who pawned it.

SAMUEL SHARMAN . I am a pawnbroker. I have a handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner.

ROBERT NORMAN . I am in the service of a pawnbroker. I have a waistcoat; I do not know who pawned it- I have the counterpart of the duplicate found by the officer; it was pawned on the 20th of September.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Months .

2001. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 ham, value 7s. , the goods of Alexander Duncan .

WILLIAM FARR. I am in the service of Alexander Duncan, a cheesemonger , in St. John-street, Clerkenwell . On the 20th of September I was standing at the door adjoining our shop; I saw the prisoner go in - I was going in to serve him, and met him coming out with this ham in his hand; I stopped him, and asked what he was going to do - he said he was starved to it; I know his parents - they have been well off, but are now in great distress.

WILLIAM ELDER. I am a constable. I took the prisoner, and have the ham.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 10 Days .

2002. JAMES KENNEDY was indicted for bigamy .

CATHERINE DADY. I know the prisoner; I was present at St. George, Hanover-square, when he was married to Mary Morgan ; I knew her at the time, and I know she went by that name - they lived together in Oxford-buildings after that marriage; it is about nine years since they were married - I saw her in Oxford-street one day last week.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long did that woman live with the prisoner? A.About seven years, as near as I can recollect - I was intimate with them part of the time: she left him at the end of seven years, and it was said she went away with some other man - she returned, and the prisoner took her back; I do not know where she has lived since - I heard a report that the prisoner's wife died at Portsmouth.

COURT. Q.How long ago did you hear that? A. About a year and a half.

Q. Are you quite sure that the person you saw last week was the person he married and lived with? A. If I saw her now I could tell - I cannot say upon my oath that she was the person: I saw a woman at the Police-office, who was the person the prisoner married.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. If you will not swear the woman you saw in Oxford-street was the woman he married, how can you swear that the woman you saw at the office was the same? A. I will not swear without I saw her present - I saw the same woman both times; she was the woman - I did say I would not swear it; I was not quite clear of her that day - I did not speak to her; I was subpoenaed to go to Marlborough-street office - there is no other person living who was present at the marriage.

GEORGE AVIS . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I apprehended the prisoner. I produce an extract from the marriage register of St. George, Hanover-square, and another from Shoreditch - here is the one from St. George, Hanover-square; I examined it in the vestry-room, in the presence of the clerk - it corresponds with the entry in the book.

Cross-examined. Q. How did you examine it? A. I read it word for word - I read this paper, and read the book - (read.)

MR. PHILLIPS to CATHERINE DADY. Q.Can you write? A. No, I made my mark in the book - I have not the least doubt of it.

MR. PHILLIPS to GEORGE AVIS . Q. Then this cannot be a true copy. here is no mark here? A. There was a mark in the book, between Catherine and Dady; there was no mark in the one at Shoreditch - I did not observe any; the name was written - (read.)

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then this is not a correct copy, for here is a mark? A. I did not observe any mark - the clerk said it was his writing.

CATHERINE CODY . I know the prisoner - I married him at Shoreditch, on the 15th of September, 1830 ; I knew he had been married before - I did not know whether his wife was living or not.

Cross-examined. Q. I believe you went from a public-house to the church? A. No, we did not - I had not lived with him before, but I had lived in the same house from Sunday to Wednesday.

Prisoner. I did not mean to put the parish to any expence, but to take her child, send it to nurse, and pay for it.

MR. PHILLIPS to CATHERINE CODY . Q. Is not your name Corder? A. No - I have never gone by that name that I know of; I never hired myself into a service by that name.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am summoned here as a juryman, and heard this case by accident - this woman was a servant of mine three or four months ago; she gave me her name as Catherine Corder - I desired her to spell it, and she did; I remarked it was the name of a man who had suffered the law - in a few weeks we discovered that she was in the family way; we accused her of it, and she then said she had married a Policeman, who was a married man, and he was allowing her a maintenance.

CATHERINE CODY . He is deaf - I did not say so.

COURT to MR. GREEN. Q. Did you hear her? A. My wife asked her about it in my presence - I had someconversation with her afterwards, and I asked if she came from the same County as Corder did.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Confined Three Months .

2003. HENRY LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 3 pairs of pattens, value 2s. , the goods of Stephen Spence .

HEZEKIAH WILLMER. I am a Police-officer. On the 29th of September I was in St. John-street, and saw the prisoner near Mr. Spencer's shop - he afterwards passed me, and I saw he had these three pairs of pattens on this stick: he was carrying them rather covered with a black apron, which he had on - he was afterwards brought back to Mr. Spencer's, and I took him with these pattens.

STEPHEN SPENCER . I live in St. John-street . I received information, and followed the prisoner with these three pairs of pattens, which had been hanging at my door- they were brought back with the prisoner.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

2004. LAWRENCE MALONEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of September , 1 jacket, value 5s.; 1 cap, value 6d., and 2 gloves, value 6d. , the goods of James Gaudie .

JAMES GAUDIE . I am an apprentice on board the brig Thomas and Mary, which was in the Regent's canal ; the prisoner worked on board that brig. I saw him go on shore with my jacket on, on the 22nd of September - he was taken with this property on him.

CORNELIUS CRACRAFT . I took the prisoner, and took this jacket off his back, which the prosecutor claimed - it was under the prisoner's frock; these gloves and this cap were in the jacket pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work on board - I laid my jacket among the other men's jackets; I took this, and thought it was mine - the prosecutor followed me and said,"That is my jacket;" I said, "Then, I have left mine on board.

JAMES GAUDIE . I did not see him with a jacket on on board, and could not find one belonging to him.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

2005. JOSEPH MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 1s. 6d., the goods of John Peter Ferry , from the person of Edward Ferry .

CHARLOTTE GRAVES . I am thirteen years old - I live as servant with Mr. Flook, in Radnor-street. On the 29th of September I was carrying a child named Edward Ferry - it had a handkerchief on its neck; it came untied three times - I saw the prisoner was following me; I asked him the time, and he said it was near four; the child cried, and I missed the handkerchief - I saw the prisoner about a yard off: he was tucking the handkerchief in his bosom - he ran off, and I did not see him again till he was in the watch-house, two or three days afterwards; the child's father's name is John Peter Ferry .

THOMAS CURRIS . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner about a week afterwards - he said he knew nothing of it.

THOMAS CURRIS . I know the prisoner as a neighbour. I saw him in Pitfield-street, and this girl - the prisoner asked for a pin; I said I had not one, but I thought she had - I asked her, but she had not; I then looked at some men, and lost sight of them.

Prisoner. I was taken to the station, and she girl said she did not think I was the boy.

THOMAS CURVIS . yes, she said on to me, and asked if that was the boy who asked for the pin.

NOT GUILTY .

2006. MARY PUTNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 2 looking-glasses, value 5s.; 6 yards of calico, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 1 table-cloth, value 1s., and 1 towel, value 6d. , the goods of Anthony Henry Hope .

EMMA HOPE . I am the wife of Anthony Henry Hope; he is butler in a family at Harrow. On the 28th of September I removed my husband's furniture to a house in Richmond-place, Lisson-grove , and the next morning I missed these articles - the prisoner was in the house, and I asked her if she had these things; she said she had taken them, and pawned them.

WILLIAM LANGFORD . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in the Edgware-road. I have two looking-glasses, a piece of calico, and a silk handkerchief, pawned by the prisoner on the 28th of September - the looking-glasses for 1s. each, and the calico and handkerchief for 3s.

THOMAS FREEMAN . I live with a pawnbroker, in Lisson-grove. I have a towel, pawned at my master's, for 1s. 6d., on the 28th of September.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a Police-officer. I was called to Richmond-place on the 29th of September, and took the prisoner - I could not find any duplicates on her.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a woman had met her and given her the property to pledge, and that all the articles had been laying about the passage.

EMMA HOPE re-examined. Q. Did she say she had pawned them for another woman? A. No, she did not - they were locked up in my room; she said she had taken the key out of the next room door - I tried it, and it fitted the door; I believe the prisoner is married.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 6 Months .

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2007. JOHN CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 jacket, value 2s. , the goods of John Carruthers .

JOHN CARRUTHERS . I live at Hayes, in Middlesex. I lost a jacket on the 12th of October from the skittle-ground of the Carpenter's Arms, where I had hung it - I saw the prisoner there; he went with the patrol, and found my jacket in a ditch, in a lane.

WILLIAM FAIR . I am a Bow-street patrol and live at Hayes. I took the prisoner on the 12th of October - he pointed out the jacket to me in a ditch in a lane, covered over with some hay; he said it had been given him by another man - I never saw it in his possession.

NOT GUILTY .

2008. HENRY PHILLIPS & WILLIAM LIGHTFOOT were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , 3 shillings , the monies of Henry Aste .

HENRY ASTE . I live in London-street, St. Pancras , and am in the employ of my father - the prisoners werein his service. On the 14th of September I marked a half-crown and some other silver; I placed it in the till in the counting-house, about eleven o'clock, and about three I missed a half-crown and two shillings; I then placed some more marked money in the till - this was on the Thursday, and on the Friday I saw Phillips standing against the counting-house door; Lighfoot and a lad named Best were standing opposite, looking into the warehouse - I went down, and phillips went away; I waited two or three minutes, and then saw Phillips a few doors off, making signals with his feet to Lightfoot and Best - I went to the till, and missed two shillings more; I went out, and found the two prisoners in the street - I collared, and gave them in charge; I saw them searched, and four shillings were found on Phillips, three of which were marked - it was my own money.

NATHANIEL CLAXTON . I am constable of St. Pancras. On the 16th of September the prisoners were brought to me; I took them to the station - I found these four shillings on Phillips.

HENRY ASTE re-examined. Q.You did not actually see either of the prisoners go into the warehouse? A.No; I saw Phillips at the door - three of these shillings are what I marked and put into the till in the counting-house, which adjoins the warehouse; we do not close the door always - I was in the granary, taking in some corn when I saw Phillips, and watched him; Lightfoot and Best were opposite, and could have got in without my seeing them.

PHILLIPS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months .

LIGHTFOOT - NOT GUILTY .

2009. JAMES ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 83lbs. weight of coffee, value 6l. 4s. , the goods of John Coles , his master.

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Joseph Swannell .

JOHN COLES . I live in Hart-street, Cripplegate, and am a carman . On the 15th of September I sent the prisoner with my cart to the East India Company's warehouse, in Cock-hill, Ratcliff-cross; he was to fetch five bales of coffee, to take to Mr. Swannell's - he went about eleven o'clock in the day, and returned about three; he appeared quite sober - I sent him with two loads afterwards.

DANIEL MILLER . I live in Adam-street, New Kent-road - I am a writer in the Home-department of the East India Company. I weighed five bales of coffee, and placed them under the care of John Wood - here is the number on the warrant.

JOHN WOOD . I live at No.5, Cadbury-place, Globe-road, and am in the East India Company's service. These bales of coffee were weighed, and placed under my care at Cock-hill - I delivered them out on the 15th of September; they were quite full, and perfectly sound - I saw them afterwards at Mr. Swannell's, in Swithin-lane.

THOMAS RAINSFORD . I live in Clifton-street, New North-road, and am warehouseman to Mr. Swannell. The prisoner brought some bags of coffee to my master, with the King's number on them; they weighed 10cwt. 4lbs. nott, and the weight on the warrant was 83lbs. more than that - I did not notice the bales at the time, and three of them were opened directly; when I came to look at the other two they seemed to have been opened.

DANIEL MILLER. They had weighed 10 1/2 cwt. 26lbs.

JOHN WOOD . They had not been weighed after that, but I am confident they had not been opened; there was no one in the room but myself, and they were under lock and key.

THOMAS RAINSFORD . I found the bales were not so sound as some others, it being damaged coffee, and the coffee might have got out - the prisoner said he had delivered them in the same state as he received them; I weighed them in his presence, and found a deficiency of 83lbs.

JOHN COLES re-examined. Q.What time should the prisoner have returned to you? A. I should have thought two hours would have been sufficient for him, but he was gone from eleven o'clock till three; after he was in custody he admitted to me that there were two men who had robbed the bales, and made him drunk - he told me their names, and I know one of them has lived by pilfering carts for some time; he said they had robbed all the bales, more or less; I had not made him any promise or threat.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you offer me a sovereign if I would tell you who the two men were? A. No - I did not.

JURY. Q.Did he tell you he had suffered any loss, when he came home? A. No, I did not know it till the next morning, when I went to Mr. Swannell's, to know if there were any more orders.

GUILTY . Aged 38. - Transported for Seven Years .

2010. JANE RUFF was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of August , 4 sovereigns, and 18 shillings , the monies of Alexander Scott .

JAMES WITTEL . The prisoner was in my service, and left me without notice, on the 25th of August; she had been three days with me.

ALEXANDER SCOTT . I am in the service of Mr. Wittel - he is a baker. I had been out on the 25th of August; I received from his customer 4l. 10s., I think - I put it into my box in my bed-room, between twelve and one o'clock, and the prisoner left in the evening, about eight; when she was gone I went to my box, and missed the money - she had not seen me put it there.

THOMAS SHELSWELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 23rd of September, from the information of her sister, in Church-lane, Whitechapel; I asked her how she could think of robbing her employer - she said she did it, because she wished to leave the country; I asked what she had taken - she said 4l. 18s., and 4l. was in sovereigns; she said she saw a young woman on Tower-hill, and she went with her to Cheshunt and to Coventry, where she robbed her of her money and clothes, and that she had walked back on foot; I believe she had the same dress on that she has now, but she did not appear so clean - she did not tell me where she got the money.

NOT GUILTY .

2011. ELIZABETH TAEE was indicted for bigamy .

JAMES TAEE . I live in Barrett-street, Vauxhall. I have known the prisoner eight or nine years - I was present when she married my brother Richard, at New Brentford church; I cannot tell the year, but it is eightor nine years ago; she went by the name of Elizabeth Beazeley - they were married by banns, and lived together afterwards for about two months; my brother is still alive at Walworth - I saw him last Monday; he has married since the prisoner left him.

WILLIAM IRVING produced a certificate of the marriage of Richard and Elizabeth Bealley , on the 12th of November, which not being stamped, was not admitted in evidence.

WILLIAM FRENCH . I live at Low Layton. I married the prisoner on the 4th of August, 1828 ; she never told me she had been married.

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that she had not seen her first husband for ten years before she married French, and had been in formed and believed he was dead.

NOT GUILTY .

2012. ALFRED HILL and AMELIA HILL were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 3 pewter plates, value 2s.; 4 yards of carpeting, value 1d.; 1 quart of wine, value 6d., and 1 bottle, value 2d. , the goods of Charles Dear .

CHARLES DEAR . I live at Bull's-cross, Endfield - the prisoner had been in my service six weeks, and Alfred had been employed to weed my garden. On the morning of the 17th of September, Amelia Hill came to my room door, and said there was a person at the gate who must speak to me; I went down - the constable told us we had lost three plates; we told Amelia Hill she must come up stairs to the cupboard, and we pulled out one pewter plate - there had been four alike, three of which were gone, one odd one, and one large plate; we told her we had lost them, and the constable had the three plates - she said she was sorry for it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did not you say, "Now, Amelia, tell me the truth about this!" A. No; I said we had missed the plates, and the constable had taken her brothers with them - I cannot swear what I said; I said nothing about her owning to it - I will not swear I had not seen them for six or eight years; I had seen them within eight years.

GEORGE ABBOTT . I am constable of Enfield. On Saturday morning, the 17th of September, I was in the foot-path, near Mr. Dear's garden at Bull's-cross - I saw Alfred Hill and another boy coming out of his gate, between five and six o'clock; the other had a bag - I suspected there was something not right; I followed them - they walked at first, and when they saw me they made more haste - they dropped the bag; I took it up, and secured Alfred Hill; I found in the bag these three water-plates, this piece of carpet, and this bottle of wine; I gave information at the house, and we went up stairs with Amelia Hill - her master said to her, "How came you to rob me so?" she put her hands together, and said it was the first time, she hoped he would forgive her, and she would not do so any more - the plates were not mentioned then; there were three plates left in a kind of a hole in the attic - one of them corresponded with the three in the bag; Mrs. Dear produced a piece of carpet, which matched this piece in the bag.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not Mr. Dear say he had not seen the plates for eight years? A. He said, "Not for some time; the prisoner were admitted to ball, and have surrendered to-day - the other boy is sixteen years old: he is older than this boy - he ran away, but this one did not.

MARY ANN DEAR . I am the prosecutor's wife. The officer came to our house that morning before we were up- he asked if we had lost any water plates; we had had six up stairs, four of one pattern and two of another; the three he found were of the same pattern with one I had left- this piece of carpet was produced; I have a piece which corresponds with it - Amelia Hill had access to the room in which that cupboard was, and she asked me what was in it; I said a good many things, and among the rest some pewter water-plates; I had them in my hand a few days before - the three brought back were the same pattern as the one remaining - in my judgment, they are ours- the prisoner said she hoped for forgiveness.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you brought, them yourself? A. No; I took them there when we removed from London twelve years ago, and they had been in my kitchen two or three years before; there is no private-mark on them - if I had seen these twenty miles off I could swear to them; I can only swear to the state they are in; they are very dirty and dusty.

NOT GUILTY .

2013. ALEXANDER VICARY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 8 printed bound books, value 90s. , the goods of Thomas Mactaggart .

MARY STENNETT . I am housekeeper to Captain Thomas Mactaggart . The prisoner was employed at his house as a paper-hanger - there was an inquiry about books; I went to the book case in the back drawing-room - I found the lock half shot, and the door ajar; I missed eight volumes out of nine of Pope's works - the seventh volume was remaining; they were bound - I saw four of them at the Pitt's Head, and four were brought back the next morning by the prisoner's brother.

MARTHA SIMPSON . My husband keeps the Pitt's Head, in Brunswick-mews, near Bryanstone-square. The prisoner came to our house on Tuesday, the 27th of September, and brought two of these books; he asked me to have the kindness to take care of them, and he would call for them when he left work - on the following afternoon he brought two more, and said, "If you will have the goodness to take care of them I will call for the four when I leave work;" I sent my servant to watch where he went to, and he went to the prosecutor's, in Berkeley-street - the prisoner came about six o'clock in the evening, for the four books; I said I could not let him have them, as I had put them into a drawer in the bar, and my husband had taken the key and gone out; he said he was sorry, as he wanted them to read; I sent to the prosecutor to know if any books were missing, and I gave the same books to the officer.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. I received information, and went to a house in Cheapside; I saw the prisoner there, and told him that Captain Mactaggart had been robbed of some books since the workmen had been at his house, and I took him on suspicion of stealing them- he said he took four to read, and meant to return them; I said there were more than four lost - he said he had no knowledge of any more - here are the four I got from Mrs. Simpson's: these other four were taken back to the prosecutor's house.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to keep them, but to read them.

GUILTY , Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

OLD COURT. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

2014. JAMES HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of September , 1 soldering-iron, value 18d. , the goods of Joseph Hudson ; to which he pleaded

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Transported for Seven Years .

2015. MARY HULM was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 10 plates, value 1s. 6d.; 1 dish, value 1s., and 1 saucepan, value 1d. , the goods of John Simpson ; to which she pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 60. - Confined Fourteen Days .

2016. JOHN CONDREN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , two 100l. Bank notes, and an order for payment of 30l. , the property of John Phillips Beavan , his master.

MR. JOHN PHILLIPS BEAVAN . I am a solicitor , and live in Sackville-street - the prisoner was in my service as porter for about eight months. On Thursday, the 29th of September, I gave him two 100l. Bank notes and a cheque for 30l.; I desired him to leave the two 100l. notes at my bankers, Sir C. Scott and Co., and to bring me the money for the cheque - he did not return; I found him in custody at Liverpool on the following Monday; when I went into the room I said."I am sorry to see you in this situation: you are the last man in the world I should suppose would be guilty of such conduct" - he said he was very sorry for it, that it was the first time he had ever committed a wrong act, and he said a 100l. note which was found on him was mine also one hundred and three sovereigns, which he said he got in exchange for the other 100l. note and the cheque- I have recovered 203l.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You believe it is his first offence? A. Yes - he bore an excellent character from several masters with whom he lived many years- he could have robbed me of 700l. the day before.

JOHN McCOMB . I am an officer of Liverpool. I apprehended the prisoner - Mr. Beavan's evidence is correct.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2017. JOSEPH BARCLAY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , 2 lbs. 11 ozs. of silk, value 5l. 7l. the goods of Henry Bonsor , in the dwelling-house of William Popkin .

ROBERT SENECALL . I am foreman to Henry Bonsor , silk-manufacturer , of Stewart-street. On the 13th of September I gave a cane of silk, weighing 2 lbs. 11 ozs., to Mary Barclay , to weave - she is the prisoner's sister; the gross weight was 3 lbs. 7 ozs. - she took it to Popkin's house: on the morning of the 15th, a letter, written by the prisoner's mother was given to me - I then gave information to the Police - it was worth 5l.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Was it worth that in the state you delivered it? A. Yes; it was worth 2s. 6d. an ounce - the nett weight would come to 5l. 7s.; it cost that.

WILLIAM POPKIN . I live in Farthing-street, Spitalfields , and am a weaver. On the 14th of September a young woman, who passed as the prisoner's sister, brought this silk to my house to be spread; I know the prisoner - he has been in my shop once - he had nothing to do with my business, but at times two or three of a family come about business - he came on the 14th of September, between nine and ten o'clock; my wife called me down to bring the cane to him - I came down, saw him, and said"There is the cane;" I gave it into his hand, and he walked away with it - my wife called to me, in his presence, and said, "You must bring that came down, for it is not weighed" - that the young man had come for it, because it was not weighed; he went away with it in his arms - he said nothing, in my presence: I had no doubt it was right - I have never seen it since.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you tell the Magistrate it was a fair young man who came? A. I did not - I said I could not swear to the prisoner; I have worked for his mother for two years at different times - he came once with her to pull on a came: I knew him by sight - I do not swear to him now: this happened about ten minutes after I received the silk - he was in his shirt-sleeves when he came.

MARY POPKIN . I am Popkin's wife. This silk was brought to our house by Barclay, and in about ten minutes her brother, as he said, came for it; I am quite sure the prisoner is the person - I opened the door to him: he said he had come for his sister's came, for it was not weighed; I stood at the door, and saw my husband deliver it to him- I have not seen it since: I do not know that I ever saw him before; he was not above two or three minutes at the door, and did not come in.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you always said you were sure of him? A. Yes - he had no coat nor hat on, and his shirt-sleeves were tucked up: I took particular notice of his features, and am positive of him.

THOMAS BICKNELL . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner.

MARY ANN BARCLAY . I am the prisoner's sister. I received a cane of silk on Tuesday, the 13th of September; I took it to Popkin's, to be turned on - I authorized nobody to go for it, and have not seen it since: the prisoner used to turn the work on sometimes; I did not send him to fetch it.

Cross-examined. Q. Was it not your mother who worked for Mr. Bonsor? A. Yes, I fetched it for her- I used to make it myself; I cannot say my mother did not authorize him to fetch it.

SUSANNAH BARCLAY . I am the prisoner's mother. The cane of silk was brought to my house from Mr. Bonsor's- I sent it by my daughter to Popkin's, to be turned on; she went for it again about two o'clock, but came without it - I never sent my son for it, and never saw it again; I have occasionally sent him to turn on other canes.

Cross-examined. Q. You sometimes sent him to turn on canes? A. I sent him to turn this on, but did not know whether he would go, and sent my daughter; I asked him in the morning to turn it on - he said he had a little business to do, and could not.

Prisoner's Defence. I was with Warren, a dyer, and my mother knows at the time it happened that I was at home - I went about twelve o'clock to Warren's, to ask him if he would go to work with me in the afternoon; he did not, and I returned to Jones', in Spur-street, and met Allport - I came with him down the Old Bailey; he said he was going over, and I waited at Allcroft's earing-house till he returned.

CHARLES WARREN attended to prove an alibi, but his evidence did not relate to the day of the robbery.

GUILTY of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

2008. JAMES REEVES was charged on the Coroner's inquisition with the wilful murder of Mary Bunyon .

HENRY WHITMORE . I am a surgeon. I examined the body of Mary Bunyon on the Thursday after her death; she had died on the Monday night - I opened her scull; decomposition was going on very rapidly on the brain - the vessels were very full; none of them appeared to have been ruptured - there was no appearance of concussion, but the science does not enable us to discover appearances of concussion; we cannot decide that in any case if it is simple concussion - there was nothing to lead me to suspect it; I found the left lobe of the lungs perfectly healthy, but the right lobe was very extensively diseased - adhesion was passing from the lung; the pericardium contained much more water than is usually met with, and so much as to occasion the disease called hydxocardia - there was a bruise on the back of the right hand; I observed no other marks, but decomposition might obliterate them, for the body was in a very small room with a fire in it - I afterwards had the body disinterred, in consequence of something which had been said, and on examining the windpipe I discovered one of the rings had become ossified, which was most likely caused by some violence having been done at a distant period - that could not affect her life, but would very much affect her comfort, and undersome circumstances render her ability to sustain life less probable; upon the whole examination I certainly could not attribute her death to violence - if I separated my professional knowledge from what I heard, I should say there was nothing to enable me to say of what she died, although there was a mark of disease - it had not arrived at that state likely to destroy life, unless under peculiar circumstances - hastily altering her position; I mean the upper part of her body being brought much lower than its usual position by stooping suddenly - I cannot think of any thing else which would cause it, but altering the position of the heart, which was impeded by the presence of water.

Q. Would going hastily up stairs produce that effect? A. That would cause syncope - she would be obliged to stop.

HENRY RAWES WHITTELL. I am a surgeon, and have been in practice between three and four years. I examined the body of the deceased, in company with Mr. Whitmore, and agree in the account he has given as to the appearance of the body - there was a slight contusion on the back of the hand, and also on the external part of the scull, but there was no internal mark corresponding with it; the upper part of the heart was much affected by the disease- the appearances were not sufficient to induce me to conclude she died by violence, nor were they sufficient to prove she died from natural causes - there were no marks to bring me to conclude that violence had been given; as such the conclusion I should come to was that she died from natural causes - I observed the water about the heart, and the auricle was thin and softened; a sudden change of position might cause her death - any violent shock or agitation of mind would have considerable influence, but would not alone cause death; sudden passion certainly would accelerate the action of the heart considerably, and in that way more or less cause this complaint, but it must be carried to a very great extent to cause death.

HENRY WHITMORE , JUN. I am Mr. Whitmore's son, and am twenty-one years old. I have just finished my hospital studies - I have been brought up under my father- I examined the body with my father and Mr. Whittell; I think great excitement, attended with a sudden alteration of position, might cause death; I could from no opinion as to the cause of her death from a view of the body.

THOMAS BLANCH. I live in Glass-court, Brook-hill, Clerkenwell. The prisoner lived at No. 6 in the court, with Mary Bunyon; two woman lived in the same house -I am a bedstead-maker. On Monday evening, the 18th of September, about seven o'clock, I was at work in the court, taking a bedstead down, before the prisoner's window - I was at the top of the court, when the prisoner came to me and said, "Have you seen my old b-h?" I said I had seen her a quarter of an hour before, and I had scarcely spoken to him before she came down Mutton-hill with something in her apron; he said, "Where have you been?" she said, "I have been to fetch you something for your supper, my dear;" he asked if she had a halfpenny- she said she had; they went away together, returned in about five minutes, and went into their apartment, which is on the ground floor - they shut the shutters, and directly they went in the door was locked; the door was bolted inside - which of them shut the shutters I do not know; I heard the door locked and the shutters bolted - I then heard them beginning to quarrel, and there was a violent commotion; I heard a table thrown down with crockery on it; I heard her say to him twice, "For God's sake, Jem don't murder me;" I heard the sound of blows, and she screamed out dreadfully - I was nearly half an hour there at work; her cries at last got so low I could scarcely hear them - they had unbolted the shutters and thrown them open; one of the shutters struck me as it opened - I cannot say which of them opened them; the window was opened to unbolt them - the prisoner came, and shut it down directly; my back was towards them - I could not see who put the sash down; I saw nothing more that evening - I saw the prisoner next morning, about eight o'clock, and he said, "My Poll is dead;" that she died about ten; I saw him go into a broker's shop at the corner of the court- he came out, and told me Mrs. Bowden, the broker, had told him he had been killing his wife; he said he had not struck her, that he only gave her a violent slmking - he laid hold of a person who stood by me, and shook him by the collar to show me how he shook her; he said he had not struck her at all.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was he always in the habit of calling her his wife? A. Yes - whether they were married I do not know; I have heard himsay they had lived together seventeen years - there was no quarrelling till they got into the room, and how it began I do not know; she had been very ill for a long time, and could not drink - I believe she had been in the habit of drinking; I have seen her a little intoxicated, but not very often.

COURT. Q. Did she appear in liquor that evening? A. No great deal - I do not know that she was so at all; she could walk and talk well.

HANNAH ALDERSON . I live at No. 7, Glass-court. The prisoner came to my house on this Monday evening, about six o'clock, or a little after - he went to the top of the house, and searched the rooms; when he came down I asked if he was looking for his wife - he muttered something, and as he stepped out of the door, he said if he could get hold of her he would break her bl-y neck -I saw him and her come down the court together in about half an hour; they appeared very agreeable - I heard him ask her for the key of the door, which she gave him, and they both went in together; she had something in her apron - I was at my door about half an hour; Blanch was at work in the court - I heard a violent blow given, and heard her say, "Pray, Jem, don't hit me;" I knew her voice - a few minutes after that he shut the window down, and locked his door; I heard another blow given, and heard her beg of him not to bit her - I saw nothing more, for I walked away; I heard of her death next morning.

Cross-examined. Q.Did you live next door to her? A. Yes - I was outside the door; the deceased used to say she was poorly sometimes.

WILLIAM BOWDER . I am a broker, and live at the corner of this court. On Monday evening, about nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner and deceased go out together; they went towards their own door - I think it was near nine; it was not quite dark - she looked at a book-case at my door, and said, "I wish I had money to buy it;" she seemed sober, and I thought the prisoner was rather in liquor - the deceased said at that time that her health had been better than for a long time; I saw the prisoner about seven o'clock next morning - he said, "My old Poll is gone;" I asked what he meant - he said, "She is gone dead, she died last night exactly at ten;" he said nothing about any body picking her off the floor.

ANN DAY. I live in the same house as the prisoner. I never heard whether the woman was his wife or not; I saw the prisoner and her on Monday evening, about half-past six o'clock, coming home comfortably - they came into their room; I heard no disturbance - I live up one pair of stairs, but am very deaf; the prisoner called to me about eight o'clock for a light - I took him one down, but could not get into his room door; he unbolted the shutter, and took the light in at the window - he said, "Mother Day, my cream has fell down, do come and help me up with her;" he got the poker, wrenched the door open, and I found her on the floor - she did not speak; I took her by the heels, he took hold of her shoulders, and we laid her on the bed - she moved her legs to ease herself up in the bed: I did not see her move before she was put on the bed - she had been ill for eight months before, and I expected every night would be her last; I have been called up two or three night in a week to assist her, and found her very had - she would spit pint pots full at a time, and I expected she would be choked with it; the prisoner called me again about a quarter-past ten o'clock - I went down, and found her dead, laying on the bed, covered over: there was some raw liver and bacon in the room - the table was not upset when I went in, but the crockery was broken when I first went in: she was not the prisoner's wife.

Cross-examined. Q.How do you know that? A. I have heard them both say so - they had lived there nine or ten months; she has been eight months of that time ill - I have seen her intoxicated; she never took more than 1d. worth at a time, but she would often have it, and could stand a good deal - she appeared intoxicated when I helped her on the bed, and smelt of liquor; the prisoner was also intoxicated.

SARAH HOWARD . I live on the second floor. I was called up on Monday night, by hearing the prisoner call Day, and the last time he knocked, he said, "For God's sake, Mrs. Day and Sarah Howard , come down, for I am afraid my Mary is dead;" we both entered the room together, and found her dead, laying on the bed covered over - she had her clothes on, and her stays, but there were no bones in them; her clothes did not appear torn at all - about a quarter to eight o'clock that night, I heard something fall down like crockery, and I found some crockery broken in the room; the prisoner was undressed, sitting on the bed, with a tinder-box in his lap - I saw no blood about.

Cross-examined. Q. Was the woman given to drink? A. Yes - when the prisoner was sober he was very kind to her.

MARY BLENCOW. I live in this court. I saw the deceased on Monday evening, about six o'clock; she appeared sober, and as well as ever she was, except having a bad cough - I was talking to her about her brother's funeral; I was in the habit of seeing her often - she had been in a very bad state of health for a long time, through a cough; I never saw her intoxicated.

MR. WHITMORE, SEN. re-examined. Q.Would shaking or striking the woman in the state she was in, be likely to cause her death? A. Certainly a violent shaking would, and if a blow knocked her down or altered her position it might.

Cross-examined. Q. Did the appearances indicate a disposition to drink, or did the water in the pericardium account for drinking? A. I have had well-known cases of dropsy of the pericardium, when I have known the persons were not given to drink; I believe drinking is one of the causes of such appearances, but I certainly should not look at the pericardium for appearances of a person's drinking - I should rather look at the liver; her falling when intoxicated might cause her death, but under the stimulus of drink, she was more capable of bearing up with what might happen - a fall when intoxicated might be more violent, and from her inability to raise herself, her altered position might continue longer; there are certain sorts of violence which might produce death, and leave no trace - if she died from blows there would be marks.

JURY. Q.Would lifting her on the bed injure her? A. If the feet were more elevated than the head it might.

MR. WHITTELL. In my opinion a violent shaking, or knocking down, or blows might cause her death without leaving external marks.

Cross-examined. Q. If she had fallen, and laid on the ground some time, would that be sufficient to account forher death? A. If she was in an horizontal position some time it might.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched a hair of her head when she fell, and have not hit her for some years.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2019. CHARLES HENRY CANNON was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying William Shinton .

JOHN KING . I am a mariner. On Wednesday, the 14th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was with William Shinton , coming home; neither of us were intoxicated - he was about forty years old: as we came up Union-street I met the prisoner and another- Shinton said to the man who was with the prisoner,"You have struck the boy;" the other said he did not: the prisoner came up, and asked Shinton what business he had to interfere; he stated to the prisoner that he had struck the boy; the prisoner said he had not - Shinton said, "You lie, you did;" blows immediately ensued between them - they fought with their fists for about three minutes; both fell down, and in rising Shinton's hat fell off, and on rising the deceased said to the prisoner, "I shall hold you till I get some assistance;" he had hold of him - the prisoner, being held, made a thrust at the deceased, and threw him; he fell, and then cried out that his leg was broken - he sent me for a Policeman, but I could not find one; it did not last five minutes altogether- when I returned the deceased had been removed, and I went home; I did not think he was so much injured -I did not see him again till he was dead - he died at the London-hospital on Monday, at one o'clock; he had hold of the prisoner at the time he gave him the shove - I cannot say which struck the first blow; the deceased said,"You lie" before any blow was struck.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Are you a friend of the boys? A. I never saw them; we had been drinking - the shove appeared an effort of the prisoner to extricate himself from the deceased; nobody else was present.

JANE COMBS . This scnffle happened right under my window; I was in my room, up one pair of stairs - the gas-light is right over my door; I could plainly see what passed - I did not see the beginning of it; I heard a man fall, and heard the deceased tell somebody to go for an officer - I opened my window, and saw the deceased on the ground; there were two person there besides the prisoner - I saw three persons beating the deceased very much indeed, as he lay on the ground; there were two besides the prisoner, and all three were striking the deceased with their hands, and kicked him while on the ground - by that time some neighbours came out; they stamped on his legs, and then a black and a white man, who came by, picked him up, and took him home - all three struck him.

Q.Your deposition before the Coroner states that two were kicking him, and a third man stood by, but did not strike? A.All three struck him.

Cross-examined. Q. The neighbours came out and saw this? A. Yes, two or three of them; I cannot say that all three persons kicked him - I saw one stamp on his legs, and all three might kick him; all three struck him four men carried him home; the Policeman came up when it was all over - the prisoner was there then, but the other two ran off as soon as they saw the Policeman,

ANN BOND. I live near this place. I was at my stall, about three doors from the gas-light over Coombs' door- I saw the decesed and King coming up arm-in-arm, and a boy behind them; the prisoner and another man was coming down the other way, and met them - the deceased said to one of them, "How came you to strike the boy?" and what few words happened I do not know - one of the men said it was no business of his; I did not hear all that passed - I was four or five yards from them- I saw the prisoner strike the deceased; I did not see the deceased strike - they both fell; I saw nobody jump on the deceased, nor kick him - I did not see him taken away; I saw the prisoner and his companion run down the street, and as they passed me I heard a bad expression, but cannot say who it was from; the prisoner said to his companion, "Oh, old chap, you are done - you are* * * like dolly."

Cross-examined. Q. Did you not say this instant you could not say which of them used the expression? A. Yes, I did say so at first, but Cannon was the last man who spoke, and it was him - I am quite sure the prisoner went away leaving the deceased on the ground; King went away when the blow was given - I did not see the deceased strike, nor take hold of the prisoner; I left the deceased laying there, and came to my stall - the prisoner was there when the Policeman came up; he had come back.

JOHN ADAMS . I was at my door, about twenty yards from the spot; I walked towards them, and just before I got up I saw the prisoner knock the other man down, but I did not force myself very forward; I stood a little distance off, the prisoner and his companion ran by me - they returned; I went and told the Policeman, and saw no more.

Cross-examined. Q. Were you near enough to see whether the deceased held the prisoner? A. No.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am an inspector of the Police. -The prisoner surrendered to me on Thursday, the 19th- the man had died on the Monday previous.

JAMES PORTCH . I am a Policeman. I was fetched, and saw the prisoner looking for his hat; the deceased was standing against a house - twenty persons or more were assembled; I said to the prisoner, "You appear to have been ill-using this man;" he said he had not, that he had had a fight; the deceased said he had ill-used him - the prisoner denied it, and asked the by-standers if they had seen him - they all said it was a fight, and the deceased had given the first offence; I thought the deceased sober.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not take the prisoner into custody? A. No, because I understood it to be an affray, which often takes place in that neighbourhood, and he was not given in charge; I saw the deceased go towards home - he walked with assistance, and the prisoner and one Cope went down Union-street; I do not know him.

THOMAS CURLING . I am a pupil of the London-hospital. The deceased was brought there on Thursday, the 15th of September, about twelve o'clock in the dayfor an injury in the ancle, in a quarrel with another man; on examination I found a large bone of the ancle joint broken - it was much inflamed and swollen; he became delirious on Friday night, and continued so at times till his death, on Monday, the 19th; the bone was set in the first instance, and during his delirium he kicked his leg about so as to force the bone through the skin; it became a compound fracture, and mortification came on - his death was caused by delirium, occasioned by the fracture- he had two black eyes, which he might have got in fighting; as he became delirious it would have been improper to take off the leg.

Cross-examined. Q. Would not his walking on the leg tend to inflame it? A. Certainly; the mortification was very recent, and had not time to cause death; he died about twenty-four hours after it became a compound fracture - we were obliged to confine him in a straight waistcoat; it is not uncommon for severe delirium to take place in cases of fracture, with persons who drink much - when he first entered he had a tremulous motion in the eye, and I suspected delirium would take place.

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Fourteen Days .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

2020. DOMINICK GANNON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 1 hat, value 6s., the goods of Thomas Horn , from his person .

THOMAS HORN. On the 19th of October, about ten o'clock, I sat down on the step of a door in Holborn , being fatigued; I was not in liquor - I sat down to rest; the prisoner came up, and instantly took my hat off my head, put it on his own head, and put his hat on my head- he ran off; I ran and got my hat from his head - he made a snatch at the one I had on, but I held the brim, and it broke, leaving it in my hand; I called Stop thief! he ran up a court, and the Policeman took him.

Prisoner. Q. Do you believe I intended to steal your hat? A. I do; it was almost new - the prisoner's was only part of a hat.

THOMAS POCOCK . I am a Policeman. I was on duty, and saw the prosecutor sitting on the step - I saw the prisoner, as he passed, take his hat off, and put it on Horn, who jumped up, seized him, and took his hat from him; the prisoner ran away - I ran and apprehended him - I found twenty-nine duplicates on him for hats and other things.

Prisoner. Q.Was the prosecutor drunk? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man sitting on the step of a door, with his head cast down in a manner I thought injurious to him; I knocked him on the hat, and told him to awake - he said I meant to steal his hat; he struck me, and I ran away, thinking he would strike me again.

THOMAS HORN . He did not touch me on the head, or awake me - I was not asleep.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Life .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2021. HENRY HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 2 pairs of pincers, value 2s. , the goods of Alexander Cowan .

ALEXANDER COWAN . I live in Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell . On the 28th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in my shop - I saw the prisoner come to the door, take two pairs of pincers, put them under his jacket, and walk away; I went out, collared him, and took them from his jacket.

CASS BUCKLER. I am a Policeman. I received him in charge.(Property produced and sworn to)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

2022. GEORGE HITCHCOCK and HENRY MAGINN were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 6lbs. of bacon, value 2s. , the goods of Richard Offord .

THOMAS KING , I am a Policeman. On the 30th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoners with another boy at Pentonville, loitering about a shoemaker's shop; I watched them for half an hour, and saw Hitchcock crawl into Offord's shop, on his hands and knees, and take this bacon out: Maginn had an apron on - Hitchcock gave it to him, and he put it into his apron; he was standing outside, about two shops off, and a third boy stood opposite; I crossed, and seized the prisoners.

RICHARD OFFORD. I keep a chandler's-shop at Pentonville; King brought the prisoners in - he had the bacon in his hand: I am sure it was mine - nobody was in the shop at the time.

Hitchcock's Defence. A boy gave it to me - I gave it to Maginn.

Maginn's Defence. I saw the other boy take the bacon out of the shop, and give it to Hitchcock.

HITCHCOCK - GUILTY . Aged 9.

MAGINN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Whipped and Discharged.

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2023. CHARLES HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , 2 handkerchiefs, value 4s. , the goods of Sarah Peover .

SARAH PEOVER , JUN. I am the daughter of Sarah Peover ; we live in Tash-street, Gray's Inn-lane . On the 13th of October, about ten o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop with another boy, to buy some apples; he asked me to let him look at a particular picture, which was in the back room; I let him look at it, and after they were gone I missed two handkerchiefs from a clothes basket near the picture; the prisoner loitered about the door - I told him I missed two handkerchiefs, and nobody had been in the room but him; he said I must have mislaid them - I inquired of my mother, and then went after him, but he was gone, and while I was gone to the pawnbroker's he was taken.

WILLIAM BARTON. I am a constable. I was called in, and saw the prisoner in the shop; I made him take his trousers off, and these two handkerchiefs dropped from them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The other boy told me to take them - I did so, and threw them down; he made me take them up again.

GUILTY . Aged 13. - Confined Six Months .

2024. RICHARD HERRIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , one 10l. Bank note , the property of Thomas Brown ; against the Statute.

WILLIAM BROWN . I keep the Three Compasses, in White Hart-yard, Drury-lane. In August, 1830, the prisoner was in my service, as pot-boy ; I sent him to my brother's, at Pimlico, with a letter for my brother to send me 10l. - I never saw him again till the 2nd of this month, when I saw him in Covent-garden watch-house: he never brought me a 10l. note.

THOMAS BROWN . I am the prosecutor's brother, and keep the Flask tavern , Ebury-square, Pimlico. On the 16th of August, 1830, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner brought a letter from my brother; I immediately wrote another, in which I enclosed a 10l. note, for my brother, and desired him to make the best of his way back - I wafered the letter; I do not know whether he saw me put the note in - it was No. 10,598.

GEORGE KING . In 1830 I lived in Oxford-street, at a pawnbroker's; I am now a silversmith. On the 16th of August I recollect a young man coming to my employer's and purchasing a watch - he gave me a 10l. note; I asked his name, but what name he gave I cannot say; he said he belonged to the ship Elizabeth, bound to India, which I endorsed on the note - I cannot say who it was.

DOWELL DANDY . I am a clerk in the Bank. I have a 10l. note, No. 10,598, paid in on the 27th of August, by Call and Co.

GEORGE KING. Call and Co. are my master's bankers- I have written on this note "Edward," but the sirname has been cut out at the Bank - here is "From the ship Elizabeth, India, 16-8-30."

Prisoner's Defence. On my way to my master's I missed the note, and was afraid to go home.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

2025. JOHN HICKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 5 yards of printed cotton, value 3s. , the goods of Simeon Brown .

THOMAS GRIFFITH . I am shopman to Simeon Brown, a linen-draper , of Holborn . A person gave me information - I went out, and took the prisoner - he ran when he saw me; I followed, and took him with this piece of print concealed under his coat - I took him back with it; I had seen it in the shop five or ten minutes before.

JAMES SANSOM. I am servant to Mr. Willis, opposite Mr. Brown's. I saw the prisoner go to the shop, and take the print from the doorway - I went and informed Griffith, and saw him brought back; I am sure he is the person - I had seen him watching about the shop for five minutes, with another person.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw three sailors there; I thought one of them was my uncle, I went back, and by the gateway I picked up the print.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2026. JAMES JARMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 hat, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Joseph Sercombe , from his person .

JOSEPH SERCOMBE . I am a servant at a public-house. On the 7th of October, at half-past one o'clock in the morning, I had spent the evening out, and was going home; a female accosted me - I was walking along, talking to her- the prisoner and another were with her, and after she left me the prisoner knocked my hat off, and took it up - he ran away with it; I followed, and called Stop thief! the Policeman stopped him with the hat on his head - I picked up a shoe while I was in pursuit, and he claimed it at the station-house.

Prisoner. Q. Was not my hat on the ground? A. He threw his hat down in front of me, and then knocked mine off - mine was some distance from his.

JOHN HANDLEY. I am a Policeman. I heard an alarm, and stopped the prisoner with this hat on his head; he had no shoes on, and owned one which was produced.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing the prosecutor - a drunken man came by and knocked off both our hats; I took up one and ran after the man, and asked, what he did it for - I did not know but I had my own hat, which was better than his.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined One Year .

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

2027. JOHN WALKER and JOHN PRESTON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 1 handkerchief, value, value 1s., the goods of Thomas Beachcroft , from his person .

MR. THOMAS BEACHCROFT . I am a merchant , and live at Queenhithe. On the 7th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day, I was in Cheapside , and missed my handkerchief, which was safe in my pocket a few minutes before - there was a crowd collected on the north side of Cheapside, in consequence of an accident, with a horse; I was on that side - the crowd interrupted my passage, and on getting out of it I missed my handkerchief - I saw it again at Guildhall on the 10th; the prisoners were at the bar - it had my initials on it - I attended there in consequence of an advertisement.

Walker. Q.When you lost your handkerchief did the witness come and ask you about it? A.Certainly not.

THOMAS TOOLE . I am a shoemaker, and live in Goswell-street. On the 7th of October I was in Cheapside - a crowd collected round a horse; Mr. Beachcroft came past on the pavement, between Honey-lane market and Milk-street -I saw the prisoners go round the crowd and try several people's pockets; Mr. Beachcroft came by - they followed him; one of them took the handkerchief out of his pocket, and gave it to Preston - I am quite certain of them both; Preston put it under his coat - Walker went back and Preston turned round the crowd; I sent Day, who was with me, to tell Mr. Beachcroft he had lost his handkerchief - I immediately took hold of Preston, and took the handkerchief from under his coat; I asked, what he took it for - he said, "It is my own, I bought it;" I told him I had seen it taken from a gentleman's pocket, and given to him - he became very obstreperous, tried to get away, and said he would not go; Day returned, and I got him to the corner of King-street - he there struck me on the mouth, put his feet behind me, and tripped me up; I still held him, and he was secured - nobody would assist me, in fact, they tried to get him from me, but I got him to Guildhall - I came back, and in King-street saw Walker; I said he wasthe other man, and must go as well - he said he did not knew what I meant, and would not go, but at last he went with me; the handkerchief was advertised, and on the Monday the prosecutor claimed it - I could not give him information of it, as he went on.

PEDDER DAY . I am porter to a carrier. I was with Toole; a mob had gathered - the prisoners were following several gentlemen, walking up and down; at last Mr. Beachcroft passed - they followed him up; I saw Walker put his hand into Mr. Beachcroft's pocket, take the handkerchief out, put it behind him, and give it to Preston -Toole told me to inform the gentleman; I went through the mob and spoke to one gentleman, but could not find the prosecutor.

Walker. You said at Guildhall that you went after the gentleman, and he said he had lost a handkerchief, but would not take further trouble about it, Witness. I spoke to a gentleman who had lost one, but that was not the prosecutor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Preston's Defence. There was a great crowd - Toole came, laid hold of me, and said I had stolen a handkerchief; I said, "Why have you not laid hold of the gentleman as well as me? I am willing to go back to the gentleman" - he said I must go with him; I asked for his authority - he said he should not show it; he tore my shirt, and threw me down.

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

PRESTON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

2028. JOHN NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of James Robbins , from his person .

JAMES ROBBINS . I am in the lace business , and live in Old 'Change. On the 25th of September, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was on Holborn-hill ; I did not perceive my handkerchief taken, nor notice the prisoner till a Policeman, who had him in custody, produced it to me - it was safe two minutes before.

GEORGE POWELL . I am a Policeman. I saw Mr. Robbins on Holborn-hill, with a lady; I saw the prisoner in company with another person, and saw the other draw the handkerchief from the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to the prisoner, who was close to him - I immediately seized him, and took it from his left hand; he said, "Oh, let me go," and burst into tears; his companion ran away immediately.

JOHN HODGE. I am a constable, serving in my own right. I saw a crowd, and found the prisoner in Powell's custody.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner handed in a petition for a lenient sentence.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Life .

2029. SARAH NEWMAN and ELIZA WALKER were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 watch, value 2l.; 1 ribbon, value 2d.; 1 seal, value 12s.; 2 keys, value 4s., and 1 ring, value 4s., the goods of James Young , from his person .

JAMES YOUNG. I am a seaman - I was keeping a gentleman's house at Bedford-place, Bloomsbury. On the 10th of October, at twenty minutes to nine o'clock, I looked at my watch in Long-lane, and am certain it was safe; I was walking behind the prisoners, who were strangers to me - a drover was passing, and struck Newman on the arm: she exclaimed that he had made her arm bleed, and that she had been bled that day - Walker turned round to me and said, "Did you take hold of that woman's arm?" I said, "I did not;" she looked me full in the face - I walked up Long-lane, and as I crossed Smithfield Walker laid hold of my arm, which I did not wish; I have a wife and children - I shook her off me, and turned up King-street; I turned up Salisbury Arms-yard for a necessary purpose - I had a bundle under my arm, and a basket in my hand; Walker came up, and took indecent liberties with me, and said she wanted to feel if I had any money to go with her; I said I did not want any thing to do with her - she immediately snatched my watch; she told Newman, who stood close by, to feel if I had any money, for she could make nothing of me; and when I went to run after her to get my watch, Newman laid hold of me to prevent my following her - I never got my watch again; Walker got away entirely - I secured Newman, and found Walker next day at the bottom of Salisbury Arms-yard; I went up to her - she said, "Do you know me?" I said Yes; she said, "What do you know of me?" I said,"No good;" she called out Joe! I saw several men; I ran, called a watchman, and told him to come, for I had a prisoner at the bottom of the yard - two watchmen assisted in taking her; she declared she had been at home for a week before, and was never out till that night - I have not a doubt of her; she was in the same dress exactly when I took her.

Walker. He came and said, "Let me look at you?" I said I would go any where with him; he said, "I should not like to take you wrongfully;" he did not come again for two minutes. Witness. I told her I had made no mistake, that I knew her.

Newman. Q. Did not I ask you what you were about knocking against my elbow? A. You exclaimed, "What the hell are you after?"

MICHAEL RYAN . I am a watchman, of West-street. I know the prisoners; I had seen them both before, but not together. About a quarter to nine o'clock I stood at the end of Salisbury-yard, and heard a scuffle - I looked round, and saw Walker running down the steps as fast as she could run; I am sure of her - I knew her before, and a few minutes after, Young came down stairs and asked me which way the woman had gone; I did not see Walker again that evening - Young said, "Stop, watchman, let us take her pal," and he gave Newman in charge; he said he should have secured Walker, but Newman had held his jacket - I was present next day when Walker was taken in West-street.

Newman. Q. Did you see me standing listening to what was going on? A. No; the transaction was in the yard, before I came to the steps - directly I saw her, Young gave her in charge.

JAMES YOUNG . I am positive of both their persons, and cannot be mistaken - I have not recovered my watch; Walker changed her dress at the Compter.

Walker's Defence. I was going along; this man came and dragged me round - he said he thought he knew no good of me; I lifted up my bonnet - he said, "No, I donot think I do know you." but in about twenty minutes he came and took me; he said, "I think this is the woman;" the watchman said, "Had you a black gown on last night?" I said, "No, I was not out last night;" he said he could swear to me by my blue gown, black bonnet, and red handkerchief, with yellow spots - here is the handkerchief I had on; he owned to the Alderman that he let me go the first time.

Newman's Defence. I never spoke to the man; I was standing in the street, fainting away - the prosecutor stood at the corner of the street - he ran after some woman; he knocked against my bad arm - I laid hold of his coat, and said, "What are you about?" he ran on, and having lost sight of the woman, turned round and said, "Watchman, take this woman, she will do as well; we will keep her till we find the other;" as I went to the Compter he said,"Tell me where the other woman lives, and I will let you go" - I said I did not know her, or I would soon tell; I never saw Walker till she was at the office.

MARY WARD . I live in Peter-street, Saffron-hill - my husband keeps a broker's-shop. Walker took a lodging of me on the 10th of October; she walked to my house and took a lodging on the first floor, at the time this gentleman says he lost his watch - at seven o'clock she came to me for the key; the prosecutor came next day with a watchman to search her room - she slept in one of my houses on the 10th of October, at No. 25, Eagle-court, St. John's-lane, for a lodger told me so; I was at home when she came for the key; she took the room at twenty minutes past nine o'clock in the morning - I delivered her the key at seven at night, because I asked where I was to get her character - she was moving her furniture in from seven till ten o'clock at night; I was not present; I went to the house about seven, and saw her and a woman moving her furniture; I left about a quarter to eight - she came to my house with a bed-wrench about ten, and said she was too tired to put up her bed, and should lay on the floor - I have three houses in Eagle-court; I let them to families -I had not time to go about her character.

ELIZABETH MORGAN . I am a milkwoman, and live in Parrot-court, Playhouse-yard. I was standing at my door when Walker, (who I did not know before,) came by; she asked me to come and help her to move - it was about five o'clock, and I took some bed-clothes from Golden-lane and some earthenware - a bedstead was carried by a bricklayer; the bedstead was carried about eight; it was on Monday night last - I beg pardon, it was on the 10th; I know it was Monday night; I left about ten o'clock, and left her in the room; it was last Monday week - I went there about half-past six and staid till near ten o'clock; she might be absent from me more than an hour of that time.

NEWMAN - GUILTY . Aged 24.

WALKER - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

NEW COURT. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2030. THOMAS KEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 watch, value 3l.; 1 watch-chain, value 6d.; 1 seal, value 5s., and 1 watch-key, value 1d. , the goods of Samuel Waller .

SAMUEL WALLER. I keep a shoemaker's shop , in St. Pancras-place, Middlesex . On the 1st of October the prisoner came to my shop with another person, under the pretence of buying a pair of shoes; the other bad an old shoe in his hand, and asked me if it was worth mending - I said No, it was worth nothing; I asked if they had money for a new pair - they said they had not; they tried on an old pair, but did not like them - they said I must make a pair for them the next week; I had a watch hanging on a nail in the shop just before they came in, and when they had got about a yard from the door I missed it - I started after them, and saw it in the prisoner's hand; I caught hold of him - he put his hand behind his back; I attempted to draw it forward, and I saw the watch in a pool of water, about two yards from where he stood - I did not see him throw it away; an officer came up, and I gave him into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Do you really mean that you saw the watch in his hand? A. Yes, I did.

JOHN CRUTCH . I live in Brewer-street, and am a plumber. I was at work next door but one to the prosecutor's - I saw him and the prisoner struggling; I saw the watch in the prisoner's hand, and saw him throw it into the water.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner, and found on him 3s.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Transported for Seven Years .

2031. ELIZABETH BULMER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 8 handkerchiefs, value 24s. , the goods of David Thomas , her master.

DAVID THOMAS . I keep a shop in Cranbourne-street . The prisoner was my servant for six months; in consequence of information, I called in the officer Bexley - I went up stairs in my house with him; we found the prisoner in a room - I said I missed several handkerchiefs from the shop, and I supposed she must have had them, as nobody else could: we went to her bed-room, and found in the fire-place a handkerchief, which we had missed the night before - I have since found seven other handkerchiefs at the pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by MR. CHURCHILL. Q.Was the prisoner the only person who occupied that bed-room? A. Yes - I have other servants; I do not live there myself - no one else had access to her room.

JOHN BEXLEY . I am an officer. The prosecutor sent for me: I saw the handkerchief found in the fire-place, behind some lumber, in a paper - we asked the prisoner how she came by it; she said she took it out of the shop, and she had taken several others, pawned them, and burnt the duplicates - no promise had been made to her.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any promise afterwards made to her? A. I said, in going to the office, she had better tell where the rest of the property was; I saw her wages, 2l. 10s., paid to her.

JAMES UNDERWOOD . I am in the service of a pawnbroker. I produce seven handkerchiefs, four of which were pawned on the 1st of July, and three on the 28th, by some woman.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Confined Three Months, without hard labour .

2032. REBECCA WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September 4 shirts, value 15s.; 3 towels, value 3s.; 3 pinafores, value 3s.; 1 handkerchief, value 3s., and 1 shift, value 2s. , the goods of Thomas Hammond , her master.

ELIZABETH HAMMOND . I am the wife of Thomas Hammond , of Little Chapel-street, Soho - he is a schoolmaster . The prisoner had been four months in our service, and left; I missed articles of apparel, spoke to her, and she always laid it on the washer-woman or the mangler - when she was gone I missed some other articles.

EDWARD FITCHEW . I am assistant to a pawnbroker, in Oxford-street. I have some shirts, shifts, pinafores, and other articles, pawned by some woman, between the 25th of July, and the 28th of September.

JOHN ANDREWS. I am a constable. On the 30th of September I went to the prisoner's lodgings, to which she directed me, at No. 22. Little Charlotte-street, and found these duplicates in a little tea-caddy; I went to her, told her what I had found, and asked if these were the articles belonging to Mr. Hammond; she said, "Yes, there is no doubt of it;" she had told me she had left her keys at home, and I opened the caddy with some keys which her landlady gave me.

EDWARD FITCHEW. These duplicates are all written by me, except one - I came out in a hurry, and did not bring the counterparts.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35. - Confined Three Months .

2033. CAROLINE PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 bonnet, value 2s.; 1 cap, value 2s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 6d., the goods of Rachael Cryer ; and 1 pelisse, value 2s. , the goods of Elizabeth Terry .

JOSEPH HOSKINS . I am superintendant of the female department of the Refuge for the Destitute, in Hackney-road . The prisoner was admitted in August last, and on the 26th of September, she quitted it - she had been placed there by her friends; I saw a cloak and bonnet on her when she was in custody.

WILLIAM KING . I am a Police-officer. On the 27th of September I went to a house in Baker's-row; I saw the prisoner sitting by the window - she had this cap and shoes on; the bonnet and pelisse were on the table - she put on the bonnet and pelisse, and I took her.

RACHAEL CRYER. I am matron of the Refuge . This bonnet is mine - this cap and shoes are mine; I missed them from the kitchen belonging to the needle-room, and had not given the prisoner leave to wear them.

ELIZABETH TERRY. I am an inmate of the Refuge . This pelisse is mine; I had left it in my box at the bottom of the stairs in the needle-room.

Prisoner's Defence. The reason I left the place was, Mr. Hoskins threw a pail-full of water over me; they sent me down to the needle-room for my clothes - I took these, and left my own; my bonnet is there still - my shoes and cap she gave to the Policeman.

JOSEPH HOSKINS . Her conduct was very disorderly, and I took away her Refuge clothes, and gave her her own clothes; I have no recollection of doing what she says.

MRS. CRYER. She threw her own shoes into the garden, and took my shoes from the kitchen - she could not get her bonnet, as it was locked up; her shoes were so bad that I allowed her a pair, and she left that pair and took mine.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

2034. THOMAS HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 hammercloth, value 30s., the goods of William Wentworth , Earl of Fitzwilliam ; and 1 hammercloth cover, value 2s. , the goods of John Jones .

JOHN ALLISTON . I am porter to William Wentworth, Earl Fitzwilliam, of Grosvenor-square. On Monday, the 26th of September, the prisoner came and said he came with Mr. Jones' respects for a hammercloth and cover, to be scoured, and knowing he lived as servant with Mr. Jones, I let him have it.

JOHN JONES . I am a coachmaker , and live in George-street, Portman-square. Lord Fitzwilliam is a customer of mine - the prisoner was in my service, and was discharged about seven weeks before the 26th of September- the hammercloth was Lord Fitzwilliam's, and the cover was mine; it belonged to a yearly job carriage - the cover was worth about 2s.; I did not send the prisoner for it, and he never brought it to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Then you cannot tell whether the cover he got at Lord Fitzwilliam's was yours or not? A. I have not seen it since; I believe he was in great distress - he had a wife and child.

COURT to JOHN ALLISTON . Q. Do you know of any coachmaker supplying Lord Fitzwilliam with covers, except Mr. Jones? A. No, none at all.

Cross-examined. Q.When did this cover come into the possession of Lord Fitzwilliam? A. That I cannot tell - I dare say it had not been there two years.

GUILTY of stealing the cover, but not the cloth, there being no Earl of Fitwilliam . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined One Month .

2035. THOMAS RODEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 9 cakes of soap, value 16s., and 1 wooden case, value 2s. , the goods of Ann Williams .

JOHN LAWSON . I live with my sister, Ann Williams; she is a widow - I conduct her business for her; she had some cakes of soap in a wooden frame on the 1st of October - I missed it about seven o'clock in the evening; there were 27lbs. of soap.

JAMES COVINGTON . I am a constable. I saw the prisoner walking with this case of soap on his right shoulder, three or four hundred yards from the prosecutrix's; I asked where he got it - he hesitated, and then said, "I have taken the soap;" I said he must take it back again, and he went back to the shop with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up this box of soap.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

2036. GEORGE AVENT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , 130lbs. of canvas, value 25s. , the goods of Joseph Soames , his master.

HENRY KIMBER . I am storekeeper to Mr. Joseph Soames, of Ratcliff - he is a ship owner . On the 13th of September I went into the street, and saw a truck, withfive bundles of canvas in it, weighing perhaps 20lbs. or 25lbs. each - the prisoner, who was in Mr. Soames' employ, had hold of the truck; I asked him what he was going to do- he said he had orders from Mr. Watson to make it up; I said, as I knew nothing of the circumstance, I must have it returned till I consulted Mr. Watson and Mr Soames; he came to me afterwards, crying, and in great distress - he said that the story he had told me was not true, that three parcels belonged to himself, and two to Mr. Soames; that he had taken them all back, and had put one into the place called the rag-hole, and the rest where he took them from, but he did not say where; I found one parcel in the rag-hole, as he said, but the other four, we never could discover.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Were not the men in the habit of saving up rags for themselves? A. Not that I am aware of; there was no more in the raghole - the one that was there remained there a week or ten days; it is now here: I marked it with the letter S. - I cannot say which of the five I marked; many people go into the room, and might have taken bags; I never knew of bags being there before; there were ten or twelve persons in the employ of Mr. Soames - the prisoner appeared to be sober.

JAMES HOPE WATSON . I am foreman to Mr. Soames. I did not give orders to the prisoner to make up any canvas; I do not know that he had any of his own - he was a workman there; I believe this canvas is Mr. Soames'- it is made up in the same way, and he had a quantity of this description on the premises.

Cross-examined. Q. Do not you know that the prisoner was in the habit of taking canvas home to work? A. Never old canvas; we allow the men to take home new canvrs, to make hammocks, and what I have given out has been returned; I do not know whether these rags have been-mixed; the firm is carried on in the name of Mr. Soames and his brother, but his brother is dead.

JAMES MORGAN . I am a Police-serjeant. The prisoner was brought to the station on the 26th of September; I asked what could induce him to rob his employer- he said it was the first time he had ever done any thing of the kind; I received this parcel from Kimber, in Mr. Soames' presence.

Cross-examined. Q. Was there any-body else present when the prisoner said this? A. I do not know; I think Collins brought the prisoner, but I believe he was by the door.

Prisoner. I never told you any thing of the kind; this bundle was not in my possession, but some rags that are not here now.

MRS. HALLIDAY. The prisoner lodged in my house nearly two years; he brought home two old sails to repair, and he has brought home new hammocks to make.

Prisoner. I had to remove, and I placed this property there unknown to any one; Mr. Kimber lent me the truck - I never told him that Mr. Watson desired me to remove them.

MR. KIMBER. I went into the street, and asked what he was going to do with the canvas; he said he had orders from Mr. Watson - I said, as neither Mr. Watson nor Mr. Soames were there, I would have it removed back, and I called our porter to remove it; the prisoner came back in a few minutes, and told me what I have stated; he said he had some furniture to remove, but did not say it was any thing from our premises.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Six Months .

2037. RICHARD AYRES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 14 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the monies of William Treadgold , from Leah, his wife.

LEAH TREADGOLD . I am the wife of William Treadgold, a tobacconist . On the 20th of September the prisoner came to our shop with another man - the prisoner asked for half an ounce of tobacco; I served him, and he threw down a sixpence, and I gave him 4 1/2d. in change: he then asked if I could oblige him with some new sixpences or shillings; I went to my drawer, and took out a little bag of silver - I turned it out into my hand; there were two half-crowns, two sixpences, and twenty-one shillings in it - I was looking it over, and he said, "Allow me, Ma'am, there is one," and he took one shilling with his thumb and fore-finger, and with his other fingers he took hold of the bag; he put his hand to my hand three times, and each time he took some money with the back part of his hand - I did not observe him the first time, but the two times I saw him put his hand to his pocket; the third time I accused him of it - he held up his fist, asked how I dared to accuse a gentleman of robbing me, and was going to strike my face; the other man went away, but the prisoner stopped at the door till I called my neighbour - he then went out; the officer came up, and he was taken - I looked at my silver, and found I had but 12s. left; he had taken 13s. - he was taken to a public-house; I believe 10s. were taken from him, and two of them had lions on them - I cannot account for the deficiency in my money in any other way.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You had not marked the shillings? A. No - I merely stepped out at my door to call my neighbours; he could not have got away - there was a mob collected; I dare say there were half a dozen persons - the prisoner did not take his coat off; I said, "Hold your coat up - you have got some money up your sleeve, or in your pocket;" I had counted this money not two minutes before he came as I had put it up to pay my rent - I stated that before the Magistrate- I pushed him back as he was going out of the shop; he did not strike me, as I pulled my head back; I suppose he was taken in half an hour.

JOSEPH FRYER . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner - he had then got as far as Southampton-street - he said, "You are no officer;" I was not then in my uniform; I took my staff out of my pocket - he got hold of it, and then seized my two cuffs; we had a regular scuffle; another person came up, and I got him to the public-house - he then struck me; I knocked him down, and got my handcuff on one of his hands; he struggled very much, and I could not get the other on - I called some persons to assist me; he then seized my arm with his teeth, and bit it through my coat - when I searched him I found in his trousers pocket 10s. 10 1/2d., and in his waistcoat pocket two shillings, with lions on them.

Cross-examined.. Q. He had got to Southampton-street? A. Yes; he was walking - I suppose it was a quarter of an hour after he first went to the prosecutor's; he was about one hundred yards from their house - he said he had no money but his own, and would not be taken.

THOMAS SMITH . I live in Harford-row, Battle-bridge, and am a shoemaker. I saw the prisoner and another man at the prosecutor's; the other man stood at the step of the door; the prisoner came to him, and then the other went away.

Cross-examined. Q.Were you examined before the Magistrate? A. Yes; I stated that the prisoner came out and went in - he then came out again, and went in again; if he had any money belonging to the prosecutor, he might have thrown it away, or given it to the other man- I looked at him attentively while he was in the shop; I did not see him do any thing.

HENRY RUSSELL . I am a carpenter, and live in Hamblin's-row. I assisted in stopping the prisoner, about one hundred yards from the prosecutor's shop - he demanded to see the officer's authority, and he pulled out his staff - the prisoner seized it, and then he took hold of his cuffs; he said he would not be searched in the street, but if he went to a public-house he would be searched quietly; when we got there he was very desperate, and fought with the officer - the officer overcame him; it took four of us to handcuff him: while the officer was searching him his expressions were very bad.

Cross-examined. Q.Did not a man named Colton come up? A. No; the prisoner became violent when we attempted to handcuff him; he was walking when he was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 42. - Transported for Seven Years .

2038. GEORGE ATKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 40 shuttles, value 40s. , the goods of John Brown .

MARY BROWN. I am the wife of John Brown, and live in Pelham-street . The prisoner worked in my shop for five or six weeks, and slept there - on the morning of the 6th of October I missed twenty shuttles out of a loom, which was standing in the shop - I then went to another loom, and missed twenty more.

WILLIAM ESTILL . I am servant to Mr. Sowerby, a pawnbroker. I have twenty shuttles, pawned with me by the prisoner, on the 1st of October, for 1s.

DICKENSON SOWERBY . I am master of the shop. I have twenty shuttles pawned with me, by some boy, on the 28th of September.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HENRY BOLTON . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence (written.) I was in the employ of John Brown, the husband of the prosecutrix, who owed me money for my employment; I applied to him for some money, and he told me to take these articles, but not to mention it to any person - he had the duplicates and money, which the wife has construed into a charge of felony, as I am the chief evidence against the said John Brown for felony, from which he has absconded.

MARY BROWN re-examined. Q. What has become of your husband? A. I do not know, but the shuttles were in my house after he left home - my husband was not indebted to the prisoner for work; my husband was charged with buying some articles, but I do not know any thing of it.

WILLIAM CRAWFORD. I live in Quaker-street, Spitalfields. The prisoner is a material witness in a case of felony against John Brown, the husband of this woman; I had the prisoner in custody for offering a tool which his master sent him to sell, and which I lost from my premises- his master absconded out of the office; he had two examinations - it was said there was a person who could prove he bought it, and then he absconded on the 28th of September.

NOT GUILTY .

2039. JOHN BOULTER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 wash-hand stand, value 4s. , the goods of George Hebbard .

JOHN HOLT . I am the son of Thomas Holt - he lives in Club-row, and is a chair-maker. On the morning of the 19th of September I was at our window, and saw the prisoner take up a wash-hand stand from Mr. Hebbard's door - he got half-way up the street; I told the prosecutor, and we followed him - he turned up Church-street, and we saw him again at the corner of Mount-street: we then lost sight of him - I saw him again in two or three minutes, and am sure he is the same person.

BENJAMIN CLARK . I live in Rose-street, Bethnalgreen. On the morning of the 19th of September, about half-past eight o'clock, I was in Peter-street, and saw the prisoner go into No. 8; I did not see him take any thing into the house, I only saw his back; the stand was found in that house in two or three minutes afterwards.

Prisoner. You said you saw me knock at the door? Witness. Yes, and the door was opened directly.

ELIZABETH HEBBARD . I live in Club-row - my husband's name was George; he was alive at that time. This stand is mine - I saw the prisoner with it on his shoulder; I saw him again in Peter-street, and he was taken - I charged him with it; he said he knew nothing about it.

EDWARD RICHARDS . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner.

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

2040. MARY CHANDLER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 half-sovereign, 2 half-crowns, and 2 sixpences, the monies of Francis Foy , from his person .

FRANCIS FOY. I live in King's-court, Pimlico, and am a labourer . On the 16th of October I saw the prisoner in York-street, Westminster; I went with her to her own room, in Orchard-street - I had a half-sovereign, two half-crowns, and two sixpences, in my waistcoat pocket; I gave her sixpence - when I had been about ten minutes in the house I missed my money, and demanded it; she denied having it - I insisted upon having it; she said, "So help me God, I have not had it" - I opened the window, and called the officer; he found it in a concealed pocket, under her stays.

JOHN MANN . I am a Police-officer. I was called to a house in Perkin's-rents, Orchard-street; the prosecutor gave the prisoner in charge for robbing him - I askedwhat money he had lost; he said a nan-sovereign, two half-crowns, and two sixpences; I found it in a concealed pocket in her stays - she said before I searched her that she had only two sixpences about her, which she had received from the prosecutor, and no other money.

Prisoner. He gave me two sixpences, and I asked him to give me some halfpence - he gave me two penny pieces, as I thought; when the officer asked me I took it out, and it was two half-crowns, and there was a half-sovereign between them - I had no light; he was not sober - there was another girl with me, but she is not here.

FRANCIS FOY. I was sober; a parcel of girls broke the door open, and I put them out again; I gave the prisoner only one sixpence; my money was all in one pocket there was a candle in the room.

JOHN MANN. The prosecutor was sober; there was no light when I went in.

GUILTY . Aged 19 - Transported for Seven Years .

2041. THOMAS JONES and WILLIAM JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 12 bars of soap, value 18s., and 1 wooden case, value 2s. , the goods of John Crow .

CHARLES WEEKES . I am servant to the prosecutor, Mr. John Crow - he lives in Ebury-street, Pimlico . On the 15th of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, after doing up my horse, I went down into the kitchen, and sat down by the area; I heard a great noise at the door - I ran up, and this soap was gone; I heard it had been put into a cart by two men, who had gone on towards Buckingham-gate - I pursued, and met the officer coming back with the soap and case.

JOHN SARSFIELD . I am a Police-officer. On the night of the 15th of September I met Dickinson, and in consequence of what he said, I ran up Belgrave-place, and stopped the cart with the two prisoners in it - I asked Jones had he got any soap; he said he had, and that a man put it into the cart - I asked where the man was, and he said he did not know; I took him back, and had him taken to the station - this is the soap; the cart was going fast, and was going from Mr. Crow's house, which is at Pimlico.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. Was the horse galloping? A. No, trotting very quick - I swear that; I was not able to speak when I got up - it was a very small poney: I asked Jones had he any soap in the cart- I did not ask what he had got in the cart; that I swear- I had heard from Dickenson that some soap had been lost.

Q.When you asked Jones whether he had any soap, did he not say Yes, and point out Johnson as the man who put it into the cart? A. No, he never pointed out Johnson - he said it was a man he did not know; Mr. Crow's son told me to take the soap, and let the man go - I said that was the way to encourage thieves, and I never let Jones go out of my sight.

Q. Did not the cart, with the men in it, drive away from Mr. Crow's door with your consent, and did not you let it go? A. No - I did not let Jones go; he got out of the cart when we got to Crow's, and I had him taken to the station; Mr. Crow's man came to look at the soap -Johnson was in the cart, but Jones was on the road along with me, and I had him in custody; he did not go into Crow's - he went to the door; I did not see him show the soap to Crow's man - Jones did not go back into the cart; I had him by my side - the horse and cart were taken to the statibn-house in four or five minutes; I went back to Mr. Crow's for the soap; it had been taken into the shop- the person at the shop did not say he was quite satisfied.

CHARLES WEEKES re-examined. Q. How long before had you seen the soap safe? A. I suppose half an hour, or three quarters; I met the officer in the road bringing back the cart, and the two prisoners in it; when it got to my master's door I looked into the rail of it, and asked what they had in it - they said there was a box put into the cart to be taken to Westminster; I can swear to this box, but not to the soap - the box had soap in it when I saw it safe, and soap in it when I found it; there were twelve bars in it - I believe Jones went into the shop to my young master; I was at the tail of the cart - he went towards the door; I am not certain whether he went in- I did not hear Johnson give any account of the soap.

Cross-examined. A. Were there twelve whole bars of soap? A. Yes, and so there were at the office - it was then put into the officer's care; there are only eleven and a quarter now - I cannot account for that; I saw Jones go towards our house - I supposed he was going to rectify his own cause, if he could - I saw the cart go, and Johnson in it; Jones went with the officer and his assistants - I did not see the officer let him go; the soap was taken into the shop, and remained there twenty minutes.

JAMES DICKINSON . I live in George-street, Pimlico, and am a gardener. On the night of the 15th of September I was passing by the wooden bridge, at Pimlico, at a quarter-past eight o'clock; I saw Jones conveying the box of soap towards a cart, about a hundred yards from Mr. Crow's; he was not above twelve yards from the cart- there was a person sitting in the cart, but who it was I cannot say; I am clear that the man who put the soap into the cart was Jones, and they went off, soap and all, at a middling pace: I heard of the soap being lost, and told the constable which way the cart went - I heard him say, when the cart was brought back, that he had been employed by a man to carry it who had run away.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he not point out Johnson as the man? A. No, he said the man had run away; I did not tell the Magistrate, but I mention it now, because my Lord asked me - I did not think of it when I was before the Magistrate; I did not know Jones before - I am sure he was the man; I did not notice his handkerchief - I think he had a blue coat on; I did not speak to him - the cart went off at a middling pace; I heard the officer say at the office, that when he got up they cut the horse to go on - I heard the gentleman at Mr. Crow's tell the officer to let them go, and the horse and cart, and Johnson did go away - I saw Jones get into the cart, turn it round, and he was in the act of driving it away when the officer brought him back.

COURT to JOHN SARSFIELD. Q.Do you hear what he says? A. He means at the time he put the soap into the cart.

JAMES DICKINSON. Jones got into the cart at Mr. Crow's.

Jones' Defence. When the officer called to me, I turned round, and met him; he said, "There is a bother about this, what have you got in the cart?" I said, "Here is a box, which a man put in, I don't know what is in it;" I said, "What is the matter?" he said he did not know - when we got to the shop the young master told the man to go and see what was in the cart; he said soap - it was taken out. and he said, "Go along about your business;" I got into the cart, and got about fifty yards - the officer came and took the cart; I got out, and he led the cart to the station - I followed it, or I need not have been taken.

Johnson's Defence. I was coming from Chelsea, and saw Jones; I asked him to give me a ride - the soap was in before I got into the cart.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 23.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

2042. ANTHONY MESSENGER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 2 gimblets, value 5d.; 2 brad-awls, value 2d.; 2 punches, value 2d.; 1 rasp, value 10d.; 1 chisel, value 6d.; 3 guages, value 6d.; 1 screwdriver, value 1s.; 1 saw, value 4s.; 1 plane, value 1s. 6d.; 1 screw-driver. value 6d., and 1 mitre-square, value 6d. , the goods of William Harris .

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am a carpenter . The prisoner and I had worked together for some days the beginning of October, in the back of the house where I lodge; I lent him my tools to work with, but not to carry away - in consequence of information I went, on the Sunday afterwards, and missed my basket of tools; I went to No. 15, Brook-street on the Monday, with the prisoner's brother; we got in at the window - we found the prisoner on his hands and knees at the end of the dresser, I pulled him out, and found several of my tools in a basket by his side - he said he was ashamed of himself, but he meant to have brought them back; I have recovered all but one saw - they were in a cupboard in the room; I had lent them to him to use, and no one saw him take them away.

NOT GUILTY .

2043. ROBERT STANWOOD was indicted for embezzlement .

JOHN COOPER . I live in Drury-lane, and am a baker . The prisoner was in my service - he accounted to me for some money received on the 19th of July, but not for 8s. received from Mr. Collins, of Somer's-town; he did not, on the 24th of September, account to me for 4l. 3s. 2d., received from Mr. Lyle, of Mecklenburg-square, who had had had bread of me to that amount.

FRANCIS MASTERS . I am in the employ of Mr. Collins. of Somers'-town. I paid the prisoner 8s., on the 19th of July, for Mr. Cooper, on account of Mr. Collins.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.May you not make some little mistake in this? A. No - we book every thing every night; I have the bill and the receipt here - here is the bill; it is for 8s. 0 1/2d. - I put it down in the daybook, but the book is not here; I paid it on Tuesday - there is no name on the bill, but we do not mind such small things; we generally throw them into the fire - I book them the day they are paid.

COURT. Q. Who wrote this receipt at the bottom? A. The prisoner, and I have written on the back, "Mr. Cooper, bread, settled the 19th of July."

ELIZABETH PHIPETT . I live with Mr. Lyle, in Mecklenburg-square, I paid the prisoner 11s. 4d. the day before he left Mr. Cooper; it was in September - I heard a complaint within two days: here are several bills, and two of them were written "Received" by me, because the prisoner said he had no pencil.

Cross-examined. Q. Can you tell the day of the week on which you paid these two bills? A. On the Monday; I recollect the amount.

MR. COOPER re-examined. Q. When did the prisoner quit your service? A. On the 1st of October; he never accounted to me for any sum of money received from Mr. Lyle since the 1st of June.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it not in consequence of looking at your book that you swear that? A. No - when I heard of it I certainly looked at my books.

COURT. Q. Do you, from your memory, know that you had not received any money of him for some time? A. Yes - I had not for a month or two.

Prisoner's Defence. I never receipted any of Mr. Lyle's bills, nor received any.

JURY to MR. COOPER. Q. Did the prisoner account to any other person in your family for money received? A. Yes, to my wife when I am not in the way, but we put it down every day in the book; Mr. Lyle had never run a long account before.

COURT. Q. Do you happen to know whether you accounted with the prisoner on the 19th of July? A. Yes, he paid me that day; the book is here - if he pays my wife she puts it down; I made out a bill to Mr. Lyle every week, and gave them to the prisoner - the last I made out was 4l. 3s. 2d.; the prisoner destroyed my bills, and made others - these bills are his writing, not mine.

Cross-examined. Q.Have you not a daughter? A. Yes, two or three: one of them used to keep my books, but she is in the country - I only know by the book what my wife has received; I never received the 11s. 4d.

NOT GUILTY .

2044. WILLIAM OLIVE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 telescope, value 4s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 3s. , the goods of Joseph Ingram .

JOSEPH INGRAM. I lost a telescope, and a pair of shoes, but I do not know when - I am a post-boy , and lodge with the prisoner's father, in Marylebone-lane ; the prisoner slept in the same room with me.

JAMES SPENCER . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have a pair of shoes, but I do not know who pawned them.

WILLIAM PERRYMAN . I am foreman to Mr. Baylis, in Mortimer-street, a pawnbroker. I have a telescope, pawned in the name of William Olive, I do not know by whom.

EDWARD BURRIDGE . I am an officer. On the 7th of October I took the prisoner in Marylebone-lane - I found on him these two duplicates, one of a telescope, pawned on the 6th of October for 2s., and one for a pair of shoes, for 1s. 6d.; I asked him how he got the telescope - he said,"I took it out of the lodger's box yesterday."(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I told him I took it from the box of Joseph Ingram - I did not say out of the box.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

2045. HENRY PORTER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 4 candlesticks, value 4s.; 1 pair of boots, value 1s., and 1 knife. value 6d. , the goods of Robert Davis .

ROBERT DAVIS . I keep the Northumberland Arms, on Clerkenwell-green . On the 17th of October I lost four candlesticks - I cannot swear to the prisoner, but between five and six o'clock two soldiers came into the house, and were drinking in the parlour for two or three hours.

JAMES MASKELL . I am servant to Mr. Davis. I saw the prisoner at his house last Monday evening, and when he was gone I missed four candlesticks, a pair of boots, and a knife.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me go out with any thing? A. Yes, I saw something protruding under his arm, which I took to be a trumpet or bugle - I followed him, and saw they were candlesticks.

THOMAS CREA . I am a Police-officer. I apprehended the prisoner at a quarter-past twelve o'clock on Monday night - on our way to the station we met his wife; she said, "What are you going to do with my husband?" I took her, and found these candlesticks, boots, and knife under her handkerchief; the prisoner said to her at the the watch-house, "I am the man that brought you into trouble, I stole these things."

Prisoner. Q. Did I not say I found them? A. No, you said you stole them.(Property produced and sworn to)

Prisoner's Defence. I went that evening to Cold Bathfields, to release a comrade from prison with his wife and child - they, I, my wife, and two children went to the prosecutor's, and had some refreshment; a man came in, and would play at bagatelle - I then laid my head on the table, and do not recollect any thing else, till my wife awoke me on the step of a man's door, and I had these things in my possession - she said she would take me back, but I remember no more, till I found myself in the watch-house.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

Second London Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2046. JAMES HINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of James Simeon , from his person ; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

JAMES SIMEON. I am a shop-lad , at a sale-shop in Holywell-street. On Friday night, the 7th of October, I was in Holborn , at half-past eleven o'clock, I took out my handkerchief, and wiped my face - while I was doing so the prisoner came up, and asked what was the matter; before I could answer he snatched my handkerchief out of my hand, and ran up Leather-lane - I called out Stop thief! a gentleman brought back my handkerchief, and I knew it to be mine - the prisoner is the person who took it.

CHARLES LANKINHORN . I was in Leather-lane. I saw the prisoner running, and took him at the end of Greville-street; some gentleman took up the handkerchief in Leather-lane - I gave the prisoner to the Policeman.

DANIEL HUMPHRIES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the cry - I ran to pursue, and the witness stopped me - I was rather intoxicated.

CHARLES EGLETON . I am ward-beadle of St. Bride's. I have a certificate of the conviction of the prisoner, which I got from Mr. Clark's office - I was a witness on the trial- he is the same person (read).

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

2047. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 cruet-stand, value 1l. 10s.; 7 cruets, value 18s., and 2 castor-tops, value 8s. , the goods of Lawrence Dorgan .

JAMES KING . I know the shop of Mr. Lawrence Dorgan - it is a Staffordshire warehouse, in the Minories . On the 14th of October, about five o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner near the shop, in company with another young man - I watched them two or three minutes; the other person walked into the shop with a handkerchief in his hand; he came out with something wrapped in the handkerchief, and gave it to the prisoner, who stood near the door; the prisoner crossed over, near where I stood, and walked down the Minories - I followed him to Swan-street, which is about one hundred and fifty yards off; I saw the street-keeper in a shop, called him, and he took the prisoner.

RICHARD WISE . I am shopman to Lawrence Dorgan . I cleaned this cruet-frame, and put it at the end of the counter - when I returned home I missed it.

JONAS CLAPHAM . I am a street-keeper. King gave me information; I ran after the prisoner, and took him - I took this property from him; he slipped out of my hand, and got half-way across the street - but I was close at his heels, and took him; I did not lose sight of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that a young man had given him the property to hold for him.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

2048. CHARLES AKERS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of John Polley .

JOHN POLLEY . I am master of Barking work-house . On the 1st of October I was returning home, and stopped just by the Bull, at Aldgate - I jumped out of my cart for about half a minute, to get some snuff; I went into the shop, and turned to see if any body came to my cart - I saw the prisoner go to the opposite side of the cart, take this coat out, and run across the road - he dropped it at the kennel; I took it up, and pursued till he was taken - I saw his person plainly.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I went up to the crowd - the prisoner and this coat were delivered to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

2049. RICHARD FREWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 1 1/2 yard of kerseymere, value 6s. 6d. , the goods of Henry Bardwell .

THOMAS THWAITES . I am in the employ of Mr. Henry Bardwell, a woollen-draper , of Holborn-bridge . On the 3rd of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came for some patterns of waistcoats, and then he asked me to show him some coatings, which I did - he then desired to see another piece, which I showed him; he asked for patterns of them, and went out - my master came in at that moment, and said that, "That man is no better than he ought to be;" I then looked, and missed a piece of blue kerseymere - I went out, and found the prisoner in Cock-lane; I asked if he had a piece of blue kerseymere; he said No - I saw his hat stood rather high on his head; I took it off, and found in it this kerseymere, which is my master's - I did not know the prisoner.

THOMAS BARTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and have the property.

GUILTY . Aged 31. - Transported for Seven Years .

2050. ALFRED APPLEFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 ass, price 12s., and 1 pair of hampers, value 3s. , the property of James Alexander Chevers .

JAMES ALEXANDER CHEVERS. I am a costermonger , and had an ass and panniers. I went to Covent-garden market on the 14th of October, to buy some fruit - I left my ass fastened to a waggon, about eleven o'clock: I went round the market, and then returned to the ass - I went round a second time, and dealt for some cabbages; I returned again, and the ass was gone - I saw it next day in Smithfield, and knew it and the panniers also.

THOMAS TAYLOR . The prosecutor is my uncle - I live with him. I went to Smithfield on the 15th of October -I saw the prisoner there with the donkey; I asked the price of it - he said 15s.; I walked away - he followed me, and said would I give 12s.; I looked for an officer, and gave charge of him - I did not know him before.

JOHN YEATES . I live in Old Pye-street, Westminster, and sell fruit in the street. I bought a pair of panniers of the prisoner on the Thursday; I had not known him before - they were standing up against a wall; he asked 1s. 6d. for them - I bought them for 1s.

Prisoner's Defence. A man sent me with the donkey to sell - he said he would give me 1s 6d., and all I got over 12s. for it I might have, and he would meet me at a public-house in Strutton-ground.

GUILTY . Aged 11.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Whipped and Discharged.

2051. THOMAS PARRY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , 1 sovereign, 2 shillings, and 2 sixpences , the monies of Samuel Robertson .

SAMUEL ROBERTSON. I lodge at No. 27, West-street, Smithfield - I have known the prisoner between seven and eight months; he pretended to be a costermonger, and lodged in the same house - I slept in the shop, as I was out of a situation, and my property was in a cupboard there- I saw him there, on the 2nd of October, till the evening; I then went out, with my friend, for two or three minutes, to have a drop of gin - when we came back, the prisoner was sitting on a chair, in front of the cupboard; I went to the cupboard, and missed a sovereign and three or four shillings from my waistcoat pocket, which had been rolled up, and put under a small parcel - the waistcoat was then spread out on the top of the parcel; I saw it rolled up and safe about two hours before; other persons had been in the room, but had not had access to the cupboard - the prisoner went away in two or three minutes after we returned- there was a half-sovereign left in my pocket; I looked for the prisoner, but did not take him till yesterday morning. when I saw him in Farringdon-market - I said to him,"Thomas, I wanted to see you;" he said, "Very well, here I am;" the officer took him to the Compter - the prisoner said he had taken the money, and spent it in two days.

JAMES LLOYD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - he said he took the money, and was very sorry.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Confined Three Months .

2052. JAMES ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 bowl, value 1d., 3 half-crowns, and 4 shillings , the property of James Rutherford .

CHARLOTTE STORMENT . I am sister-in-law of James Rutherford, a baker , who lives in Golden-lane, Barbican . On the 17th of October last I was in the parlour, between nine and ten o'clock; a person came into the shop, and found the prisoner behind the counter - I went out, and saw him at the street door; I then went to the desk, and missed the bowl, with about 16s. in it - a little boy raised an alarm, and a neighbour pursued the prisoner and brought him back; I went a little way in pursuit, but returned - I did not see him taken, but I am certain he is the same person as I saw at the door; I had seen the bowl of silver safe, about ten minutes before.

HENRY SMITH . I was nearly opposite the prosecutor's door - I saw the prisoner come out of his shop; I pursued him, and the Policeman took him - the prisoner dropped this bowl on my foot; a woman came up and said, "Lord bless you, that is not the man," and she threw some snuff into my eye; a young man in the crowd wrested one shilling from the prisoner's hand.

JOHN EASTOFF . I am a Police-officer. I heard the alarm, saw the prisoner running, and came in a line with him - he turned into a short street; I was not five yards from him - I saw him drop this bowl, and one shilling was found in his hand.

JOSEPH HORTON . I am a City-constable. I took the prisoner and this bowl; he had no shoes or stockings on, but I found a boot in each of his pockets, which exactly fitted his feet.

CHARLOTTE STORMENT . I can swear to this bowl.

Prisoner's Defence. I turned up a street in Golden-lane - a boy ran by me; there was a cry of Stop thief! and they took hold of me - a woman, who had seen the other boy run, said "Lord bless you, that is not him;" I had my boots off because there were two or three nails in them, and I could not wear them; I had only come to town on the Saturday night, from the other side Nottingham.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Transported for Seven Years .

2053. HENRY CARPENTER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Jeffery Shores , from his person .

JEFFERY SHORES. I was at the corner of St. Paul's church-yard last Friday, about four o'clock in the afternoon - I felt a tug at my pocket; I found my handkerchief was gone - I turned to the left, and saw the prisoner- I said, "You have my handkerchief;" he said, "I have not;" I turned him round, and saw it in his breast pocket.

Prisoner. I said I had picked it up. Witness. You did not say so to me.

THOMAS PEAKE . I was at the corner of Paternoster-row on Friday evening; I saw the prosecutor take the prisoner by the collar, and take the handkerchief from his breast-pocket, or his breast, and I went up and took him.

THOMAS PROTHEROE . I was on duty, and the prisoner was delivered to me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along St. Paul's church-yard, and kicked against the handkerchief; I took it up, and put it into my pocket - the gentleman asked me if I had picked his pocket; I said No, I had picked up a handkerchief - he opened my coat, and took it from my inside, not my breast-pocket.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

2054. FRANCIS DARLING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Clement Chawner , from his person .

CLEMENT CHAWNER. Between six and seven o'clock last night I was in King-street, Smithfield ; I felt a tug at my pocket, near the top of the street - I turned, and saw the prisoner walking very sharp by my left side, towards the sheep-pens; I overtook him in the footpath, near St. John-street, and accused him of having my handkerchief: he denied it - I said."You certainly have it;" I turned him round, and found it between his two coats - he said,"Is this yours? I saw a little boy pick your pocket, and drop this, and I took it up;" it was my handkerchief, but the officer, who has it, is not here - the prisoner had got twenty or thirty yards from where I lost it; there was no other person near me.

Prisoner. He blamed me for picking his pocket, and I said I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

2055. RICHARD CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 2 cloaks, value 1l. 10s. , the goods of Henry Baldwin .

HENRY BALDWIN. I am a woollen-draper , and live in Cheapside . On the 5th of October I arrived from the country- I took a hackney-coach at the Bull and Mouth, to take me and my family home; the prisoner was the driver - I put a small parcel in, and took the number of the coach; I had two cloaks on my arm - I put them on the seat of the coach- when we arrived at home I took my wife and children out; I then took the luggage from the prisoner, and handed it to my young man, but I did not receive the cloaks - I forgot them for about ten minutes; I then went to see for the coach, but could not find it; it was then about nine o'clock in the evening - I went the next morning to the office in Essex-street: they gave me the address of the proprietor of the coach - I went there, and saw a lady, who said she should see the man in the morning, and no doubt my cloaks would be forthcoming, but I have not seen them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was it in the evening that you arrived? A. Yes, by the Shrewsbury coach- I had not seen the prisoner before; I waited four days after I made the inquiry; there were four boxes in the coach, and one paper parcel, and I believe an umbrella - they were all given out but the cloaks; I am positive he is the person - the gas was burning in the shop when I paid him his fare; they were two blue camblet cloaks, one lined with scarlet and one with blue.

JOHN ANGLE . I am horsekeeper to Mrs. Halfpenny - she is the proprietor of the coach; the prisoner drove it - he had been in her service two or three weeks; he went out between nine and ten o'clock on the 5th of October, and was to return between one and two o'clock in the morning - when I went to the yard the next morning the coach and horses were safe, and the prisoner went to work the next day, as usual; this was on the Wednesday, and he worked on the Thursday - as he came home with short money my mistress sent him out again.

Q.Did you tell the Magistrate that he did not come back the next day? A. No, Sir, I did not; I was examined- I can write - this is my signature; what I stated was correct.

Q. Then what did you mean by this - (read) - "The last day the prisoner was at work was last Wednesday week - he did not come next morning?" A. He did not come without being fetched; I went for him - he came on the Thursday, went out with the coach, and did not return- I did not state, to the best of my knowledge, that he did not return.

Cross-examined. Q. Then he did come? A. Yes -I told the Magistrate he was short of his fare on the Wednesday, and on the Thursday he did not return; he would have had to make up the money which he was short; that is the usual way with those who have been but a short time - I was present when the prosecutor made his last application to my mistress, and I went for the prisoner; I found him standing against the first coach in Aldersgate-street - I did not know the business rightly; I asked him for my mistress' key and money, and said a gentleman wanted to speak to him; he, I, and two or three more then went and had something to drink - we then went back, and the prosecutor went and spoke to him.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman came and said, "I left two cloaks in your coach;" I said it was more than I knew, and I would go where he pleased; he then went into a shop - I could have got away, but I knew myself innocent.

MR. PHILLIPS to MR. BALDWIN. Q. Did you go to the coach-stand and speak to him? A. Yes - I told him I left two cloaks in his coach - he said he knew nothing about it; I said he certainly had them, and if he did not give them to me I should give him in charge - I went into Mr. Matthews's shop, close by, to inquire for an officer, but I looked through the window at the prisoner all the time; I was there while Mr. Matthews sent for an officer, perhaps ten minutes - he made no attempt to go away, but I told him I would take care he should not.

JURY. Q. How was the coach left when the prisoner came into your house? A. The coach door was shut, as I believe.

NOT GUILTY .

2056. JOHN STANLEY and JAMES WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , 1 coat, value 10s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 16s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 7s.; 1 watch, value 1l.; 1 watch-chain, value 2d.; 1 seal, value 3d.; 1 watch-key, value 1d.; 1 jacket, value 2s., and 1 pair of braces, value 6d. , the goods of Charles Russ .

CHARLES RUSS . This property all belonged to me - I lost; it from Moor-lane, Cripplegate , where I work, as a chimney-sweeper ; Williams had been my fellow-servant - he had slept in the same room with me, but had left us about two months; he knew the house well - Stanley is a sweep , but he lived in Holborn. On the 6th of September I went to bed, and awoke about five o'clock in the morning - I then missed the articles stated out of my box; it had been locked, but the key was in it - I had been drinking with Williams and Stanley the day before, near the Wheatsheaf public-house, in Smithfield; Williams went out while I was there.

WILLIAM JOHN BORN . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Holborn. I have a coat, waistcoat, trousers, and two handkerchiefs, pawned by Stanley.

SAMUEL HAMPSTEAD . I am shopman to a pawbroker, in Gray's Inn-lane - I have a watch, pawned, I believe, by Stanley, but I am not positive.(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL WOOLLARD . I am a Police-officer. The prosecutor came and told me he suspected a party of robbery, and I went with him to Essex-street; we found Stanley in a court - I said I wanted him, and took him to the watch-house; he told me he had assisted Williams in the robbery, as far as helping him over the wall, and he went the next day with him to pawn the property.

JOHN GEORGE HATCHER . I am a Police-officer. I took Williams; I said I wanted him on suspicion of a robbery, from information I had received from Stanley; he said, "If I am in the robbery, Stanley pawned the things."

STANLEY - GUILTY . Aged 23.

WILLIAMS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Twelve Months .

2057. THOMAS HARRISON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

NOT GUILTY .

2058. HENRY DOLLERY was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , 1 handkerchief value 2s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a porter at the Bull and Mouth. On the 23rd of September, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was at the end of Holborn-hill, and saw the prisoner trying to pick a gentleman's pocket; he did not get any thing at first, but when he got to the King's Arms-yard , he put his hand in, and abstracted a handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket - I seized his two arms, and took the handkerchief from him; I called to the gentleman, who turned, nodded his head, and said,"That is my handkerchief;" I said, "You follow me," and I took the prisoner on till I saw the street-keeper -I gave him in charge, but the gentleman did not come.

JOHN RICHMOND . I received the prisoner and the handkerchief; the gentleman could not be found - the handkerchief is marked J.S.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards Smithfield, and in crossing I saw the handkerchief on the ground -I took it and put it into my side-pocket; several persons saw me pick it up - that man accused me of taking it from the gentleman, but I did not.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN. He acknowledged to me and the officer that he took it to buy a pair of shoes.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

OLD COURT. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

2059. MATTHEW MURPHY and GEORGE PERCIVAL were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 1 watch, value 30s., the goods of Edward Harrison , from his person .

EDWARD HARRISON. I am errand-boy to Mr. Price, and live in Queen-street, Spitalfields. On Sunday morning, the 11th of October, between four and five o'clock, I went into the William the Fourth, a coffee-shop, in Shoreditch , with Hemming, and had some coffee - I had been out all night; I had been at a friend's house almost all night - he is a person who used to live with my mother; I was not sober at night, but I was in the morning - when I went into the house my watch was in my fob, and had a guard-chain attached to it; I fell asleep, and in about half an hour Knight awoke me - I found my guard had been cut, and the watch gone; I have not found it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Who is Hemming? A. My cousin; he had been out all night with me- I was never out all night before; I had been at a public-house, and had a pint of beer - I was only in one public-house; when I awoke the coffee-shop was quite full of people - I found my watch-glass on the ground.

JOHN KNIGHT . I was at the William the Fourth coffee-shop on Sunday morning, and saw the prosecutor come in with Hemming - the prisoners sat opposite me; I saw the prisoner Murphy there first - Percival came in a good while after him; another man was in their company - the prosecutor was asleep; I saw the one who is not in custody shift a stool up in the corner - he moved it again, just by where Harrison sat, and then Murphy was moving about from one place to the other; Percival was leaning over the next box - I heard Percival ask Murphy for a knife; Murphy gave him one, and Percival gave it to the other man, who cut Harrison's watch-guard, and in taking his watch out, the glass and key fell on the ground - I saw Percival give the knife back to Murphy, who said it was a pearl handle and steel blade; I saw no more of the watch- the man who took it went and sat on the stairs, and shortly after they all three left the room and went away together; several other persons left at the same time - I awoke Harrison, and told him what had occurred; Hemming came out with us - I met the prisoners and the other man by Spitalfields church, almost immediately after, with several others who had been in the shop; I directly went to the Police station, and told what had occurred, but before I got assistance they were gone - I knew Murphy before, by his living at the top of the street where I do; he was not acquainted with me.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you sleep that night? A. No where - I live in Charles-street, Curtain-road; Iand a few friends generally go out on a Saturday night -I had been drinking, but was not intoxicated; I staid with my friends at the coffee-shop - I am a chair-maker; I was a afraid to mention it in the house - after I did mention it a man told me to hold my tongue; Harrison went out after losing his watch, and came in again - I then mentioned it.

Q.Were there as many as twenty persons in the shop when Harrison awoke? A. Yes, but all that were in the place were of one company, laughing and joking together - six persons were in my company; I was there not an hour and a half before Harrison - the prisoners were sober; I never quarrelled with Murphy - I had two pints of porter, and drank with several friends besides; I was not the least intoxicated.

HENRY BROUGHTON . I am a hearth-rug maker. I went to the William the Fourth with Knight and others -I saw the prisoners there; I was asleep - Knight hit me on the head, and said, Awake! I looked round, and saw Murphy sitting on the edge of the table by the side of a young woman, and the other prisoner on the form - I saw a knife in Murphy's hand, and at the same time I saw the one who is not taken, sitting under the prosecutor on a sort of stool, shifting about him - I laid down my head and went to sleep again.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you had been a little tipay? A. No, I had been up early on the Saturday morning - I was in Knight's company all night; we only went to one public-house - I live at Kingsland; I went home and came back, as I could not get in - Knight went with me.

HENRY BOLTON . I am a Policeman, I apprehended Murphy on Monday evening, and found a knife on him.

JOSEPH BIRCH . I am an officer. I apprehended Percival in John's-court, Old-street, in bed, about two o'clock in the morning, and found a knife on him.

Murphy's Defence. I was going home between two and three o'clock in the morning, and went into the coffee-shop, alone; I had my knife to my hand, spreading some butter - I showed the persons near me what a curious knife it was; it was handed round to be examined - there were thirty or forty persons in the shop; the prosecutor and witnesses were asleep - I had no connection with the party - I never saw them before, except Knight, whom I have abused for abusing his mother in the street, and for that reason, I believe, he picked me out; seven or eight persons went out at the same time as me.

Percival's Defence. I went there for a cup of coffee, and returned directly, as I was sitting up, watching my brother, who lay dead.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Lord Cheif Justice Tenterden.

2060. RICHARD POWELL was indicted for killing and slaying Philip Glendining .

The offence having been committed in the County of Kent, the witnesses were not examined.

ACQUITTED .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2061. EDWARD KERRY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Cleave , on the 21st of September , and stealing 2 planes, value 9s.; 1 saw, value 4s., and 1 blanket, value 3s. , his property.

FREDERICK DORMER . On the 21st of September, about half-past twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out of a house, No. 10, Hyde-place, Hoxton , with a blanket under his arm, and a saw and plane in his hand; he asked me what o'clock it was; I went to my grandfather's, who keeps a beer-shop close by, and found Cleave there - he went after the prisoner with me, and took him at the corner of Norris-street, with the property.

JOHN CLEAVE . I am a carpenter, and live in Hyde-place, Hoxton - I am only a lodger there; the house is barely finished, but I had lodged there for six weeks, occupying it till it is let; I keep it for Mr. Reeve, of Pentonville, and pay no rent; I slept there: I am not paid for minding it, except having permission to lodge there; I went to dinner at the public-house, leaving nobody in the house; the front door was locked, and could only be opened with a key; the window was fastened with a piece of wood - I was the only workman there, and am sure I fastened the house up; I went after the prisoner, and found him with the property - there seemed to be no violence used to the door; it is a common lock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY of stealing only, having a doubt whether the door was locked . Aged 35. - Confined One Year .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2062. THOMAS JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 1 shawl, value 5s. , the goods of William Bulmer .

WILLIAM BULMER. I live at Bethnal-green, and am a weaver . On the 19th of September I went into the Crown and Anchor, at Hackney , with my wife; the prisoner sat at another table - my wife went out of the tap-room for ten minutes, leaving her shawl on the bench; I remained in the room - when she returned she missed it, and the prisoner was gone: his grandfather, who was in the room, showed as where he lived - we went and found him in bed- I said he was the boy; I said nothing about the shawl, but he said, "I have not seen the shawl."

JANE BULMER . I have heard my husband's evidence; I found my shawl in pawn next day.

HENRY HORN. I am a shopman to Mr. Attenborough, a pawnbroker, of Shoreditch. The prisoner pawned the shawl, for 2s., between seven and eight o'clock at night.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES CONNELLY . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner to the station, and heard him tell a person who was with him, that he had pawned the shawl opposite Shoreditch church.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 10. - Confined Two Days .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

2063. JAMES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 1/2lb. of tea, value 7s. , the goods of Francis Roberts , his master.

FRANCIS ROBERTS . I am a grocer , and live in Longacre . The prisoner was my errand-boy for two months -I had suspicion, and told Kirkman to watch; he afterwards produced 1 1/2lb. of congou tea to me, which I believe to bemine - it is the same quality; I could not miss it, as the canister contained above 60lbs.; it was kept in the shop; the prisoner had access to it.

JOHN KIRKMAN . I am a Policeman. On the 20th of September, at seven o'clock in the morning, I was on duty opposite the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner come out of the shop; he began to clean the window, then beckoned to a boy who stood in a court, and pointed down Charles-street; the boy took the hint, and went down that street - the prisoner directly left the shop, and went down that street, towards him; I followed, and seeing me he went into his master's shop again - he went through the shop, and was going out at the back door; I followed, and took him, and in his hat found this tea, in paper, covered with a handkerchief.

EDWARD WINKWORTH . I am apprentice to Mr. Roberts. I went into the shop about seven o'clock, and saw the prisoner at a tea-canister - I saw him put his hat on his head, and then put the lid on the canister; he afterwards took his hat off, and appeared to be smoothing something in it - he then went out to dust the windows.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2064. JANE MORRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , 1 key, value 6d.; 3 half-crowns, 7 shillings, and 1 sixpence, the property of George Nunn , from his person .

WILLIAM SIBLEY . I am a Policeman. On Saturday morning, the 17th of September, at half-past one o'clock, I was on my beat in Oxford-street , between Davis and Gilbert-streets - Nunn was walking down the street, and the prisoner laid hold of him; they had some conversation, and after he went away she ran after him, put one hand under his arm, and the other into his pocket; I heard a piece of copper fall on the ground - Nunn caught hold of her, and said, "You have robbed me, and I will give you in charge, unless you give me my money;" she crossed over the way, and said, "Here is a Policeman - he will take me in charge;" Nunn said very well, I should take her to the station - I asked what for; he said she had robbed him of his money and a key - he supposed he had lost 15s, or 16s.; I immediately searched her, and found three half-crowns, seven shillings, a sixpence, and a key, all in her hand; he identified the key by it having been broken and soldered.

GEORGE NUNN . I was in Oxford-street - the prisoner came up, caught hold of me, and said, "Young man, where are you going?" I said home; she said, "Go with me;" I said No, I would go home - I walked further, and heard a halfpenny drop on the pavement; I caught hold of her hand, and said, "You have robbed me - I will give you in charge; I have lost my money and a key, which I can swear to;" she said, "There is a Policeman - give me in charge;" she crossed over to him, and said, "This young man gives me in charge;" I know I had half-crowns, shillings, and a sixpence, but not exactly how many - this is my key; I broke the ward, and had it soldered - I did not touch her.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave it to me, and pulled me about very improperly.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Life .

Before Mr. Justice Park.

2065. CHARLES PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 2 silver spoons, value 5s. , the goods of Benjamin Dawson .

CHARLOTTE UNWIN . I am cook to Mr. Benjamin Dawson, of Hampstead . On the 30th of September the prisoner came there, and delivered the bread - he is out baker's journeyman ; mistress had desired me to let her see him before he left - he was in a great hurry, as he said he wanted to go home; I left the kitchen to call mistress, but as I stood on the mat I heard the kitchen drawer opened, and the platebasket, which is kept there, rattle - I ran back immediately; the prisoner was then standing against the drawer, with it shut - I saw his hand come from his bosom; I went to the drawer, opened it, and missed several spoons - I said I had heard the drawer open, and plate rattle, and knew he had been taking spoons; he said, "Yes, I have, but I will return them again" - he gave them to me: I said, "You have got more;" he said he had taken no more - imstress came into the kitchen directly, and more were found loose about; I cannot say they had been in the basket.

WILLIAM BARFIELD . I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner in charge - as I took him to the station-house he said, voluntarily, that he was at the house on a previous occasion, and saw the plate in the drawer, and on this occasion, while the servant went up, he took the plate.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined One Year .

Before Mr. Recorder.

2066. THOMAS REECE and JAMES ADDEN were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 fan, value 2s. , the goods of Richard William Major .

SOPHIA MAJOR . I am the wife of Richard William Major , who lives in Archer-cottage, St. Thomas'-square, Hackney , and is a clerk in the Alliance office. On the 1st of October, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I missed this fan off the parlour sideboard, where I had seen it half an hour before, and saw it in Chicherly's possession in half an hour.

EDWARD CHICHERLY . I am a Policeman. I was in London-fields on the 1st of October, and saw a mob - on going up Howell and Harding had the prisoners in custody, and charged them with entering Mr. Major's parlour- I met Blackley, and found the fan thrown over the wall in the direction he said they had run.

GEORGE BLACKLEY . I am thirteen years old, and live in Well-street, with my parents. I saw the prisoners in Mr. Major's garden - the gate is kept locked; they must have climbed over the rails - they left the garden; I gave information at the house, and the fan was missed; they got over the rails, and went over London-fields - I saw the officer find the fan behind a shrub, in a garden, which they would pass in the way they went; only Reece was in Major's garden - when he got over Adden went up to him, and they went away together.

ROBERT HARRIS . I live with a cheesemonger, at Bethnal-green. I was passing, and saw Reece coming over Major's palisades, and join Adden, who was walking at a little distance; I then saw Reece take the fan from his pocket, and show it to Adden - I then rang Major's bell, and gave information; I followed them -Howell took Adden, and Harding took Reece.

WILLIAM HARDING . I am a gardener. I heard a call of Stop thief! and took Reece.

Reece's Defence. I was hawking blacking - I was teasing a penny, and it went over the rails; I got over, and fetched it.

REECE - GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling , and Discharged.

ADDEN - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

2067. RICHARD ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , 4 sovereigns , the monies of Esther Conner his mistress.

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the monies of Esther Conner and another.

ESTHER CONNER. I am a widow , and keep the Elder Tree public-house, Norton falgate - the prisoner was my pot boy , On the 3rd of September, between five and eight o'clock in the evening, I gave him four sovereigns, and told him to get 4l. worth of silver for them; he never returned - I found him in custody on the 22nd - I never received the change; he had lived thirteen weeks with me - my sister shares in the profits of the trade.

THOMAS PETCH . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on another charge.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Two Months .

2068. JACOB SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , 1 coat, value 7s.; 3 pairs of trousers, value 15s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s. 6d.; 1 shirt, value, 18d.; 1 pair of stockings, value 6d.; 4 handkerchiefs, value 2s.; 1 hat, value 2s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of Samuell Bursiell .

SAMUEL BURSIELL . I live on Church-hill, St. Pancras . On the 4th of September the prisoner came and begged me to give him a night's lodging, as he was in distress - he had been twice in my employ, and I gave him leave; when I went to bed these articles were all safe in the kitchen, except the coat, which hung in the dye-house - I locked the prisoner up in an empty parlour, to sleep, and left the key outside; I got up between seven and eight, o'clock, and he was gone with all these articles; I had locked the kitchen door, and taken the key up with me -I found him in the New Prison on the Sunday following with my shoes and shirt on.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in charge on the 17th of September - the prosecutor, claimed the shirt and shoes he had on; I only found a farthing on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Two Months .

2069. JOHN STOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

JOHN CONSTABLE . I am a Policeman. On the 14th of September, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in New Palace-yard, near Poetscorner , at the time the Abbey was open for inspection - he was in the crowd, near the barrier, and appeared alone- I saw him take, this handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket; I was hut able to get to him at the time, as I stood on some stones to raise myself above the crowd - I kept him in sight; I saw him put the handkerchief into his hat - I could not get to inform the gentleman, for the barrier was opened, and there was a crush; when he came out of the crowd I took his bat off, and found the handkerchief in it; he said, "What do you take my hat off for?" I told him I had seen him pick a gentleman's pocket - he gave me no answer; I took him to the station, and asked if he had any mark on the handkerchief - he said there that it was his own; he said he did not know of any mark on it - I found the centre of it marked, "A. J. West, Durham, No. 7."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Have you had many charges for stealing the property of persons unknown? A.Never before; I have been a Policeman since February, 1830. and before that was in a tallowchandler's service for thirteen years; I was about twelve yards from the prisoner; I should think there were fifty persons between us - I could see very well what he was doing, as when the crowd crushed towards the barrier the mob was not pressed together, and being elevated I saw this; I was at least a foot from the ground, and saw over the heads of the people - the people passed from barrier to barrier, which opened at certain times; the prisoner was pointed out to me by a gentleman, as having attempted his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

2070. EDWARD SIZER was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 1 counterpane, value 5s. , the goods of James Jennings .

JAMES JENNINGS . I am a labourer , and live in Horse Shoe-alley, York-street, Westminster . The prisoner lodged in a furinshed room of mine for a fortnight; he paid me 2s. out of 8s. - he said he was a gardener , and had come from Cambridge. On the 3rd of October, when I came home to dinner, I found him in the custody of a Policeman, with this counterpane in a bag - it had been let to him with the room; he said he was taking it to be scoured.

JAMES MONRO . I lodge at Jennings'. The prisoner went out with a bag - the prosecutor's wife sent me after him; I overtook him in St. James'-park, and told him to come back - he said he would not; I walked with him till I saw a Policeman, and gave him in charge.

JAMES RABITT. I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner, and found the counterpane in the bag.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I brought a counterpane to London, just the colour of this, and happened to put this into the bag with the rest of my things, as I was going into the country; I did not know but it was my own, as my wife was out; my wife gave them the duplicate of some rings to settle it.

JAMES RABITT . The bag was full of his children's and his wife's clothes.

JAMES JENNINGS . His wife gave me the duplicate of a ring for the rent since he has been taken.

NOT GUILTY .

2071. JAMES TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 4 pairs of stockings, value 6s. , the goods of William Fawcett .

LEONARD LEECH. I am in the employ of William Fawcett , a hosier . On the 8th of October, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw these stockings in the shop window, and did not miss them till about six, when the Policeman secured the prisoner, and brought him in; I took these four pairs of stockings out of his hat - I had not seen him in the shop.

Prisoner. Q.Was not half of your window out? A. A small hole was broken in a pane of glass before; the stockings were tied together, and could not be pulled through that hole - a single pair might he drawn through, as the hole was certainly larger afterwards.

CHARLES CLARKE . I am a Policeman. About six o'clock on Saturday evening, the 8th of October, I saw the prisoner standing in a doorway, by the side of the window; I turned round when I got about twenty yards, and seeing him watching me I turned back; he walked round the corner - I went and looked at the window, and saw a pair of stockings hanging nearly down through the glass; I called to the people in the shop, ran round the corner, met the prisoner coming back, and secured him- he denied having been in the doorway; I took him into the shop, and in the doorway found four pairs of stockings; they had been tied in bundles of a dozen each, and the strings were cut - I found a knife on him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I resist? A. Not in the least.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. As I came by the shop it rained very hard; the stockings laid at my feet - I took them up, and put them into my hat; I then thought I would take them to the shop, and as I turned back the Policeman took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

2072. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously receiving, of an evil-disposed person, on the 24th of September , 19 quires of paper, value 20s., the goods of Jeffrey Jolly , well knowing it to have been stolen .

JEFFREY JOLLY. I am a paper-hanging manufacturer . On the 24th of September I missed a ream of paper, in consequence of information - I saw one quire of it that day, at the house of Ephraim Finch's mother; he was in my employ, and is about sixteen or seventeen years old - I never allowed him to take paper for any purpose - I saw the other nineteen quires at the office, and am quite certain it is my manufacture.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.What mark have you on it? A.None; it is part of a large parcel, but seeing it constantly worked up and handling it I have no doubt of it - it has no appearance of waste-paper.

JEFFREY CHARLWOOD JOLLY . I am the prosecutor's son. I went with him to Finch's mother's, where Finch slept; she produced a quire of paper from a drawer; it was worth at least 1s. - I am certain it is my father's - I returned to the manufactory; a Policeman was called in, and after Finch had given information I went, about five o'clock in the afternoon, to the prisoner's, in Edward-street, Portman-square - he is a grocer and cheesemonger; he was in the shop - the Policeman asked if he had not bought some paper of a boy that day; he hesitated a little, and said he had; that he hoped the boy had come by it honestly - the Policeman said indeed he had not, and wished him to produce it; he immediately produced nineteen quires, and said he had given at the rate of 2d. a lb. for it, 3s. 10d. in all - he accompanied the Policeman, without being forced, to the station-house; he remained in custody- he was taken before the Magistrate that evening, and was remanded - I believe he was permitted to go at large; he appeared on the Friday following, and was committed.

Cross-examined. Q. He was admitted to half? A. Certainly, and has surrendered to day - the paper was on a shelf in the shop; all of it, the whole marchant quires; there was none on the counter when I went in - the paper on the counter was of quite a different description; he keeps a respectable shop - the top of the paper was covered; the sides could be seen by any body.

WILLIAM FURBER . I am an upholsterer. I saw Finch come out of the warehouse, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, very cautiously, and as he approached me I said, "Where are you going with that paper?" he said,"I am going to Mr. Williams', Portland-road;" I went to Williams - I did not see Finch there; when I returned I told Jolly - Finch was brought in, and accused of this,

JAMES ISAAC . I am a Policeman. I went to the prisoner's house, and asked if he had bought any paper of a boy - he said he had; I said, "You gave him 2d. a lb. for it;" he said Yes - I asked if he had got it: he said Yes; he took it off the shelf, and put it on the counter; there are nineteen quires; there was no other of that description on the counter - I said he had better go to the station with us; he went - I was at his final examination, but do not know when he was bailed.

Cross-examined. Q.Have a you doubt of his being bailed, as soon as his friends came? A. No; the Magistrate said he would take bail.

JURY to MR. JOLLY. Q.Could you have sworn to the paper, if you had not heard it had been taken there? A.When it was taken it was in a wrapper, with a duty-stamp on it; that was not on it then - I should certainly feel a hesitation in swearing to it without accompanying it with other circumstances - we buy the paper in this-state, and manufacture it into hangings; we sell it in quires occasionally - the cost price is 22s.

EPHRAIM FINCH . I am seventeen years old, and have lived six years with Mr. Jolly. I took this ream of paper from the warehouse, with the wrapper on it - I took it home, took a quite out, and left it at my mother's; I took the wrapper, with the rest of the paper, to Mr. Harris', and got 3s. 10d. for the nineteen quires.

Q. Did he ask you any questions about it? A. He asked if it was all right; I said Yes - he must have seen the wrapper; he asked me no other question; I took the paper about half-past seven o'clock in the morning - I did not see what became of the wrapper.

Cross-examined. Q. You could not tell a lie for the world, could you? A. No, not on my oath; I have not told a lie about this - I said I was taking the paper to Williams', but I was not on my oath; I took the whole nineteen quires to the prisoner's at once, and was only once in his shop that day - I was not there so late as between eight and nine o'clock; I took no single quire there - I saw nobody in the shop but him; I never stole any thing before - my mother did not know it was stolen; I often took parcelsthere - she saw the paper, but went down stairs directly after; she said nothing to me about it - the prisoner only asked if it was all right; he did not say he did not want any - he weighed it; I asked 2d. a lb., which he gave me.

Prisoner's Defence. There was no wrapper to it - the boy came, and asked if I wanted paper; I said not particularly - he said it would suit me, and said, "Master always sends me to sell it at 2d. a lb., when it is cut at the end, and not fit for our use;" there was a quire on the counter; when Jolly's son came I pointed it out to him - he said, "That is right, give it us all."

JOHN THURLOW . I was in the prisoner's shop, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, when Finch came with the paper - there was no wrapper, except the outsides, but there was no Excise stamp, or any thing on it.

COURT. Q.Should you know the Excise-stamp? A. I think I should; I am not conversant with paper - the outside paper was like that produced; I was standing close by the parlour door, at the further end of the shop, and think he could not enter the shop without seeing me- there was nothing to draw his attention to me; I did not take sufficient notice to repeat what passed - I did not hear Harris ask him about his employer; it was not Mr. Harris that was in the shop - it was Mrs. Harris; Mr. Harris did not buy it - I believe I heard Mrs. Harris say afterwards, that he was gone out; I swear he was not in the shop.

Q.What sum was asked for it? A. I do not know - if there was any bargain it must have been between Mr. Harris and the lad; that is, it did not take place with Mrs. Harris - I should suppose there was a previous hargain, but Mr. Harris was absent when the lad brought the portion of paper which I saw; it was rolled up, and there was not so much as is now produced - this could not all have been brought at one time; I reside in the home, and leave at nine o'clock, to attend an office in the City - I did not closely examine the paper, but will swear there is more here than I saw brought; I looked at it on the boy's arm - this would make a bundle double the size; it was perfectly clean paper, as it is now, without any cover - Harris told me the quantity produced at the office, and I told several people that was not all brought at once, and Harris told me it was brought at different times on that day, a day or two after it happened.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it possible to roll up that paper as you saw it rolled under his arm? A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2073. HENRY CHILVERS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 plane, value 1s. 6d., the goods of William Perry ; 1 saw, value 3s., and 1 chisel, value 1s. , the goods of John Hope .

WILLIAM PERRY. I live in Burn-street, Lisson-grove, and am a wheel wright . I was at work at Irongate on the 29th of September; the prisoner had been working at the same place a month or two before, and was in the habit of coming there - I missed a plane, which I had been safe the day before - it was brought back again, but I do not know what day it was.

JOHN HOPE. I live in Little Westbourn-street, Paddington. I worked at the same shop with Perry - I lost a saw and Chisel.

CHARLES WINNICUTE HUTCHINGS . I am a Police-constable. About one o'clock in the morning of the 30th of September, I saw the prisoner in Chaple-street, Edgware-road, running very fast, with this saw, plane, and chisel; I asked where he got them - he said from his uncle, who was a countryman, and lived at No. 2, Union-place; he then gave me another direction, and I took him to the station-house - the person he represented to be his uncle proved to be his father; he attended, and the prisoner told him where he stole them from - I find his father has not treated him well.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

2074. MARY DUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , 1 sheet, value 2s., and 1 pillow, value 3s. , the goods of Maria Spokes .

MARIA SPOKES . I am a widow - I rent a room in Lower Queen-street, Islington ; the furniture is my own. The prisoner lodged with me from the 8th of May till the 23rd of September - on that day, when I came home from work, I missed a pillow and a sheet; I said, "Mrs. Dunn, what have you done with my pillow and sheet?" she said, "I don't know what you are talking about;" she denied it.

GEORGE DYER . I am in the service of a pawnbroker, in the Lower-road, Islington. On the 23rd of September the prisoner pawned this pillow and sheet, for 1s. 9d.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I intended to have redeemed them the next morning, when I had 12s. to receive, but the prosecutrix flew in a passion, called the officer, and I could not say any more.

MARIA SPOKES. I heard her say she was to receive money the day before, but I could not believe her - she has a husband, but does not live with him.

GUILTY . Aged 49. - Confined One Month .

2075. WILLIAM EVANS and SIMON CLARK were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 6s., the goods of Richard Mason , from his person .

RICHARD MASON. I am butler to a gentleman, who lives near Dartford, in Kent. I was in Holborn, about ten o'clock in the morning of the 14th of October - I noticed the two prisoners following me; I went on to Lincoln's Inn-fields - I saw them again there; I passed on to Coventry-street, and on the Regent's-circus - when I got to the Spread Eagle coach-office, I missed my handkerchief; I turned, and accused the prisoners, and they both ran away - I cried Stop thief! and Evans was stopped by the officer at the corner, who gave him to me- the other ran down Jermyn street, and was stopped.

JOHN FLETCHER . I live with my father, who is a baker. I was passing the end of Jermyn-street, on the 14th of October - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and saw Clark run up the street; I endeavoured to stop him, and he dropped the handkerchief at my feet - I took it up, and gave it to Mason; I did not see him stopped.

SAMUEL POTTER . I am a Police-officer. I was inRegent's-circus on the 14th of October - I heard a cry of Stop thief! and took Evans; seeing Clark running away, I gave Evans to the prosecutor, pursued Clark, and took him.

Clark. He did not take me. Witness. He was stopped by some man, and I took him directly - I was close behind him.

WILLIAM MASON . This is my handkerchief - it was rolled up quite close in my pocket; I had several bundles with me, and tried to avoid the prisoners several times in going along, but could not.

EVANS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

2076. PETER GILES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , 1 bed, value 1l.; 4 chairs, value 4s.; 1 mattress, value 2s., and 1 table, value 1s. , the goods of Joseph Blanchard .

JOSEPH BLANCHARD. I lived in Dagley-street , but now in Featherstone-buildings - I am a carpenter ; the prisoner is my wife's own brother. On the 10th of September I had a very serious quarrel with the prisoner, and he removed some of my goods - my wife came with a cart, and removed some of the things; the prisoner came with a bed-wrench, apparently to unscrew the bedstead, and I put him out - I then went to a broker, and when I came back he had got into my house, and I put him out again; I had missed a table and a looking-glass in the morning, and when I came home in the evening, all my things were gone but a stove and a chest - they consisted of the articles stated; I found them again, at No. 5, Sophia-street, Poplar.

Prisoner. Q.Have you the man here who belongs to the track? A. No; he has been cut in the head, and his wife is foolish or mad, and has put him out of the way.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am steward of a ship, and live opposite to where the prosecutor did. On Saturday afternoon, the 10th of September, I saw the prisoner at his house - he took some chairs out of the house, and put on a truck; he then took a bed on his back - the prosecutor's wife went after him, and told him to bear a hand, and come back for the rest.

Prisoner. Q. At what time was this? A. Between six and seven o'clock; there were other things in the truck, but I did not see you put them in - I did not see the truck go away.

JOSEPH BLANCHARD re-examined. Q. Had you given any authority to the prisoner or your wife to remove these things? A. No, they were removed without my consent; the prisoner came to my house at twenty minutes before six o'clock that morning - my wife came down stairs, and let him in; I was in the coal-hole - my wife and the prisoner went into the front parlour; I heard her pull the window-blind down, and thought it was the prisoner shut the door, but I went up, and he was standing inside against the door, with his arm against it - I heard the rumpling of my wife's clothes - [the witness here detailed a conversation which he over heard between the prisoner and his wife, after which he deposed that he entered the room, and discovered them in the act of adultery] - I went to the fire-place, and took up the poker, but my hand being in a tremble it jinked on the fender, and they heard it; they had not heard me before - I struck at the prisoner with the poker, with the intention of striking them on the head and killing the pair of them, but in the room of hitting him on the bead it struck his shoulder, and he flew out of the room and locked me in, as the key was outside - I opened the window, and got out, but as the front door was fast, I could not get in that way; I then got in at the window again, knocked at the room door, and a man up stairs came down and let me out - my wife still remained in the room.

MARY ROSS . On the 10th of September, in the morning, a woman, whom I now know to be Mrs. Blanchard, came to my house, and took a room; she said she would bring the goods in the afternoon, and told me to have the room ready by three o'clock - the prisoner and her came together in the evening, between seven and eight o'clock; they slept in the same room - they brought a feather-bed, four chairs, and a small table, with a truck- the prisoner staid there on Saturday and Sunday night, and he was taken on the Monday; on the Saturday night there was only one bed in the room, but on the Sunday she brought in a palliasse - they brought a piece of carpet, and put it into the kitchen; on the Saturday the prisoner took it up, and said he would sleep upon it - there was no bedstead in the room; Mrs. Blanchard said, in the prisoner's presence, that she took the room for herself and her husband; on the Tuesday Mr. Blanchard claimed the things, and took them away.

JOSEPH BLANCHARD. They were my goods.

Prisoner's Defence. It was eleven years, before the last voyage, since I was in England before; I came home in the Maria, of London, and boarded at the prosecutor's house - he became jealous of me; had I been guilty of the first part of the charge, I should have locked the door at first, and I might have got away; this is a story fabricated to ruin me - I had no hand in moving these things, but my own chest; I had no bed on my back.

JURY to MARY ROSS . Q. Did you go into the room on the following morning? A. Yes, but the woman had been out of the room - the carpet then laid on one side, and the bed on the other.

GUILTY . Aged 28. - Transported for Seven Years .

2077. JAMES HAINES was indicted for putting off 5 counterfeit shillings, at a lower rate and value than they were counterfeited for .

JAMES GOLLOCKER . I am a constable, and live in King-street, Lambeth-walk. I had known the prisoner previous to the 14th of June, and had made appointments with him, but none had been made for the 14th of June; on that day I went with Lawrence to the prisoner's lodgings, in Wentworth-street; I stood in front of the house, and called Jem - the prisoner put his head out of a window, and told me to come up stairs; Lawrence went up with me - there was a man and a woman in the room with the prisoner; the prisoner said, "If you had come ten minutes sooner, you would have found me making;" he then asked me what I wanted - I said a few bobs, meaning shillings; he said he had been just making fourteen for himself and his old woman, and I might have them ifI liked - I said I would take five of them; I gave him one good shilling for them - I then handed them to Lawrence to look at; Haines said they were very good ones- Lawrence gave them to me again; we returned to the Archer's public-house - I there marked them, and gave them to Miers.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Pray, what are you? A. A constable of Lambeth, and have been so upwards of six years; the prisoner did not know I was an officer - he lives three or four miles from our parish; the first time I had seen him was on the 13th of May - I had been in his company three or four times; I did not go to tempt him, but to detect him - I did not offer him money till I got the base coin of him; I went to buy coin - I am not regularly employed by the Mint; I am sanctioned by them - I expect to be paid, as a witness, for my loss of time, and no more; I have been the means, with others, of detecting several persons - I received about 1l. 8s., three years ago, for detecting two persons in Surrey; I never have been settled with but once by the Mint, and that is three years ago -I make a minute of the days I am employed; I cannot tell what the Mint owes me now, within a few pounds, without I had my books here - I have sometimes been employed day and night for them; I have only been at work for them since December, and not before for three years; I should think, take one thing with another, they now owe me 40l. or 50l. - I have not asked for it, because I know the Mint officers have been busy in going the circuits and other things, and I did not want; I do not know that I should be satisfied if they gave me 60l.; I think I should with 80l. - my wife is a laundress, and I attend to that; I have been on board a man-of-war.

ROBERT LAWRENCE . I am a fishmonger, and live at Lambeth - Gollocker is a neighbour. I went with him to the ARchers public-house, in Wentworth-street - Gollocker went down the street, to the house where the prisoner lodged - he called out Jem! the prisoner put his head out and said, "Come up;" he went up, and I followed him - the prisoner said, "Is it all right?" Gollocker said,"It is;" the prisoner said, "If you had come ten minutes sooner, you would have caught me making;" he said he had been making fourteen, and he might have them if he pleased - Gollocker said he would take five, and he gave him five; he gave him one shilling for them - we then went to the Archers, and I saw the money given to Myers.

Cross-examined. Q. Have you repeated exactly the words that passed between Gollocker and the prisoner? A. As near as I can recollect; he said he and his old woman had put off fourteen on the Saturday previous, and if Gollcker pleased he might have them all - he then gave Gollocker five shillings - Gollocker said, "I do not want the whole, I only want five shillings," and he tendered him a good shilling for the five - sometimes they call shillings bobs; I cannot say whether Gollocker said bobs or shillings - I have only given evidence in three different cases; there were five cases, but there were three at once, at Maidstone - there was one in the Old Court last Session; I have given orders for counterfeit coin three times, not oftener.

Q. Did you not swear, last Session, in the case of Bagley, "I have not given more than six or seven orders for counterfeit coin?" A. No, I did not swear any thing about how many times; I believe it is not more than five times - I never had a halfpenny for these jobs; I work for my living daily, and am selling fish at my shop - Gollocker employed me in this business; I do not make a stipulation for what I am to have, but I make a rule of losing very little time - I keep a book; I leave it entirely to Mr. Gollocker; I could not tell how many days I have been employed in the last six months, without looking over Mr. Gollocker's book; I do not suppose I have been half fifty days - I should be satisfied if the Mint pay me 5l.; I never got any money from Gollocker - I think my account begins on the 9th of June; Myers paid my expences to Maidstone - I may have been five times with him, buying counterfeit coin.

RICHARD MYERS . I went with the witnesses to the public-house, and received these five shillings - I had searched Gollocker before, and he had nothing about him but the shilling which I gave him.

Cross-examined. Q.Were you with Lawrence at the Spring Assizes, at Maidstone? A. It was the last Assizes- I will not swear that I did not say, at the last Session, that it was the Spring Assizes; I cannot swear, within 50l., how much I have received, within the last two years, from the Mint - I was not asked to bring my books; I said if you wanted them I would bring them; for what I have done, within the last twelve months, I should not be satisfied with twenty guineas, nor with fifty, without I had my books here - I have been employed for them about ten years; I cannot tell how many times; I have been examined for the Mint, and for other cases; I was an officer.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. I had a warrant, and took the prisoner, on the 1st of October, at Spa-fields' watch-house, where he had been left by Myers - the date of the warrant is the 24th of August; I could not find him before.

EDWARD JOSEPH POWELL . I am one of the inspectors of coin for the Mint. These shillings are all counterfeit, and four of them are from the same mould.

Cross-examined. Q. We have heard that the prisoner said, if the officer had gone ten minutes sooner he would have caught him making; has any die or mould been produced to you? A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was near any of these men till I was taken - on the night I was taken Gollocker came up to me, and asked if my name was Haines - I said Yes; I was then surrounded by three men, and one of them, named Perkins, said to Gollocker, "That is him;" I had a quarrel with Perkins, and he said he would waylay me.

RICHARD MYERS . Perkins has discovered people before, but not this case; I do not know that he knew this prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Is Perkins a convict? A. I understand he had been convicted, but I do not know it - he had not been paid by me, but he had given us information, and sometimes had a shilling or two.

JURY to JAMES GOLLOCKER. Q. Why did not you take the prisoner, as you was an officer? A. I had information that there were five or six regular sets of coiners in the street - I did not see any moulds on the 14th, but I saw him at work on the 13th.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

2078. JOHN COOPER , JOHN CUTLER , and JOHN GREEN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 3 cart loads of wood, value 4l. , the goods of William Barron ; and JOHN SNELLING was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to have been stolen ; against the Statute, &c.

JOHN GASKIN. I am a Thames Police-surveyor. There are some buildings pulling down in Devereux-court, Strand - on the 20th of September I saw Cooper, Cutler, and Green on those premises - I believe they were labourers there; I saw Cooper nearly the whole of the afternoon, from twelve to five o'clock, on the upper part of the buildings, chopping up wood; he put it into a basket, and Green received it from him - Cutler was at the lower part of the building: Green then went down, and stood within the boards at the lower part of the building, while Cutler went out of the door, and went to the end of the court; he then beckoned with his hand, and pointed towards the Essex Head public-house, which is kept by Mr. Snelling - it is not more than four or five yards off; Green then went there with the basket of wood - I watched them, and saw the same transaction in the same way, in all respects the same - the basket contained about as much wood as is in this bundle; it was a regular rubbish-basket: I went to Mr. Barron, and informed him of what I had seen - he sent for Cooper, and challenged him with what I had said; he said he had never disposed of any wood, but he had chopped up some old wood, and had had some beer; I had seen Cooper chop up a girder and some boards - it appeared to be useful wood; I went with Mr. Barron to Essex-street, and saw Mr. Snelling at his house - Mr. Barron told him he had been informed that his men had been chopping wood, and bringing it there; Mr. Snelling said he had had a basket or two of wood, but he was not at all aware of any thing wrong; Mr. Barron asked him if he would show him the wood: he said, "Yes, by all means;" he said, "If it is yours, I wish you to take it away, and I am very sorry that any thing of the kind should occur;" I looked over Snelling's cellar, and saw about three cart loads - I asked Mr. Snelling if it had all come the same evening; he said it did, a basket or two at a time - I then took Cutler and Green; Green said he had taken a basket or two full off the premises - I said, "By whose order?" he said, "I don't choose to tell you that;" Cutler said he never sold any, nor ordered any to be sold, but he had certainly had some beer.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Then Cooper never denied that he had chopped up some? A. NO.

WILLIAM BARRON . I am a master-builder. Cooper, Cutler, and Green were in my employ - I had to take down and rebuild those premises, using the old materials as well as I could; the men are not to cut up the materials, but to use them again - this piece is an architrave, that goes round a door or a window, and being cut, it is now useless; when I went to Snelling's, he said he considered he had given the value for it - that he had given 3l. or 4l. in liquor or beer - it was brought in in the day time, and he thought it was all right; he showed it very readily, and in a yard I saw my own baskets, with wood in them.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Mr. Snelling went to the Police-office, I believe, expecting to be called as a witness? A. I did not tell him to go - I gave the others in charge, but not him; when I saw he was to be committed I asked the Magistrate if he might be admitted to bail, as I felt for him.

Cooper's Defence. It is impossible that three loads of wood could go from there; I am compelled to use an axe and a saw, as a carpenter.

Cutler's Defence. The time that the officer saw me look out was when some carts came to take away some rubbish, and I called two or three of the men to load them.

The prisoners all received a good character.

COOPER - GUILTY . Aged 35.

CUTLER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

GREEN - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Six Months .

SNELLING - NOT GUILTY .

2079. ANN DONNELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of Adolphus Van Speigel , from his person .

ADOLPHUS VAN SPEIGEL. I hold a situation in the Treasury . At a quarter-past twelve o'clock last Monday night, I was in Regent-street ; I had a handkerchief in my pocket- an officer told me I had lost it; he had it in his possession, and pointed out the prisoner to me.

JOHN BURKE. I am an officer. I saw the prosecutor and another gentleman near the Fire-office - they passed me, and the prisoner pulled the prosecutor's handkerchief partly out; some persons then came by, and she stopped; she then pulled it again - they then went on to the Quadrant, where she pulled it right out, folded it up, and put it into her bosom: I took her to the prosecutor, and told him of it.(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner. My father and mother are both dead; I have not a friend in the world.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

2080. JOSEPH PORTER and SAMUEL KERRY were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 bag, value 2d.; 2 coats, value 2s. 6d.; 4 waistcoats, value 3s.; 1 shirt, value 1s.; 1 shift, value 1s.; 1 tablecloth, value 6d.; 1 cap, value 3d.; 1 handkerchief, value 3d.; 1 pair of trousers, value 1s.; 2 keys, value 6d., and 1 knife, value 2d. , the goods of Thomas Walters .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

2081. JOSEPH ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 tea-kettle, value 3s. , the goods of Mark Russel .

WILLIAM KING . I am a Policeman. On the 28th of September, at a quarter before eleven o'clock, I met the prisoner in Hatton-wall, with this tea-kettle; he said he had brought it from Castle-street - I took him to the station, and then he said he found it in a court at the bottom of Gray's Inn-lane.

MARK RUSSEL. I keep the Castle, in Tothill-street . -This kettle is mine; the prisoner came into my tap-room, between ten and eleven o'clock on the 28th of September; I saw him sitting, drying his coat, as it was a very wet evening; the next time I went in he was gone, and the kettle also.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in Gray's Inn-lane- I was never in the prosecutor's house.

GUILTY . Aged 16. - Whipped and Discharged.

2082. WILLIAM THOMPSON and JOHN MARTIN were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of September , 1 kettle, value 4s., and 36 pies, value 2s. , the goods of John Hodgkinson .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the goods of James Weeks ; and that Martin had been before convicted of felony.

JOHN HODGKINSON . I sell pies in the street - I had my kettle and pies near Petticoat-lane, in Whitechapel , between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; I fell asleep, leaving the kettle and thirty-six pies all safe - the officer awoke me, and my pies and kettle were gone.

JOHN BURROWS . I am a Police-officer. On the 22nd of September, four or five minutes before twelve o'clock, I saw the two prisoners near Essex-street - Thompson opened the prosecutor's kettle, and gave Martin some eatables out of it; Martin saw me, and he whistled - Thompson then shut up the tin kettle, and warked up the street, singing out,"All hot! All hot!"

WILLIAM LAW . I am a Police-constable. I received information, and from inquiry I went up George-yard - on a dung-hill I found this tin kettle, smoking; I took it up, went out, and saw the two prisoners - they ran away; I pursued, and took Martin - he was cramining something into his mouth, with both his hands, but I could not see what it was.

JOHN WILLIAM DENNIS . I am an officer. I was coming up Wentworth-street, and saw the two prisoners; they ran - I pursued, and took Thompson, who was eating something, but I could not see what.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS HOBBS . I produce a certificate of the former conviction of Martin, which I got at Mr. Clark's office -(nead) - I gave evidence on the trial, and Martin is the person.

Thompson's Defence, (written) I am innocent of the charge- it was some other boys that done the deed; it is true I was in the streets that night, having lost the key of my brother's room door, therefore I could not get in - my brother, with whom I reside, was at Deptford, at work: I was eating a piece of bread, and sitting on the step of the door, when the Policeman was passing me; he directly said I was eating pies, and took me.

THOMPSON - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Transported for Seven Years .

MARTIN - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2084. ISAAC THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 1 coat, value 17s. , the goods of Robert Plant .

THOMAS DAY . I am shopman to Mr. Dunn, of Piccadilly . I was at his shop door on the evening of the 17th of October, about half-past six o'clock; I saw the prisoner in the act of taking the coat off the bar of the prosecutor's shop, which is next door to us - he went up Titchbourn-street; I pursued, and did not lose sight of him till he was taken - I brought him and the coat back.

WILLIAM SHAVER . I received the coat from Mr. Day- this is it; it belongs to my employer, Robert Plant .

THEOPHILUS HOWE . I am an officer, and received the prisoner and the coat from Day.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along - a man came up, and gave me this coat; he said Run! I put it into my a pron, and run.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor.

Confined Three Months .

2085. MARY WARDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , 4 shillings, 1 sixpence, and 4d., in copper, the monies of John Raper , from the person of Eleanor, his wife .

ELEANOR RAPER . I am the wife of John Raper , and live in Reservoir-cottage. On the 15th of October I received fourteen shillings and two sixpences from my husband - I got a little intoxicated, and was taken to the station, in Harcourt-street ; I then had 4s. 6d. in my pocket - the prisoner was in the lock-up-room; I went to sleep there, and when I awoke, about a quarter before five o'clock, I missed my money - I knocked at the door; the constable came down - I said this woman had robbed me; he searched her, and in her bosom were some half-pence, and in the hem of her gown he found the silver -I had told him before what I had lost.

JOHN WALSH . I am a Police-officer. On the night of the 14th of October I found the prisoner in a state of intoxication in the New-road - she had a child; I took her to the station-house - she said she had received 2s. from Marylebone workhouse that day; I searched her, and found 6d. in silver, and 5 1/2d. in copper, on her - I took that money, and gave it to the inspector on duty; late at night the prosecutrix was brought in - she took some silver and some halfpence from her pocket, and threw on the table; she took it up again, and went away - the presecutrix was brought in again, but I was not there at the time, but when I returned I found her in the lock-up-place - at a quarter to fire o'clock I heard a knock at the door; I went with a light, and opened the door of the room - the prosecutrix said the prisoner had robbed her of 4s. 6d.; the prisoner said she had out - I began to search her; the prosecutrix said, "If you find 4s. 6d. and some copper on her, it is my money;" I found in the tail of the prisoner's gown, in separate parts, 4s. 6d. in silver; and after that she took from her side-pocket a sort of purse, with copper in it, and she turned them out on the floor - the silver was between the lining and the outside of the gown; the prisoner had delivered her money up the night before, and said it was all she had.

Prisoner. I sewed money in my gown when I took any home, because a woman who slept with me used to make me spend it in drink, and the officer tore my gown to get it out. Witness. I pushed it out through the lining; I did not examine to see how it had been introduced- I did not observe any hole in it, but it was very easy to get the money out through the lining.

ROBERT CROWE . I am a Police-officer. I recollect the prosecutrix heing brought back the second time - she kept her money that time in her own care; I do not know what she had - I had before seen 3s. in her possession, and some copper; the prisoner said a lady had given her 5s. when the money was found - the money might have been slipped between the lining and the gown by herself; the prosecutrix stated she had some halfpence, and among them two farthings, one of which had two holes in it, which the prisoner's child said a woman gave to her mother.

Prisoner's Defence. When the prosecutrix came in she sat down under the window - I was sitting with the child in my lap; the prosecutrix said, "My husband has given me 2s., and they have got my bacon and the keys of my room;" I said I had some money, which I had been obliged to sew in my gown, and when she heard that she knocked against the door, and said I had robbed her.

GUILTY . Aged 39. - Confined One Month .

2086. JANE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 hat, value 7s.; 1 waistcoat, value 2s., and 1 handkerchief, value 1s., the goods of John Cratzra , from his person .

JOHN CRATZRA. I am a sugar-baker , and live at the Brown Bear, Leman-street, Whitechapel. I met the prisoner in the Commercial-road, about eleven o'clock at night, on a Saturday in September - she took me to her house, in Albion-street, Commercial-road ; we had before been to a public-house - I went up stairs at her house, and we had some rum there; when it was time for me to go home, she would not let me go, and locked the door; I was there about a quarter of an hour - when I wanted to go she asked me for a sovereign; I said I had not got so much, but I gave her 6s. 6d. - she then would not let me go, but took my hat, silk handkerchief, and waistcoat from me; she said I might have them if I brought her a sovereign - I parted with my things to get away; I got out, and called a Policeman.

Prisoner. Q.Did I take off your things and lock the door? A. Yes - she first asked if I would go and see her home; she took my hat off, and I took off my waistcoat, and gave it to her.

COURT. Q. Could you not have pushed her away? A. I do not know; she would not let me go out - she locked the door; I could not help it.

WILLIAM MIDDLEDITCH . I was an officer at that time. I saw the prosecutor crying; he told me he had been robbed - I went with him to a house in Albion-street; I first went up stairs, and then into a room on the ground floor - there was the prisoner, and three or four other women; the presecutor pointed the prisoner out - I demanded the clothes; the prisoner said she was not the person, and knew nothing about them - I searched the room, and found this property; when I took the prisoner she said she was a modest girl, and thought no barm of taking the clothes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met this prosecutor; he went with me, and he sent for half a pint of rum - I had some of it, and he and my landlady had some; he then said he had no money, but he would give me his coat to pawn -I said I would have nothing to do with that; he then said he would go and get some from his friends - he went down, and in a quarter of an hour he brought in a Policeman; I said I was with him, but I knew nothing about his clothes - I was searched at the watch-house, and 3s. were found on me, with which I was going to market; I did not ill use him, nor do anything bad to him - there was nothing of his found in my room; I am married, but my husband is not in town.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Transported for Seven Years .

2087. WILLIAM WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , 3 lbs. 4 oz. of sewing silk, value 3l. 2s.; 1 oz. of floss silk, value 6d.; 4 pieces of silk-cord, value 5s.; 8 pieces of braid, value 1s., and 7 bobbins, value 7d. , the goods of William Hind , his master.

WILLIAM HIND. I live in Providence-house, East-street, Cambridge-heath, and am a trimming-manufacturer . The prisoner lived in my house for two years - on the 19th of September, I found a bobbin with some silk on it, under five or six quires of paper; I afterwards missed that bobbin, and sent for the prisoner - I spoke to him, and he produced a bobbin from his hat; he had had that to work with in my business - I sent for the officer, who found this knot of brown silk in his pocket, which he had not been employed to work on; it weighed about 1 oz. 12 drams. - I valued it at 6d.; the prisoner told me of two places where be lived - I went to one of them, and found in two drawers, which the landlady pointed out, six bobbins of silk, two knots of cord, and four pieces of worsted braid; five of the bobbins have my mark on them - this is the property.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.What is the mark on your bobbin? A. My initials, W. H. - we never part with any with the mark on them; we always burn them when they get old.

GEORGE FROST . I am a Police-officer. I received the prisoner, and found this brown silk in his breast-pocket - I then went to Durham-street, where he said he lodged, and found these other things there.

HANNAH WILDMAN . I am the wife of Richard Wildman . The prisoner lodged with us in Durham-street -I pointed out to the officer the room he occupied; he had two drawers, in which these articles were found.

Cross-examined. Q.Was he a well-conducted young man? A. Yes - he was twelve months with us.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Six Months .

2088. ELIZABETH BOND was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , 1 cloak, value 10s.; 1 shawl, vlaue 1s., and 1 silk handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of Thomas Parker Steedman .

MARY ANN STEEDMAN . I am the wife of Thomas Parker Steedman , a potatoe-dealer - we live in Oxford-street ; the prisoner was my servant rather more than two months, I missed a plaid cloak, a silk handkerchief, and a shawl, while she was in my service - I went into her room and found her pocket, which she had left on the bed - I found in it a purse, containing these duplicates.

WILLIAM THOMAS BARTON . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in Oxford-street. I have a silk handkerchief, pawned there on the 9th of August - I do not recollect the prisoner, but I gave this duplicate for it.

JAMES MOODY . I am shopman to a pawnbroker, in East-street, Marylebone. I have a plaid cloak and a shawl, pawned on the 11th of July - I do not recollect the prisoner, but this is the duplicate I gave.

JAMES SUFF . I am a Police-officer. The prisoner wasgiven into my custody on the 14th of September - I asked what she had been doing; she said Nothing - I asked for her purse; she said she had lost it the evening before - I then searched, and found it in a hat-box in her bed-room, with fourteen duplicates in it; she then said she was very sorry, but she must own she had taken the things.

GUILTY Aged 23. - Confined Three Months .

2089. HENRY COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , 1 pair of stockings, value 1s., and 1 sovereign, the property of John Foy , from his person .

JOHN FOY. I live in Falconburgh-court. Soho. On the 4th of October I was taken to the watch-house for an assault - I was locked in a cell; the prisoner was there -I sat down on one of the forms, and the prisoner took a sovereign from my pocket, and the stockings off my feet; I had never been in a watch-house before, and I did not know that I could get assistance if I had called for it; I did not make any resistance, as I thought he would have thrown the things away - there were other persons there, and one man took my stockings from the prisoner - when the cell was opened I pointed out the prisoner as the person who had robbed me.

Prisoner. There was an Irishman in the watch-house, and he said if I did not take off the stockings he would give me a good thumping all round; the stockings were wet, and he said, "Put on him my dry ones." Witness. There was a pair of stockings there, but they were much worse than mine.

RICHARD MOORE . I took the prisoner into custody, and put him into the cell - I searched him; he had no money - I went to the watch-house again, ata quarter before seven o'clock, and then there was a charge made against him of taking the stockings and a sovereign - I searched, and found in his neck handkerchief a sovereign and one shilling; he said, when I took off his handkerchief, "There are two shillings in it;" I had searched it before, and there was nothing in it - I took the stockings from another man.

GEORGE COOPER . The prosecutor pointed the prisoner out to me, as the person who had robbed him; we always search persons before they go down.

Prisoner's Defence. His trousers were down, and the sovereign and shilling fell out - the Irishman said,

"Keep them till he asks for them, and if he don't ask, don't give them to him."

JOHN FOY . My trousers were not down - the sovereign was in my fob - I felt his hand in my pocket - I could see his features by the gas-light over the grating.

GUILTY . Aged 15. - Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin .

2090. EMMA BURCHER and ELIZABETH STEVENS were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 pair of shoes, value 14s.; 1 hat, value 7s.; 1 round frock, value 9s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s. , the goods of John Bond .

JOHN BOND. I am a labourer . On the 27th of September I came to London from Oxfordshire, to look for work - I had never been in London before; I was standing in Smithfield, about five o'clock in the evening, with a smock-frock on - the prisoners came to me, and asked me for 1 1/2d. for some gin - I did not go with them for some time, but at last I went into a gin-shop; we had some gin and water, and several quarterns of gin - they drank with me, and I paid for it; I then asked if they could tell me where I could get a lodging; they said they could, and they would go and show me - they took me to No. 11, Playhouse-yard ; Burcher took off her bonnet and shawl, and acted as mistress - they took me up stairs to the two pair back room; Burcher asked for the money for the bed, and I gave her 4d. - they took me up stairs to the two pair back room; Burcher asked for the money for the bed, and I gave her 4d. - they were both in the room; they told me to make haste and go to bed, as they wanted to go down - I went to bed, and went to sleep; when I awoke in the morning all my things were gone but my trousers and stockings - I had a shilling or two in my pockets, but I do not know how much; it was all I had in the world, and it was gone - I got up, and went to Maidenhead, where I had some more things; I did not see the prisoners again till Friday, when they were in custody - I have never seen my things since - they were most of them new and good.

SOPHIA LEWIS . I live in the next room to where this happened in Playhouse-yard - I know Burcher lived in that room. I saw the two prisoners and the prosecutor come home together that night, and gave them a light - I went out, and returned in a quarter of an hour; I saw the prosecutor asleep on the bed - the two prisoners were gone; Burcher had opened my door, and put two or three articles of crockery into my room - the candle was standing on the table; the prosecutor's clothes were all gone - I went and told the landlord, who tried to awake him, but he could not.

SUSANNAH MORTHEN . I keep a clothes shop in Playhouse-yard. On the night in question, about eight o'clock, the prisoners brought, me a new hat, and a pair of boots with dust on them; the boots had lace-holes in the front, and hob nails in them - I asked how they came by them, and they said they belonged to a young man in Newgate, that they were authorized to sell them, and take him the money; I doubted that, and would not buy them - Burcher had a bundle in her shawl; she stood near the door.

Burcher. You said I was not the person, that it was a tall person, puck-marked. Witness. I did not, I said you had a few marks, I thought.

GEORGE DYSON . I am a Police-officer. I went to the house about half-past ten o'clock at night; I found nobody in the room but the prosecutor fast asleep; there was no appearance of wearing-apparel left - I tried to awake him, but I could not; the next morning he gave me information of the two prisoners - I sent him home, and took them on Friday; Stevens said she was one of the girls who took the prosecutor home, that she staid ten minutes, and then left him - that Burcher would have robbed him of his shirt and trousers if she had been agreeable.

Burcher's Defence. He was awake when we left the room; I closed the door, and went part of the way home with Stevens.

Stevens' Defence. He had all his clothes on but his hat when I left the room.

BURCHER - GUILTY . Aged 26.

STEVENS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

2091. ALEXANDER CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 2 locks, value 4s.,and 1 lock handle, value 2d., the goods of William Bromley , and fixed to a building of his .

THOMAS CATLING . On the 10th of October I was at work at a house, in Church-street, Marylebone ; I opened the attic window of the house, and saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards on the opposite side - he saw me, and went down Exeter-street and several other streets- I came down, and followed him; I saw him go into No. 20, where he staid about twenty minutes; I told one of the labourers there was a person there, and to give a good look out - I then went to No. 20, and missed the locks; I came down, and said to the labourer, "Where is he?" I then saw the prisoner running down Exeter-street - I pursued him, and called Stop thief! he took up the flaps of his coat, and ran on - he dropped one lock; I still pursued till he was stopped - I took him back to No. 15; he then gave up the other lock, and took two screw-drivers from his hat; the house belongs to Mr. William Bromley, for whom I work - it was not in habited; we had lost twenty-seven locks the Saturday before.

JOHN WILLIAM SUTTON. I am a carpenter. I had been repairing the locks, and putting them on, at No. 20- these are two which I had fitted on two of the doors; I have tried them, and they fit in every respect - I am sure they are two that I had put on, and left safe on the Saturday; I had never seen the prisoner before.

JOHN WATSON . I am an officer. I heard the alarm; the prisoner and this property were delivered to me.

Prisoner. I am a stranger in London, and came to town for a situation; I had no money, and nothing to do.

GUILTY . Aged 25 - Transported for Seven Years .

2092. THOMAS DAVIES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 2 shawls, value 30s.; 3 shirts, value 7s.; 1 pair of stays, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 7s., and 1 piece of calico, value 6d. , the goods of John Cheetham .

JOHN CHEETHAM. I am an armourer in the Tower. I lost the property stated out of my room; the key had been left at a neighbour's house, and when I returned on Sunday evening, the 26th of September, the property was gone - it was then a quarter before nine o'clock, and the key was left in another place, not where I left it; the prisoner is a soldier in the guards, and was in the same barracks as me.

CATHERINE HAYES . I keep the Blackamoor's Head, in Cutler's-street, Rosemary-lane. On the Sunday stated, the prisoner came to have a pint of beer, I think it was about six o'clock; there were both men and women drinking in the house - he called them into the parlour, and sold this property to them; two shirts were offered to me by a young woman in the parlour, but I would not buy them- I saw a black silk handkerchief bought by one of the persons for 1s. 6d.; the prisoner offered me a shawl for sale, and he offered a pair of stays to a young woman for 7d.; I asked where he got the things, and he said it was nothing to me; I said they were stolen - he said they were not, they were his own; he then abused me, and I sent for an officer; I received the waistcoat from my brother.

ROBERT THORP . I am a Police-officer. On the Sunday night, at a quarter before ten o'clock, Catherine Hayes called me into the house; I went in, and asked the prisoner where he got these things - he said his wife was dead, and he was selling her clothes, that he had had 2l advance money from his captain, but that was not enough- I said, "Did your wife wear shirts and waistcoats?" he then wanted me to take some gin, and to let him go, but I would not; I received this shawl from a woman in the tap-room - this waistcoat and two shirts I received from Hayes, and here is the rest of the property.

CATHERINE HAYES . One of my lodgers bought the shirts, and I made him give them to me; I did not see the prisoner have them.(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Seven Years .

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2093. FRANCIS DAVIS and MARY DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 3 lbs. 10 ozs. of bacon, value 2s. , the goods of John Spooner .

JOHN SPOONER. I am a cheesemonger , and live in South-street, Manchester-square . On Sunday morning, the 18th of September, I was called down stairs - I went out, and saw Francis Davis beckoning to some person; I ran and asked him where the woman was who had been with him in my shop- he said he had no woman with him; I said if he would tell me where she was, and would give me the piece of bacon, he might go about his business; he denied it - I called an officer, and gave him in charge.

ELIZABETH HAMMOND . I was in the shop that morning, and saw the two prisoners there - I saw the man put his hand behind him; the woman was standing by his side - I did not see any thing taken; I told Mrs. Spooner I thought they had taken something.

LYDIA THOMAS . The prisoner Mary Davis came to my house on Sunday morning, and asked where her husband was - I said I had not seen him; she asked if I would allow her to leave this parcel, which she did, and two days afterwards I heard she was in custody; I gave the pareel to the officer - it was a piece of bacon.

EDWARD JONES . I am an officer. I received the bacon from Thomas; I was on duty when the male prisoner was brought in on Sunday morning - I searched him; he gave his address "No. 26, Great Peter-street," but he did not live there - I then went to Berwick-court, and saw Mary Davis - I asked if her name was Davis; she said Yes, that she had seen her husband three hours ago, and she should see him again at dinner time.

JOHN SPOONER . This is my bacon - I had cut it off the day before, for a customer, and weighed it.

Francis Davis Defence . My wife was not in my company that morning after nine o'clock till I saw her in the station-house.

NOT GUILTY .

2094. RICHARD EMANUEL was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 watch, value 7l.; 1 watch-key, value 3s., and 1 ring, value 4s., the goods of William Broadbelt , from his person .

WILLIAM BROADBELT. I am a publican , and live opposite Whitechapel-church. On the 1st of October, about one o'clock in the morning, I was going out, and thought it was going to rain - I turned back, and stood under a shed; the prisoner came up, and said, Broadie - I missedmy watch at that moment; I pursued him to the corner of Wentworth-street, and saw the watch in his hand.

cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Where did this occur? A. At Mr. Creswell's door, next to my own house but two; he said Broadie, and the watch went - he might be a little fresh; I have known him for three or four years - he has borne the character of an honest, hard-working man: I did not know him that night, but I did the next morning, when I came to look at him.

WILLIAM LAW . I am a Police-officer. I was on duty in Wentworth-street. and heard the prosecutor call out "I know you;" we saw the prisoner running - my brother-officer caught hold of his right arm; the prosecutor was about twenty yards behind him - I fell back a little, and saw the prisoner put his hand into his right-hand pocket; I caught his arm, and he threw this watch out of his hand.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not do it with any felonious intent - I had taken his watch before.

WILLIAM BROADBELT. He never had my watch before- I have known him before; I do not know that I had drank with him.

WILLIAM LAW . The prisoner was in liquor; he did not then say that it was a lark - he made no resistance.

NOT GUILTY .

2095. ELIZA FULLER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 2 pairs of boots, value 4s., and 10 pairs of shoes, value 30s. , the goods of Alexander Cowan , her master.

ALEXANDER COWAN. I keep a sale-shop , in Aylesbury-street . The prisoner was my servant of all-work - we suspected, and had her watched, and on the 8th of October the officer took her into custody, about three yards from my house; some shoes and boots were found on her.

EDWARD BINGHAM . I am a Police-officer. The prisoner had left the prosecutor's premises, and I took her back - I found these two pairs of shoes and this pair of boots on her person.

FANNY COWAN . I am the prosecutor's daughter. I saw the prisoner take some shoes off the line, put them under her arm, and secrete them in the kitchen.

JOSEPH JOHN GOODE . I am assistant to my father, who is a pawnbroker. I have three pairs of shoes and a pair of child's boots, pawned by the prisoner, I believe, but I cannot swear to her.

WILLIAM HENRY BAYFIELD . I am shopman to a pawnbroker. I have four pairs of shoes, pawned, I believe, by the prisoner, at different times.

MR. COWAN. These are all my property - I have been robbed to such an extent that I thought people had broken into my premises.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

2096. LYDIA GOODEN was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 1 shirt, value 1s., and 2 combs, value 4d. , the goods of John Deaton .

ELEANOR DEATON . I am the wife of John Deaton - we live in John-street, Whitechapel . On the 3rd of October, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to me, and asked what time they opened the coal shed next door; I said exactly at seven o'clock - she said by husband lodged there, and asked if she might sit down at my place till it was open; I let her come into my room - I went out for a short time: when I returned I missed a shirt and two combs - I taxed her with having them; she utterly denied it, with many oaths and imprecations, and called me all the old husseys she could; I offered to search her, but she pushed me away - I sent for the officer, and he took her to the station; a door or two before we got there she dropped the shirt from under her petticonts - this is it; I had not known her before.

HENRY BOLTON . I am a Police-officer. The prosecutrix sent for me, and I found the prisoner there, accused of stealing a shirt and two combs - she denied it; I took her to the station-house, and as we were going along I saw her put her hand into her pocket-hole, and I directed the prosecutrix to keep watch - I saw her drop this shirt, and when she had been a short time at the station I found these two combs behind her.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. The property is my husband's, and the prosecutrix washes for him; the people at the next house are the means of keeping me from him - he ill-uses me, and says if he cannot transport me he will get some other person to do it.

ELEANOR DEATON. I do not wash for her husband - this shirt belongs to a man named John Johnson, a navigator.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked her to go to my husband, and ask him for a trifle; he has kept me in prison two months; I did not take it to steal it - I asked the Policeman who first came to search me, but he would not take me; he fetched this man because he knows my husband.

HENRY BOLTON . I have seen her husband - I believe he is a carpenter, and his brother-in-law keeps the coalshed; I never saw her before.

NOT GUILTY .

2097. DAVID GILMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , 2 boxes, value 3s.; 1 brooch, value 10s.; 2 pieces of cornelian, value 1s.; 1 thimble, value 1s. 6d.; 2 petticoats, value 6d., and 7 books, value 2s. , the goods of Abigail Harding .

ABIGAIL HARDING. I am a servant . I have known the prisoner - he lived with his uncle, and was employed in removing goods with a van. On the 29th of March I delivered him two boxes, to take to No. 26, New Broad-street; one of them arrived safe, but the other did not - I spoke to the prisoner in May following, and told him to bring the other box to my situation; he said a City and west-end carrier had come for it - I never received it; it contained the articles stated, and a good many others - the prisoner was to keep that box till I sent for it, but I never had it.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You gave him this box to take care of? A. My landlord delivered them both to him - I told him to take the first box on the 29th of March, which he did; I did not want the other, as I did not know that my situation would suit me - when I wanted it I told him, and he said he would send it; he said afterwards that a carrier had had it - he said, as a friend, he would take them free of expence; I was not very intimate with him - I have been to the theatres with him; I have played at cards with him several times, but he was not a particularacquaintance; he said a carrier, of the name of Thompson, had had my box, and when I went out I said, "It is Charles;" meaning the person where I lived, who, I thought, had fetched it in a joke - I did not say that I thought my landlord took it as security for a debt, and that he had threatened to kick me out of the house and detain my boxes - I remember living at Mr. Hodsoll's; I was there four months - I did not get a character from there; I went to a situation where it was not required; I never applied to Mr. Hodsoll for a character, and never was refused one.

COURT. Q. You knew something of this man? A. Yes; I had lodged at a coffee-shop, at Mr. Eyre's - I told him to deliver the boxes to the prisoner, which he did.

CHARLES EYRE . The prosecutrix lodged with me, and left the two boxes; she asked me to let Gilmore, the prisoner, have them, which my wife did, on the 29th of March- I heard nothing more about them, till one day she happened to come in when the prisoner was there; he said to her, "What carrier was that you sent for your box?" she said, "I never sent any;" he said his name was Thompson.

JOHN HARDY . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner on the 7th of October - I went to Little Welbeck-street, where the prisoner lodged, over a stable; the prosecutrix there pointed out a pair of scissors - we then came down, and found this brush.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q. How do you know he lodged there? A. I was told so.

CHARLES EYRE. I was told, by his uncle, that he lodged there - I went and saw him at work in the stable.

ABIGAIL HARDING. I know the prisoner lodged there; I can swear that this brush is mine, by a scratch on it, and it was in the box which was lost - these scissors are mine, and were in the work-box, which was locked; the large box was only corded.

NOT GUILTY .

2098 JOHN STOCKS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 9 wooden staves, value 15s., and 6 pieces of wood, value 4s. , the goods of Alfred Rosling .

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

ALFRED ROSLING . I am a cooper , and reside at Cambridge-heath, Hackney - the prisoner was in my service four or five months; he was a jobbing-man, had to look after a horse and chaise, and do any thing that was wanted- he had no right to any of my staves. I employed two officers to watch my premises, and on Monday last I saw nine staves and six pieces of wood - one of the staves I know to be mine, and am quiet confident, in my own mind, that they are all mine.

Cross-examined by MR. HEATON. Q. Have you missed property before? A. Yes, repeatedly, and before the prisoner lived with me - he said he had lived with a bedstead-maker.

WILLIAM HENRY RICHARDSON . I am in the service of Mr. Rosling - the prisoner was in his service. Here is a piece of wood, which I can identify by a mark on it in my own hand-writing.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer of Worship-street. I went to the prosecutor's house last Monday morning, about seven o'clock - I was in pursuit of another person as well as the prisoner; I went to the prisoner's house, which is a cottage with one room, in Nova Scotia-gardens, Crabtree-rew, Bethnal-green - I got there about halfpast seven o'clock in the morning; I found a woman there, who was said to be Mrs. Stocks - I found under the bedstead, these nine staves, and these six pieces of wood; the two staves which have been identified were among them - a person mamed Grubb was taken, and the prisoner came down to the office, and I took him.

Cross-examined. Q.There was only one room? A. No; there was no other convenient place to put the wood- some part of these appear to have been out; it might have made legs of bedsteads, perhaps, but I do not know- I never saw oak bedsteads; the prisoner was not at his house.

Prisoner's Defence. Grubb asked me to make him a bedstead - he said he could find stuff; I said I would at my leisure time - he said he was in no hurry; I said he might take the stuff to my house at any time, and if my wife was not in the way, he might lay it down on the premises; he brought this wood at twice - I did not know it belonged to my master; I thought it was his own - when my wife said they had been and taken it, I was astonished, and went to the office.

JURY to MR. ROSLING. Q. Was the prisoner in the habit of handling any of these staves? A. That laid more with the foreman than myself - he was jobbing about, and had access to them; there were twenty thousand staves there sometimes.

MR. RICHARDSON. He sometimes had to remove staves from one part to another - he was an odd man, doing anything; wood in this shape is used almost exclusively by coopers - some part might be convered into a bedstead; Grubb had no right to take it.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

2099. WILLIAM GRUBB was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , 6 wooden staves, value 10s. , the goods of Alfred Rosling , his master; and JOHN STOCKS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing the same to have been stolen , against the Statute, & c.

ALFRED ROSLING . I employed Vann and Eagles to watch my premises - I afterwards heard that Grubb was taken, and the officer showed me these other pieces of wood, which I know to be mine.

THOMAS EAGLES . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 20th of October, in consequence of information, I went with Vann to the prosecutor's premises, about seven o'clock in the morning - I saw Grubb in a cart; he drove it down Crabtree-walk, from Cambridge-heath way; Grubb stopped the cart, got out, took these six staves now produced, on his shoulder, carried them down a passage, through a garden, and from there to Stocks' house, but he did not go into the house - I went up to him, and said, "What have you got there?" he said some wood which he had brought to Stocks', and at the same time he pitched it, and said, "Mrs. Stocks, I have brought some wood for you;" when I had handcuffed him, he said he was all right, that the wood was bought by Stocks, and he had brought it there - these are the stares.

Grubb's Defence. He asked me how I came by the staves, and I said that Stocks bought them of master; I used to have staves from the docks, and they sometimesgave me more than my tally, and I put them in the bayloft - Stocks was going to make a bedstead, and he said I might take them there any time I liked.

GRUBB - GUILTY . Aged 27.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, who engaged to take him into his service again.

Confined Six Weeks .

STOCKS - NOT GUILTY .

2100. JOSEPH BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 watch, value 1l. 2s.; I half-crown, 1 shilling, and 1 sixpence, the property of Charles Bailey , from his person .

CHARLES BAILEY. I am a baker . About a month ago I was asleep in my room, in Willow-street , and when I awoke I missed my watch - the prisoner is my brother; he was in the room just before I went to sleep - I had not permitted him to take and pawn my watch.

HENRY SINDER . I live with a pawnbroker. I have a watch, which I received from Sarah Long , on the 19th of September, for 12s.

SARAH LONG . I was standing at the end of the place where I live - the prisoner came and asked me to pawn this watch for 14s.; I went to Mr. Sinder, and pawned it for 12s. - I gave the prisoner 11s. 11d., and the duplicate; he did not give me any thing for it.

HENRY BAILEY . The prisoner, who is my brother, gave me this duplicate.

WILLIAM CLIFTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on the 6th of October - he said he took his brother's watch and the money, but said there was only half a crown.

CHARLES BAILEY . I cannot swear to this watch - it looks very much like mine, but it is some time since I saw it - there was a glass in mine, there is not in this.

NOT GUILTY .

OLD COURT. MONDAY, OCTOBER 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2101. HENRY WEATHERALL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 7s. , the goods of Robert Richardson .

JAMES BOOTY. I am shopman to Robert Richardson, a bootmaker , at the corner of Judd-street, New-road . I saw the prisoner come up three steps, and take these shoes off the nail at the window, put them under his coat, and walk away - I followed, and took him with them.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS BUTTRESS . I am a Policeman. I received him in charge - I found no money on him.

Prisoner. They were boots that I took; I was in great distress.

JAMES BOOTY . They were ankle shoes.

GUILTY. Aged 15.

Strongly recommended to Mercy by the Jury, on account of his distress.

Judgment Respited .

2102. JAMES WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 2 carriage lamps, value 23s. , the goods of William Close .

WILLIAM CLUSE . I am a coach-painter , and have known the prisoner - he occasionally worked for me, and knew my premises, which are in Rose and Crown-yard, Knightsbridge . He has not worked for me for two or three months; I fasten my workshop by a trap-door, and a padlock - it is an open yard; these lamps were safe in the workshop on Saturday night - I missed them on Monday morning, when I found a slight paper partition broken down; a person must have got through there to get them- they belonged to a chariot which I was painting.

JOHN BOOTH . I am a salesman, at Pimlico. The prisoner brought these lamps to me on the 7th of September- I think it was on a Wednesday; he said his brother gave them to him - he bought a black waistcoat of me, and left the lamps as security; I inquired, and found the owner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS NORRIS . I am a stable-keeper, in Sloane-street. I sent a chariot to Close to paint, and believe these to be the lamps of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them at a public-house in Sloane-street.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Confined Six Months .

2103. MARY WISEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , 1 snuff-box, value 3s.; 1 book, value 18d.; 1 box, value 1d.; 1 pair of bracelets, value 6d.; 1 bodkin, value 1s.; 2 pockets, value 6d.; 1 pin, value 6d., and 1 handkerchief, value 3d. , the goods of John Branch , her master.

ELIZA BRANCH . I am the wife of John Branch, and live in Pleasant-row, Pentonville . The prisoner was about three months in my service; I missed several articles, and mentioned it in her presence, but she made no reply - she was my only servant ; I discharged her, and five or six weeks after I found my property at Pickford's.

HENRY PICKFORD . I am a broker. On the 20th of August, I distrained for rent on the prisoner's mother, and among other things there was a hair trunk, which the prisoner was to have back if her mother would give up the key, which was refused, and the trunk was condemned, among other things; but previous to that the prisoner took her clothes out of it, and in that trunk we found these articles.

GEORGE WILMOTT . I am a head borough. I apprehended the prisoner, and received these articles from Pickford; I believe she has been misled by her parents.

JAMES BROWN . I am a Policeman. I have a tortoiseshell box, with a pin in it; when the prisoner saw me with it she said they were both her own, and her father had left them her.

ELIZA BRANCH . This box and pin are mine, and the rest of the property; I received a good character with her from the person she lived with before - he has since called on me, and will take her again; I believe she was persuaded to do this by her mother.

GUILTY. - Aged 15. Judgment Respited .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

2104. THOMAS APPLEBEE was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Calnan , and with a certain sharp instrument cutting him, with intent to murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to disable or do him some grevious bodily harm.

JOHN CALNAN. I live in George-street, Grosvenor-square, and sell baked potatoes about - I sleep in the bake-house. On the 27th of September, when I got up in the morning, I missed 4 1/2d. from my pocket - the prisoner also sold potatoes about; a boy named Hewitt told me something, and next day I saw the prisoner at High-street office- the prisoner was going to beat Hewitt, who was in the street, for telling me; I asked the prisoner about my money - he said he did not have it, and began calling me names, and using low expressions; he hit Hewitt, who is less than me, and not able to take his own part - he is twelve years old - I hit the prisoner for striking him; he then struck me - I struck again; he had a tobacco-box in his hand - he put that into his pocket, took out a knife, and struck me in the left side.

The Court ruled that this offence did not come within the meaning of the Act.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

2105. ISAAC ISAACS was indicted for stealing on the 19th of September , 1 note of the Bank of Amsterdam, for 300 guilders, and one other note, for 200 guilders, value 41l. 12s. 5d., the property of Michael Hart , from his person .

MICHAEL HART (through an interpreter.) I am a native of Amsterdam; I came to England nine or ten weeks ago, and lodge in Cox-square, with Norah Levy - I became acquainted with the prisoner, slightly, about a fortnight after I came to this country; I was courting his sister, and do so now. On a Monday morning, about eight o'clock, I met the prisoner in the neighbourhood, and went with him up the street to Whitechapel; we went into a public-house, and there had two quarterns of gin together- we then went back to the prisoner's lodging: before we got there he asked me if I had my notes about me, and asked why I did not change them, as I could get English money for them; I said that at present I was not in need of money, and thought of saving them a little longer - I had them in my pocket at the time; they were two Amsterdam notes, for three hundred and two hundred guilders- he asked me to come home, and I went to his lodgings in Gulston-street, Whitechapel - when we got up stairs he asked me to let him look at the notes; I took them out of my pocket, intending to show them to him - I held them in my own hand; the prisoner took them out of my hand with one hand, and gave me a blow with his other hand - he went down stairs; I did not follow him immediately -Cohen, his wife, and the prisoner's wife and sister were in the room; I saw the prisoner again at two o'clock - he was brought home by two strange men, drunk, and incapable of coming up stairs - I assisted him up; I went away for about two hours, then returned, and found him laying on the bed - there was nobody else but his wife in the room; he was not quite so bad, but still drunk - I afterwards asked him for my money; he said he did not know, for he was ill-treated - that was the reply he made; I ran about, and asked the advice of some persons - I went that evening to the Police-station, and told the inspector, who sent a Policeman with me, and he took the prisoner; I had a man with me, who interpreted for me - I have not seen or heard of my notes since - a guilder is worth 20d.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was not the prisoner against your marrying his sister? A. I do not know - I have three names in Holland, but since I have been in England I have only been called Michael Hart, and here is my hawker's licence in that name; I was so stunned with fright I could not follow the prisoner down stairs - I am sure I did not give him the notes to change - he took them out of my hand.

COURT. Q.What did he say when you asked him about the notes? A. I asked him for my money - he said nothing, but that he had been badly handled.

HART COHEN . I was in the prisoner's room when he and the prosecutor came in, between eight and half-past eight o'clock in the morning - they spoke in Hebrew, which I understood, but did not notice what they were talking about; I saw Hart open his pocket-book, and take out some papers - the prisoner snatched them out of his hand, gave him a push, and ran down stairs; I could not see what the papers were, but Hart called out in Hebrew,"I have lost five hundred guilders;" I had seen him in possession of a three hundred and two hundred guilders Amsterdam notes; I have not seen them since.

Cross-examined. Q. Who was in the room? A. My wife, the prisoner's wife, his sister, and children: he being an intended brother-in-law, I did not like to interfere - I did not call Stop thief! my wife was alarmed - the prosecutor was standing up; he could have followed him down stairs if he chose - I had merely called there because the children were ill with the measles; I saw two men carrying the prisoner home, drunk, about two o'clock; the prosecutor went to Brighton, and my son went with him as an interpreter, and I wrote to him, directing my letters "Lewis Cohen," which was my son's name - the prisoner was to inquire at the post-office for a letter in that name; my wife is too ill to be here.

JAMES WALTON . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner in charge; I found a shilling, a sixpence, and a few halfpence on him - he appeared to have been drinking; I searched all his pockets - there was no hole in either of them - I swear that.

THOMAS BICKNELL . I am an inspector of the Police. I was at the station-house on Monday, the 19th, when the prisoner was brought there by Walton - he appeared to have been drinking, but was capable of knowing what he was doing and saying; the prosecutor brought an interpreter, and as they were all Jews I asked the prisoner if he understood what the interpreter was saying; he said Yes, he understood every thing, but knew nothing about it, nor had he ever seen the notes; I am positive of that; I was before the Justice next morning - what he said was taken down by the Magistrate.

Prisoner. I have witnesses to call.

MARY ISAAC . I was at the prisoner's house, between eight and nine o'clock, when this gentleman came up stairs, and he gave Mr. Isaacs the notes - I live there as servant to the prisoner; I am not related to him; Mr. and Mrs. Cohen. Mr. and Mrs. Isaacs, and I were in the room, nobody else - I cannot speak Hebrew; I saw the prosecutor give the prisoner the notes; he put them into his pocket, had his breakfast, shaved himself, and went down - before he went down the prosecutor took out his pocket-book, and wrote downon a piece of paper, how many guilders there were, and how much they would come to - I did not read the paper; he wrote it in numbers - I understand numbers; the prisoner then went down - Mr. Cohen went down directly after.

Q. Do you know whether there was any quarrel between the prosecutor and prisoner about his sister? A. No, there was none - his sister was not there at all; the prisoner was afterwards brought home drunk - the prosecutor helped him up stairs.

BARNARD BARNARD . I called at the prisoner's house, between eleven and twelve o'clock, on the day this happened - I saw the prosecutor and a young woman there.

MICHAEL HART . I did not see the witness in the room at the time the prisoner took the notes - I saw her after I came up the second time.

HART COHEN . I did not notice Isaac there, and do not suppose that she was - it is a middling sized room, and has a bed in it.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Transported for Life .

Before Lord Chief Justice Tenterden.

2106. RICHARD TURPIN was charged, on the Coroner's Inquisition, with killing and slaying Sarah Turpin .

MR. BALL conducted the prosecution.

JAMES HENRY ANDREWS . I am a Policeman. On Thursday, the 21st of October, at two o'clock in the morning, I was in Three Colt-alley , opposite Cinnamon-street, and saw some clothes come out of the two pair of stairs window of Delay's house - I was about twenty-five yards off, and before I could get to the house I saw a bed come out; I went to the house, and hearing a cry of Murder! I tried to break the door open, but could not; but in a short time the prisoner's wife and Mrs. Delay came out at the side door - Mrs. Turpin ran to the bedclothes; I stood by her - she turned over the bed and clothes, and found her child underneath, in the middle of them; it was in its night clothes, and had some mud on its cap - it appeared completely stunned; it did not cry; it was about a month old - I took the candle out of Mrs. Delay's hand, and went up to the second floor front room- I saw the prisoner standing at the foot of the bedstead with merely his trousers and shirt on; there was a little child, between three and four years old, screaming on the floor - it was undressed; my brother-officer accompanied me to the room - Mrs. Turpin had the child on her arms- I seized the prisoner; he knocked the candlestick out of my hand on the bed; he up with his first, and struck his wife over my shoulder; she at that time had the child in her arms - I took hold of him, and said he must come with me; he appeared to have been drinking, but not much - he asked me to stop while he put on his stockings and shoes, but I would not; when we got into the street I asked how he came to throw the child out of window - he merely laughed, but made no answer, and as I took him along Green-bank he tried to get from me, but could not - there was nothing thrown out but the clothes and the bed.

WILLIAM CLAYTON . I am a Policeman. I accompanied Andrews - I said to the prisoner, "What a villain you must be to throw your child out of window;" he said, "I did not mean to do it;" or "I did not mean to hurt the child;" I am not certain which - the child's head appeared to have a large swelling on it, and there was a dirty mark on the cap; I saw the cap taken off at the doctor's, and there was a large swelling on the head- that was a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes after; it was not dead, for I heard it cry after that - leeches were applied to the head; the prisoner was rather the worse for liquor, but not much so.

EDWARD CONOLLY. I lodge at Delay's house. On Friday, the 21st of October, I was awoke by a disturbance - I saw the child in the mother's arms; I knew it - it was called Sarah Turpin; I saw leeches on its head - it died in my room in about an hour and a half; I saw the head was very sore and soft, where it had come to the ground - I saw it die.

EDWARD DELAY. I live at No. 12, King Edward-street. Wapping. The prisoner lodged in my second floor front room, with his wife and two children - on the 21st of October, about two o'clock in the morning, my wife awoke me; I found the prisoner's wife in my bed-room, crying - she asked me to go and appease her husband; and as I went out of my room, I heard the second floor front window thrown open, and on entering the room, the little boy was standing on the floor, quite naked, and crying; the prisoner had a pillow in his hand, and was in the act of throwing that, as I thought, out of window- I laid hold of him, and said, "Do you know what you are about? are you mad?" I prevented his throwing it out - he made no answer, but laid hold of the bed; I laid hold of it, and said, "Rick, are you mad?" he said,"D - n my bl - y eyes, I will heave out every hit in the place - I will smash them all;" I prevented his throwing the bed out - his wife then came into the room, and exclaimed, "My child, my child!" the bed was then at the foot of the bedstead, on the floor - the prisoner made an attempt to strike her; I prevented him, and stamped my foot, thinking the child must be under the bed, smothered - I said, "D - n you, pick the child up;" she turned over the bed two or three times, but did not find it, and then she screamed out, "My child is thrown out of window;" the prisoner was present - he made no reply that I heard; she directly ran down stairs, and I after her with a light - I saw her pick up the child; she said it was dead - it did not cry then; two Policemen came up - I gave one of them the light, and he went up stairs; I saw the child after it came from the doctor's - its head was grazed and swollen, but there was no blood; I thought the prisoner very much in liquor.

EDWARD BYRNE . I am a surgeon, and live in Old Gravel-lane. The child was brought to me by the mother and two Policemen - I examined it, and found a very large tumor on the head, and a fracture of the skull - this unquestionably caused its death; I ordered leeches, as the only resource, but entertained no idea that it would be of benefit - I have not a doubt that it died of the fracture on the head.

FRANCIS FAGAN . I am an inspector of the Police. The prisoner was brought to the station, at a quarter-past two o'clock - I asked what could induce him to throw the child out of window; he laughed incessantly, and I asked him no more questions then - in the morning, when Ifound him more composed, I asked what induced him to do it; he cried, and said he had thrown his wife's duds out, but gave no answer about the child.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the child- I saw it at ten o'clock in the morning, when I went to work, but never afterwards; I did not know it was there till next day, when Fagan asked me about it - I leave it all to your Lordship.

GUILTY . Aged 33. - Transported for Life .

2107. WILLIAM WEBSTER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , 4 pairs of stockings, value 8s., and 1 cloth, value 18d. , the goods of Daniel O'Keefe ; and that he had been previously convicted of felony, by the name of William Wilson.

JAMES POSFORD . I am a Policeman. On Sunday morning, the 9th of October, about half-past five o'clock, I saw the prisoner come from the area gate of No. 26, Seymour-street, Euston-square - he dropped a little white parcel, then took it up again, turned round, saw me, and ran off; I followed, and saw him throw something over into the area of an unfinished house, in Drummond-street - I sprang my rattle; he ran down a mews, got over four walls, into the carcase of a house, and escaped - I went back to the area, and found three pairs of stockings in a cloth; I went to the prisoner's house the same day, in plain clothes - I knew where he lived; he was denied- I then sent another person; he was denied again - I found him on the Tuesday night, at the Rising Sun, Somers'-town; he said he was innocent - I am sure he is the man; I knew him perfectly well before - I took him to the watch-house; he had two pairs of trousers on, and between them I found a pair of stockings - he said somebody must have put them there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did you not pass close by him at twelve o'clock that very day? A. I did not - I have not asked any body what kind of a person he was - he had blue trousers and a blue coat on; I had no quarrel with him that night; he did not throw a piece of tobacco-pipe at me.

CATHERINE O'KEEFE . I am the wife of Daniel O'Keefe - we live at No. 26, Seymour-street . On Sunday morning Posford showed me three pairs of stockings and a mangling-cloth, which were in my care to wash; they were in my front kitchen on the Saturday night - a square of glass was broken with the mangle; they could be drawn through that, and the stockings reached - Posford afterwards produced another pair of stockings, which I also had to wash.

Cross-examined. Q. Is there any mark on the last pair? A. They are marked T. R., and belong to the same family as the others.

ROBERT WOOLEY . I am a Policeman. I have a certificate of the prisoner's former conviction - (read); I was present at his trial, and know him to be the person convicted by the name of Wilson.

Prisoner. I have witnesses.

WILLIAM HAYLING . On Saturday night, the 9th of October, I was with the prisoner, close against his door; he had a quarrel with the Policeman - I cannot say what it was about; he had a tobacco-pipe in his hand, and threw it, but did not happen to hit that Policeman; it hit another, who stood by - the Policeman ran up and took him, but the woman interfered; his wife pulled him in, and shut the door - about a quarter of an hour after that the Policemen and I were drinking together - it was at two o'clock in the morning, at No. 26, Southampton-street -I drank gin with them; I am a coach-maker, and live at No. 5, Churchway, Charlotte-street, Somers'-town, and work for Messrs. Hanawell and Co., Oxford-street - the prisoner had darkish trousers on.

HARRIET BURGESS . I keep a little shop in Churchway. The Policeman came to me on Sunday morning, yesterday fortnight, between six and seven o'clock, and asked me at what time the prisoner generally got up - he lived on the same side of the way as me; he asked what kind of a man he was, to the best of my opinion.

ANN DACEY TAYLOR. I live in Churchway, right opposite the prisoner - I saw him go up stairs to bed, about half-past two o'clock - he was very much intoxicated; we were all trying to get him in - he was fighting and tearing about: his mother and wife were helping.

ELIZABETH WEBSTER . I am the prisoner's mother. -On Saturday fortnight, at half-past twelve o'clock, I saw him dreadfully intoxicated, and tried to get him in, for fear he should get into trouble with the Policemen; Taylor, who lives in my first floor assisted, and his brother, who is out of town.

COURT. Q. Did you succeed in getting him in? A. I got him in about two o'clock, and it was near half-past two when I came out, leaving him dreadfully intoxicated - he had not any sense in him.

JAMES POSFORD. On my solemn oath, the prisoner did not throw any pipe at me; I was with another person, but I saw no pipe at all - I did not attempt to take hold of him between eleven and twelve o'clock - if I wanted him I could have taken him; my serjeant was with me - he was sober at half-past five o'clock in the morning, when I saw him with the property; the two witnesses sent to the prosecutrix, and offered her money not to appear.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Transported for Life .

2108. PHOEBE WILSON was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 28th of September , of an evil-disposed person, 4 pairs of shoes, value 12s., the goods of James Stewart , she well knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES STEWART. I am a boot and shoemaker , and live in High-street, Shadwell . On the 28th of September, about one o'clock, inquiry was made if I had lost any shoes; I immediately missed four pairs, which had hung at the door.

DENNIS POWER . I am a Police-officer. On Thursday, the 29th of September, I received information respecting the prisoner - I went next day, and found her at her own house, in London-terrace, Commercial-road - she keeps a house of ill-fame; I took her into custody - she asked what it was for; I told her for some shoes which she had pawned, and asked where she had got them - she said she did not steal them, but a young man named James Rankin had shirked them, and that he gave them to her to dispose of - I asked where she had pawned them; she said she pawned one pair at Williams', Cable-street, Wellclose-square - that she took them herself; I asked if she sent young Stubbs to pawn a pair - she said she did; I asked how much he got for them - she said 2s. 6d., and that theywere pawned at Hale's, late Anderton, Commercial-road; I asked where the remainder of them were; she said she did not know - I did not mention how many pairs had been lost till afterwards; I went with her to Williams', who produced a pair, but said he was not present when they were pawned - she told him she had pawned them herself, and what they were pawned for, and described them; I took her to the station, and asked if she knew about any more - she said there were four pairs stolen, she knew, but she knew nothing of more than two pairs; I have one pair, which I got from Laws, and another from Nock.

WILLIAM STUBBS. I am going on for fourteen years old. On Wednesday, the 28th of September, the prisoner sent me to pawn a pair of shoes, and said she would give me a halfpenny - she told me to take them to Anderton's, to ask 3s., and not take less than 2s. 6d.; I received 2s. 6d. for them, took her the money, and got her change for the half-crown - I was with her at the top of Morgan-street, when a young man named Joseph Sheplierd came and asked her how much I had got for them - she said 2s. 6d.; he said,"How much did he ask?" she said 3s.

GEORGE SMELLEY . I am in the employ of Mr. Hale, a pawnbroker, who succeeded Anderton. Stubbs pawned a pair of shoes with me on the 28th of October, for 2s. 6d.

WILLIAM NOCK . I am shopman to Mr. Williams, of Cable-street. A pair of shoes were pawned with me - I do not know who by; the Policeman brought the prisoner to me - she owned that she had pawned them.

CATHERINE SOLOMON . On a Wednesday in September, about half-past two o'clock, I saw the prisoner sitting on the step of her door, and asked her to lace my frock, which was undone; she did so - she sat there with a pair of shoes in her hand, and asked if I would buy them; I asked what she wanted - she said 2s.; I bought them - they were quite new; she said they were misfits of her own - that she did not like them, and would sell them; I pawned them at Laws', for 2s. 6d., to get the money to pay her; I went back, and gave her the money - here are a pair produced by Power, with No.3 on them, which was on those I bought, and they are the same sort of shoes.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know they were stolen.

DENNIS POWER . The meaning of shirked is stolen from a shop or warehouse.

GUILTY . Aged 19 - Transported for Fourteen Years .

First London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

2109. MARY ANN CASE was indicted for perjury .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

2110. HENRY WHITTY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 1 decanter, value 2s. 6d. , the goods of William Kegele .

WILLIAM KEGELE. I am a broker , and live on Saffronhill . I saw the prisoner about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, come into the shop; he went out in a moment, with something under his jacket; I stopped him at the next house, and took the decanter from him.

DANIEL BROWN. I received him in charge, and asked what induced him to do this - he said he wanted to make up a few shillings to buy clothes.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Fourteen Days .

2111. JOHN TENANT was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , 1 watch, value 1l., and 1 key, value 6d. , the goods of James Wetherley .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

2112. THOMAS TATE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , 1 watch, value 15s., and 1 key, value 6d. , the goods of Benjamin Curtis .

BENJAMIN CURTIS. I keep a butter-shop in South Audley-street . On the 10th of September, at ten o'clock in the morning, I left my watch on a nail in a turn-up bedstead in the kitchen - the prisoner came to the house as helper to a gentleman who lodged on my first floor; about eleven o'clock at night, when I went to bed, I missed my watch; I had seen the prisoner there about seven o'clock in the evening.

THOMAS WELLS . I am servant to a pawnbroker in Lower-street, Islington. This watch was pawned with me for 10s., with a gold key, by a man, in the name of George Smith. No. 3, Windsor-street, a lodger, on the 19th of September - I do not know whether it was the prisoner.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . I live in Adam's-mews, Grosvenor-square, and am a servant out of place; the prisoner lodged in the same room with me - I lost a great coat, and accused him of it; he showed me three duplicates - one was for a watch; I copied it, as I had heard of Curtis' loss, and gave it to him - I took the copy to Curtis' shop, and left it, on the 26th of September - the prisoner was taken the same day.

GEORGE DEVELIN. I am a Policeman. I received the prisoner on another charge; I found a duplicate on him, went to the pawnbroker's, and found the watch; Curtis described it before it was produced.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the prosecutor twice after his watch was lost, and he said nothing.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

2113. THOMAS TATE was again indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , 1 coat, value 2l. , the goods of William Aldridge .

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE. The prisoner lodged in the same room with me; I lost a coat from the room; he was absent two or three days: when I saw him I asked if he knew any thing of my coat, and after some time he acknowledged taking it, and selling it to a Jew - I did not make him any threat or promise; it was a great coat, and cost me six guineas - I am a groom.

Prisoner. He said he would let me go for 2l. Witness. I said if he would make it good I would.

GEORGE DEVELIN . The prisoner told me he had not pawned this coat, but sold it to a Jew, and described him.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

2114. WILLIAM STOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , 1 picture, value 3l. , the goods of William Cauldfield .

WILLIAM CAULDFIELD. I live in Gray's Inn-passage, and am a book and print-seller . On the 8th of October, about half-past five o'clock in the evening, I left my shop, leaving this picture safe - I returned in about three minutes, and as I came to my door Mason gave me the picture, and gave me information.

GEORGE MASON . I live in Gray's Inn-passage, nearly opposite the prosecutor's. I saw the prisoner walking up and down the passage - I then saw him go into Cauldfield's shop, and come out with the picture under his arm- he ran away; I called Stop thief! he dropped it; I took it up, and gave it to Cauldfield - he was secured in a few seconds; I have not a doubt of him - he was alone.

PHILIP WILDEY . I laid hold of the prisoner in Bedford-street, near Red Lion-square; Mason called to me to stop him - I saw him throw down the picture, and stopped him, without losing sight of him.

ALFRED MARTIN. The prisoner was delivered into my custody, with the picture; he said it was not him who stole it - that he ran to get out of the way when the man ran.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran.

GUILTY . Aged 17. - Transported for Seven Years .

2116. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 watch, value 40s.; 1 chain, value 8d.; 1 key, value 4d.; 1 pocket-book, value 1s., and 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Thomas Clark , from his person .

THOMAS CLARK . I am a lighterman , and live at Brentford. On the 27th of February, about twelve o'clock at night, I took a cab in Fleet-street - I was not sober; I took a female into the cab with me - the prisoner drove it; my watch was in my fob, which was taken from me, also my pocket-book and handkerchief, but how I cannot say.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. I suppose the prisoner sat on one side of the cab? A. I do not recollect where he sat, but I recollect his face; the young woman sat by my side - she might have taken my watch; the prisoner put me down by Shadwell church, where I desired him - the female left us in the Minories.

JAMES SMITH . I am a Policeman. On the 27th of September, about two o'clock in the morning, I observed Leanon following the prisoner; I joined in the pursuit, and saw Leanon secure him in Cannon-street, St. George in the East - the prosecutor, in the courst of the pursuit, said he had lost his watch, handkerchief, and pocket-book- the prisoner was searched in the street, but nothing found; I got into the cab, and among the straw at the bottom I found the watch - he denied robbing the prosecutor; I saw no woman.

HENRY LEANON. I am a Policeman. On the morning of the 27th I saw the cab going down by Shadwell church; it crossed the street - the prosecutor came out intoxicated, and then the prisoner, who was in the cab; there was no woman - the prosecutor was very much intoxicated, and gave him 4d.; the prisoner said he had agreed to give him 1s. from the Minories - I stopped there; another cab-man came over, and said, "George, are you not coming back?" he said, "No, this man won't pay my fare;" the other said, "Give him in charge"- I said I dare say he would pay; I went round to take the number of the cab - the prisoner turned round to drive off, and in consequence of what the prosecutor said, I went and overtook the cab, and asked the prisoner to stop; I asked if he had sat down a seaman opposite Shadwell church - he said, Yes what was the matter; I said he said he had lost his property, and charged him with taking it - he said No, he had not, and told me to come into the cab and not make a noise; he got up in the cab two or three times, and sat down again - he then jumped out, and ran away; I found the handkerchief and pocket-book under the seat.

Cross-examined. Q.Were you listening to the altercation about the shilling? A. Yes - it might last four minutes; I had my uniform on - he saw me.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. If the property was lost before he came into my cab. I should be placed in the same situation - I am quite innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

2117. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 6 handkerchiefs, value 24s., and 2 yards of flannel, value 4s. , the goods of Richard Ensoll .

RICHARD ENSOLL. I am a hosier , and live in Broad-street, St. Giles' . On the 11th of October, about half-past three o'clock, I saw this property in my back parlour - I was up stairs about ten minutes after, and heard a call of Stop thief! I saw somebody cross the road - I ran down, ran across, and a crowd had stopped the prisoner; these handkerchiefs and flannel were found in his hat, which he held in his hand - they were separate handkerchiefs, and the flannel was put inside to make one appear like a piece; they have no mark, but are the same pattern, and I have no doubt of them.

Cross-examined by MR. BALL. Q. Can you swear these were on your counter ten minutes before? A. There are so many alike, it is impossible to swear to one in particular; there was nobody in the shop - Mrs. Ensoll was in the parlour.

COURT. Q. Do the handkerchiefs correspond in quality and quantity with what you lost? A. I cannot tell what quantity I lost - they are the same quality and pattern; the flannel is in them - the prisoner did not claim them; I never sold him any - I believe them to be mine; I missed some off the counter.

GEORGE HOBBY . I am a Policeman. I found the prisoner in custody in Mr. Ensoll's shop; he said before the Magistrate that they were his own - I found a pair of scissors on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a hawker in Tottenham-court-road, for 22s. - my brother had desired me to buy some to send into the country.

MR. ENSOLL. There is flannel in the handkerchiefs, and I miss both flannel and handkerchiefs.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

2118. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 28 yards of shalloon, value 32s. , the goods of Abraham Moss .

ABRAHAM MOSS. I am a tailor , and live at Shadwell . The Policeman brought the prisoner into my shop with twenty-eight yards of shalloon, which are mine; I had seen it on a trussel with more shalloons - here is the letter M in my own hand-writing, on the paper; it was taken momentarily, without my seeing it - the prisoner is a stranger.

MATILDA ROGERS . I am house-servant to Mr. MossOn the 12th of October, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I was in the kitchen, on the same floor as the shop, and saw the prisoner enter the shop, and walk to the back part if it; he went out with a parcel under his arm - I went to the door; a neighbour came up - he was followed, and stopped by Collins, before he got out of my sight.

THOMAS COLLINS . I am a Policeman. I stopped the prisoner a hundred yards from Moss door. with this parcel under his right arm - he said he had bought it; I took him back to the shop.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoenr's Defence; I picked it up, looked at it, and the Policeman collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months , and Publicly Whipped .

2119. ANN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 gown, value 5s. , the goods of Benjamin Fletcher .

BENJAMIN FLETCHER . I live in Dorrington-street, Brook's market . This gown hung on a nail in my shop; I went into the parlour, and when I came back I saw the prisoner getting up from behind the counter - I asked what she wanted; she could not tell me - I saw this gown hanging three or four inches below her petticoat, and pulled it from under her clothes.

CHARLES MUMFORD I took her in charge; she said it was turned drink had caused her to do it - she was in liquor.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner put in a written Defence, declaring her innocence.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Recommended to Mercy - Fined 1s. and Discharged.

NEW COURT MONDAY, OCTOBER 24.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2120. WILLIAM RUSH was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , 7 weights, value 5s. , the goods of Henry Legge ; and that he had been before convicted of felony to which he pleaded.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

2121. WILLIAM GIBSON and JOSEPH BENNET were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , 1 live tame fowl, price 3s. , the property of William Nunney .

JAMES HARRYS . I am a constable of Bayswater. On the 25th of September I saw the prisoner in a field belonging to Mr. Fortesue - I asked where they were going, as it with no therefore, they said, was it not, then they would go back - Gibson's brother, who is younger than these boys, was with them, and he had something with him; they then turned to go behind Lord Hill's - I said there was no thoroughfare that way; I then asked the little boy what he had got - he made no answer; I looked, and found a fowl in his pinafore - I said,"Where did you get this?" the prisoner Gibson replied, they found it across the fields on some hay; I said, "You stole it;" I took the little one and the fowl, and these two prisoners ran away - a gentleman stopped Gibson in the field; Bennett got over the hedge, and was taken there- I took them all, but the little one was dismissed; I found on them a quantity of sun-flower seed, which fowls are particularly fond of.

LUCY NUNNEY . I am the wife of William Nunney - we live in Durham-place, Kensington. We had some fowls; this one produced by the constable is ours - I had seen it safe at half-past three o'clock that day, and it was brought back between six and seven; we live nearly half a mile from where it was found.

Gibson's Defence. We were all going black berrying, and saw the fowl under the hedge.

Bennett's Defence. The little boy saw it, and put it into his piuafore: we told him to put it down.

A witness gave Bennett a good character, and engaged to take him into his service.

GIBSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined One Month and Whipped .

BENNETT - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury.

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

2122. THOMAS GRAVES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , 190 yards of silk warp, value 12l.; 1 weaver's harness, value 10s.; 1 weaver's reed, value 10s.; 1 cane roll, value 3s., and 12 whirlgees, value 1s. , the goods of Charles Evans .

2nd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of John Kindrick .

3rd COUNT, stating them to be the goods of Thomas Ballance .

MR. CHURCHILL conducted the prosecution.

JOHN KINDRICK . I am a journeyman weaver , and live in Princes-court, Tyson-street. On the 12th of September I got a cane of work from Mr. Ballance's warehouse- I took it to the enterer's, Mr. Evans, and left it with Mrs. Evans; there were 190 yards of warp, valued at twelve guineas - the whirlgees I took the next day; the harness and other things might be worth another pound- when I had left the came at Evans', I went to a public-house; I saw William Bennett there, who works for Mr. Ballance - I told him I had left my work at the enterer's, but I did not say where; I only said in Hope-town - I never sent the prisoner to Hope-town for my work; I never saw him till I went to the Magistrate - I have never seen the work since.

REBECCA EVANS . I am the wife of Charles Evans - we live in Charlotte-street, Hope-town. On the 12th of September Kindrick brought the cane of work to our house, and the next day he brought the other articles; I was to make him a harness, and get it entered by half-past one o'clock, on the 14th, and he was to come for it - at two or half-past two, I was down stairs, and heard a knock at the door; I went up, and saw the prisoner - he said he had come for his father's work, whose name was Kindrick; I asked him what it was - he said one thousand one hundred, three double, on six lambs, and that the reed had come just before noon, which was the time Kindrick had left it - I got the work, asked him again what it was, and he told me again; it was impossible he could have known the right quantity unless he had been told - he took off his hat, and took a handkerchief out; he said that handkerchief would cover it, and that would do - he went away, and took the work with him; Ithought it was his father, as he said - I had never seen the prisoner before, but I took such notice of his person that I am sure he is the same; I described him at the Police-station - I saw him again on the Saturday following, and knew him in a moment.

Prisoner. She gave the description of the dress which Kindrick's son had on. Witness. I saw his son the same night, and if he had been the person I should have known him in a moment.

ANN DUCE . On the 14th of September, I was standing at my own door, which is next to Evans', and I saw the prisoner knock at her door, and take the work away- I am sure of his person; he passed me twice.

HENRY COTTON . I am a Police-officer. I knew the prisoner before I took him on this charge; I touched him on the arm, and said, "Tom. I want you;" he asked what for - I said, "For some silk;" he said, "So help me G - d, I know nothing of the robbery;" he had been described to me by our inspector.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent.

JURY to ANN DUCE . Q.Had you known the prisoner before? A. No, but I saw him pass my door, and thought him a character not to be trusted further than he could be seen - I suppose he was about ten minutes at the door; when I saw him again I was quite sure he was the person - I can say nothing about his dress.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

2123. JOHN MIDDLETON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , 1 carding-machine, value 5l.; 1 tub, value 5s.; 1 stand, value 5s.; 1 fly-wheel, value 20s., and 300 feet of wire-carding, value 7l. , the goods of Joseph Mellingen ; and MARCUS STULTZ was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing the same to have been stolen, against the Statute , & c.

MESSRS. PHILLIPS, CLARKSON, CRESWELL, and BODKIN conducted the prosecution.

JOSEPH MELLINGEN . I am the proprietor of a wadding-manufactory , in George-street, Spitalfields . In June last Middleton was my foreman - I had a carding-machine there; on the 18th of July (I believe) I made inquiries of Middleton respecting it - I had heard it was gone, and missed it; I then asked Middleton what had become of it - he seemed astonished at the moment; I asked him again, and he said, "I sold it to Mr. Snape;" I said,"How dare you take the liberty of selling a machine of mine without my leave?" he said he thought it was not of much use to me, laying below, and he thought best to sell it - I am not acquainted with the business myself, and do not interfere; I placed the utmost confidence in Middleton - I asked if he had got the money for it; he said No, but he should in a few days - that he had sold it for 3l. 10s.; I said it was conduct I did not at all approve of - in a day or two I received some more information; I had not taken Middleton up on the 18th of July, as I did not wish to take any further notice at that moment, but I found, a day or two afterwards, that not only the machine was gone, but a large quantity of carding, a fly-wheel, a size-tub, and other things; and on the 1st of August, I went with Burrell, my clerk, to a house in Spicer-street - Jones opened the door, but the house was taken in the name of Stuliz; the moment I went in I saw my machine completely at work, with the fly-wheel, the size-tub, and the whole apparatus - I then went home, and sent for Middleton in the evening; I told him what I had seen in Spicer-street - I afterwards had him apprehended, and next day I went to the same house with two officers; I found Stultz there - I asked him if these things belonged to him; he said he had bought them of Snape for ten guineas - I told him that was impossible, as he knew very well that they were stolen from my premises; I had never seen Stultz before, but I gave him and Jones into custody - there was a quantity of carding on the machine, and the other articles were there.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.Have you brought your books here? A. Yes; I am a diamond merchant - I think I have been about three years and a half in the wadding business; Middleton had been with me the whole time - he was never in partnership with me, and I never said so to any one; I could not say it; a gentleman named Day and his lady called on me - I never told them that he was my partner; he, at first, had a guinea a week as wages, then 25s., and, from the 2nd of May last, he has had 30s. - there is an entry in my book of the bulk of the wages of the whole of my servants - he used to put it down on a state; I sent him the money - he paid the men, and took his own wages week by week; I never told him he should have half the profits, nor that if the trade made a crown he should have half of it - I have lived in White-street, and in Wentworth-street, before I went to George-street; I had the misfortune to be burnt out of two places - my landlord warned me out of two places - this machine had been standing unemployed below for six or eight months; it could not be brought into work - there was no carding on it; it was merely the wood work; I had not mentioned any wish to sell it - we could, at any time, bring it into work- it is very large, and would weigh 14cwt. or 15cwt.: my clerk entered it in the book, on the 19th of July, as if it had been sold; it was not to his account, but to mine - here is the entry of it in this book; I have a wages-book in which the wages of each man is entered; I have sometimes eighteen or twenty men at work in the factory, but at that time there was but little work, and I probably had not more than two boys and a man; I used to see the book from time to time, but I was not there regularly; I have not probably gone there for a month or five weeks; I have seen that the entries were made from week to week - Middleton bought and sold what was wanted; here is the entry of the machine to Snape at 3l. 10s.; it was put down on the 19th of July, in Burrell's hand-writing- it is carried into my journal; I sent for Middleton, and took him up - I took Stultz and Jones the next day; I preferred a bill at the September Session - the Grand Jury threw it out; I was examined as a witness, and so was Burrell and Leonard; but Snape, the principal witness, was kept out of the way - I have every reason to suppose so; I can swear he had removed, and no one could tell where he was gone - when the bill was thrown out I did not make any application to the prisoners to forgive me for what was past, and say I would take no further notice about it - I went before the Grand Jury again the next day, with the same witnesses and the same charge; Snapewas not found - I never said that it was not the value of the machine I cared about; that it might be removed over and over again, for what I cared, but I felt sore at Stultz taking the concern to my prejudice - he had set up business in Spicer-street, five hundred yards or half a mile from my place; it appeared that Jones had gone to work for him, as I found him there - Jones had worked for me.

COURT. Q.Had your attention been called to the entry before the 1st of August? A. No; I had not attended there.

MR. CLARKSON. Q. Who are Mr. and Mrs. Day? A. I do not know, except that they called at my house one Saturday, and asked about Middleton; it appeared that Middleton had gone into the country for the purpose of marrying Mr. Day's daughter; they said he had represented to them that he was carrying on an extensive business in the wadding-manufactory, and they thought it adviseable to come to me - I said he was a trust-worthy servant, and I had every confidence in him, but he had not one shilling except what he received from me; if they thought proper to give their daughter to him, and she had any fortune, I would give up the business to him, as I was tired of it - that was all that passed; I think that must have been in the month of June - the conversation, between me and Middleton, took place on the 18th of July; it was stated he had sold the machine six weeks prior to that - he had no authority whatever to deal with any machinery or plant of mine, without my direction - it was his constant course to sell the wadding, to attend the factory, to make the wadding, and give account of it; here is no entry of the sale of the fly-wheel, or tub, or carding - they are quite distinct from the machine; the fires, at my former premises, were accidental - our premises are not insurable.

JEREMIAH LEONARD . I was, in June last, in the service of the prosecutor. I remember the carding-engine being in the cellar - it was removed six or seven weeks previous to the prisoners' being taken; I helped to put it into the truck, by direction of Middleton - Snape was there, and assisted; I did not go with the truck. On the 4th of August I went to Mr. Stultz's premises - I saw the machine and the fly-wheel; they were the same as had been at the factory, but as to the carding it is impossible to say - sixteen or seventeen sheets of carding had been missed from the factory about three weeks before; they are about two feet and a half in length, and sixteen inches wide - there was only a piece here and there found on the machine.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q.What time in the day did you remove this? A.About two o'clock in the day; I did not see Burrell there - there were five or six of us present; I did not tell my master of it - Mr. Snape and Jones were there; a lad named Conner, and another named Miller - we were not desired to keep it secret; the machine could not be used without the fly-wheel and trough; there was some old carding on the machine when it went - I received 12s. a week, and there might be seven or eight at the factory in July, receiving wages- Middleton paid us.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q.Were you in the service of the prosecutor, when he removed from one place to another? A. Yes; I do not know whether Snape was employed to remove his articles then - Middleton lived on the premises, and used to pay the men; Mr. Mellingen came every morning to the factory -Borrell kept the books.

MR. BODKIN. Q. Do you mean you saw Mr. Mellingen every morning? A.Sometimes he might miss a morning or two, or a week.

THOMAS BURRELL . I am clerk to Mr. Mellingen. About the middle of July I had some conversation with him about a carding-machine - I had not then missed it; I went to Middleton, and told him that Mr. Mellingen had been inquiring of me about the sale of a carding-machine, and if it was sold it had not come to my knowledge - he took no notice, but turned round, and walked out; I went into the cellar, and missed the machine - I spoke to Middleton again in a day or two, in the counting-house; I said, "That machine is gone, and you have not made me acquainted with it;" he said the reason was that he had not got settled with for it - it would have been his duty to have mentioned the sale of it to me whether it had been paid for or not; on the 19th of July, which was after the conversation, I entered it in this day-book, by the direction of Middleton, "One carding-machine, sold for cash to W. Snape, 3l. 10s.;" Middleton is charged with it by this entry - I went to Stultz, and saw the machine on the 1st of August.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Do you and your wife reside on these premises? A. Yes, in a dwelling-house behind the factory; I cannot tell how many men were employed on the premises - there is a wages-book of the men who are employed, but that is at the factory; the wages are entered here in a lump - here is a running account with Middleton in this book; on this page it appears he had a balance of 1l. 11s. 6d. in his hands - he had always paid the men their wages, and perhaps did not like his name to appear; Mr. Mellingen is my master, but I call many a man my master - I may have called Middleton so in a joke; I swear I never considered him my master, and he never was so - I do not recollect whether I have ever called him so; Mr. Mellingen sometimes came every morning, and sometimes not for a week - he was very uncertain; I have known him stay away longer than a week - in July, to the best of my recollection, he made it his business to come every morning; I do not think I ever knew him to stay away a month or six weeks together - he might stay two or three days, or a week; it was my duty to go out to travel - Middleton did not go away till August.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. Did you make the entry on the 19th of July? A. Yes, and I told Mr. Mellingen of it, I believe, the next day - I do not recollect that Middleton knew I had told Mr. Mellingen of it; I kept the books, by Mr. Mellingen's direction - here is one of them, marked at the edge J. Mellingen; I have made out bills of parcels in the name of Middleton - I cannot say how many; it was done by Middleton's direction- I thought it my duty to tell Mr. Mellingon; I said,"Do you know, Sir, there are bills of parcels going out in the name of Middleton?" he said, "Very well, it is all right, I gave direction so while this business of Owen's is in litigation."

COURT. Q. How long did you continue issuing bills of parcels in the name of Middleton, when, as you represent, he was not a partner? A. I cannot say; they were in the name of Middleton only.

MR. CLARKSON to MR. MELLINGEN. Q.Can you explain the statement of the last witness? A. In consequence of an indictment against two persons, named Owen and Riley, who were in my employ, of which they were convicted, for a conspiracy to defraud me of about 1200l., and as Owen had been to my customers and received money which I sent for again, the customers would not purchase any more goods from the factory, as they said they did not know what they were about, and I directed Middleton to send what goods did go out in his name.

COURT. Q.How came you to keep Middleton in your employ after what you found out? A I was told if I let it rest a few days, I should find out such things as would astonish me.

WILLIAM SNAPE . I am a machine-maker. In the latter end of June, or the beginning of July, Middleton gave me a carding-machine to repair, for which I was to have 5l.; I saw it in Mr. Mellingen's cellar, and it was removed from there to my house, by Middleton's directions; in about three weeks after I received from Middleton some carding- I cannot tell how much, it was about forty or fifty feet; I cannot say where he took the carding from, but I was to put it on the machine - Middleton told me he should book the machine to me, as if I had bought it, for 3l. 10s., but I am quite sure he gave it me to repair; I was to have 5l. for it - I did not buy it at all - I repaired it, and put the carding on it which I got from Middleton, and he then directed me to take it to Stultz's premises, which I did - I remember Stultz being apprehended, but I cannot tell the day; Stultz came by my house the day he was apprehended - I do not recollect his saying any thing to me that day about the machine; Middleton paid me for repairing the machine, to the value of 5l., as I asked for it - I do not recollect having any conversation with Stultz about this machine after his apprehension.

COURT. Q.Had you any conversation with Stultz about the price of this machine? A. There was something, but I do not recollect what it was.

Q. Be careful - did he say any thing about the machine? A. I do not recollect what he said - I do not know what passed; he might mention the machine - I think there was something he said, that I was to say he bought it of me for 10l. - he had not bought it, nor given me any money.

JURY. Q. Was it after the machine had been removed that Middleton told you it was to be booked? A. Yes, three weeks after; I said it made no difference - I had paid nothing, but was to have 5l. for repairing it.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2124. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 1 set of chaise-harness, value 3l. , the goods of Martha Loomes .

JAMES COLLINS . I am a Police-officer. I was near Islington on the 5th of October, about half-past four o'clock in the morning; I met the prisoner - he crossed the road, and seemed to wish to avoid me; I crossed, and stopped him - I asked what he had got; he said harness, which he had bought of a man on the other side of St. Alban's, for 25s. - I took him, and detained the property; he was about two hundred yards from the prosecutor's.

JOHN LOOMES . I am the son of Martha Loomes - she is a widow , and the owner of this harness. I remember the stable door, in which it was, being locked on the 4th of October, at half-past seven o'clock in the evening; I went the next morning, and found the door closed, but the padlock and staple were on the ground - this harness was missing; I do not know the prisoner.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy, believing it to be his first offence, and being in distress.

Confined Three Months .

2125. HENRY WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 1 purse, value 6d.; 1 knife, value 6d., and 2 half-crowns, the property of John McAnnulty , from his person .

JOHN McANNULTY. I am a hawker . On the 15th of September I was at the General Elliott, Church-street, Chelsea ; I had lodged there four nights previous - as I was taking my supper the landlady called me out, and said there was a bad lot in the tap-room, who were going to fight - I came to the bar, and thanked her; I drank a pint of beer, wiped my knife with which I had eaten my supper, and took my purse out of my breeches pocket, it was over some halfpence; I put the purse into my waistcoat pocket, and put the knife on the top of it - the prisoner came, reached over my arm, and took my knife and purse; I cried Robbery! and ran out directly after him - he had the purse in his hand, and got in among a parcel of women, and which he gave the purse to, I do not know; a Police-serjeant came up, and I gave charge of him - I saw the purse in his hand upwards of three minutes after I lost it.

Cross-examined by MR. CLARKSON. Q.Have you always given the same account of it? A. I believe so - the purse was made of linen; I never said it was made of leather - it was about eleven o'clock at night; I never swore it was nine - I said I did not know the time, as there was no clock; the prisoner was taken facing the door of the General Elliott - the landlady was in the bar, but the passage is but narrow, and I turned my side to the bar to drink the beer; she was perhaps two yards from the prisoner - she did not say, in my hearing, that he was not the man; I was perfetly sober.

LUKE NIXON . I am a Police-serjeant. The prosecutor charged the prisoner with robbing him of a purse and some money; I took him to the station - I was surrounded by three women, and thrown down with the prisoner in my hand; we were all down together - in going along the prisoner said he would be d - d if it was him that robbed him, or something of that kind.

Cross-examined. Q.Were you on the spot? A. I was passing by; I took the prisoner ten or twelve yards from the house - I cannot say that the prosecutor said before the Magistrate, that he had seen the prisoner give his purse to a woman, but he said so after he came out of the office; the office was so crowded, I did not hear what he said there.

JURY. Q. Was the prosecutor sober? A.He hadbeen drinking, but knew what he was about; I did not hear any of the women call the prisoner by name, but he lives with one of them named Dockerty.

GUILTY . Aged 19. - Transported for Seven Years .

2126. JAMES BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 1 pair of shoes, value 4s.; 1 waistcoat, value 4s., and 1 pair of stockings, value 6d., the goods of Michael O'Hara ; 1 shirt, value 2s., and 1 pair of stocking, value 9d. , the goods of James Finnigan .

MICHAEL O'HARA. I live in Crown-court, Golden-lane . The prisoner slept in the next bed to me; he came there on the 1st of October - there were four beds in the room; I have slept there three years - my shoes were under my bed; my stockings on a line, and my waistcoat on a box; they were all safe on the Sunday night - I went to work at five o'clock on Monday morning, and left the prisoner in the room; when I came home at night he was gone, and my things also - he was taken on Wednesday.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How many people slept in the room? A. The prisoner and five others - they were labouring men.

HENRY BERESFORD . I am an officer. I took the prisoner on another charge - I went to a wharf where he was in the habit of working, on the City-canal, near Battle-bridge; I went up into a left with Ryan, (the landlord of the house he had lodged at before,) and Ryan pulled out this bundle from behind some wood.

JOHN RYAN . I live in Lamb's-court, Bunhill-row. I went with Beresford to search for the prisoner; I found this bundle - I do not know whether the prisoner used the left; I have seen him wear these trousers.

WILLIAM LEWINGTON . I am a labourer, and worked with the prisoner - he told me he had put a bundle into the left; I did not see it.

ELIZABETH RYAN . I know these to be the prisoner's trousers; I had seen him put a piece on the knee of them.

JAMES FINNIGAN . This shirt and pair of stockings are mine, and were lost from the same room.

Prisoner's Defence. There was drinking in the next room, and strange people going up and down all night.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Confined Six Months .

2127. SARAH WATKINS and ANN HILLERY were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , 1 watch, value 20s., the goods of Robert Waters , from his person .

ROBERT WATERS. I am a shipwright . On the 5th of September I was with my cousin, who is a sailor, in Ratcliff-highway - I was drunk, but I knew what I was about; I and my cousin were with the two prisoners for two hours - I had not taken any liberties, or had any thing to do with either of the prisoners; I had given one of them 1s. to get some drink - I do not know whether I had any; they both ran away, and I then missed my watch - I met the officer, and asked if he had seen two girls and a sailor go along; he said Yes he had - my chain and watch were all in my fob, and the fob was cut off.

JAMES GAMBLE . I am an officer. I passed the two prisoners in London-street - I then met the prosecutor; he was drunk; he said he had lost his watch - I looked, and his fob was cut off; he said it was two women, and described which way they had gone - I told him to come with me; I took the two prisoners, and one of them(but I cannot say which) threw down this watch and fob- I believe Watkins said they or she had been tempted to do it by a shipmate of his, who had been drinking with them; I found nothing on the prisoners, but the fob seems to have been cut - they said, "Don't hurt us;" I said, "It don't rest with me."(Property produced and sworn to.)

WATKINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

HILLERY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

2128. HENRY FITT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 hat, value 4s., the goods of William Gattrill , from his person .

WILLIAM GATTRILL. I am a carpenter . On the 21st of September I was walking down Wentworth-street , between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, and a person snatched my hat off - I saw a person, and pursued him up a court, but I lost sight of him; I met the Policeman, and asked if he saw any body run by with a hat - he said,"Yes, there he runs;" he pursued, and brought back the prisoner with my hat - the man who took my hat had no hat of his own on.

WILLIAM LAW . I am a Police-officer. I saw the prisoner running with this hat on his head, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to a person's house to tell him to call me soon in the morning to go to Newgate-market, and I picked the hat up in Essex-street - I took it up, and said, "Who does this belong to?" two persons said they did not see any man, and I put it on.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 3 Months .

2129. JOHN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , 1 blanket, value 5s. , the goods of William Walton .

ELEANOR WALTON . I am the wife of William Walton- we live in Spring-place . On the night of the 21st of September, I lost a blanket from my yard - I gave information.

JOHN FITZPATRICK . I am an officer. I received information, and suspecting the prisoner I spoke to him, and asked if he knew that a blanket had been stolen from Spring-place, Kentish-town - he said he did, because he took it himself; he showed it me under a hedge - this is it.

GUILTY . Aged 14. - Transported for Seven Years .

2130. JOHN READY was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

ROBERT ROBERTSON . I am a Police-officer. On the 2nd of October, at a quarter before six o'clock in the evening, I went to Marylebone church , to have a child christened - when I got in, the first thing I saw was the prisoner with his hand in a gentleman's pocket - I wentup to him, and took hold of his right arm; he dropped this handkerchief down, and I took it - I went to the gentleman, and asked if he knew he had been robbed - he said No, but he felt, and his handkerchief was gone; we went to the station - the gentleman gave a name and address, but said he did not wish to do any thing to the prisoner; I went to the address, but could not find the gentleman.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

2131. JOHN READY was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 2 pick-axes, value 6s. , the goods of William Barron .

JOHN NICHOLAS . I am a labourer, and work for Mr. Barrow, at the New hospital, Charing-cross - the tools all belonged to Mr. William Barron . I missed two pick-axes on the afternoon of the 10th of October - I had left them safe at dinner time; I found them at a broker's shop - the prisoner used to work on the building, but did not then.

RICHARD JACOBS . I live in Green's-court. I bought these two pick-axes of the prisoner, last Tuesday week in the afternoon - he came first, and asked if I would buy them; I said Yes, if they were his own - he said they were; that he was out of employ, and wanted victuals - he brought them; I had not change, and I sent for it - a person came by, and said he would give 1s. for one of them - I said No, I had bought them.

GEORGE COLLEY . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; when I got these axes I took them to him, and asked if he knew them; he said he had never seen them before.

GUILTY . Aged 30. - Transported for Seven Years .

There were two other indictments against the prisoner.

2132. ANN MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 memorandum-book, value 1s. , the goods of Amelia Cleaver .

SARAH HARKER . I am inspectress of the bazaar, in Soho-square - I walk about there, and keep an eye on every one. On the 20th of September the prisoner was pointed out to me by a young person there - I watched her; she lurked about several jewellers' stalls, and then made her way to the door; I called to the door-keeper to stop her, and we sent for an officer, who took from her bag six steel-pens, a memorand um-book, and two duplicates.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.Was not she very much frightened? A. She did not appear so; I believe she is a native of France.

WILLIAM MOORE . I am porter at the bazaar. Mrs. Harker told me to stop the prisoner - I took her into a room, and called the Policeman; these things were found in her bag.

HUGH CASH . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner - I found these articles in her bag, and 1s. 3d. on her.

FANNY CLEAVER . This book is my sister Amelia's.

Cross-examined. Q. How do you know it? A. By a scratch on the cover - I did not make it; we have three others, which have not a scratch - I had not been at the stall the whole day, but when I came I looked over it.

NOT GUILTY .

2133. ANN MILLER was again indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 6 steel-pens, with metal cases, value 3s. , the goods of Elizabeth Grant .

SARAH HARKER . At twenty minutes past two o'clock, on the 20th of September, I told the porter to take the prisoner - I was present when I found these six steel pens on her.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. How long were you watching her? A.About a quarter of an hour - I did not see her take any thing.

WILLIAM MOORE . I took the prisoner - she ran when she got out, gut I took her - these pens were in her bag.

HUGH CASH . I found these six pens with steel cases in her bag.

SARAH ANN GLINDON . I serve at Elizabeth Grant 's stand, in the bazaar. These pens are her property - I had not seen the prisoner near her stand; I did not sell her these pens.

Cross- examined. Q. How do you know them? A. By this mark of sixpence on them - it is a common price, but this is my writing - we had but these six on the counter and missed them.

Prisoner's Defence. They were not marked when they were taken from me.

HUGH CASH. They are exactly in the same state as when I found them in her bag.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury - Confined 1 year .

2134. JAMES LATTIMORE , THOMAS LAVINGTON , JAMES WICKHAM , JAMES STANWAY , and WILLIAM VAUGHN , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of a man unknown, from his person .

JOHN COLLEY . I am a Police-officer. On the 12th of October, about one or two o'clock, I was in Pall Mall - it was the day the different parishes, went up to the King with petitions; I saw all the prisoners together, and watched them for about three quarters of an hour - I as last saw Lattimore take this yellow silk handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, and give it to Lavington, who put it between his shirt and his skin - the other three were all close; they kept in a body together - I followed them an a little further; I spoke to the gentleman to come, but the mob was very great, and he did not - I at last got some persons, and took them into custody; I found on them five other handkerchiefs, which I took from the different prisoners.

Wickham. He took my own handkerchief off my neck. Witness. I saw him take a handkerchief from a gentleman's pocket, and put it round his neck directly.

JOHN PENNY . I am a gun-polisher. I saw the prisoners in company, and saw Lattimore but his hand into a gentleman's pocket; he took this handkerchief, and gave it to lavington - I then saw Wickham take one, and put it round his neck.

LATTIMORE - GUILTY . Aged 12.

LAVINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

WICKHAM - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

STANWAY - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Three Months .

VAUGHN - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Judgment Respited .

2135. FRANCES LISK was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of September , 1 shawl, value 6s. , the goods of Joseph Donohue .

CATHEMAN DONOHUE . I am the wife of Joseph Donohoe, of Pram-street, Camden-town . The prisoner came there on the 12th of September, to say I was to go after a family's work, at No. 27, Euston-square, and the lady had been recommended to me; I am a laundress - I went out of the room a few minutes, leaving the prisoner in the room, where this shawl was; when I returned she was gone, and the shawl - I saw it again in an hour, at a pawnbroker's I found what she had told me was false.

ROBERT MILTON . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Clarandon-square. This shawl was pawned by the prisoner, on the 12th of September.(Property produced and sworn to.)

MICHAEL CALE . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner, from the information of the prosecutor.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

2136. FRANCES LISK was again indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , 1 pair of boots, value 6s. , the goods of Thomas Dormer .

MARY DORMER . I am the wife of Thomas Dormer - we live in Little George-street, Hampstead-road. The prisoner and I had been brought up together, but I had not seen her for six years till a fortnight before the 24th of September - she called on me several times, and on the 24th of September she came, and I left her in my room while I went for a pail of water, leaving my child in the room; she got up, and said she was going - I let her down stairs, and said, "Good bye;" she said she would come again on the Monday - when she was gone I missed my husband's boots from the next room to where I left her.

HENRY SUTTER . I am in the service of a pawnbroker. I produce the boots, pawned by the prisoner, on the 24th of September.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor widow, and was left in great distress, or I should not have done it - I was turned out in the street for five days and five nights.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Transported for Seven Years .

2137. GEORGE JEFFCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of September , 2 gallons of plums, value 1s. 3d.; 1 basket, value 1s. 6d., and 1 pewter pot, value 9d. , the goods of William Hawkins .

WILLIAM HAWKINS. I deal in fruit . I know the prisoner; on the 3rd of September I gave him some fruit to sell, and he never returned.

NOT GUILTY .

2138. JOHN ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , 1 seal, value 9s.; 1 watch-key, value 2d.; 1 piece of foreign silver coin, value 3d., and 1 watch-chain, value 1d., the property of James Miller , from his person .

JAMES MILLER. I am a broker , and live near Seven-dials. On the 18th of October I had been into the Crown, in Seven-dials, for about two hours; I came out about eleven o'clock at night, as my wife came to call me home - the prisoner came in, and called for a pot of beer; he spoke to some girls - when I got out I turned into Crown-street , and my wife followed me; the prisoner ran across the street, and caught hold of my watch-chain- I caught the watch, and the chain broke; he took the chain, seal, and key away - I took hold of him; my wife came up, seized his hand, and said, "That is the hand that took my husband's watch;" I called the officer, who took him.

SUSANNAH MILLER . I went to fetch my husband at a quarter to eleven o'clock at night - he left the house, and I came out behind him, and four women came out; the prisoner came out alongside them, and I stood on one side for him to pass - he made a catch at my husband's watch; I ran up, and took hold of his hand - I said,"Here is the hand that took the watch;" we gave charge of him.

THOMAS WAKERLY . I am a Police-officer. I was on duty, and heard the alarm; I went up, and the prisoner was given into custody by the prosecutor and his wife, for stealing his watch - I began to search the prisoner, and the prosecutor found his watch; he said, "My watch is safe, let him go;" I left him, and went on my duty - I then saw another disturbance; I went again to the same place, and the prisoner was given into custody for stealing the chain and seals - I looked on the spot, and found them.

Prisoner. I was standing at the public-house door - when he came up he said, "I must search you;" I said,"You may;" he then said, "You are not the man, you may go." Witness. Yes - I took him into the public-house, searched him, and left him; I was then called again, and took him for the chain and seals - a man picked them up on the ground, by the light of my lantern.(Property produced and sworn to)

The prisoner put in a written Defence, stating that the prosecutor and his wife were intoxicated, and that he had not gone near him.

JURY to THOMAS WAKERLY . Q. Was the prosecutor and his wife drunk? A. No; he had been drinking a little, but made the same statement he has to-day.

NOT GUILTY .

2139. THOMAS PEDDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 1 watch, value 2l. , the goods of John Holmes .

JOHN HOLMES . I live in Queen-street, Cheapside . The prisoner had been a shopman of mine, but left me about two months - he came on the 5th of October, to ask if I would give him a character; I said he had better refer to the person he lived with last, but I would go and speak to his mother - I went to wash myself, and while I was doing so he left, saying he would call again; I came into the shop again, and missed my watch, which had hung there.

JOHN THOMAS PRATLEY . I am a Police-officer. I was on duty at Knightsbridge. on the 5th of October, at half-past ten o'clock at night; I saw the prisoner - he walked backwards and forwards till about twenty minutes before twelve; I then asked him if he wanted any one - he said he was waiting for the coffee-shop to open; that he had been to the play, and came out at half-past eleven - Iasked what he had about him; he said nothing - I searched him, and found this watch.

The prisoner put in a petition, expressing his contrition for the offence.

GUILTY. Aged 13.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury.

Judgement Respited .

2140. JOHN EDWARD PARR was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of September , 1 handkerchief, value 3s., the goods of John Murray , from his person .

DANIEL RIERDON . I am an officer. On the 22nd of September, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming along Holborn-hill, and saw the prisoner and another boy following two gentlemen, who turned into Furnival's Inn; they then followed two other gentlemen, and when they got to Turnstile, the prisoner took this handkerchief from one of the gentlemen's pockets, and put it into his breast - I seized him, and dragged him some distance; I left him in custody, and went for the gentleman, who came and gave his card; he attended at Bow-street, and identified his property; but he is now gone to Paris - his name is Dr. John Murray, and his initials are on the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and saw the handkerchief on the ground - I took it up and put it into my bosom; the officer came up, took me, and said,"What is that you have there?" - I said, "Is it yours?"

GUILTY . Aged 22. - Confined Three Months .

2141. MARY OAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , 1 candlestick, value 3s. , the goods of Thomas Bennett .

JOSEPH CLINCH. I am pot boy to Mr. Thomas Bennett , who keeps the Rose and Crown in Tottenham-court-road . On the 14th of October, the prisoner came to the tap, and asked for something - she then went away, and in about a quarter of an hour I missed a candlestick - I followed her, saw her put her hand into her pocket, and I saw this candlestick slip half way out of her pocket.

GEORGE JOHN RESTICAN . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner, and this candlestick from the prosecutor - she said she was very sorry, and she had taken it to get food.

Prisoner. I had only had a stale roll for two days.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Recommended to Mercy by the Jury. - Confined 1 Month .

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2142. BRIDGET MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 bonnet, value 3s.; 2 gowns, value 5s.; 2 petticoats, value 1s. 6d.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 6d.; 1 apron, value 2d., and 1 pair of stockings, value 3d. , the goods of Thomas Kelly .

MARY KELLY . I am the wife of Thomas Kelly - he lives in Devonshire-street, Lisson-grove . On the 28th of September I was out washing till a quarter before ten o'clock at night; on my return I found a deal box broken open in my room, and I missed my property - I saw the prisoner at half-past eleven the same night, as I was at the window of my room, and she had my bonnet on her head; I went down and charged her with it, and she was taken into custody.

WILLIAM EDWARD WRIGHT . I was an officer I took the prisoner with this bundle, which I produce she said the articles were her own - I asked what business she had in the prosecutor's room; she said she had not been there; I asked how she came by the bonnet my her head - she said she bought it at Newcastle, on her way from Ireland, six months previous; I took her to the station, and found these things all of which were claimed by the prosecutor - I then went to the prosecutor's room and found the box broken open, the hasp hanging inside; and a black bonnet, which the prisoner afterwards claimed - she said, "Give me that bonnet, it is mine;" I asked how she came by two bonnets - she again said, she had bought this one on her way from Ireland, and the black one she bought in London, and the other things were given her by a lady in Soho.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I bought these things at Westminster for 5s., and the petticoat was a present to me; I told her every thing I had in the bundle.

MARY KELLY . No, she never told me any thing - I said "How came you by my bonnet;" she said it was not mine - she made an attempt to go, and to shake herself from me; she was inquiring the nearest way to Harcourt-street; the black bonnet was left on the floor of my room.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

2143. WILLIAM LODGE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , 3 frocks, value 6s. , the goods of Walter Allison .

JANE ALLISON . I am the wife of Walter Allison - we lodge in a front attic in Portpool-lane ; the prisoner and his wife lodge in the adjoining attic. On the 11th of October I went out, leaving the door of my room locked, and the window open; it opens on a place by which any one may pass from the room occupied by the prisoner - the prisoner was at home when I went out; on unlocking my door I found my room in confusion; the wood of the window cill was broken, and the things strewed about the room - I missed three frocks from the drawers; I had left a chair against the drawers, and that was removed - when I went into my room the prisoner was getting out of my window; I said to him, "Lodge, what have you been after?" he said to get a light - I went down, and fetched my husband's brother; in going down I saw the prisoner had no light in his room, but he had a fire - he was taken the same evening.

HEZEKIAH PETTY . I lodge in the front part of the same house; their premises are at the back - I have a full view of the back attics, and between four and five o'clock that afternoon, I saw the prisoner go from his own window into the prosecutors - he came out in four or five minutes, with a small bundle under his arm; I was not at that time aware that the prosecutor was out.

RICHARD BAYLISS . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner; I found in the prosecutor's room these three frocks, which appeared to have dropped as some one was getting out at window - I found nothing on the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 57. - Confined Six Months .

2144. CHARLES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , 1 iron drill-collar, value 10s. , the goods of James Stones .

MICHAEL CURTIS . I am in the employ of Mr. James Stones - he lives in Tottenham-court-road, and is a builder . On the morning of the 17th of September, he sent me to look after some premisess of his, is Tudor-place; in going along I met the prisoner with a bag on his shoulder - I stopped him, and found in the bag this cast iron collar. belonging to a turner's lathe; it is my master's, and I had seen it safe the day before, on the premises; the prisoner said he went into the place with the rest of the boys, to look for a stray rabbit, and he found the collar.

JOHN MARTIN . I am an officer. I received this property and the prisoner in charge.

Prisoner. I have no father nor mother - I had nothing to eat; I should be happy if you would do something for me.

GUILTY. Aged 14. - Judgment Respited .

2145. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 3 keys, value 1s. 6d., and 1 hammer, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Bacon .

ANN BACON . I am the daughter of John Bacon; he lives in Peerless-row . On the morning of the 28th of September I was coming down stairs, and saw the prisoner going out of our passage; I said, "You have got something of ours" - she said, "I have not;" I said,"You have" - and I called my father; he stopped her, and took these things from her.

JOHN BACON. On the morning of the 28th of September I stopped the prisoner in the City-road, about fifty yards from my house - I took this hammer and three keys from her, which are mine; she said,"Take them, they are of no value" - I said, "I shall give you in charge;" she said, "Very well, I wanted a lodging."

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence, I went out to look for a lodging; I was standing near a door, and picked these old iron things up in the street - a man said to me, "What are they?" I said, "Some old iron" - he said, "Keep them;" this girl then said that I had something of her father's; and then the prosecutor came and said I had - I said, "If these are yours, take them; they are not worth a 1d."

ANN BACON. She was in the passage of our house; and these articles were in a wash-house behind.

GUILTY . Aged 52. - Confined Nine Months .

2146. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 28 yards of printed cotton, value 15s. , the goods of Thomas Ball .

THOMAS BALL . I keep a linen-draper's shop , in Field-terrace, Battle-bride . On the afternoon of the 5th of October I was behind my counter; I heard a noise, got over the counter, and saw the prisoner running away - I missed a piece of printed cotton from the lobby of my shop - I saw the prisoner running, and something hanging between his legs; I followed him, and saw him drop it opposite Mr. Bradley's door; I followed, and was within one yard of him, when he was stopped; the cotton was picked up, and carried to Mr. Bradley's.

JOHN BRADLEY . I live in Cumberland-road, Battle-bridge. I saw the prisoner drop this cotton at my door; a gentleman picked it up - it was delivered to the prosecutor.

CHARLES MUMFORD . I am a Police-officer, and took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman who picked it up said I did not drop it; and he never saw it in my possession.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Six Months .

2147. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 suit of boy's clothes, value 12s.; 1 gown, value 5s.; 1 petticoat, value 4s.; 2 shillings, and 4d. , the property of Morgan Jones .

JANE JONES . I am the wife of Morgan Jones; he is a labourer - the prisoner is my son; we live in Featherstone-street . I left home on the night of the 30th of September; I had fastened the door and windows - I returned in half an hour; I found a box broken open, and missed from it, a suit of boy's clothes, a gown and petticoat - I did not see my son again till he was in custody, the next day.

JAMES LEACH . On the 30th of September I was at Mr. Brooke's, a pawnbroker, in Whitecross-street - assisting in his business; I took in these clothes from the prisoner, and gave him a duplicate; this is the counterpart of it - I asked who sent him; he said his mother, and I took the address down; I noticed the dress was too small for him - he said it belonged to his brother.(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN TIPPER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in Featherstone-street, at half-past twelve o'clock at night, on the 30th of September, from the description I had received of him - he was on the opposite side of the way; I called, him and he ran away - I pursued and took him; I asked what he had about him; he said some money - I took it from him, and found the duplicate of these things; he said he had been to the play with another lad, and he had given him two half-crowns to mind for him - I went into the Vinegar-yard after the other lad; I knocked at the door - his mother opened the window, and threw out two half-crowns; I said the lad must come with me - she said he was very ill, she would not open the door - I broke it open, and took the lad out.

GUILTY. Aged 12. - Judgment Respited .

2148. ABRAHAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of October , 1 jacket, value 15s.; 1 waistcoat, value 5s.; 1 pair of trousers, value 10s.; 1 pair of braces, value 2s., and 2 handkerchiefs, value 1s. 6d. , the goods of John Rodriguez .

JOHN RODRIGUEZ. I am a seaman , and lodge in New Gravel-lane . The prisoner slept in the same room for three nights before the 10th of October - when he was gone, on the morning of the 9th of October, I missed the articles stated; he returned and slept there that night -I got up early the next morning, and when he came down, we had him stopped - he took my jacket out of his trousers, and jumped through a window; I jumped after him, and took him in a skittle-ground next door - this is my jacket.

Prisoner. It was impossible for him to see me, I was in one room, and he in the other. Witness. No, I was in the room - I saw him take it out of his trousers.

EDWARD LAYLAND . I am an officer. I took the prisoner - I found this handkerchief in his cap at the station-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the handkerchief from my pocket - it has my mark on it, made by a woman in the Isle of France; the prosecutor never saw me take any thing - I never had any of his clothes; when I came down the landlady said she could not get the door unlocked - he then went up stairs, came down, and whispered to her; I waited an hour, and could not get out -I then said I would stop no longer, as my captain's orders were to be on board by the time the dock gates were open; I got out at the window to get to my ship.

GUILTY. Aged 27. - Judgment Respited ,

2149. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 1 bird-cage, value 5s. , the goods of Lady Elizabeth Hunter .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the goods of Elizabeth Hunter .

JAMES GRIFFITHS. I am footman to Lady Elizabeth Hunter, the widow of Sir John Hunter; she lives in Harley-street, Cavendish-square On Wednesday last, Mr. Glaze, the publican, brought back the prisoner with a bird-cage belonging to my mistress - I had seen it safe, hanging outside our dining-room window, at a quarter past twelve o'clock.

JAMES BUGG . I am a stable-man, and live in North Audley-street. On the 19th of October I was at the bar of the Turk's Head, in Hartey-street; I heard an alarm, ran after the prisoner, and brought him back with this cage - I said, "Old man, I want that bird;" he said,"You may have it" - I took him back,

ANDREW JOHNSON . I am a Police-officer. I found the prisoner near Lady Hunter's, and this cage was given to me; the prisoner said he was in great want, and almost dying, or he should not have done it - there was a canary bird in the cage.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing and saw the cage on the pavement; I took it, and went up Harley-street.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . It was by the side of the dining-room window; no one could reach it without a stick - the prisoner had a stick.

GUILTY . Aged 65. - Confined Three Months .

2150. JAMES JOHN JONES , THOMAS HARRIS , ROBERT ROBINSON , and EDWARD BOLTON were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 shirt, value 1s.; 3 pairs of stockings, value 1s.; 3 towels, value 6d.; 1 shaving-box, value 3d., and 1 razor, value 6d. , the goods of James Collins .

JAMES COLLINS. I live at Aylesbury, and have been in service. On the night of the 27th of September I was at a beer-shop, at Hillingdon , kept by Thomas Taylor; I gave Mrs. Taylor a bundle to take care of for me, at nine o'clock - she called my attention to the bundle, and I missed the articles stated from it; I saw the prisoners in the parlour - an officer was sent for; the candles went out - I cannot say whether they were burnt out or knocked out; there is no other witness here.

NOT GUILTY .

2151. ELIZABETH HONOR was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 2 table-cloths, value 1l. , the goods of Sarah Peel .

SARAH PEEL . I am a widow , and live in Old-street - the prisoner lived as servant with me. On the 1st of October I missed two table-cloths from my linen-chest - I asked her if she had been to the chest; she said Yes, and had taken the table cloths and pawned them - I asked where the duplicates were; she said she did not know, but in about an hour she took a pocket from under a waterbutt, and gave me the duplicates out of it.

ROBERT WRIGHT . I have the two duplicates, which I received from the prosecutrix.

CHARLES WORLEY . I am foreman to Mr. Capel, a pawnbroker, in Old-street. I have two table-cloths, pawned with us; one on the 6th of August, and the other on the 13th of September - I do not know by whom, but these are the duplicates given for them.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor, as being a very good servant when sober.

Confined Two Months .

2152. MARY HEALY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of October , 2 caps, value 1l. , the goods of Charles Manners .

MARIA MANNERS. I am the wife of Charles Manners. I am a laundress, and live in Wharf-road, Paddington -On the 3rd of October I brought home some things to wash; the prisoner came in soon afterwards, to ask ask if I would employ her; she had had something to drink when she came in - I went out, and when I returned she was gone; I missed two caps, which I had brought in- I went in search of the prisoner, and she had them in her pocket; she gave them to the officer, and said they were mine.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. She had got rather sober then? A. Yes, and was returning to her own house; she lives opposite me - she had had a great deal to drink; I have known her a good while - she is a very honest woman; she was in such a state that she might think these caps were her pocket handkerchief.

GEORGE GROUNDWELL. I am a Police-officer. I stopped the prisoner in the Harrow-road - I asked how she came to take the property; she hesitated a minute, but when she found I was going to search her, she said she took the caps, and would give them up - she took them from her left-hand pocket - she appeared to have been drinking, but knew what she was doing.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was she not in the way to her own house? A. Yes; this was about a quarter-past eight o'clock.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went there, and she had some drink as well as I - I was very tipsy; I went to my daughter's, and then found these caps in my pocket; I was returning to deliver them back to her.

NOT GUILTY .

2153. JOHN EMERY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , a hat, value 4s. , the goods of John Brickell .

MATTHEW HENRY NORRIS . I am shopman to Mr. John Brickell, a pawnbroker , of Tottenham-court-road .On the morning of the 6th of October I saw the prisoner near his door - he took a hat off a board on the shop grating; I ran after him to the next turning - I said I would give him in charge; he threw the hat at me, and went away - my master followed, and he was taken.

JOHN RYLES. I am an officer. I received the prisoner, and produce the hat, which I got from Norris; the prisoner asked what I would advise him to do - I said I could not advise any thing; in going to the office he struck me, and ran away - I pursued, and took him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor - I did not know what I was doing; I have a wife and four small children.

JOHN RYLES . He had been drinking, but could walk very well.

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Recommended to Mercy - Confined One Month .

2154. JOHN GODMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 2s., the goods of Henry Spicer , from his person .

HENRY SPICER. I live in Farringdon-street, and am a stationer . On the 20th of October I was at Spring-gardens , between one and two o'clock; I felt some one rubbing against me - I turned, and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; when he saw me look at him, he dropped it - I took it, and secured him; he did not struggle at first, but when I got him to the top of the passage there appeared to be nearly a dozen round me - one of them came running up, and said he would show me where a Police-station was; he took me across by the National Repository, and was going up a court, but I would not go; I asked a woman at a stall where the station was - she directed me to Scotland-yard - I was taking the prisoner there, and then he struggled and struck me; a soldier came to my assistance, and he was given into custody.

WILLIAM COOK . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner, and have the handkerchief.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming out of Spring-gardens - there were a great many people; the prosecutor seized me, and said I had robbed him - he dragged me about; I tried to put him away - he seized my handkerchief, and would not let me go, but took me down to Charing-cross, where half a dozen Policemen jumped on me directly.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Transported for Seven Years .

2155. MARY DUCE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , 1 gown, value 10s., and 1 shawl, value 5s. , the goods of Jane Shearsby .

JANE SHEARSBY. I am a widow , and live at Stoke Newington . The prisoner lodged in my house, and slept with me, but I never received a farthing from her - on Sunday week I missed a gown and shawl from a drawer in the room we slept in; she left me on the 6th of October.

GEORGE RUEFIELD . I live in High-street, Kingsland, and am a pawnbroker. I produce a gown and a shawl, but I cannot say who pawned them.

DAVID LOW . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner at Islington - in going along she wanted to know what it was for; I said she knew better than I, for I did not know - she then said she had robbed a lodger of a gown and shawl, pawned them at Kingsland, and made away with the duplicate; I found them where she described.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutrix.

Confined Ten Days .

2156. JOHN DERRINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , 2 boots, value 4s. , the goods of William Hayhow .

HECTOR SEDERGREEN . I live in Johnson-street, Shadwell , next door to the prosecutor's. On the night of the 14th of September I was taking the goods in from my master's door; I saw the prisoner take a pair of boots from Mr. Hayhow's shop - he put them under his coat, walked a little way, and then began to run; I followed him, and he was taken on the middle of the wooden bridge, which is twenty or thirty yards off - he threw the boots under the bridge; an Irishman got them out, and gave them to the shopman - I did not lose sight of the prisoner.

Prisoner. Q.You did not see me throw them away? A. No - I saw you put them under your coat; I did not say there were two of you together, and I could not say which took them - I just put my head into the prosecutor's shop, and told the shopman, but I did not lose sight of you.

JOHN HOBBS . I am foreman to Mr. William Hayhow; he lives in High-street, Shadwell - these boots are his. -On the evening of the 14th of September the witness called my attention to what had occurred, and I ran into the street; I saw the prisoner running, and followed him - he got to the bridge; I cried Stop thief! and two men attempted to stop him - he threw them off - as soon as I got three yards on the bridge I collared him; he said I was as wrong as ever I was right to take him, as he had done nothing - I shook him; he said, "Don't ill use me."

GILBERT McDONALD . I was a Police-officer. I received the prisoner and the property in charge.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to my uncle's, in Poplar, and as I was coming home I passed the prosecutor's shop; I heard a cry of Stop thief! and ran amidst the crowd, the nearest way to my home; Sedergreen's mistress said he is such a confounded story-teller that his word is not to be taken.

GILBERT McDONALD . She told me the day before yesterday that his word was not to be taken.

COURT. Q. When did you resign? A. About three weeks or a month ago; I was not dismissed - I swear I discharged myself - I had not committed any fault; I was at Poplar station-house.

JOHN HOBBS re-examined. Q. Do you know any thing of Sedergreen? A. I always understood he bore a good character - his master says so.

GUILTY . Aged 26. - Transported for Seven Years .

2157. MICHAEL CLELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , 1 Bible, value 5s. 6d. , the goods of John Thomas Noble .

GEORGE AUSTIN . I am shopman to Mr. Savage, in Crombie's-row, Commercial-road . On the night of the 5th of October, at a quarter-past seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Noble's book-stall, next door to us - there was another boy with him; I watched them, and saw one of them take a Bible, and put it between them - they first walked, and then ran away; I pursued, and took the prisoner - I did not lose sight of him till I gave him in charge- he said he knew nothing about it.

JOHN THOMAS NOBLE . I keep a bookseller's-shop in Crombie's-row. In consequence of what I heard I ran from my door; I saw Mr. Austin in pursuit of the prisoner- I saw him taken; the Bible was brought in by a person who picked it up, but he was not bound over.

THOMAS BATES . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner to the station-house; this Bible was produced there - I asked how he came to take it; he said it was not him, it was another boy, and he ran for fear he should be accused of it - the other boy was bigger than him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE AUSTIN . The two boys were close together, and close to the stall; they both moved off together.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not near the place - I was on the other side of the way; there were two boys running- I ran to see, and they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 12. - Transported for Seven Years .

2158. WILLIAM BRIDGES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , 1 shawl, value 9s. , the goods of Thomas Benn Sowerby .

GEORGE MOXON . I am apprentice to Mr. Thomas Benn Sowerby, a pawnbroker , of Chiswell-street . On Saturday afternoon, the 1st of October, I was in the shop - in consequence of information I looked for a shawl, which had been hanging on the door-post; I missed it, and went out; I saw the prisoner about fifty yards down the street; I caught him with the shawl buttoned up in his coat - it was cut down, and he had to pass two shawls to get it.

PAUL PLANT . I am a Police-constable. I took the prisoner.(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it off the pavement.

The prisoner received a good character.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy. - Confined Three Months .

2159. JOHN BROUGHTON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , 20 yards of diapers, value 16s. , the goods of William James Stevenson .

BENJAMIN THOMAS . I am shopman to Mr. William James Stevenson, a linen-draper , of Ratcliff-highway . On the morning of the 23rd of September I was in the corner of the shop - I heard the window break; I ran out, and saw the prisoner running up the street, about fifty yards off- he was the nearest person to me; a piece of diaper had been taken out of the window, which was restored to me by Johnson, who is not here; it had our mark on it - I saw something under the prisoner's waistcoat; I did not see him drop any thing - there is no other witness here.

NOT GUILTY .

2160. SAMUEL AGETT was indicted for bigamy .

MR. BARRY conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE YARROW . I am parish-clerk of Shoreditch. -I produce the register of marriages in that church. On the 1st of January, 1827, Samuel Agett, of that parish, bachelor, and Rosetta Hodsoll , spinster , were married by banns, in the presence of Charles Rose and Thomas Haigh Price.

ELIZABETH HODSOLL . I am married. I have a daughter named Rosetta - I was present at her marriage with the prisoner, on the 1st of January, 1827; she is alive - I saw her to-day, but she is ill.

LOUISA MARY MARTIN . I am not sixteen years of age- I lived with my mother, and the prisoner worked next door to us; he courted me for some time, and obtained my mother's consent to marry me - we were married by banns on the 2nd of July last, at St. George's church, Cannon-street-road; my mother was at the wedding, and she gave us every article of furniture for our use - the prisoner lived with me till the 11th of August, when he sent me to my aunt's, and went away.

SUSANNAH MARTIN . I am the mother of this witness -I was present at her marriage with the prisoner.

Prisoner. It was entirely her own doing - she came thirty miles after me. Witness. The wedding-day was fixed, and then he went away, but he sent me a letter, and I went thirty miles, but it was to ascertain whether he was married; I should have been very sorry to have let him have my child if I had known he had been married.

JAMES LEE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in York-street, Commercial-road - he was not at home; I waited till he returned; there was a woman there, who clung round him, and said, "Oh, Sam, what have you brought me to?" she called him her husband; he said the next morning that he had been married five years next January, and that he had been led into the second marriage, there were some disagreeables about his first marriage.

Prisoner's Defence. My first wife sold the things, and left me; Mrs. Martin came after me to Chatham, and said she would supply me with deals if I would marry her daughter.

MRS. MARTIN. I never said so - I went to the Lord of the Manor at Chatham, to find out whether he was married or not, and what was the reason he did not come; his master said he had lived with a little woman.

JAMES LEE. He told me that he had told the second wife's mother that he was single, but that he had said it out of a joke.

GUILTY . Aged 25. - Transported for Seven Years .

2161. SARAH BLAKENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 3 pieces of printed cotton, containing 13 yards, value 11s. , the goods of William James Stevenson .

EDWARD ROBERTS. I am shopman to William James Stevenson, a linen-draper , of Ratcliff-highway . On the afternoon of the 20th of October, the prisoner came to the shop, and asked to look at some striped cotton; a piece was shown to her, at 7d. a yard - she objected to the price, and was going out - she walked rather quick; I called her back - she refused to come; in a few minutes a Policeman brought her back - he produced this cotton, which is my employer's; it had been on the counter while she was in the shop.

EDWARD DORKIN . I am a Police-officer. I saw the prisoner rolling up these three pieces of print in a dirty cloth; I asked what she had there - she told me to go andmind my business - I asked her to go back to the corner of Cannon-street, and as we were going into the prosecutor's shop, she dropped these from her apron; I took them up; I am quite sure they fell from her person.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 57. - Transported for Seven Years .

OLD COURT. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Sergeant Arabin.

2162. MARY ANN COREN was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of September , 25 sovereigns and 1 shilling , the monies of James Shoolbred , her master.

JAMES SHOOLBRED. I live in Tottenham-court-road . The prisoner was in my service for about sixteen months, house-maid , but the nurse being ill she assisted her for the last three months - I have three female, and one male servant in my private house; when I go to bed I leave my trousers in the dressing-room, which joins the bedroom - the prisoner had access to it; I missed money from my pocket from time to time, in consequence of which I discharged two female servants, and was on the point of discharging another, when suspicion fell on the prisoner - I missed three sovereigns on Monday morning, and on Tuesday two more; I marked nine sovereigns and twenty shillings, and put them into my purse, in my pocket, on the night of the 21st, and on the morning of the 22nd I missed one sovereign and one shilling - I called a Policeman in, and told him the circumstance; I thought it best to search the boxes of both the servants - the Policeman went up to their bed-room with Mrs. Shoolbred, the prisoner, and cook; Mrs. Shoolbred found in the prisoner's box a pair of stays, with a pocket in an unusual place, which made us suspect her, which we did not before; Mrs. Shoolbred then took her into another room, and called out, "Here is some money," handing me a paper containing a number of sovereings - we went into the room, and while we were examining the money, the prisoner threw something on the table, and then we found the marked sovereign among the sovereigns - whether it was the one she threw down I cannot say.

HARRIET SHOOLBRED . I took the prisoner into a room, and told her I must search her - she objected; I persevered, and said if she would not undress before me she must before her master and the officer; she said there was no necessity for that, for she had got nothing of mine- I said, "Never mind, undress and clear yourself, show me that you have nothing;" after putting her hands about her dress a good deal, she at last took her pocket off, and said, "Are you satisfied now?" I said, "No, you must undress;" she turned her back to me - I said,"Stand still, and undress," and after some time she did undress, but kept feeling about her dress; I said, "You have got something in your hand." as I saw her hand closed - she then produced this paper, with money in it; I called Mr. Shoolbred, and handed it to him, and after he came in, I perceived her hand in the same way, and said, "You have something else in your hand," and whether I took it from her I cannot say, but I thing she threw it on the table - a sovereign came from the table, which came from her; the marked shilling was in the paper with twenty or twenty-one sovereigns.

JOHN EDWARD POWELL . I am clerk to the prosecutor. I marked some sovereigns, and gave to him - I know this sovereign and shilling by the mark.

JOSEPH HEYNDRICK . I am a Policeman. I was called in - the other servant said she had no pocket on. but the prisoner had, and she gave me a purse with three sovereigns in it; Mr. Shoolbred's evidence is correct.

MR. SHOOLBRED. Here is the mark on the sovereign and shilling - they were in my purse the night before; the prisoner had 10l. a year - I have lost between 40l. and 50l. since she has been with me.

GUILTY . Aged 32. - Transported for Seven Years .

2163. WILLIAM GERRARD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , 12 printed bound books, value 12l., the goods of Stephen Winkworth Silver , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN EMPERER . I am an upholder. I was repairing the house of Stephen Winkworth Silver, in Circus-street, St. John's-road - the prisoner was employed there as a journeyman painter ; this happened between the 9th and 16th of April - he left abruptly; I discovered that the bookcase had been broken open, and twelve volumes of the Encyclopoedia stolen - he had access to that room; I know they had been there, as I assisted in putting them in.

JOHN CROUCH . I am a pawnbroker, in Grafton-street, Tottenham-court-road. A man, very much resembling the prisoner, brought six volumes of the Encyclopoed in to pawn - I believe him to be the man; he said he brought them for a gentleman named Brown - I detained them, and sent him to fetch Brown; he never returned.

JOSEPH HALL . I am shopman to Mr. Butler, a pawnbroker, of Battle-bridge. The prisoner pawned five volumes of the Encyclopoedia in April last - I gave them to the officer; I am certain he is the man.

DAVID ANDERSON . I am a pawnbroker, of Brewer-street, Somers'-town. I took in one volume of the Encyclopoedia - I believe it was the prisoner who pawned it.

JOHN CULLEN . I am a Policeman, I had information of this robbery in May last, and have been in search of the prisoner ever since - on the 18th, between twelve and one o'clock, I went to No. 16, Suffolk-street, and knocked at the door; the prisoner opened it - he instantly shut the door, and escaped backwards, leaving his hat in the yard; I afterwards heard he was at work in the Borough- I went there; they denied him - I waited till the workmen came out; he was among them - I took him; he said he knew nothing of the robbery - I said, "You worked at Mr. Silver's;" he said, "I believe I did;" I said,"Your wife knows something about them;" he asked me where I got my information, and he said he was sure she knew nothing of it, for she did not know what the charge was.(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 20s. only . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Recorder.

2164. STEPHEN BARRY and CAROLINE McKELVIN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th ofOctober . 14 lbs. of beef, value 5s., and 1 ham, value 9s. , the goods of Nathaniel Dyer ; and that the said Caroline McKelvin had been before convicted of felony.

NATHANIEL DYER. I keep an eating-house in York-street, Westminster . This beef and ham hang at the end of my kitchen - the prisoners lived in a room, the window of which is about four feet from the tiles of my watercloset; they could get on there, and get down to my premises - on the 21st of October, about one o'clock in the morning, I saw McKelvin on the tiles; I went out, and said, "Halloo! what do you do here?" Barry was inside his own room, talking to her - he said, "It serves her right, she will not come in;" I said to her, "Come down into my yard then." but she would not; I said, "If you don't come down into the yard, I will shoot you;" she put her foot up, and ran across the warehouse tiles into a court, and got into her own house - I directly missed the beef and ham; Barry came out into the yard, and a woman called out from a window, "There is something thrown out at the window where the girl lives;" the beef was found on the top of the wall - the ham has not been found; I looked down, and saw the shin of beef laying on the stones - it had been removed from its place; I sent for a Policeman, and we went to their door - Johnson opened it when we knocked - we took her into custody, and she gave as information; we took the prisoners, and found in their room a piece of suet, which matched with the aitch-bone of beef which was thrown down - McKelvin was laying on the bed.

McKeloin. Q. Did not I open the door to you? A. No.

HANNAH JOHNSON . I saw McKelvin at the window of the house her father occupies, about one o'clock in the morning; Dyer came out and said, "If you are not off I will shoot you" - I saw a woman at the window; McKelvin ran up the tiling, and jumped off the wall, which was about twelve feet high - she had nothing then; she sat a few minutes, then got up, ran into the passage, and slammed the door too - I then saw her throw a piece of beef out of the window; I called to my husband, who was in Dyer's premises at the time, and told him; he picked the beef up - when we got a light Dyer claimed it; I heard a man say, "D - n you, what the bell have you been up to; are you going to transport me?" - after the prisoners were at the station I went there- McKelvin flew at me, and struck me in the face; she had heard my account.

Barry. Q.Will you swear I used those words? A. I cannot say, but he is the man I saw at the window; it was quite moonlight - I could see McKelvin well.

THOMAS JOHNSON . I am the last witness' husband; I was talking to Dyer at the front door - Mrs. Dyer said,"Hark, what is that?" Dyer ran backwards - I had not been in the yard half a minute before he called me; I went and saw McKelvin running across the tiles - she jumped off into the passage; I made haste round - she ran in, and slammed the door too in my face: the shin of beef was found on the ground - I had not seen it in her possession; it was picked up - I saw another aitch-bone of beef thrown out of the window of the room they lodge in, after I returned to the yard; it fell on the wall - I afterwards went into the room; I know McKelvin lived there, but do not think I knew Barry before - a little piece of suet was found under the bed; Dyer matched it to the beef - it appeared to me to be part of that beef; after taking it off the wall Dyer told me to stop there while he got a Policeman, and I heard Barry swear at McKelvin several times, and ask if she wanted to get him transported - I could not hear her answer; after Barry was taken to the station I went up to the room - McKelvin d-d my eyes, and said I and my wife were the cause of it; she took a hammer up, and knocked me down with it - all I had said was that I thought the best thing Cooper could do was to search the house for the ham; and at the watch-house she d-d my wife, and struck her.

Barry. Q.Where were you, when you heard me say any thing? A. In Dyer's back premises; you was in the back room; I am sure it was your voice - the other man, who lives on the premises, is quite an old gentleman; when I mentioned about the woman knocking me down at the watch-house, Barry said it would have served me right if she had killed me.

DANIEL RIERDON . I am a Policeman. I was sent for, and went up to the prisoners' apartment - an old man, who I believe is McKelvin's father, was in the same room; there was only one bed in that room - when I went in I met Cox; she went up stairs - Dyer charged her and Barry with it; I took Barry to the station - I afterwards returned, and found McKelvin laying down in the back room - Dyer gave charge of her; she pretended to be asleep - Johnson said, "Mr. Dyer you had better look for your hams;" McKelvin immediately made a blow at him with the hammer, which fell from her hand - Dyer afterwards produced some suet, which I fitted to the beef, and am convinced it belonged to it; when Mrs. Johnson came into the station-house, McKelvin strock her - I heard Barry say it served her right.

ELLEN COX . I occupy the same room as the prisoners. I opened the door, when Dyer came, and he gave me in charge - I said I was not the girl, and was discharged - I was asleep in the room at the time - I heard a great scuffle, and got up; I saw McKelvin out on the tiles, and Barry in the room; McKelvin chucked the meat into the room- I did not see Johnson struck; I saw him take a hammer out of McKelvin's hand - he showed me his forehead, which appeared hurt.

Barry's Defence. I went to have a pint of beer, and met the female prisoner - I went to see her home at one o'clock; it was too late to go home, and I remained there; I was awake, got up, and saw her on the tiles - I never made use of the words they state; it was her father, who was at the window, when I awoke.

McKelvin's Defence. My father lives at this place -I met Barry, and was much intoxicated; he came to see me home, and threw himself on the bed - I was undressing- my father got up, and asked me a question; I answered him very sancy - he swore he would kill me, and I jumped out on the tiles; he dragged me in by my hair - the meat was found in an unoccupied house - it was very dark, and rained; this woman could not have seen me - some young men in the yard used to throw us pieces of pudding and fat, and in that way the suet must have got there; I struckJohnson because I was naked, and he thrust his hand into my bosom.

THOMAS JOHNSON . She was not naked - she was dressed as ussale; I did not behave at all indecent to her - the Policeman had her in charge before I entered.

DANIEL RIERDON. He did not behave at all indecent; her gown was on when I entered the room - I produce a certificate of her former conviction.

JAMES DYER , SEN. I know McKelvin - I was present at the Westminster Session in 1829, when she was convicted of stealing a ham of mine - (Certificate read.)

McKELVIN - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

BARRY - NOT GUILTY .

2165. WILLIAM CONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 waistcoat, value 3s. , the goods of Robert Schofield .

SARAH SCHOFIELD . I am the wife of Robert Schofield - we live in Castle-lane, Westminster, and keep a clothes shop . On the 21st of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and selected a quantity of goods to take to India, and said he would come back with his sisters, and pay for them: the officer brought him to my house in about an hour - I charged him with stealing this waistcoat; he denied it - I have not seen his sister.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a pawnbroker, in Queen's-row, Pimlico. On the 21st of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner pawned this waistcoat for 3s.(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT SUTTEN . I am a Policeman. I took the prisoner in York-street, in consequence of information.

GUILTY . Aged 27. - Confined Five Months .

2166. THOMAS FOWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 pair of sheets, value 3s. , the goods of John Neat .

MARGARET NEAT . I am the wife of John Neat, and live in Old Pye-street . The prisoner took a lodging for the night at our house, for which he paid 4d. - one man and two women slept in another bed in the room; he went out about ten o'clock in the morning - I went up, and missed these sheets off the next bed to his; I called out, and McDonald ran out and brought him back, with one sheet in his hat and another round his body.

CATHERINE McDONALD . I went after the prisoner - he returned quietly with me, and the sheets were found on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 48. - Confined One Month .

2167. THOMAS GEORGE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , 1 pair of trousers, value 5s.; 1 waistcoat, value 1s.; 1 Guernsey frock, value 1s.; 1 handkerchief, value 2s., and 1 pair of shoes, value 2s. , the goods of Isaac Harvey .

ISAAC HARVEY. I am a seaman , and live with my friends in the Borough. I left my chest and clothes at a house in Johnson's-court, Commercial-road - the chest was corded, but not locked; I went there on the 18th of September, and found it still corded, but these things gone- I have known the prisoner thirteen years; we had been in the same service - he lodged in the house, and had a chest of his own there.

ROBERT RUSSELL . I am a Policeman. I apprehended the prisoner - he at first denied the charge, and said he had as much right to the chest as Harvey; I found the shoes on his feet, and the duplicate of a frock in his pocket- the waistcoat was on the table.

CATHERINE HATCHER . I keep this lodging-house. There were five chests in the room, all corded - the prisoner's was among them; he lodged in another room - on the 16th of September I met him in Rateliff-highway, very much intoxicated, with a pair of trousers under his arm; I asked what he was going to do with them - he said he did not know - (Harvey had come to the house intoxicated a few days before, and left his trunk open;) I said I would take the trousers from him - he came home about ten o'clock intoxicated, and in the morning I accused him of it - he denied it; the handkerchief and waistcoat were in the possession of another man, named Gibson, who used to go to the prosecutor's chest.

WILLIAM NOCK . I am foreman to Mr. Williams, a pawnbroker, in Cable-street. On the 17th of September the prisoner pawned this Guernsey frock.

ISAAC HARVEY . This is my frock. I always thought that the prisoner was innocent.

Prisoner. I was drunk, and did not know what I was doing.

NOT GUILTY .

NEW COURT. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25.

Fourth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

2168. JANE BOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 half-crown, and 4 shillings, the monies of Ralph McKeeney , from his person .

RALPH McKEENEY. I belong to the brig George , lying at Stone-stairs. On the night of the 19th of October I met the prisoner at a public-house in Shadwell; we had each a glass of gin, for which I paid - we then walked up Ratcliff-highway together, and she had her right arm round me: she put her hand into my right-hand pocket, and whipped it out again - I missed a half-crown and four shillings - I know they had been safe when I was in the public-house; I had a half-crown piece, four shillings, and one sixpence - I was as sober as I am now; she ran away, and I followed - she got out of my sight; I waited for her, as I thought she would come again - I saw her in about three quarters of an hour, and took hold of her; I asked her if she would deliver up my money - she abused me, and would have struck me; I called Police! the officer came, and took her - I do not know what time it was; we were walking in the street, but I dare say it was near midnight; she was going to take me home, but she robbed me before she got home.

Prisoner. Q. Did I take your money? A. Yes, you pulled your hand out of my pocket with the money, and called for two glasses of gin; I had one and the prisoner the other - I objected to pay for it, and told the prisoner to pay, but I did not see any money in her hand; the bar-maid came out, and asked me to pay for it - I was not five minutes in the house; I was not with any other female.

WILLIAM CLAYTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, and found on her two half-crowns, four shillings, two sixpences, and one halfpenny - she claimed it all; I returned one half-crown to her at the office - she said it was the change of a sovereign, that she had bought a pair of shoes, and treated one and another.

WILLIAM ROBERT GARDE. I am a Police-serjeant. On the morning of 20th of October I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner walking in King David-lane - she had her right-arm round his waist; I said to him, "Do you know what company you are in? he careful, you will be robbed; she is an incorrigible thief;" he made no answer, but went on.

Prisoner. I had slept with a sailor at Mr. Clark's the night before; he gave me the sovereign, and all I had out of it was this hand round my waist, and a pair of shoes- 1 spent about 2s. 6d. in liquor.

GUILTY . Aged 24. - Transported for Fourteen Years .

2169. JOHN CORNER was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 6 snuff-boxes, value 2s. , the goods of Jane Burland .

JANE BURLAND . I am a widow , and keep a snuff-shop in Penton-street . On the morning of the 21st of October I was taking down my shutters, and the prisoner went into my shop; I followed him, and said, "You have taken my snuff-boxes;" he said something, and ran away - I cried Stop thief! and he was taken by a neighbour.

WILLIAM BONNER . I am a constable, and live in Hermes-street. I was sent for, and took the prisoner - I found these six boxes in his pocket; he said he wished he had taken a dozen more of them - he appeared in great distress, and said he had had nothing for two days; he asked me to give him something.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Ten Days .

2170. JOHN DALEY , JOSEPH EADES , and TIMOTHY COCKRANE were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 hat, value 4s. , the goods of John Stewart .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

2171. HENRY DONALDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , 1 carpenter's plough, value 10s., the goods of Daniel Miles , and 1 adze, value 3s. , the goods of Benjamin Curtis .

DANIEL MILES . I am a carpenter , and lodge at Laura-place, Kensington. I lost this plough on Monday three weeks, off my bench, in some new buildings in Warwick-street, Kensington .

BENJAMIN CURTIS. I am a sawyer . I was working with Miles - I lost this adze on the same Monday.

JOHN MILTON . I am apprentice to Mr. Alders, a pawnbroker, in Berwick-street. I have a plough, pawned by the prisoner on the 1st of October, and an adze, pawned, I believe, by him on the 27th of September - they are both in the same name and same address.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sitting in a coffee-shop - a person came in, dressed like a carpenter, and asked if I had any thing to do; I said No - he took me to the pawnbroker's, and told me to pawn this plough for 3s.; I asked him why he did not like to go in with it himself - he said he had pawned something there just before, he showed me the duplicate, and told me to put it in the same name; three days afterwards he sent me to the same place with a rule, and I was stopped.

GUILTY . Aged 20. - Confined Three Months .

2172. JOHN GRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 1 dresser-cloth, value 2s.; 1 shirt, value 2s., and 1 shirt, value 1s. , the goods of Elizabeth Pagett .

The prosecutrix did not appear. NOT GUILTY .

2173. THOMAS GEE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 1 handkerchief, value 6s., the goods of William Stone , from his person .

WILLIAM STONE. I am a servant . I was in St. James'-park about two o'clock in the afternoon, on the 20th of October, and lost a handkerchief; there was a crowd, as His Majesty was going to prorogue Parliament; a witness secured the prisoner, and I saw my handkerchief in his hand.

JOHN SHEPHARD . I am a Police-constable. About two o'clock in the afternoon of the 20th of October I was in St. James'-park; I saw the prisoner and another, and watched them; the prosecutor and two other gentlemen stood seeing the carriage pass - I saw the prisoner go behind the prosecutor, and draw this handkerchief from his pocket; I seized his hand, and held it till the prosecutor saw it.

WILLIAM HOWAND . I am an officer. I was with Shephard, and saw what he has stated.

GUILTY . Aged 18. - Confined Six Months .

2174. THOMAS LARKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , 1 coat, value 50s. , the goods of James Sanson .

JAMES SANSON. I keep the Cheshire Cheese, in Dean-street, Holborn . On the morning of the 19th of October, I took one of my coats from a box, and brought it down to air - I laid it on a table in the back parlour; the prisoner came to inquire if I wanted a person in my employ, as my man had left me - a gentleman came in, and I left the room; I saw the prisoner pass out by the bar - I stepped into the back parlour, and missed my coat; there are two doors to my parlour, with windows in them - I had never had my coat on; it cost 3l. 10s. - this is it.

LYON COHEN . I live in Bull-court, Aldgate, and deal in clothes. On the 19th of October the prisoner came after me in Holborn, and said, "Will you buy this coat?" I turned round, and said, "I am sure you don't want to sell that coat;" he said Yes he did - I looked at it, and it was full of moth holes in the back; I said, "What do you ask for it?" he said 8s.; I said, "How did you come by it?" he said, "It is my own;" I said, "It is too large for you;" a boy came up, took hold of him, and said he had stolen it- I said, "Hold him fast - where does your father live?" he said in Dean-street; I took the coat up in my arms, and said, "Go, you don't;" I ran to Dean-street - the prosecutor stood at the door, and I took him to the prisoner.

JAMES SANSON , JUN. I live with my father. I came up to the prisoner, who was talking to Cohen - I took hold of the prisoner, and Cohen kept the coat.(Property produced and sworn to)

GUILTY . Aged 29. - Transported for Seven Years .

2175. JOHN MALLISON was indicted for embezzlement .

STEPHEN KING . I live in Kennorton-street, Woburn-place. The prisoner was in my employ - on the 23rd or 24th of August he did not account to me for 7s. 6d. received from Mr. Bell, nor at any time since.

JOHN BELL . I live in Little Russell-street. and deal with the prosecutor for bread. The prisoner brought bread from him on the 23rd, or 24th of August - I paid him 7s. 6d.; he gave me this receipt.

STEPHEN KING re-examined. Q.Was there any other person to whom the prisoner should account? A. Yes, to my wife, but we always took it - my wife is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

2176. HENRY PLEFFER and CHARLES EDWARD PECK were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , 1 handkerchief, value 4s., the goods of David Thomas Deane , from his person .

JOHN BURTON . I live in North-place, Gray's Inn-road. On the afternoon of the 22nd of October I saw the prisoners in Gray's Inn-road, in company with another boy - they looked into two or three shops; they then saw the prosecutor, and tried his pocket in Verulam-buildings - they followed him, and tried again and again, and just as he was going into Holborn , they got his handkerchief out - Pleffer went to put it into his bosom; I seized his arm - he slipped from me: Rierdon was just by, and took him; I knew the prisoners before, and am certain of their persons.

Peck. I know nothing of Pleffer - you did not see me with him. Witness. Yes, I did; I saw you at nine o'clock in the morning, and this was about eleven - you were close at his elbow.

WILLIAM COLTON . I live in High-street, Islington, and am a broker. I followed the prisoners out of Gray's Inn-road - I came up just as Rierdon took Pleffer, and I took Peck; I saw the three boys together for two hours - the other got away.

DAVID THOMAS DEANE . I live in Cloudesley-terrace. This handkerchief is mine; I had it in my pocket in Gray's Inn-road - I saw Pleffer throw it down, but I was not conscious of its being taken; I was not aware that they were following me.

DANIEL RIERDON . I was passing promiscuously, and saw the prisoners in company, and another boy with them- they were behind the prosecutor; I secured Pleffer - he threw the handkerchief down.

Pleffer. I have no father, and was so hungry I was forced to do it; Peck was not with me.

PLEFFER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

PECK - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

2177. JOHN WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , 1 saw, value 5s. , the goods of Richard Johnson .

RICHARD JOHNSON . I live in Little Ebury-street. Chelsea. I have known the prisoner these six months - on the 30th of September I was working at Mr. Davies' premises, in the Five-fields, Chelsea ; I saw the prisoner there, and had some conversation with him - I left him in front of the premises, at half-past four o'clock, and returned in about half an hour; I then missed a saw.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q.How do you know it? A.I have no private mark on it - I bought it from the manufacturer, whose name is on it; I have used it about two years - I do not recollect that I have said, I knew it in no other way but by the maker's name; I have no recollection of saying so to Mr. Fletcher - I know Mr. Fletcher; he is a bricklayer - I did not leave him behing me at work; I left work about half-past five o'clock, as soon as it got dusk.

HENRY RILEY . I am shopman to Mr. Thompson, a pawnbroker, in Grosvenor-row. I produce a saw, pawned in the evening of the 30th of September, about seven o'clock, by the prisoner.

Cross-examined. Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? No; he had a fustian jacket on - I noticed his face, and pointed him out at Queen-square.

THOMAS BARNES . I am a Police-officer. I received the prisoner - he denied any knowledge of the transaction.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the building when Johnson left it - Fletcher was with me till half-past seven o'clock; he never saw a saw in my possession - I was in bed by nine, and was fetched out at eleven.

THOMAS FLETCHER . I worked at the same buildings. I remember Johnson leaving his work - the prisoner was with me the best part of the day, from three till about seven o'clock; we left the buildings a little before five, went to the Orange Tree coffee-house, and had two pints of porter in the gardens - we then went to the King's-mews, in Pimlico; from there I went to my residence, No. 3, Eccleston-place - the prisoner went with me; Johnson had left at three o'clock for a short time - I did not see the prisoner take any saw; there are three houses - three plasterers and one bricklayer were at work there - some of them wore fustian jackets.

COURT. Q. Could any body have taken it without your seeing it? A. Yes, but I do not think the prisoner was in the house where it was, from three till five o'clock.

JOSIAH VINEY . I have known the prisoner fourteen years - he is a truly honest character; I was at the Session's-house, and heard Johnson say he could not swear to the saw, except by the maker's name; he had no private mark on it.

RICHARD JOHNSON re-examined. Q. Where had you your conversation with the prisoner? A. In the back parlour of the house where the saw was; Fletcher was not in that room, to my knowledge - I used the saw about half-past three o'clock, and did not see it afterwards; the prisoner was there after that.

GUILTY . Aged 23. - Confined Seven Days .

2178. THOMAS LARGE , HENRY COOPER , & GEORGE LOWE were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , 1 frock, value 7s.; 1 pair of shoes, value 6s.; 1 handkerchief, value 1s.; 2 sovereigns, and 12 shillings , the property of Daniel Derby .

DANIEL DERBY. I live near Stourbridge, in Staffordshire. On the 28th of September I was with my boat, on the canal, near Harefield, in Middlesex - the boat was fastened there; I went to bed in the cabin - I awoke about one o'clock, and missed a flannel frock, a silk handkerchief, a pair of shoes, two sovereigns, and some silver- they had all been taken while I was in bed.

ELIZABETH MARY ANN DANHAM . I am the wife of Richard Danham , of Uxbridge-moor. On the 1st of October Large brought this frock to my house, and told me to keep it till he fetched it away in the afternoon or evening - our house is about four miles from where the boat was; I believe there were one or two persons in the taproom with Large, but he came alone to the bar to leave the frock - Lawe came the next day, which was Sunday, for the frock; I did not let him have it - he was taken into custody at my house.

JOHN BIRCH . I produce the frock, which I got from Danham - I apprehended Large; he had a pair of shoes on, with nails in them - I brought him up to London, and when we arrived he had no shoes on; he had slipped them off in coming along the road - Cooper and several others were in his company when I took him - I found this handkerchief on his neck.

WILLIAM CHERRY . I am a victualler, and live at Uxbridge. On the morning of the 1st of October the prisoners were in my tap-room - Large put on a jacket or frock, and Cooper said to him it would look well on the right one; Large said he would take care it did not go on him.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Large's Defence. I was coming down the path by the canal, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, and picked up the frock, the shoes, and the handkerchief - I left them three days at Mr. Cherry's; I took a young man there, and asked if he would buy them - he said No.

LARGE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

COOPER - NOT GUILTY .

LOWE - NOT GUILTY .

2179. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 half-sovereign, the money of Richard Smith , from his person .

RICHARD SMITH . I am mate of a brig . I fell in company with the prisoner on Friday last, and went to a public-house, in Ratcliff-highway - I told her, in fun, that I had lost a half-sovereign; I then took it from my pocket- I dropped it into my pocket again, but she did not see me; I afterwards lost it, and charged her with taking it- I sent for an officer; the prisoner went to a privy - when the officer came he went there, and found it under a mat.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Was it not to the prisoner's father's house you went? A. Yes - I left that house, with a woman, and went to a public-house; I then returned to the prisoner - I had not been throwing my money about; I had been to the privy.

NOT GUILTY .

2180. JAMES MURRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 pair of boots, value 4s. , the goods of Garratt Condon .

RICHARD CONDON . I live with my father, Garratt Condon, in Monmouth-street ; he is a shoemaker . On the evening of the 21st of October the prisoner came and bought a pair of shoes for 3s. - as he went out I saw something bulky under his coat; I went after him and saw him drop these boots at the bottom of Monmonth-street.

JAMES FITZMORRIS . I am in the prosecutor's employ- I saw the prisoner take the boots; I followed, and saw him drop them.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Confined Six Months .

2181. MARGARET NASH & MARY ANN HAYMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 4 sovereigns , the monies of Rowland Protheroe .

ROWLAND PROTHEROE . I am a shipwright , and live at the North Country Sailor public-house, at Wapping. On the 20th of October I went to Nash's house in Vinegar-lane , between twelve and one o'clock in the morning- I saw the two prisoners there; I told them I had been plundered of 50l. by a man named Jones - I took out four sovereigns and 12s., and said I had lost all but that; I put it into my pocket again - I afterwards went to bed in the back-room, and the next morning about six o'clock I found Hayman had left me; I went to the house to sleep with Hayman, but she did not go to bed with me while I was awake - I have not recovered my money; I was sober - I had delivered my money to a Mrs. Green the night before, but I received it from her again in a few hours afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

2182. ARTHUR SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , 1 waistcoat, value 5s. , the goods of John Elliott .

JOHN ELLIOTT. I am a pawnbroker , and live in Kingsland-road . I had a waistcoat hanging inside my door on the 20th of October - I was called into my shop in a quarter of an hour, and saw the prisoner, a little girl, and the officer, with the waistcoat - this is it.

Prisoner. Q. Had you pinned it up? A.Half an hour before I had gone to the door and seen one pin out of the back of this waistcoat; I put another in, and made it safe.

ANN ANDERSON . I was coming out of the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner unpin the waistcoat. put it under his coat, and walk away up Union-street; the shopman ran after him.

Prisoner. Q. How many pins did I take out? A. Two.

JOHN ROWBOTTOM . I stopped the prisoner at the top of Union-street, with the waistcoat under his coat.

ALEXANDER SKEEN . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up as I passed by.

GUILTY . Aged 21. - Transported for Seven Years .

2183. WILLIAM HENWRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of September , 1 cap, value 3s. 6d. , the goods of Alfred Wildy .

ALFRED WILDY . I am a hatter , and live in Oxford-street . On the 20th of September I lost three seal skin caps from inside my shop door; I picked up one of them on the step.

WILLIAM HORSFORD . I am a Police-officer. I took the prisoner in a public-house in Oxford-street. on the 23rd of September - he said he was quite certain in had seen nocaps; he said at the watch-house that a cap had been sold at Mr. Sarsfield's.

ROSS CARNEY . I live with my father, in Calmell-buildings. I was in the buildings, and the prisoner came and said he had a cap, which he put into his pocket; he then gave it me to mind for him - I took it to Mrs. Sarsfield, and left it with her; the prisoner afterwards asked me for it, and I took him to Sarsfield's - she asked him the price of it; he said 2s., and she bought it for 1s. 6d.

NOT GUILTY .

2184. ANN SHEFFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , 20 brass socks, value 30s., and 1 brass boss, value 3s. , the goods of George Procter .

The prosecutor did not appear. NOT GUILTY .