Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 30 September 2014), May 1823 (18230514).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 14th May 1823.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 14th of MAY, 1823, and following Days;

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF THE RIGHT HON. WILLIAM HEYGATE , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By J. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1823.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable WILLIAM HEYGATE , Esq., LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir John Bayley , Knt., one of Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John Hullock , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Samuel Birch , Esq.; George Bridges , Esq.; Matthew Wood , Esq.; and Christopher Smith , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City.; Newman Knowlys, Esq., Recorder of the said City; John Garratt Esq.; and John Crowder , Esq.; Aldermen of the said City; Thomas Denman , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City; his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Lowe ,

David West ,

Peter White ,

Charles Lawrence ,

Lewis Williams ,

James Findley ,

William Kipling ,

Thomas Jones ,

William Howell Smith ,

James Pearce ,

William Hewlett ,

William Cowperthwaite .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Robert Raddon ,

James Walker ,

Henry Heath ,

Lewis, Hastings ,

William Wilsden ,

John Holloway ,

John Grayson ,

John Barton ,

Richard Bickworth ,

James Hodson ,

John Sly ,

Thomas George M'Larin .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

William Whitton ,

Edgerton Cutler ,

James Findon ,

James Wiggins ,

Robert Walkington ,

John Fildes ,

Archibald Horne ,

John Large ,

Joseph Hale ,

Robert M'Lachlan ,

William Butterfield ,

Jacob Barber .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, MAY 14, 1823.

HEYGATE, MAYOR. FIFTH SESSION.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

723. BENJAMIN PIPER and WILLIAM PIPER were indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house of Maria Haggar , Letitia Haggar , and Hannah Haggar , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 14th of February , with intent to steal .

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HADLINGTON . I know Maria, Letitia, and Hannah Haggar - they are housekeepers in the parish of Tottenham .

SARAH GODFREY . On the 14th of February, I was servant to the prosecutrixs. I was not the last person up that night, and did not fasten up the house - I got up about five o'clock next morning, and found it all quite safe. I missed two bottles of wine from the shop, and 2 lbs. of candles from the cellar; they were safe the night before. I do not know how the persons got in. There is an iron grating before the cellar, if that was lifted up persons could get in.

WILLIAM MAYOR . I lived with Mr. Bone at Tottenham; but am now out of place. I know the prisoners. On the night of the 14th of February, I saw them coming from Mrs. Haggars's, about midnight - it was either on a Thursday or a Friday night, I cannot say which: I saw them come out of the cellar grating; they had something with them. I said nothing to them - I saw them again a few days after, and told them I saw them coming from Mrs. Haggars - they bid me hold my tongue, and say nothing about it; this is all that passed.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. How do you get your living at this time. - A. I am supported by my mother. I told nobody what I had seen. I was coming from London at the time.

COURT. Q. Did you say nothing more to them - A. Nothing more. I am certain I said nothing more to them.

Q. Were you afterwards at Mrs. Haggars yourself - A. Yes; I went there with two others, and went again on the 2d of March, between three and four o'clock in the morning - we got in at the grating - we were disturbed, and did not stay. I first told of this when I was apprehended, which was about a fortnight after the 2d of March. I have known the prisoners seven or eight years.

SARAH GODFREY re-examined. I saw the grating the last thing over night; it was safe, and so it was when I got up in the morning. A person could get in there. I bolted the street door before I went to bed.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

724. THOMAS CONNOR and THOMAS COOLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , at St. Marylebone, twenty-three silver forks, value 8 l.; twelve spoons, value 8 l.; one silver mug, value 2 l.; three sauce ladles, value 1 l.; a fish slice, value 1 l.; a butter knife, value 10 s.; a sallad fork, value 1 l., and four dishes, value 1 l., the goods of David Bevan , Esq., in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE COLEMAN . I am servant to David Bevan , Esq. , who lives in Upper Harley-street, in the parish of St. Marylebone . On the 28th of April, about twenty minutes before eight o'clock in the morning, I put some plate out to clean, on the dresser in the pantry, which fronts the area steps - a person could not see it passing along the street, unless he stood on the area steps of Mr. Goldsmith's, next door. I went into the kitchen for three or four minutes; as I returned from the kitchen to the pantry, I saw a man go through the area gate dressed in a darkish frock coat. In consequence of what the kitchen maid said, I looked and missed the plate, this was within a minute of when I returned - I immediately put on my jacket, ran up the area steps, and into the New-road, with Mr. Adams. I saw two men in custody half an hour after; they ran through the house, No. 14, in York-court - we found one in the privy, and the other by the dust-hole. We lost twenty-seven silver forks, twelve spoons, a silver mug, three sauce ladles, a fish slice, a butter knife, and a sallad fork, all silver; also four plated dishes. I found them all at the Apollo, public-house, the same morning, about eight o'clock, in possession of Morris, the officer. I cannot say whether it was one of the prisoners, who I saw go up the steps; but one of them had a dark frock coat on when taken.

SAMUEL ADAMS . I am coachman to George Patterson , Esq. On the morning of the 28th of April, about a quarter before eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner Connor dressed in a blue frock coat, and blue trowsers - he came up theprosecutor's area steps, with a bundle which rattled, and appeared to me like plate; I alarmed the servant maid - Coleman came up immediately; I watched Connor to the New-road end of Harley-street, and gave an alarm to some persons on horseback, who pursued. I ran into Paddington-street, and East-street, and in a back yard in York-court, we found the two prisoners - Cooley was just coming out of the privy; Connor was shuffling about close by the dust-hole - they were both out of breath, and had been running. I knew Connor again, and am sure he is the man who came up the area steps. We kept them until the constable came. Cooley wanted to speak to Coleman. I saw the plate in Morris's possession. I did not see Cooley till I got to York-court, which is half or three quarters of a mile from the prosecutor's.

ELIZABETH KENTISH . I keep the Apollo, public-house, Paddington-street. On Monday morning, the 28th of April, about eight o'clock, I heard some persons running through my passage; I could not tell how many. I directly went to the door, and on looking down saw a bundle in the passage, tied in a yellow handkerchief - I picked it up, and took it into the bar, and delivered it to Morris, the officer. They could get into York-court by running through my house.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am an officer. On the morning of the 28th of April, I heard an alarm, and found the prisoners in the custody of several people, and took charge of them. I received a bundle from Kentish, which contained forty-two pieces of plate; they were the articles stated in the indictment - I have kept part of it as a sample ever since, and produce it.

JAMES DAVEY . I am servant to Mr. Wilkinson. On the 28th of April, I was on horseback in the New-road. In consequence of what Adams said, I went in pursuit, and saw the two prisoners walking together in Paddington-street - they saw me beckon to Coleman, and then both run; Connor had a bundle. I saw them run into the Apollo - they run through the house - they had the bundle when they went in, but came out without it, and ran down East-street, into York-court; the back of the house opens into East-street. I saw them in custody.

JURY. Q. Did you see them both go in and come out of the house - A. Yes. It is a corner house; I rode round.

MARY PHILLIPS . I am servant to Mr. Bevan. I was cleaning the area steps, and saw Connor come out of the area gate - I did not observe that he had anything. I saw him in custody soon after, and am certain of him.

GEORGE COLEMAN re-examined. Paddington-street is half or three quarters of a mile from my master's. I ran with Adams, and saw two men run into the Apollo, public-house - I ran through the house into East-street, but did not see them taken. I found them in York-court. The plate is all my master's, and is worth 40 l. All the articles have my master's crest on them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. When Connor was taken had he not a black coat on - A. I do not know. The person who ran up the area steps had a frock coat on.

MICHAEL MORRIS . I am almost certain Connor had a frock coat on.

CONNOR'S Defence. I got up this morning to buy a pair of scales in Crawford-street, and when I was in East-street, a man said two thieves had run into the court - I went to see for them, and the butler turned, and said,

"That is the man, I can swear to him," and took Cooley; I was going away soon after, and he said I was one.

COOLEY'S Defence. I was walking up Paddington-street, and was taken ill, went into the court, and asked where the privy was.

SAMUEL ADAMS re-examined. I said I would swear to Connor, not to Cooley.

CONNOR - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 19.

COOLEY - GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 17.

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

725. SARAH BAGATT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , three broaches, value 2 s.; a seal, value 6 d.; an umbrella, value 2 s.; two books, value 2 s.; an half-crown, and two shillings , the property of Charles Cull .

ANN CULL . I am the wife of Charles Cull ; we live in Fox's-place, Marylebone . I took the prisoner into my house for a fortnight, as she was out of service - she nursed my children. On Monday, the 28th of April, about a quarter before six o'clock in the morning, I went out to wash, and left her in care of my four children; the youngest is between three and four months old, and the eldest seven years. My husband fetched me home about half-past twelve o'clock - she was gone, and we missed all the articles stated in the indictment; the half-crown was in a tea pot on the mantle-piece when I went out. I found her about a quarter before ten o'clock at night, in Great Portland-street, and gave her in charge - she had one of the broaches, a book, two handkerchiefs, and an umbrella - I found a gown in pawn in Union-street, I asked her how she came to rob me; she made no answer.

GEORGE MEAD . I am an officer. I received her in charge with the umbrella, broach, handkerchiefs, and book.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

726. ELIZABETH BENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , six yards of cotton, value 5 s. , the goods of Thomas Read .

GEORGE GRAY . I am a shopman to Thomas Read, linendraper , High Holborn . On the 11th of April, about half-past ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to see a print, which laid in the window - I shewed her several; she bought none, but asked for two patterns, which I gave her; she then bought some muslin, which came to 1 s. 2 d., but said she had only 1 s. without changing a sovereign. As she stood at the counter I saw the second print I had showed her under her shawl; I said nothing until I could be certain it was ours. I missed it from the counter - she was going out, and I went after her; she had got to the door. I saw a woman go from her. I brought the prisoner back, but she had not got the print - I am sure she had it when she went to the door - I have not found it. She said she lived round the corner, at the first butter shop. I said,

"Some one hasdied at your house" -

"Yes," she said,

"it was a young person from the country." When she was secured, she said she lived in Chandos-street.

GEORGE HARRIS . I am an officer. I took charge of her. I found no money on her - she said she must have lost a sovereign in coming to the watch-house, and that she lived at the Key, public-house, Chandos-street.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

727. MICHAEL BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , three saws, value 12 s.; a plane, value 8 d.; a square, value 8 d.; two chisels, value 4 d., and a basket, value 4 d. , the goods of James Matson .

JAMES MATSON . I am a carpenter , and live in Phoebe-street, Limehouse. On the 25th of April, I was working at a shop on Limekiln-hill , and after dinner I went to a public-house to get a pint of beer - I saw a disturbance in the street, and went out, and saw the prisoner; he was charged with stealing a basket of tools, which I found to be mine - they were given to me. I had left them in the shop, and bolted the door, but it could be unbolted outside. I did not wish to hurt him, and let him go, as he said he was distressed - the people said they hoped I should be robbed again, so I secured him again.

DAVID SAUL . I am a butcher. I knew the prisoner by sight before. On the 25th of April, between two and three o'clock, I saw him passing my father's door with a basket of tools in his hand - a mob followed him; he dropped the tools, and ran away. I saw Matson take him afterwards, and am certain he is the man. The basket appeared to be the same as I saw him with.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 37.

Confined One Year .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

728. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a jacket, value 8 s.; a waiscoat, value 4 s., and a pocket book, value 6 d. , the goods of John Stockwell .

JOHN STOCKWELL . I am second mate of the Governor Harcourt, which laid in Shadwell-docks . On Saturday last, about half-past nine o'clock, I took my jacket and waistcoat off, and gave them to Sharlands, who belongs to the ship, to put them down in his box, and about half-past eleven o'clock I was called ashore, and found them held up in a crowd. Anderson had them in his hand; they were delivered to me. The pocket book was inside the jacket pocket. I do not know the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERT MARTIN . I am an officer of the Thames Police. The property was delivered to me at Fletcher's-yard, in Shadwell, when Stockwell was there, he claimed them. I have had them ever since. I took the prisoner at the same time.

ROBERT CAMPBELL . I am a shipwright. I was at work on board the Governor Harcourt. I frequently saw the prisoner lurking about the docks. On Saturday morning, about half-past twelve o'clock, I was coming ashore, and thought I saw something bulky in his breast - I looked and saw he had a new jacket on under his own. I told the chief mate, and we followed him to the bottom of Fox-lane - he turned into a stable yard; we went together, and met him coming out at the gate. I said,

"This is the man who had the jacket on" - he said,

"I had no jacket on but this," and opened his breast to shew us. I said,

"You must have left it in this stable," and went to look for it; but there was a passage leading from the stable where I did not search. Wood found it there.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a shipwright. I was in the stable yard, and found a jacket laying close to a parcel of hoops, and gave it to the chief mate.

WILLIAM HILL . I am a labourer, I found the waistcoat in the hoop building. I saw the prisoner close to where I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 64.

Confined One Year .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

729. JOHN CHIPPERTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , a coat, value 6 l.; a pair of trowsers, value 2 l., and a waistcoat, value 1 l. , the goods of Charles Walker .

CHARLES WALKER . I am a tailor . The prisoner was employed as porter by me, for a month or five weeks. On Saturday night, the 26th of April, about ten o'clock, I sent him with a bag containing a great coat, a pair of trowsers, and a waistcoat; he was to take the waistcoat and trowsers to No. 32, Charing-cross, and the coat to New-street, Covent-garden - he was not to return that night, but on the Sunday, at ten o'clock; he did not return. I took him on the Monday, in St. Martin's-lane, intoxicated. I asked what he had done with my property - he said he did not know. I found near 2 l. on him, in silver.

JOSEPH RAWLEY . I live in New-street, Covent-garden. On the 26th of April, I expected to have received a coat from Mr. Walker, which never came.

JOSEPH TOMLINSON . I live at No. 32, Charing-cross. I received no clothes from Mr. Walker - I had ordered a pair of trowsers and a waistcoat.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking all the afternoon, and after I received these things, I met two men, and drank with them, and do not know what became of them.

CHARLES WALKER . He was sober when I delivered them to him. When I took him he said he had been tired of himself this two years.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Nine Months .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

730. CATHERINE CONNOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , a shift, value 2 s.; two pair of sleeves, value 4 s.; a tea cup, value 1 s., and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. , the goods of Sophia Thomas .

SOPHIA THOMAS . I live in Euston-square . The prisoner occasionally charred for me. On Wednesday, about three weeks ago, she was there, and appeared more bulky than usual. I asked what she had got about her person - she said nothing. She produced half a pound of tea from her pocket, which I knew to be mine. I searched her, and found a white handkerchief, and two pair of sleeveson her. I sent for an officer, and gave her into his custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES COUSINS . I took her in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchiefs are not her's - she is a woman of the town.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Confined One Year .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

731. EDWARD FAIRMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , three pair of breeches, value 15 s. , the goods of Joel Nathan .

JOEL NATHAN . I am a clothes salesman , and live in Chapel-street . On Thursday, the 8th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, six pair of trowsers hung over my door. I was standing behind my counter, (a woman opposite had given me information) I watched and saw the prisoner take down three pair of them; he gave two pair to his companions - I ran out, but could not overtake them; the prisoner dropped one pair, and his hat fell off with a red cravat in it. As I could not overtake them, I run back, and put on a pair of shoes; I only had my slippers on before. I then went after them again, and saw the prisoner coming down James-street, into Oxford-street, without his hat; his two companions were with him - I seized him, but his companions got off. I am sure he is the man who took them. I said,

"You are the man who stole my small clothes;" he said,

"Where is my hat?" I said it was in my shop. I was surrounded by a set of ruffians when I collared him.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . I am an officer. I received charge of the prisoner at the corner of James-street, Oxford-street. Next morning I received the hat and cravat from the prosecutor's wife, which the prisoner claimed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Paddington-street, and met two lads; they stopped behind me. I saw them pull down a pair of breeches, and run off. The prosecutor came calling Stop thief! I run after them, and lost my hat; but never had the breeches. He says they hung over the door, but they were against a dead wall.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Two Years .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

732. WILLIAM GLEED was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , six brushes, value 12 s. , the goods of Francis Lamb .

JOSEPH ROWLEY . I am shopman to Francis Lamb , oil-man , of Holborn-bars . On the 30th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and took six brushes off a hook, put them under his coat, and walked off - I followed him down Gray's Inn-lane, caught him, and took them out of his hand.

THOMAS GAMHAGE . I am a watchman. I took charge of him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Two Years .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

733. JAMES HODGE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , a coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Sir John Hamilton , Bart.

HENRY ANDREWS . I am coachman to Sir John Hamilton. On the night of the 2d of May, about ten minutes past twelve o'clock, I returned home with the carriage, which stood in Blandford-mews - I unlocked the stable door, and went in for about a minute, and heard the horses move. I ran out, and caught the prisoner on the box, taking my coat; he had it in his hand - I had left it on the box; he instantly came down and ran off; he left it on the foot board, and had not removed it.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

734. JOHN HOANE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , a shirt, value 5 s.; a handkerchief, value 5 s., and a pair of stockings, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Neal .

THOMAS NEAL . I lodge in Whitechapel . The prisoner lodged in the same house for four or five nights. I lost a shirt, a handkerchief, and a pair of stockings, on the Friday, about a week before he was taken - he never came there afterward. I had put them in a bundle behind the bedstead.

(Shirt produced and sworn to.)

JAMES HORSON . I am servant to Mr. Fleming, pawnbroker, Whitechapel. I took a shirt in pawn of the prisoner, on the 11th of April, for 3 s. 6 d. - I knew him before.

ROBERT COOMBES . I am an officer of Whitechapel. On Monday, the 21st of April, I apprehended the prisoner - I said,

"What have you done with this man's property?" he said,

"I have pawned them" - I asked where; he said the shirt in Whitechapel, and the handkerchief at Dexter's, in Whitechapel-road. He denied taking the stockings. I went to Dexter's, but the handkerchief was lost.

Prisoner's Defence. He demanded 1 l. of me - I said I had not got it. He said he would swear all he could against me.

THOMAS NEAL . I did not.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

735. JAMES LAYFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , a shirt, value 2 s.; two neckcloths, value 1 s.; two brushes, value 6 d.; five razors, value 5 s.; a bone, value 4 s.; two books, value 18 d., and two pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of Thomas White .

THOMAS WHITE . I am a labourer . I have worked with the prisoner for four or five months. We came out of the workhouse together last Saturday week, and agreed to take a room between us, but we could not find one. I left my bag, containing the articles stated in the indictment, at a cook shop, in Broad-street, St. Giles's - a pair of shoes and a shirt of his, were in my bag. We gave it to the landlord, and went from there to a lodging house in Belton-court - I left him there, and walked the streets all night myself, and went to him next morning, about a quarter after six o'clock, and found he had left. I went to the cook shop, and found him there, making a noise; he wanted the bundle - I told him it was mine, and askedwhat he wanted with it; he made no answer but went away. I went to my breakfast. I saw him soon after - we went and got the bundle, and took it to the lodging house, where he slept; we agreed to sleep there together that night. He said,

"Don't you deliver such a message as you did at the other house last night" - (I had told them not to part with the bundle, unless we both came together) I said,

"Well, deliver a message yourself about it." We went and drank together, and about eleven o'clock I left him. I went to the lodging house about five on Sunday afternoon - the bundle was gone. I have found nothing, I saw him on the Monday evening - he said the bundle was gone, and I might go and look for it. I gave him in charge.

SAMUEL CROWTHER . I am servant at the lodging house. In the afternoon of last Monday week, about half-past three o'clock, the prisoner came, and said,

"Let me have the bag, as I want a shirt out of it" - I gave it him in the passage; he went away. I did not know who had left it there - the landlord told me to give it him. He did not come afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. By some means or other, his bundle and mine are both lost.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

736. WILLIAM MORELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , a square, value 3 s.; a pair of pincers, value 10 d., and two saws, value 12 s. , the goods of Samuel Wigley .

SAMUEL WIGLEY. I am a carpenter . I was at work at a house in St. Clement's parish; I saw the prisoner there on the evening of the last day in April - I met him as I was going from work. He asked for a job; I said I thought I could give him one. We had a pint of beer together; he said he was apprenticed to the same master as myself. He promised to meet me next morning between ten and eleven o'clock; he came, and when I came from dinner about one o'clock, I missed these tools, which I had seen safe about eleven.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you agree to lend me tools at 4 s. a week - A. Never. I never knew him before. The saws are not mine.

(Pincers produced and sworn to.)

HENRY SHARP . On the 1st of May, Wigley applied to me - I took the prisoner on the 2d of May, at his lodgings - he gave the pincers into my hand, and said he took the saw, and hoped Wigley would not prosecute him, and he would endeavour to make them good.

Prisoner's Defence. I borrowed the pincers of him, to do a job. I went home before twelve o'clock, and was not out afterwards. Next day he came to see if I was at home - I said I was, and in an hour he brought the officer; I immediately gave him the pincers, and said I had pawned two saws, alluding to two of my own.

SARAH CRAWLEY . I live in Wych-street - the prisoner lodged with me. Before he was apprehended a man came to ask for him, and in ten minutes the officer came.

HENRY SHARP . He did not say the prosecutor had lent him the pincers.

NOT GUILTY .

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

737. GEORGE DOWNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , seven books, value 3 l., and a snuff box, value 1 l., the goods of Joseph Addison , in his dwelling-house .

MR. JOSEPH ADDISON . I live at No. 1, King's Bench-walk, Inner Temple . I left my chambers about six o'clock on Saturday evening, the 12th of April. I am not certain whether I left anybody there or not, or whether I locked the outer door. I returned about ten o'clock, and found a note on my table, which I now produce. Next morning, I missed from my book shelf Bacon's Abridgment, seven volumes, octavo, which were safe the preceeding day, and a tortoise-shell snuff box, with a painted lid, which was on the table in the course of Saturday. I found the books on the Saturday following, at Cooper's shop, in Fisher's-alley. They have marginal notes, in my own hand writing - I found the snuff box in pawn afterwards.

JAMES MARTIN . I live with Mr. Addison. I was gone to dinner when he left the chambers. After I returned, the prisoner came to the chambers, a little past eight o'clock, and asked how long Mr. Addison had been out - I said I had not seen him since four o'clock. He said he would write a note to him, and went into Mr. Addison's room; I followed him in - he asked if Mr. Addison had Bacon's Abridgment; I said Yes; he told me to get them down for him - I did so, and asked if he wanted them for Mr. Whiting, whose name he had mentioned. He said. Yes, and took them away. I had not noticed the snuff box. I saw Mr. Addison on Monday; he said Bacon's Abridgment was gone - I said a man had been for them. (Looks at the note,) this is the note he left. On the Thursday following, I went with Limbrick, to the prisoner's house, in Clarence-street, Rotherhithe - I saw him, and told him a gentleman was waiting for him at the bottom of the street; he said he would come to him immediately. I returned to Limbrick; we waited half an hour for him; he did not come; we went to the house, but could not find him - we went again on the Sunday following, and took him. I have seen the books since, and know them to be my master's, (Note read.)

"SIR, I will call upon you on Monday morning, by eleven o'clock, respecting some business I wish you to do for me."

CHARLES HUSHALL . I am a bookseller. I bought Bacon's Abridgment of the prisoner, for 35 s., on the Saturday night - I am certain of his person. Mr. Addison saw them on the Monday week following, at Mr. Cooper's, to whom I had sent them.

WILLIAM MASLAND . I am a pawnbroker. On Saturday evening, the 12th of April, the prisoner pawned a tortoise-shell snuff box with me, for 10 s. - I am certain of him. It is mounted in metal, and has no silver about it.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at his own house. I said I had found the books, and wanted to know where the duplicate was - he said,

"I have tore it." I said if the snuff box was pawned, I would find it - he then wrote on a paper,

"Snuff box, opposite Magdalen, Westminster, Richard Williams ."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY. Aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 35 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

738. MARY GROSVENOR was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , five sheets, value 10 s.; six table cloths, value 1 l.; four napkins, value 4 s.; three towels, value 3 s.; a glass cloth, value 6 d.; a muslin dress, value 12 s.; nine handkerchiefs, value 12 s.; a habit-shirt, value 2 s.; four pairs of cuffs, value 4 s.; a frill, value 6 d.; four neckerchiefs, value 15 s.; a dressing gown, value 2 s. 6 d.; two flannel gowns, value 1 s.; and eleven pair of stockings, value 17 s. the goods of Thomas Clark , to whom she was servant .

MR. THOMAS CLARK . I am a solicitor , and live in Bridge-street, Blackfriars . The prisoner had been about ten months in my service. On the 15th of April, in consequence of suspicion, I sent for a constable, and had her boxes searched - my daughter had given her warning, and she was to quit on the following day. I was present at the search; all the articles stated in the indictment were found - she appeared much affected.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. They could not have been taken all at one time - A. I should imagine not. I believe it to be her first offence.

JOSEPH POTTER . I was sent for, and took charge of her. There were three boxes; she opened the third herself - I found the articles mentioned in the indictment. She threw herself across the bed, and said she was undone for ever. I asked her for the key of a box which stood in the passage; she said she would open it, which she did, and threw out three of the articles.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 29.

Recommended to Mercy . Confined Two Months .

739. JOSEPH IBBETSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , twenty-two yards of moreen, value 22 s.; six shawls, value 3 l.; a whittle, value 5 s.; two pelisses, value 20 s., and a wrapper, value 6 d. , the goods of William Waterhouse .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to be the property of William Waterhouse and others, his partners.

MR. CORWOOD conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS FELGATE . I am clerk to Mr. William Water-house , coach proprietor ; he is owner of the Union, Southampton coach. On the 23d of April, we had a parcel directed to Mr. Chambers, of Southampton - the coach went that morning from the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill. It is our custom to send the parcels there in a hackney coach - they were put into John Wright 's coach that morning; I delivered him this parcel. The prisoner was brought back with it five minutes after.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a hackney coachman. On the 23d of April, I was employed by Mr. Mountain, of the Saracen's Head, to fetch the parcels from Waterhouse's - I received them at a quarter before eight o'clock. I remember one directed to Chambers, Southampton; I put it in the coach myself, and was waiting in the office for the weigh bill - the coach stood at the door in Lad-lane. I saw the opposite side coach door open; I ran directly round the horses' heads, and saw the prisoner with this parcel under his arm - I said,

"Hallo, what are you doing;" he threw it down, and ran off, but was stopped before I lost sight of him. He said,

"Let me go, it's all nonsense."

WILLIAM HAYWARD . I am a calenderer. I made up this parcel; it is worth between 5 l. and 6 l.; and contains the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. I ran along with several other people, hearing the cry of Stop thief! but know nothing about it.

JOHN WRIGHT . Nobody was near him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

740. GEORGE WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , a deal box, value 5 s., and thirty straw bonnets, value 17 l. , the goods of William Sykes .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to John Lacey .

JOHN LACEY . I am a straw hat maker , and live in Cranbourn-street, Leicester-square. William Sykes keeps the Catherine Wheel Inn-yard, Bishopsgate-street . I had sent a quantity of plait to Braintree, to be made into bonnets, and expected them to be returned. The prisoner formerly lived servant with me, and had left about three weeks - he had fetched goods from the Inn for me.

WILLIAM SYKES . I keep the Catherine Wheel Inn-yard - the Braintree waggon comes there. On Saturday morning, the 3d of May, about five o'clock, the waggon came in - it had a box directed to Mr. Lacey. The prisoner came early that morning, and asked for Mr. Lacey's box; I delivered it to him, not knowing that he had left Mr. Lacey - he paid 2 d. for booking, and took it away. Mr. Lacey sent for it two hours after, and I said I had delivered it. I saw him in custody on the Tuesday, and am certain of him. The box has not been found.

SAMUEL COLLIS . I am a straw bonnet maker at Braintree. I sent the thirty-two bonnets to Mr. Lacey, by the waggon, on Friday, the 2d of May, and next week I received a letter about them. They cost 17 l.

CHARLES READ . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday, at a coffee shop in Drury-lane, about twelve o'clock in the day. I told him I took him about some bonnets - he said,

"You can do nothing with me, I did not fetch them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

741. JOHN BRADLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , ninety-three pair of stockings, value 5 l. and a parasol, value 5 s. , the goods of John Theobald , the elder.

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN THEOBALD , JUN. I am the son of John Theobald , hosier - we live in Skinner-street . The prisoner has lived four or five years with us, as porter , and in consequence of information, an officer was fetched. This property was afterwards brought; he then fell on his knees, and begged for mercy.

GEORGE WORRALL . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Theobald and a warrant, on the 2d of April, to the prisoner's lodging, in Well-street, Cripplegate. I found two pair of cotton drawers, wrapped in a paper, with the prosecutor's mark, also three pair of braces, and some cotton stockings, among papers, with the prosecutor's mark on them. I took them to the prosecutor's house.

WILLIAM THEOBALD . I was present when these thingswere found; the braces were wrapped in papers, which have our private marks on them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES TILLAGE . I am servant to the prosecutor. Here are two pair of drawers with our private mark on the paper.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Do not you send goods out in those papers - A. We do when we sell wholesale, but not retail - we should not send out such small quantities as these in that paper.

NOT GUILTY .

742. JOHN BRADLEY was again indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , two pair of cotton drawers, value 5 s., and three pair of stockings, value 4 s. , the goods of John Theobald , the elder.

MR. JOHN THEOBALD . The prisoner was our porter - we had a warrant to search his lodging.

GEORGE WORRALL . I found a quantity of duplicates at his lodging, and three or four in possession of his wife.

BENJAMIN COGSWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Essex, pawnbroker. On the 31st of August, twelve pair of new stockings were pawned by a woman, for 14 s., in the name of Elizabeth Warren ; on the 11th of September, a pair were pawned in the name of Ward; on the 14th of September, two pair by Warren; on the 27th, three pair in the name of Eleanor Bryan ; on the 30th of September, two pair were pawned in the name of Ann Darter ; on the 20th of December, a pair by the prisoner's wife; on the 23d of May, Warren pawned twelve pair; on the 1st of June, another, and on the 27th of April, another pair.

ELIZABETH WARREN . I live in Golden Lion-court. I had the care of a house in Castle-street. I pawned these stockings by desire of the prisoner's wife.

ELEANOR BRYAN . I pawned the stockings by order of Mrs. Jones.

MARY JONES . I got them from the prisoner's wife.

WILLIAM SHARP . I am shopman to Mr. Reeves, of Red Cross-street, pawnbroker. I have two pair of stockings pawned on the 20th of September, for 12 s., in the name of Mary Bryan ; on the 8th of March, one pair in the name of Mary Warren , and on the 21st of September, a pair in the name of John Warren ; on the 15th of January, a pair in the name of Bradley; on the 16th of September, three pair in the name of Jones; on the 30th of July, seven pair in the name of Mary Bradley ; on the 15th of January, three pair in the name of Mary Jones , and on the 16th of January, seven pair, in the name of Mary Johnson .

ELEANOR BRYAN . I pawned nothing in the name of Mary Bryan .

PETER PIGE . I am servant to Mr. Baylis, pawnbroker, of Aldersgate-street. I have eighteen pair of stockings, all new, pawned in the name of Ann Williams ; on the 20th of September, three pair in the name of Ann Goram ; on the 23d of September, two pair in the name of Ann Bradley , and on the 23d of March, a pair in the name of Ann Jones .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am shopman to Mr. Young, of Old-street. I have thirteen pair of stockings, pawned in the name of Ann Webb , Old-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

743. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , a deal board, value 4 s. , the goods of John Willet and William Blandford .

WILLIAM BLANDFORD . I am in partnership with John Willet ; our manufactory is in King's Arms-yard, West-street . On Friday evening last, my man stopped the prisoner with a board, which was in a gateway of the yard. I went to him, and asked what he was going to do with it - he said he was going to lend it to a man, to whitewash a room, as he had no ladder. He had been in our service for eighteen months. I asked the man's name and residence; he could not tell me, but said he became acquainted with him at the White Horse, public-house, Baldwin's-gardens, and was to meet him at the corner of Baldwin's-gardens. All the property in the gateway was ours.

RICHARD BURNHAM . I am in the service of the prosecutors. I was coming down West-street, about eight o'clock in the evening, and saw the prisoner coming from the premises with the board on his shoulder - he was bringing it out; part of it was in the yard when I first saw him. I stopped him - he said he was going to lend it to a person to whitewash.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

SECOND DAY. THURSDAY, MAY 15.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

744. WILLIAM M'DONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , a waistcoat, value 10 s. , the goods of John Burgess .

JOHN BURGESS . I am a tailor , and live in Little Queen-street . On the 23d of April, I missed this waistcoat from the window, ran out, and found the prisoner with it.

WILLIAM FROST . I am a cheesemonger, and live opposite Burgess. I saw the prisoner with two others go up to the window - the prisoner lifted up the window, and took out the waistcoat, and all ran off together. I pursued, secured the prisoner, and took it from under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM THEOBALD . I saw the prisoner standing with two others close to the window. After he left the window, I saw it had been lifted up about an inch; it was close down when they came up. I joined in the pursuit.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year , and Publicly Whipped .

745. THOMAS NEWCOMBE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , two lamps, value 12 s. , the goods of John Elgi .

JOHN ELGI . I keep the One Tun, public-house, Strand . I put two lamps in my back place to clean. The prisoner came to the tap-room for some beer - the servant gave me reason to suspect him; he ran out - I pursued him, and found a lamp in each pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months .

746. JOHN O'DONNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , a saw, value 4 s. , the goods of Francis Jordan .

FRANCIS JORDAN . I am a carpenter . On Friday afternoon I was working at No. 10, Charlotte-buildings, Gray's Inn-lane , and left about two o'clock, leaving my saw in the front room on the first floor. I locked the house up, and went over to another house - I returned at nine o'clock next morning, and it was gone; there was a ladder in front of the house, which would enable a person to get in. The prisoner was taken that afternoon, and gave the duplicate to the constable - he has no parents.

WILLIAM MARCH . I am the constable. The prisoner gave me the duplicate.

EDWARD FAIRCLOUGH . I am servant to Mr. Nicholls, pawnbroker, Gray's Inn-lane. I was present when the prisoner pawned the saw at our house.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 12.

Judgment Respited .

747. WILLIAM SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , four deal boards, value 5 s. , the goods of Archibald Hurley .

ARCHIBALD HURLEY . I am a builder , and live in Park-street, Dorset-square. I was employed at a building at Kilburn . On the 30th of April, about six o'clock in the morning, the watchman came to me, and I missed a deal - I found it in a yard, which I believe to be the prisoner's; we found him, and I gave him in charge - he seemed agitated. I asked him to shew me where my deal was; he took me to the premises, and shewed it me - it was a deal plank, which I had sawed into four pieces. I am certain it is mine.

WILLIAM HALL . I am the watchman. I saw the prisoner at a quarter before one o'clock at night, with these four boards, coming from the new houses which Hurley was building, I questioned him; he said he bought them the evening before, at Paddington, and lived in Willsden-green. I did not detain him then, but next morning I took Hurley to the house, and found the deals.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I had been assisting the overseers to find a man who had deserted his wife, which kept me out late, and as I came through Kilburn this plank laid in the road - I took it up. The watchman stopped me; I gave him my address, and took the boards home.

ARCHIBALD HURLEY . They did lay outside the building.

WILLIAM HALL . He gave me his address; but I am sure he said he had bought them.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

748. JOHN BROWN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Wells , about the hour of nine in the night of the 29th of April , at St. Marylebone, with intent the goods and chattels in the same dwelling-house, feloniously and burglariously to steal .

WILLIAM WELLS . I am a coal merchant , and live in Upper Berkley-street, Marylebone - the house is my own; I had let it to a family, who left it about the middle of April. On the 29th of April, about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, I fastened all the windows and double locked the door; I slept there every night; but was going up to another house of mine at Edgware. Between five and six o'clock that evening the prisoner had rang at the bell, and asked if one Mr. Gurney did not lodge there; I referred him a few doors further on. While I was at Edgware, between half-past eight and nine o'clock, I was sent for - I got back to the house before it struck nine; it had been dark about an hour. I found the door shut, but a crowd of people round it - I applied the key, and found it on the single lock. I am positive that I double locked it; I went in, and found the back door, which I had double bolted and barred, wide open, and a pair of steps moved from where I had put them, and set against the party wall. I found somebody had scratched the wall leading to the mews with his feet, in endeavouring to get over. I went down stairs to get a light, and found the matches disturbed, which I had left on the tinder box. Upon going up stairs, I found a glass moved from the table by the window, and the trap door leading to the loft open, but not the trap door above the loft, so that a person could not get on the roof. I found about an inch of wax candle, which had been lighted, in the back area. There was a fire in the back kitchen, by which the matches must have been lighted. I am certain the prisoner is the person who rang at the bell - I did not know him before.

WILLIAM HART . I live in Horse Shoe-yard, Lower Brook-street. About a quarter past eight o'clock on the evening in question, I was in Upper Berkley-street; it was duskish; all the lamps were lighted - I could not distinguish a man's features to know him a short distance off. I was passing down on the opposite side of the street with my wife, (the prosecutor is my brother-in-law) - my wife said,

"There is somebody gone into Mr. Well's house;" I said,

"Well, I thought so" - we crossed over and went up to the door, and found it closed. I had been there about an hour and a half before with Wells. We hesitated for some time, and presently I saw a light come up as if from the kitchen - I gave a very loud double knock at the door, and the light disappeared. I crossed to the other side of the way. There was a tall man walking up and down; he gave two or three very loud Halloes! and while I crossed over, he crossed to the same side as the house, and walked up and down. My wife stood at the door, and rang the bell; I told her she had better go to Portland-place, and fetch Mr. Wells; she went, and I guarded the door. The man passed me two or three times, and so did the watchman. I stood with my back against the iron railing, about two feet from the door. About forty minutes past eight o'clock, the prisoner opened the door, and came out - I stepped up, and collared him, and asked what business he had there; he said he found the door open - I called the watchman. A mob collected, and wanted me to let him go. His coat and trowsers were all covered with lime white, as if he had attempted to get over the wall - I gave him in charge. I went to the back of the premises, and found the whitewash all scratched off the wall leading to the mews, and three or four of the bricks pushed into the gutter. I think it must have been about twenty minutes past eight o'clock when we saw him go in- it was a quarter to nine when we took him to the watch-house; it was too dark to discern a person's countenance.

JAMES BREWER . I am a watchman of Upper Berkley-street. I saw Hart by Wells's house twice; when I called eight o'clock and half-past eight - when I was calling half-past, I was fetched, and took the prisoner from Hart to the watch-house; he kept knocking the white off his clothes all the way as he went along. I found upon him a latch key, a small bag with two halfpence, and a small piece of wax candle, and a large bundle handkerchief.

WILLIAM SELLERS . I received him in charge.

WILLIAM WELLS . The lock is very strong. The key found on him would not open it. I could find no false key about.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the house.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

Before Mr. Baron Hullock.

749. JOHN WILFORD and CHARLES NIBBS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Gillings , about the hour of nine in the night of the 24th of April , at St. John the Evangelist, Westminster, with intent to steal, and stealing therein a bed, value 3 l.; a bolster, value 10 s.; two pillows, value 6 s.; a counterpane, value 3 s., and a key, value 6 d., the goods of the said George Gillings , and ten yards of baize, value 10 s., and 2 lbs. weight of cheese, value 1 s. , the goods of John Websdale .

JOHN WEBSDALE . I live in the house of George Gillings , in Elizabeth-place, Vauxhall-road, in the parish of St. John, Westminster ; it is George Gillings ' house. On the 24th of April, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I went out with Mrs. Gillings, who is now lying-in. We left nobody in the house; the window shutters and the back door were bolted; I stood at the front door when she locked it; she left every thing secure, and took the key with her; we returned about twelve o'clock at night, and found the door shut to; it is a spring lock; we opened it with the key, and found a bundle tied up in a blanket in the front parlour, ready to be removed. I sat up all night in the room where the bundle was, and am certain the same bundle was taken to the office; it appeared to contain a bed. I had left some green baize up stairs when I went out; I left one piece on a hamper, and the other on the bed. I went up stairs at night, and found the bed and baize, and quilt and blanket gone. I live with Mrs. Gillings; she has left her husband. A piece of cheese was also gone, weighing 4 lbs. The bed was on the mattrass in the morning when I saw it. They were all tied up in the blanket in the parlour.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Mrs. Gillings lives with you - A. Yes; Mr. Gillings does not live in the house; he gave his wife the house; it is his property; we pay no rent for it. The bed is his wife's. He does not visit her, nor ever comes to the house.

COURT. Q. How long is it since he lived with his wife - A. Not since September; he never lived in this house himself at any time; he pays the taxes; I have lived there six months with his wife.

WILLIAM BOWEN . I am a master carman. On the 24th of April, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I was going home - it was moon-light. I went into Elizabeth-place, and met the two prisoners and another man. knew Wilford before. I was forty or fifty yards from the house. Wilford had the bed in a bundle on his back, and Nibbs had a small bundle; I could not see that the third person had any thing. They said

"Hollo, old chap, how are you?" I said,

"How are you?" I looked at them, and thought it was not right. I knocked at the door of the next house to Gillings's, and asked if they had been robbed; they said No. I looked at Gillings's door, and saw it three parts open; I knocked at next door again, and alarmed them, and went after the prisoners. I met Mullins, who directed us which way they had ran; I ran, and caught the prisoners in a place called the Five Chimnies, and pulled the bundles off each of their backs; I said,

"You bl - thieves, you have stolen these." Wilford immediately knocked me down with a stick; I jumped up at him; he knocked me down again; I got up again, and he knocked me down a third time. I hallowed out, and they ran off; I pursued; they were both stopped in Regent-street, without my losing sight of them, and taken to the Ship, public-house, Vauxhall-road. The third man escaped. The bundles remained where I had pulled them off their backs. I went back, and carried one bundle back to the house, and Smith carried the other; we put them down in the front parlour. I left the next door neighbour in possession of the house.

Cross-examined. Q. Had they both a bundle - Yes; I kept them in sight all the way; I was not above twenty yards behind them; it was not above half-past nine o'clock.

GEORGE IBBS . I am turnkey of the General Penitentiary , and live in Regent-street. On the 24th of April, about half-past nine o'clock at night, I heard the cry of Murder! and Stop thief! I ran down stairs, and assisted in taking Wilford, who was running. As we were taking him along he dropped a dark lanthorn, which I caught as it fell. We took him to the Ship. The other prisoner was brought in about the same time; I proposed to search them; somebody said I had no authority; I said I was an officer. Nibbs immediately dropped three skeleton keys: one of them fell on the floor, and I caught two as they fell; they are different sizes; Wilford also dropped the key of a clock.

JARAD HUNT . I live in Regent-street, Vauxhall-road. On the 24th of April, at twenty minutes past nine o'clock at night, I was at supper, and heard a shuffling noise coming along the street; there was a cry of Thief! I ran out, and saw Wilford running on the opposite side of the way, and Nibbs running on my side, in the gutter. He halloed out,

"There he goes! Stop thief!" It struck me that he was one of them. I ran down the steps, overtook, and collared him. He said,

"I am not the man; why do you detain me?" Bowen, who was behind, came up, and said,

"That is one that I stopped with a bundle on their heads in Five Chimnies-passage; and there goes the other who knocked me down three times." I said,

"Go after him." He did so, and I detained Nibbs till Wilford was brought back. Both were taken to the Ship Nibbs wanted to get his hand into his left trowsers pocket but I held his arm; he said he wanted to pull out his handkerchief. Nibbs said he was not the man. When I was proposed to search him he pulled four skeleton keyout of his pocket, and dropped them; I took up one of them, and Bowen took the other three.

HENRY WOODLEY . I am a constable. I was fetched to the Ship, and took the prisoners. I found a chisel on Wilford and a key, which he said belonged to his door, or box; I also found two small articles belonging to a lock and three bundles of matches on him; and on Nibbs I found a knife. We went to Wilford's lodgings, and the key opened the padlock of his door.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. I went to the Ship about ten o'clock, and found the prisoners in custody. After we had taken them to the watch-house, I pulled a handkerchief off Nibbs' neck, which has the marks taken out of it. I went to Wilford's lodging with the key which he said belonged to his door or box; it opened the padlock on the door. I searched the room, and found two regular skeleton keys and some other keys, which have been filed; I found five fine files there. I have known him many years, and know he has lived there for the last two years. Some of the keys were on his work bench. I stripped and went up the chimney, and found a surgeon's instrument case, containing two lancets and a probe. I was at the office next morning when the bundles were produced, and have had them ever since; Bowen brought them to the office; I found a piece of cheese in one of them.

WILLIAM BOWEN re-examined. The bundles were put into a cart about nine or ten o'clock in the morning, and driven to the office. Websdale helped to put them in.

JOHN WEBSDALE re-examined. I sat all night in the room with the bundles - I found them tied up in the front parlour on coming home. They were put into the cart in the same state they were then in. Here is a piece of cheese in one, which I know to be mine; it was safe up stairs at three o'clock, and here are my two pieces of baize, which I know.

GEORGE GILLINGS. The house No. 8, Elizabeth-place, is my leasehold property. I pay the ground rent and taxes - I built it last spring, but never lived in it. I let it for a quarter to another person. My wife wished to leave me - I told her she should have that house to live in, and the goods also - the furniture in it is mine; it was moved from Garden-street, where I live; she left me in September - I allowed her to take what furniture she liked - I knew she was going to live there with this man, because she had encouraged him in the house where I lived. I never had any conversation with him about the house. I told my wife if she chose to leave me, she might have the house to live in, and the things for her use; that is all. I have paid no taxes, but I have got a bill for them, which I must pay. I have two more houses adjoining this. I did not take a list of what furniture she took, but I know what I gave her - I had no concern with Websdale. I gave the house to my wife to live in. I know the bed, bolster, and two pillows to be mine, by the pattern; I had had them about three years, and gave them to her.

Cross-examined. Q. You gave them for her use - A. Yes; I did not know at that time that Websdale was to live with her, but suspected it; we had no intention of coming together again.

Q. You never intended to claim her or the furniture again - A. I can't tell what may happen sometime or other. I never put any servants in the house. I have not attempted to separate her from this man; I ask him how he is when I meet him. I never intended to occupy the house myself; I never drank tea with Websdale there.

Q. You did not intend to claim the furniture again - A. I do not know what I might do if it pleased God to take her. Taxes have been demanded, but I was not at home, so I did not pay them.

The prisoners made no defence.

WILFORD - GUILTY. Aged 42.

NIBBS - GUILTY. Aged 16.

Subject to the opinion of the Twelve Judges, whether the house is described correctly as the dwelling-house of Gillings's .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

750. JOHN WOOD was indicted for a burglary in the dwelling-house of Richard Wilson , about the hour of one in the night of the 26th of April , with intent to steal .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be the dwelling-house of David Smith .

DAVID SMITH . I lodge at the house of Richard Wilson , in Regent-street ; there is an internal communication between the parts we occupy. I left the house about eight o'clock on Saturday evening, the 26th of April, leaving my shopman there. Mr. William Raine was to sleep there. I do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Mr. Harding, an artist lodges there also - A. Yes. Wilson has a lease of the house.

WILLIAM RAINE . On the 26th of April, I was at Mr. Smith's lodging. I went to bed about eleven o'clock. Smith has an outer door leading into the street, which I locked and bolted. I did not examine the shutters - there is a wooden partition between Mr. Smith's shop, and another shop, forming I believe part of the premises, kept by Mr. Wilson; but there is no direct communication from one to the other. About one o'clock in the morning I was disturbed by a noise at the street door, as if some person was attempting to get in; I listened for five minutes, when it ceased - in a few minutes it began again; I listened, and thought I heard some persons whisper; I slept on the same floor as the shop. I got quietly out of bed, and softly opened the door, saw something dark by the door, and found it was a chair - I saw the prisoner crushed up by the door, in a corner; I collared him, and demanded who he was; he did not speak - I struck him with the chair; a struggle ensued. I gave an alarm; the watchman came, and demanded admittance; I told him to force the door open, which he did. I gave the prisoner in charge of Foley. I got a light, but could not see how he got in. I enquired of him how he got in; I threatened him, and in consequence of what he said, I went and examined Wollat's shop, and found a pannel had been removed between Wollat's and Smith's shop - it was a very small hole, but a small person might get through - I should have thought the prisoner could not get through there; he could have got in no other way that I know of. I did not examine the shop when I went to bed, and cannot say whether any one was behind the counter or not. The shopman had left about half-past eight o'clock. I found Smith's door unlocked, and the key in my door.

Cross-examined. Q. The first time you saw the hole inthe pannel was on your return from the watch-house - A. Yes. I saw a young man much less than the prisoner, try to get through the hole, but he could not.

DANIEL SMITH re-examined. I returned about eleven o'clock on the Sunday morning, and saw the opening in the pannel; it had been removed by boring holes round it, and then forcing it out. The holes were not bored all the way through; I should think the prisoner could not get through there. If the holes had been bored the night before, I think I must have seen them. I do not believe it was possible that the prisoner could be in the shop when I left.

Cross-examined. Q. You think he could not pass through the hole - A. No; it was ten inches and a half square - he might; he is thin made about the shoulders.

JOHN FOLEY . I am the watchman. I took charge of the prisoner - I did not search him. I produce the pannel.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a constable. I went to the house at ten o'clock on Sunday morning, and looked through the hole in Smith's shop. I saw the pannel lying in Wollat's shop, and a chisel under the hole, on Wollat's side, some pieces of wood, and a gimblet. The pannel came against a counter on Smith's side; the aperture was about ten inches and three quarters square. Smith's shopman got through the hole into Wollat's shop, and opened the door - I went in, and found it was quite easy to get through when the counter was moved, as it was then open the full size of the pannel.

COURT. Q. A person in Wollat's shop could not have removed the counter - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

751. JAMES MASLIN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , two curtains, value 3 s.; twenty-two glasses, value 20 s.; three decanters, value 3 s., and two bottles, value 3 s., the goods of William Toutt ; a coat, value 1 l.; two pair of trowsers, value 12 s.; two waistcoats, value 6 s.; a handkerchief, value 2 s., and a pair of pantaloons, value 2 s., the goods of Henry Jordan , in the dwelling house of the said William Toutt .

WILLIAM TOUTT . I keep a public-house in Jeremy-street, St. James's . The prisoner lived at my house about six weeks prior to the 26th of April, on which day I missed this property, and got a constable - I told him I suspected him, and he had better confess; he afterwards took us to Mr. Field's, an old iron shop in Long-court - he went in, and asked for a bundle, which a woman there gave him; it contained a quantity of duplicates of my property. I returned to the shop with him, and saw two of my decanters and a glass, and brought them away. He then took us to a shop in Market-street, and there picked out himself a number of my glass coolers, wine and finger glasses. This was a rag shop kept by Martin. I found my window curtains in pawn. The property was missed at different times.

HENRY JORDAN . I am waiter at Mr. Toutt's - the prisoner lived there; my box stood in his room; I kept the key of it. On Friday, the 26th of April, I missed two waistcoats, a pair of trowsers, and a silk handkerchief, which were safe the begining of the week; they were all nearly now, and worth 2 l. I found them in pawn.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I am a constable. On Saturday morning, the 26th of April, I took charge of the prisoner; I took him with the prosecutor to Long-court, and found some duplicates in the bundle which led me to different pawnbroker's, where I traced the property.

THOMAS BARTS . I live with Mr. Hodges, pawnbroker, Drury-lane. The coat and trowsers were pawned with me for 30 s., on the 25th of April, in the name of John Clark . I gave the person that duplicate. I do not know the prisoner.

JAMES BASSETT . I am shopman to Mr. Harrison, of Wardour-street. I have two waistcoats pawned by the prisoner, for 6 s., on the 24th of April, in the name of John Clark .

HENRY POWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Cameron, pawnbroker, Strand. A pair of trowsers were pawned with us, on the 25th of April, by the prisoner, for 1 s. 6 d., in the name of John Clark .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 50.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Two Years .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

752. LUCY RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , two pelisses, value 3 l.; two night shifts, value 10 s.; a gown, value 5 s.; a pair of stockings, value 1 s.; an apron, value 2 s., and two night caps, value 2 s., the goods of Ann Erridge ; a pelisse, value 10 s.; a muff, value 10 s.; a shawl, value 10 s., and a bonnet, value 10 s., the goods of Maria Stockwell , in the dwelling-house of James Barker .

MARIA STOCKWELL . I lodge in the house of James Barker , in Francis-street, St. Pancras - the prisoner was servant there. On the night of the 18th of March, about eleven o'clock, I was sitting in the kitchen; the prisoner went out of the kitchen - I heard her go up stairs, and come down again in about a quarter of an hour, run through the passage, open the street door, and shut it again. I went up to Erridge's room, and missed two pelisses, and other things, which I had folded up, and put on the drawers - I ran out after her, and met the watchman with a bundle; he said he had taken it from a girl. I saw it opened; it contained a bonnet, a pelisse, a shawl, a muff of mine, and other articles. I went to the prisoner's mother's, but could not find her. I returned home, and looked about my room, and missed other things - she had been in my room with me just before, and I took my things out of the second floor, and put them in the first.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Barker does not live in the house - A. No; his wife does. The prisoner only came the night before. My Christian names are Louisa Maria .

SARAH BARTON . I keep the house - my husband's name is James Barton , not Barker. I sent the prisoner up stairs to look at the fires - she went out; her bonnet and shawl were in the bundle.

ANN ERRIDGE . I live on the first floor. I was not at home on this night - I came home between twelve and one o'clock, and found several of my things gone - I found them at the watch-house.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you ever use any other name - A. Occasionally. My things were all safe at nine o'clock.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am an officer. I was at the watch-house - the watchman brought the bundle in; I cannot find him. Stockwell came with him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. It is a house of ill-fame, and a great many people frequent it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

753. WILLIAM LATHAM was indicted for killing and slaying William Tate .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

MR. THOMAS WADD . I am a surgeon, and live in Basinghall-street. I attended the prisoners at Whitecross-street. William Tate applied to me early in March, on account of ill-health - I gave him medicine, and attended him up to the time of his decease. On the 22d of April, I saw a mark under his left eye; it was a considerable bruise, apparently from a blow - leeches had been applied to it before I saw it. He complained of no other mark; there was no other external mark. Previous to this, he was under great debility, and indigestion. I continued to apply remedies until his death - I thought nothing serious whatever from the mark on his eye. On the 1st of May, about one o'clock, I was called in; he was then very ill and sick, and complained of pain in the region of the stomach; he made no complaint respecting his head - he died in a spasmodic fit while I was with him. I opened the body with Mr. Lloyd and Mr. Lake. The membrane of the brain, on the upper surface, had suffered inflammation - there were sufficient diseases in the head, to lead me to suppose it might occasion death. There was an adhesion of the outer membrane, and the outer surface of the scull. External violence would produce those appearances. I opened the body; the heart was in a very diseased state with a quantity of bloody serem; this might have produced all the appearances in the head. The heart had doubtless been diseased for a length of time, and might have produced the inflammatory appearance on the head.

Q. If a person was suffering from the disease in the heart, and received external violence, might it accelerate his death - A. Very probably. I think the wound under the eye had very little to do with it, for he made no complaint of it; it appeared no more than a common black eye - a blow on the head might have accelerated his death. I examined the back part of the scull - there did not appear any bruise there. I think the serem on the heart was not produced by violence. A person in this state would suffer more from a blow than another.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. If he had received a blow, so as to produce inflammation, would it not have produced pain, which he would have complained of - A. I should certainly think so. The appearance in the head might arise entirely from the state of the heart.

JOHN LAKE . I am a surgeon, and live in Fore-street. I was present when the body was opened, and fully agree with Mr. Wadd's statement. A person in that state of body receiving a violent blow was likely to accelerate his death, and if he was intoxicated at the time, it would be more likely to be in a state of inflammation. Intoxication alone might have caused it.

WILLIAM SMEDLEY . On the 22d of April, I was a prisoner in Whitecross-steet prison . On the 20th or 21st of April, I was sitting at my table with Tate, who was a good deal in liquor - he had an altercation with one Barnstaple - in consequence of which the prisoner interfered. After some words had passed between them, Tate was removed by Smith to his own seat, and we prevailed on him to be quiet. Some conversation passed between the prisoner and somebody, and Tate said,

"It's a d - d lie," or

"It's a lie," I do not know which. The prisoner at that time was sitting on the opposite side - he immediately came across the ward, and struck Tate, who was sitting at the table with his arms folded; he struck him on the left cheek, and another blow on his head; immediately after Tate received the blow, his head fell on the table, as if he was stunned. The prisoner collared him, and said,

"Why don't you come out, and face me like a man?" No more blows passed - Tate said nothing. I said,

"Don't strike a man who is sitting down, it is so unmanly;" I prevailed upon him to let him alone. I believe his nose bled but he was subject to that. The prisoner went to his own side of the ward. Tate sat as if in a stupor for four or five minutes - his face was swollen immediately after the blow. When he came down stairs next morning he complained of his head, and afterwards, and particularly on the day he died. We prevailed on him to go to the sick ward on the day he died; he had not complained of his head before the blow; but he had complained of being bilions.

Cross-examined. Q. He complained of his head every day did he - A. Yes. I saw him drunk frequently after that.

GEORGE WATTS . I was a prisoner at the time, and saw this quarrel. Tate was sitting down at the time the blow was given - he called Latham a liar, twice; he said if he called him a liar again, he would strike him; he did so, and Latham hit him on the side of his face - Tate said

"Very well, Mr. Latham, I thank you." I went away in about half an hour, he was then sitting there.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Tate was in the habit of getting very much intoxicated - A. Yes; he drank a good deal, and lived very irregular till he died. He complained of being very poorly in his stomach.

JOHN MOSLEY BANKS . I was a prisoner at the time. I heard a quarrel between the deceased and Barnstaple - hasty words arose, and Latham said something to Tate, that he had no business to interfere; in consequence of which Tate went, and sat down in his own seat, with his arms crossed, leaning his head back. Something more passed. Tate called the prisoner a d - d liar; he instantly moved, and struck him, saying he would suffer no man to call him a liar; he struck him on the left eye - I did not see that it had any particular effect, except bruising his cheek. He sat up, and said it was unfair; he was intoxicated at the time - they were violent blows. I saw him next day with his face tied up. I was in the room for half an hour after; during that time Tate got up, and walked about as usual. I saw him intoxicated several times after that.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did he complain,of his head during all that time - A. I never heard him. I believe the wardsman fined them both 1 s. for their behaviour. He had his hat on when the blows were struck.

ROBERT BARRETT . I was in the prison, and slept in the same room as deceased - he complained of his head several times after this affair. I saw him in liquor two or three times after.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Is it not usual for a drunken man to complain of his head - A. I believe so.

THOMAS BOLT . I was in the prison, but was not present at the quarrel. After the death of the deceased, I went over to Latham's ward to see a friend; I told the prisoner it was a pity he had not conducted himself differently, in consequence of the death of the man; he said he did not see any reason why he should not play as usual; and that he had not caused the man's death; and if I had said the same to him, he should have served me the same.

MR. E. LLOYD. I am a surgeon, and live in Falcon-square. I was present at the opening of the body; there were appearances of inflammation in the head, and of bruises under the left eye, but no appearance of any other external injury; the dura mater appeared of a darker colour than usual, and a greater adhesion than natural; this was produced by inflammation.

Q. Might the inflammation he produced by external injury - A. Certainly; the appearance might be occasioned by the state of the heart, but in my judgment no to that extent; there was a greater appearance of blood on the back of the head than usual. It was stated that the blow he received drove his head against the wall, which might have produced those appearances. When the brain is affected in consequence of the heart, the vessels easily become full, but in this case they were fuller than they would usually be from that. I think the inflammation was not wholly occasioned by the state of the heart; intoxication would produce the same effect as the influx of blood from the heart; the blow would have been a sufficient cause to produce it. Though I have no doubt but the blow accelerated his death, still I think it would not have happened had not disease previously existed; he might have lived some months under the disease.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You are supposing a blow given which caused a counter-blow on the back of the head - A. Yes; the blow under the eye might have caused it; intoxication would not occasion such appearances. I never saw him before death, but can say he had not apoplexy, for appearances of that may be traced years afterwards. Intoxication in his state might occasion death.

The following witnesses were called on behalf of the prisoner.

JOHN SMITH . I am a prisoner in Whitecross-street. I slept in the same room as Tate. I saw him about an hour after this affair, in bed and asleep - I asked how he felt next morning; he said he felt nothing the matter, only his face was stiff; that he thought he could beat the prisoner at any time, and certainly would call him out to fight; I begged him not. I saw him every day; he never complained of any effects from the blow; I was particularly friendly with him. I think he was drunk on the day after it happened. He had spasms in the chest the night before his death.

THOMAS HOWARD . I was a prisoner at this time, and saw the deceased every day after this occurrence; he said next morning, he was much obliged to us for fining him so low. On the 23d, I was sitting down; he came up with half a pint of half and half; I asked him how he was; he said, very well, and wished me to drink; I said he had better take physic than drink; he said,

"I have had seven pots of half and half to-day, and will have seven more before I go to bed;" and that, before he went out, he would lick Latham, kick the steward up and down the yard, and fight Barnstaple; this was three days after it happened.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was his eye tied up at this time - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

754. WILLIAM BALL was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Charles Eley , from his person .

MR. CHARLES ELEY . I am a silversmith , and live in Paternoster-row. On the 21st of April, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was passing through Panyer-alley into Paternoster-row . I felt my pocket move; the prisoner rushed by me into Paternoster-row; I missed my silk handkerchief, and pursued him into Cheapside, and never lost sight of him; he ran down Foster-lane; I saw him drop it in the middle of the lane, and picked it up, and he was secured.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Are you sure you did not drop it - A. Yes; I felt my pocket move immediately; before he rushed by me.

RICHARD SKILLERN . I am an officer. I was in Cheapside, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner running, and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

755. ANN PETHARD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of January , a brooch, value 7 s. , the goods of Thomas Jeffery .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS JEFFERY . I am a woollen-draper , and live in Cloth Fair . The prisoner came into my service on the 6th of November, and left on the 25th of January; about six weeks after, we missed a pearl brooch, with other articles. I did not see her again until the 5th of May, when I found her in service at Mr. Woodroe's, in Smithfield; I asked her what she had done with the articles she took when in my service; she fell on her knees, and said she hoped I would forgive her; she denied taking any thing; I found the brooch at Muncaster's, the pawnbrokers, on Snow-hill; I had not seen it, perhaps, for twelve months.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. She was not above six months with you - A. No; I had a good character with her, which I found false.

SARAH JEFFERY . The prisoner was in our service, and some time after she left we missed a pearl brooch, among other articles; it was kept in a box locked up in a cup board, in an upper room; I kept the key of the box; I saw it in the box about a fortnight before the prisonerleft; I have seen it at the pawbroker's, and know it to be ours.

EFFY R. TAYLOR . I am a widow, and live in St. Dunstan's-court, Old Bailey. The prisoner lodged with me, both before and after she was in the prosecutor's service. I saw a pearl brooch in her possession a Sunday or two before she asked me to pawn it; this was in March - she said it had been pawned before, but did not say where. I pawned it for her at Muncaster's, and gave her the duplicate, and money - she waited outside the door the while.

Cross-examined. Q. She knew you dealt at the shop - A. Yes. I think I should know it again; but not if I saw it among others - there was a pearl or two out at the end of it.

WILLIAM HULL . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, but found nothing on her, nor anything in her box. Mr. Jeffery had examined it before.

MR. JEFFERY re-examined. I was present when Mr. Woodroe searched it - we found three keys in it, and one key the officer found on her; one of the keys which had been filed opens a chest of drawers in my house, and will lock the box where the brooch was, but will not unlock it.

Cross-examined. Q. Where was she when you searched the box - A. Present.

WILLIAM WARD . I am in the employ of Mr. Muncaster, pawnbroker, Snow-hill. On the 22d of March, I took a pearl brooch in pawn of Taylor - it is broken, and not worth above 3 s.; it is a very common pattern. I should not like to swear to it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

756. JAMES GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , a pair of stockings, value 3 s. 6 d; a frock, value 2 s. 6 d.; a shirt, value 10 s.; a shift, value 2 s.; a neckerchief, value 1 s. 6 d.; a table cloth, value 2 s. 6 d.; 3 lbs. of cheese, value 2 s.; two loaves of bread, value 1 s. 4 d.; 3 lbs. of butter, value 2 s. 6 d., and 10 lbs. of lard, value 7 s. 6 d.; the goods of Rice Davis ; a shift, value 2 s., and a handkerchief, value 15 d. , the goods of Elizabeth Davis .

RICE DAVIS. I am a milkman and cow-keeper , and live in King's Arms-yard, Lower Whitecross-street . The prisoner was my servant and lived with me for thirteen months; he left me about a month before Christmas, without giving notice; he came about eleven o'clock, next night with his father, who wanted me to take him back; I refused. On the 29th of March, I missed a pair of stockings, and the other articles stated in the indictment; he had then left my service nearly four months. I had two servants after him. I have only found one pair of stockings, and they were on his legs when he was taken. Last Monday morning my wife saw him, and got an officer, who took him. I am sure the stockings are mine; they were stolen off the line, on the 29th of March; he said he bought them of Mr. Rogers, in Chiswell-street,

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am the sister of the last witness; and live in the same house. I missed my property out of a basket on the drawers, above a month after the prisoner left.

ANN DAVIS . I am the wife of Rice Davis; we missed these things on the 29th of March, I know the stockings to be my husband's; they are spun in a particular way, and have been mended by my sister and myself.

NOT GUILTY .

757. GEORGE SHARPLESS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , a handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of James Theophilus Wenham , from his person .

MR. JAMES THEOPHILUS WENHAM . On Friday last, about ten minutes before two o'clock, in the afternoon, I was turning up Stationer's-court, Ludgate-hill ; my handkerchief was safe in my pocket half an hour before. I turned round, and found the prisoner in custody of a constable, who asked if I had lost my handkerchief. I felt and missed it. The constable produced it.

WILLIAM DICKENS . I am constable. I saw the prisoner behind Mr. Wenham - I noticed his pocket move round. The prisoner turned round sharp under a door way, and was putting a handkerchief inside his coat. I took it from him, and held him. Nobody else was near enough to take it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Two boys were following the gentleman; one of them picked the gentleman's pocket, and threw the handkerchief down; I picked it up, and put it in my coat, and walked back.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Life .

THIRD DAY. FRIDAY, MAY 16.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

758. THOMAS PERKINS , EDWARD BRUCE , and JAMES GRAY , were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , a saw, value 1 s., the goods of Richard Silverside; and a steel, value 3 s. , the goods of Stephen Silverside .

RICHARD SILVERSIDE . I am a butcher, and live at Kentish-town . On the morning of the 6th of May, I missed a saw from my shop; it was safe the afternoon before - it was brought to me on the Wednesday morning, with the steel, which belongs to my brother Stephen. The prisoners are strangers to me.

SAMUEL B. NORTON . I am watch-house keeper, of Cambden-town. On Tuesday morning, about three o'clock, the prisoners were brought to the watch-house, by Halton. I found the saw and steel on Perkins, concealed under his smock-frock, with 4 lbs. of beef. He said they were his brother's, who lived in Leadenhall-market.

JAMES HALTON . I am a watchman of Cambden-town; about three o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoners together - I asked where they were going; they said to Whitechapel, to work at a coal cart. I took them to the watch-house. As we went along, Perkins had his hand on his coat pocket. I asked what he had there; he said nothing at all; I found a small hammer there. They were coming in a direction from Kentish-town, and going towards town.

WILLIAM PARSONS . I am a watchman of Cambden-town.About half past nine o'clock at night; I saw the prisoners going towards Kentish-town, all three together. About half past eleven, they passed my box again. I believe them to be the same persons, but will not swear positively to them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

PERKINS - GUILTY . Aged 27.

BRUCE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

GRAY - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months and Publicly Whipped .

759. JOHN SWAP was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , fifty yards of linen, value 4 l. , the goods of Peter Duff .

PETER DUFF. I am a linendraper , and live in Brewer-street. In the afternoon of the 1st of February, I gave the prisoner two pieces of linen, measuring fifty-three yards, to carry into the City - he was a porter , but not in my employ; he never returned to be paid. His brother called on me next day. I saw the linen at Marlborough-street, last week. I gave him no authority to pawn it.

WILLIAM ALDRIDGE . My father is a pawnbroker, in Orange-street, Bloomsbury. On the 1st of February, about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner pawned this linen for 2 l., in his own name.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Fourteen Days .

760. JOHN WILFORD and CHARLES NIBBS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Coultas , about the hour of eight in the night, of 15th of March , at St. Margaret, Westminster, with intent to steal, and stealing therein, a bed, value 5 l.; a quilt, value 10 s.; a coat, value 2 l.; a pair of breeches, value 1 l.; a waistcoat, value 10 s.; fifteen yards of linen, value 30 s.; eight pair of stockings, value 5 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 1 s., and a table cloth, value 4 s. , his property.

WILLIAM COULTAS . I rent a house in Stafford-place, Pimlico, in the parish of St. Margaret, Westminster . On the morning of the 15th of March, I went out leaving my wife at home, and did not return until late in the evening. I am foreman to a currier . My coat, waistcoat, and breeches cost me 7 l.

MARY ANN COULTAS . I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the 15th of March, about half-past seven o'clock in the evening. I went out; it was quite dark then - I left the house quite safe, and locked the door. I left nobody at home. I returned about five minutes before eight o'clock, and found the street door wide open - I am quite certain I had locked it, for I tried it afterwards. I found somebody had entered the house - I got a light, and found the cupboard doors open. I went up stairs, and missed my bed, and a patchwork quilt. The drawers too were open, and the articles stated in the indictment gone, and a great many other things taken out. I have since seen a silk handkerchief, and a few pair of stockings. The value of the whole is from 25 l. to 30 l. (Looking at a handkerchief and some stockings, produced by Pace) here are three stockings I know by any own mark on them, and another pair by the old fashioned silk clocks, and another pair I know by the darning. The handkerchief was marked with white thread; it is picked out now; the appearance of it having been picked out is quite plain. The persons must have got into the house by a false key, for the lock was not injured.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The handkerchief is not an uncommon pattern - A. No; I have often washed it. I know my own darning.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer, I look the handkerchief off Wilford's neck, and found the stockings at his lodgings, about twelve o'clock on the 24th of April. I had apprehended them both at ten o'clock that night, at the Ship, public-house, in the Vauxhall-road. I had known where Wilford lived for two years - I have seen him and Nibbs together at a public-house in Duck-lane at times, for two or three months back - they were acquainted before the 15th of March. The door of Wilford's room was padlocked. Woodley who went with me, opened it with a key, which he took from Wilford; he is not here - he is a constable, and had them in custody when I went there. I had been at Wilford's lodgings before, and saw him there several times - a woman lived there with him, and nobody else. I found the room empty; I had seen a padlock on the door when I have been in the house before. On searching the room and bed, I found these stockings, and some of them were hanging over a chair in the room. I noticed the letter C on some of them, and brought them away. I found a large quantity of keys there; here are two skeleton keys and four filed keys. I found five files, two large, and three small - one of the files was on his work bench, with a screw driver. I have not tried any of the keys at Coultas's house. I found nothing particular on their persons except the handkerchief.

Cross-examined. Q. You found them five or six weeks after Coultas was robbed - A. He was robbed on the 15th of March. A number of persons lodge in the same house as Wilford; there are girls of the town there; it is a common lodging house - he is a shoemaker, and had the lower rooms. The woman who lived with him has left him - the last time I saw her was at the bar of this Court, from which she was transported - I think it was the Sessions before last. I found the prisoners in custody together - I was not present when they were taken. I had not been to Wilford's rooms for twelve months before, but I have passed by, and seen him in the room, a week, or perhaps a fortnight before he was apprehended. I have seen another woman in the room with him since the one I spoke of was gone. I understand he lived with her.

Q. Shoemakers use files in their business - A. They use very coarse ones. I do not think the three small ones are such as they use.

MRS. COULTAS. The house was very dirty; but I cannot say whether there were footmarks of one or more persons.

NIBB'S Defence. I have had the handkerchief for twelve months. She said at the office, that she did not mark it herself.

MRS. COULTAS. We bought it with the mark on it.

One witness gave Wilford a good character.

WILFORD - GUILTY . Aged 42.

Judgment Respited. See Page 275 .

NIBBS - NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

761. WILLIAM PHIPPS and MATTHEW COKELL were indicted for an unnatural crime .

NOT GUILTY .

Before Mr. Baron Hullock .

762. JOHN LAKE and CHARLES BUTLER were indicted for killing and slaying Norman M'Cloed .

MR. WHITE. I am a surgeon. I was called in on the 9th of May, to attend on the deceased, at a public-house in Theobald's-road, and found him in the arms of three or four persons, in the back yard; he was very black in the face. I ordered him to be put to bed, when I opened his arm, but could only extract two ounces of blood - I then opened the jugular vein, from whence came about fourteen ounces; he died soon afterwards, as I was informed. I left him because I knew nothing could be done for him. I opened the head next evening, as the Coroner's Inquest sat on the body - I found about four ounces of extravasated blood pressing on the brain. His death was caused by some violence; I should think external - there have been instances where a vessel has been ruptured by violent exertion, but I have never witnessed one myself. I consider the agitation of the mind of the deceased might contribute to form the rupture.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. A rupture might be caused by the mind being violently affected with passion, and a great effusion of blood, pour on the brain - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BARRY . I live at Mr. Bridges, in Hatton-wall, and am a baker. I knew the deceased - I saw him last Thursday week, in Copenhagen-fields, about six o'clock in the evening; I saw the prisoners there. I had seen Lake on the preceding Tuesday, and went to see him and the deceased fight - when I saw Lake on the Tuesday, he said he would rather not fight. I saw them fight; it lasted eighteen minutes, when the deceased was carried off the ground - I went the same evening to the Cross Keys, public-house to see him. I observed he was discoloured about the head and neck; he was dead, The prisoner Butler was second to the deceased; they fought for four sovereigns. I held the stakes, because I was requested to do so.

Cross-examined. I heard Butler persuade them not to fight, and tried to prevent it. There was another second to attend the deceased, who rendered every possible assistance. I never knew M'Cloed by name before. He was considered a taller man then Lake. I was not near enough when they were fighting to learn what Butler said to the combatants. I believe Butler and the deceased lived together as fellow servants.

JAMES REYNOLDS . I keep the Bedford-head, public-house, in Upper King-street. I only knew M'Cloed, by his coming into the house with others. On the Saturday before the fight, they were there at a singing club; this was on the 3d of May - Lake was the chairman - words arose, and a quarrel ensued, which induced me to clear the room; then M'Cloed made some allusion to the unfitness of Lake, for being the chairman; having my business to attend to, I did not pay attention to the precise words uttered - I remember a person coming afterwards from the deceased, with a challenge for Lake, and two sovereigns; Lake said he had no money to fight for, nor did he wish to fight - one of the persons put down his watch as a stake for him; I recommended them to go away and make it up - I heard no more about it till the accident, except that Lake called on me the next day, and said he felt very uncomfortable, and did not wish to fight.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I apprehended Lake, he told me he should not have fought, but he thought if he refused, he would be thought ill of by the members of the club.

The following witnesses were called for the prisoners.

EDWARD ROGERS . I carried the challenge from the deceased to Lake, to the Bedford-head - Lake was present, and said he did not wish to fight; but as the deceased had sent a challenge, he would accept it - I delivered the answer to the deceased, who seemed pleased.

JAMES MILLER . I attended at the fight; the prisoner Butler and myself, persuaded the deceased not to fight - he said he would beat him or not come out alive - he would die on the spot first. He said this during the contest.

LAKE - GUILTY . Aged 21.

BUTLER - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Confined Two Months .

Before Mr. Justice Bayley.

763. KITTY SHEENE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , at St. George, Hanover-square, a bonnet, value 10 s.; four half-crowns, and a shilling, the property of Susan Clues , spinster ; two sovereigns, and four half-crowns, the monies of Mary Harrison , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Carswell .

SUSAN CLUES . I am single, and live with Mrs. Warner, dress-maker, Half Moon-street, Piccadilly - the house belongs to Thomas Carswell ; he is a baker, and lives in it - it is in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. The prisoner lived servant at the house for three or four months. On the 25th of April, about eight o'clock, she came up to Mrs. Warner for money to buy tea and sugar; Mrs. Warner gave her 6 s. - she asked if she should not buy some meat, as we should want some next day, and asked for more money to buy if. Mrs, Warner refused; she went out, and never returned. I went to bed about twelve o'clock, and missed four half-crowns and a shilling from my pocket book, which was inside my bonnet - the bonnet was pinned in a paper bag, and laid on a press bedstead - I had seen it safe in the morning, after breakfast. Other persons had access to the room. In the morning I found a dirty bonnet was placed in the bag, as a substitute for my own; I had never seen the dirty one before; I had only unpinned the bag overnight, and taken the pocket book out, without looking at the bonnet. I saw the prisoner in custody the following morning, in Duke-street, Manchester-square, and afterwards at the office.

MARY HARRISON . I have been with Mrs. Warner since the 27th of March - the prisoner was servant there. On the night of the 25th of April, about eight o'clock, I met her as I came in on the landing place; she was going out - I said nothing to her - I did not see her again till she was taken. Next morning, about eight o'clock, I missed two sovereigns, and four half-crowns, which I had locked up in a writing desk, in my bed room, where Clues slept; it was safe on the preceding evening at six o'clock - Ifound the lock forced open. Another young lady slept there besides us. We made the beds ourselves. The prisoner had occasion to go into the room that morning to clean it.

JOSEPH COLLINS . I am an officer. On the 26th of April, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, I found the prisoner at No. 10, Calmell-buildings - I met her running down stairs, and stopped her, and said she must go with me to the watch-house; she said she must have her bonnet and shawl, and asked me what for - I said for robbing, but did not say whom. On our way to the watch-house, the two prosecutrixs were walking behind; I asked her if she knew them - she said she did; I then asked if she had not been taking some of their property. I neither promised or threatened her - she said she had taken some money from them; I asked what she had taken; she said a sovereign, and ten shillings of Miss Harrison's, and eleven shillings, and a bonnet of Miss Cluse's. I searched her at the watch-house, and found a sovereign, seven half-crowns, five shillings, and a sixpence upon her. I went back to the house by her desire, and asked for her bonnet, and one was given to me, with a cap and frills in it. I asked her if that was the bonnet she had taken of Miss Clues; she said it was.

SUSAN CLUES . The bonnet is mine.

The prisoner made no Defence.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 18.

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

764. THOMAS WALLIS , JEREMIAH CRONIE , and THOMAS LEE were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , a padlock, value 6 s. , the goods of George Hicks .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Jessee Baker , and Alexander Wilson , churchwardens, of St. Andrew, Holborn .

THIRD COUNT, stating it to belong to the parishioners, of the said parish .

MR. WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE HICKS . I am sexton of St. Andrew, Holborn; there is a vault in the burying ground in Shoe-lane , the entrance to which is secured by two large flaps, and a bar across, which is fastened by a padlock - I saw the padlock safe on Friday, when we had been burying; I missed it about twelve o'clock on Saturday. I have the care of the burying ground. I found another padlock placed in its stead which was about as good as the other; I sat up to watch the burying ground on Saturday night, and about half past one o'clock, I heard some tiles slip off a house adjoining the burying ground; about ten minutes after I saw four men come down the wall, they came to the grave, unlocked the padlock and went in; I run off to the watch-house, and sent assistance to different places, then got over the wall, and found Wallis and Cronie in the vault; I shut them in; the watchmen came; we got over the tilings and went to a house in Plumtree-court, from which house they must have come, as we found two ropes hanging to the window, and found Lee there in the room; he has a wooden leg; we took them to the watch-house - I returned to the house and searched the room; between the bed and the sacking, we found our padlock, and also the one which had been substituted for it; we also found pickaxes, and shovels, hats, and shoes.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you buy the padlock - A. I bought it for the parish - I had the key of the one I put on.

Q. Persons putting on another, would give them access to the vault - A. Yes; they certainly came to rob the graves; they stole the padlock; I do not know what became of the fourth man. I had no information of what they intended.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You saw four men in the ground - A. Yes; there was plenty of time to run away, while I was sending men to different places - they must have escaped the same way as they came.

THOMAS WELDEN . I am an officer of St. Andrew's. I was with Hicks, and went to the room where Lee was found; we found a rope hanging from the window next morning - there were two pair of shoes, and two hats in the room, which Wallis and Cronie claimed at the watch-house; they were without hats or shoes in the vault.

JOHN CLARK , I am a watchman. I accompanied Hicks and Welden. Their account is correct.

LEE's Defence. I merely went to the room as a spectator, at the same time as the sexton.

GEORGE HARRIS . I went into the room with the watchman; we found Lee standing at the door, inside the house, with his hat on; I had met two men coming out previous to that.

JAMES GIBSON . I live at the Three Tuns, public-house, West Smithfield. Lee was at my house between twelve and one o'clock, on the night in question with Watts.

JOHN WATTS . I live in Guilford-street, in the Borough, and was with Lee, and left him about the middle of Fleet-market, rather in liquor; he lives in Holland-street, Blackfriars-road.

NOT GUILTY .

765. GEORGE WHITAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , a coat, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Davis .

THOMAS DAVIS . I live in Smith-street, Westminster. On the 25th of April, I was working at the Welch-chapel, in Jewin-crescent , and about twelve o'clock, I went to dinner, leaving my coat there; I returned about one, and met the constable with the prisoner in custody with it.

JAMES VINT . I am a labourer, and work a few doors from the chapel. I saw the prisoner lurking about, and missed him all at once - I watched and saw him come out of the chapel, with something wrapped up in his apron - I pursued and caught him, and found it was the coat; he dropped it.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I am a builder. Davis was in my service. I heard a scuffle in the street, and saw Vint holding the prisoner, who dropped a coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 63.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

766. MARY DEVINE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , a pair of trowsers, value 12 s.; a pair of drawers, value 2 s.; a pair of stockings, value 3 s.; a shirt, value 3 s., and a handkerchief, value 1 d. , the goods of William Larham .

WILLIAM LARHAM . I am a seaman . I lodge with my sister in White Lion-street, Norton-falgate; I met theprisoner about eleven o'clock on Wednesday night in Bishopsgate-street; I was quite sober; I had these things in a bundle, and had just come from my ship, about ten o'clock; she was with another woman; they asked me to go home with them, I went to a house in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street ; we went into a bed room on the second floor; I stopped till near one o'clock; the other woman stopped with me - I put my bundle on the table, and sat down by the fire. The prisoner made an excuse to go out, to light the candle - she took the bundle off the table, and went out. I had not then been in the room above five minutes - I went after her but could not overtake her, and returned to the room and stopped there, thinking she would return. I have found none of the property; I saw her next morning between nine and ten o'clock, opposite White Lion-street, Norton-falgate, and charged her with it - she said she had never seen me before. I am certain of her. It was a moon-light night, but there was no candle in the room.

JOHN HARDING. I am an officer. Larham came to me about one o'clock in the morning, and described the prisoner's person. I took her from his description in Shoreditch; I searched her - I found nothing in the house. He shewed me the house; I know she lived there, with the other woman.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw him before.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

767. JOSEPH DICKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , a handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Robert Roberts , from his person .

ROBERT ROBERTS . I am clerk to Sir R. C. Glynn, and Co. On the 13th of May, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was on London-bridge ; my handkerchief was in my coat pocket. A person told me something; I turned round and found the prisoner in custody. The handkerchief was produced to me; he said it was not him.

AMOS BARNES . I am a labourer, in the East India Company's Service. I was on London-bridge, and saw three young men following Mr. Roberts; the prisoner was one of them - I watched and saw him take the handkerchief from Mr. Robert's pocket, I was close behind him and collared him; he dropped it - I saw nothing of the others after; a little girl picked it up, and gave it to Mr. Roberts.

JOHN SALMON . I am warden of London-bridge. The prisoner and a handkerchief were delivered to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Nobody was with me, I was coming from the hospital, when the gentlemen charged me with it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

768. GEORGE MOSS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , a purse, value 2 s.; two crown pieces; two half-crowns; two shillings, and a sixpence, the property of Elizabeth Wright , from her person .

ELIZABETH WRIGHT . I live in Bell-lane, Spitalfields. On the 1st of May, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I had my purse containing this money in my basket - I had been to a shop in Aldgate to buy a gown - I had two sovereigns, and got change at the shop; I was going into another shop, close to the church. I stood looking in at the window; the prisoner stood at my side - I felt something touch me; I looked down, and saw him take his hand out of my basket, with my purse in his hand - he ran off; I pursued, calling Stop thief! he was stopped before I lost sight of him. Three boys were standing by him when he took it. The purse was not found - I am certain I saw him with it.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house - he said the other boys had got it.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard a call of Stop thief! I fell down, and they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 10.

Transported for Seven Years, to the Prison Ship .

769. THOMAS MIHON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , a handkerchief, value 4 s. 6 d., the goods of James Barber , from his person .

JAMES BARBER . I am a linendraper , and live in Tavistock-street. On the 24th of April, about six o'clock in the evening, I was near St. Dunstan's church, Fleet-street - a young man came out of a shop, and asked if I had lost my handkerchief; I found I had. He pointed out the prisoner to me; I went and took him - he denied taking it. I have not found it.

JOHN JEPSON . I live at Messrs. Wells and Nevill's, in Fleet-street. I saw Mr. Barber in the street, and the prisoner behind him - he put his hand into Mr. Barber's pocket, and took out his handkerchief. I ran out and told Mr. Barber of it; he had got on two or three doors. We overtook him. The handkerchief was not found; I saw nobody with him. I am certain he took it - he was scarcely out of my sight. He stopped at a picture shop, where other persons were standing.

Prisoner's Defence. One of my braces came undone - I stopped to fasten it, and the gentleman took me.

NOT GUILTY .

770. WILLIAM DOUGHTY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , a straw bonnet, value 3 s. , the goods of Margaret Robinson .

MARGARET ROBINSON . I am a straw hat manufacturer , and live in Leadenhall-street . This bonnet was in my window on the morning of the 14th of April - I did not miss it till the prisoner was brought into the shop, about half-past nine o'clock; it was taken from near the door.

DANIEL FORRESTER . I am a constable. On the 14th of April, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner and another loitering about Leadenhall-street - I saw them go over to Robinson's shop window. The prisoner stood with one foot on the cill of the door; he could reach to the window. I saw him run off with something in his hand, and took him with this bonnet - his companion got off.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Judgment Respited .

FOURTH DAY. SATURDAY, MAY 17.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

771. MARY ANN STRANGE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , a gown, value 2 s.; a whittle, value 18 d., and a bonnet, value 6 d. , the goods of Edward Forster . Stephen Lushington , and Peter Martineau .

SECOND COUNT, stating them to belong to Joseph Hoskins .

JOSEPH HOSKINS . I have the care of the Refuge for the Destitute . The prisoner was received into the institution on the 28th of September, and left on the 4th of May, without our knowledge. We missed a gown, a bonnet, and a shawl. She was apprehended on the 7th, and brought back to the house, and I found those articles on her back - they are the property of the institution. They were not for her wear, but for two other inmates; she had other clothes, which she also took with her; she said she would not be confined to see the committee, but would take the event of justice. She had her own clothes on, as well as these when she was brought back.

ELEANOR CLARK . I am housekeeper at the institution. The prisoner left about eight o'clock in the evening, and when brought back had these clothes on; she left the clothes behind which she came in with - they were locked up. Edward Forster , Stephen Lushington , and Peter Martineau , Esqrs. are the trustees and governors of the institution.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

772. JOSEPH SMALL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a watch, value 20 s., and seven seals, value 7 s. , the goods of Jane Cartwright .

MRS. JANE CARTWRIGHT . I live in Upper Cleveland-street . On Saturday, the 15th of March, my watch and seals were hanging by the side of the fire-place. The prisoner is my nephew - I thought he was in Staffordshire, but about two o'clock on that afternoon he came to my house, and stopped about ten minutes - I was in the room all the time, and saw the watch lianging up while I was talking to him; he had not left a minute before I missed it. I went after him, but could not find him for half an hour. I found the watch on the floor, behind the door of a pawnbroker's passage - I had met him in the street, and he ran to this pawnbroker's door, and got behind - the watch laid just under his feet.

GEORGE LEDGER . I am a pawnbroker. The prosecutrix informed me she had lost her watch and seals, and described them. I told her I thought one of the seals had been offered to me by a man, whom I described to the officer, and about half-past nine o'clock he brought the man to me.

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable. I received him in charge at the watch-house. I asked what he had done with the property - he said he had shewn them to a boy; that he gave the seal to a costermonger, who was to give him 7 s. for it on the following morning. I went after the costermonger, and got back one of the seals.

Prisoner's Defence. The watch was given to me one

(Property produced and sworn to.)

day when I was at her house - I asked her for it several times after; she would not give it me, so I went up and took it.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years, recommended to the Penitentiary .

773. SAMUEL SETTLE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , a ham, value 10 s. , the goods of Thomas Wagstaff .

THOMAS WAGSTAFF . I am a cheesemonger , and live at Kensington . On the 18th of April, about half-past one o'clock, this ham hung at the door-post. A person came in, and said a soldier had taken it - I ran up the street, and the prisoner was brought back with it.

JOHN LOMAS . I saw the prisoner take the ham. I went after him, and caught him about one hundred yards off with it in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. A gentleman who appeard to be owner of the shop, said, if I would carry it to Knights-bridge, he would give me sixpence.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Three Months .

774. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Butcher , in the forenoon of the 8th of May , (he and others being therein) and stealing thirty-six yards of carpet, value 8 l. , his property.

WILLIAM BUTCHER . I keep a carpet warehouse in Upper James-street, Golden-square . On Thursday morning I took the thirty-six yards of Brussels carpet from the hall, which is part of the dwelling house, the stairs come into the hall, it is the passage to the house.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. You do not know whether the door was open or shut - A. It will not stand open unless it is propped back; the carpet was in a large room in the passage, where I occasionally store goods; the door had been opened to take in the milk.

THOMAS LUDLOW . I live in Silver-street, opposite to Butcher. I saw the prisoner lurking about the house for five or ten minutes, about half past seven o'clock that morning; I watched him; another person was with him, who looked very hard at me. The prisoner stooped down towards the key-hole of the prosecutor's door, and went away very hastily as if something interrupted him; the door was shut then. I went into the parlour, so that they could not see me, and directly I was gone in he returned to the door, and opened it, and went in; I could not see what he opened it with; when he was in, he beckoned with his finger to a man who was on the opposite side of the street; he went across to him, placed his back against the door, and kept it open. I saw the prisoner put a roll of carpet in front of the window by the side of the door, and during the time of his going from the window, a little boy went into the passage to go to his work; I then saw the man who stood at the door leave it and come across the road, and go down the street; the prisoner then came out with the roll of carpet on his shoulder, and went in a direction for Golden-square. I went over, and asked if they had sent anything away, but the servants were so long answering me, that I could not overtake them. I saw no more of him till the Saturday morning, when he and another man, (not the same as before) cameto the same spot - he had been in my sight on the Thursday for quarter of an hour or twenty minutes. I secured him with the assistance of the square-keeper. I am certain of his person. He opened the door as easy as if he had a proper key.

Cross-examined. Q. You could not tell how it was opened - A. No; I am sure it was shut. I saw the milkman go away three minutes before. I often joke with the servant, and had been at the door with her that morning. I am positive the prisoner opened the door; he stooped, and put his hand to the key hole. I observed his face before he went in; he was dressed in a black coat, and blue pantaloons - I could swear to him among a thousand.

THOMAS CLEMENTS . (This witness was nine years old, but appeared fully to understand the obligation of an oath.) On Thursday morning I went to work at Mr. Butcher's - there were two gentlemen in the hall - I was going to ring the bell; but they let me in. The prisoner is one of them - I do not recollect how he was dressed. I saw him at the office on Saturday.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not remember his dress - A. I know he had new blue trowsers, a blue coat, and blue buttons, and a broach in his handkerchief. His coat was not black.

COURT. Q. You said you did not recollect how he was dressed - A. I have thought of it now.

BENJAMIN WEBB . I took him in charge, and found nothing on him.

NOT GUILTY .

775. THOMAS FENWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , being servant to Rees Davies , at St. Andrew, Holborn, in the dwelling-house of the said Rees Davies , fifteen sovereigns; a half-sovereign; a 40 l., and three 10 l. Bank notes, the property of the said Rees Davies , his master .

REES DAVIES . I am a linendraper , and live in Lamb's Conduit-street - the prisoner was in my service for eighteen months, as clerk and shopman . On the night of the 9th of April, about ten o'clock, I locked up my money as usual, in my iron chest, which is in a small counting-house adjoining the shop. I put in a 40 l. Bank note, three 10 l. Bank notes, fifteen sovereigns, and a half-sovereign; there was a great deal more money there before, a quantity of silver, and my cash box. I locked the chest, and took the key up to my bed room. The prisoner slept in the shop to protect the property. I was unwell on the morning of the 10th, and Mr. Lewis, my junior clerk came up and fetched the key - I delivered it to him about nine o'clock; it was not out of my possession till then. About three quarters of an hour after, I went into the shop; the prisoner was not there - I asked for him; he had no business to leave the shop. I did not see him again till his appreheasion, on the 29th of April. I went to the chest about as hour after I went into the shop, and then missed this money, which consisted of the cash taken on the previous day. I found the chest open; it is usual to leave it open in the day time. The bowl in which this money had been put was gone - I did not know the numbers of the notes, but should know the 40 l. note, from a mark which was on it.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am in Mr. Davies's service, as cashier. It is my business to take the money, and hand it over to him at night. On the morning of the 10th of April, about nine o'clock, I went up to Mr. Davies for the key of the chest. Before that the prisoner had asked me for the key, as he said he wished to make out some bills; he asked me twice to get it - the first time was about eight o'clock, and again about half an hour after. When I had the key I unlocked the chest, and took out the silver and copper - I left the safe open, and did not go to it afterwards. I left the prisoner in the counting-house, and saw him take a book out of the chest - I was out about half an hour, leaving him there. Mr. Davies went to the safe afterwards - I do not know in what state he found it.

GEORGE DYER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I have a 40 l. note, No. 8447, dated the 31st of December, 1817, which was paid into the Bank on the 22d of April, by Barclay and Co.

JOHN SHARLAND . I am a clerk in the banking-house of Messrs. Bassett, Grant and Co., of Leighton-Buzzard. (Looks at the note;) on Friday, the 18th of April, this note was brought to our banking-house, by the prisoners; I did not know him before, but am certain of him - he asked for change for it. I gave him three 10 l. and two 5 l. Bank notes - we sent the note to Messrs. Barclay's, our bankers, on Monday.

MR. REES DAVIES . Here is the name

"Miss Morel," on the front of it, written by Miss Curl, a friend of mine, of whom I took it - I know her hand-writing perfectly well, and remember it was some date in December, 1817. I swear it is the note. I particularly noticed its being an old one, and had some conversation with Miss Curl about the name when I took it.

ROBERT HILL . I am a patrol. I took the prisoner on the 29th of April, about eleven o'clock at night, at a public-house in Great Ormond-street - I was called in by the landlord, and found him in bed with his clothes on; I thought I knew him - he said,

"Ah! Hill!" I recognized him as Mr. Davies's servant; I sent for the prosecutor, and told him the charge - he said nothing, but as we were taking him from the office, he said voluntarily, that he had one of the best of masters in the world, and what could have induced him to do so, he could not tell.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH . Aged 28.

776. GEORGE HERD and THOMAS PURSE were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , seven spoons, value 1 l.; two salvers, value 10 s., and eight castors, and frame, value 2 l., the goods of Sarah May , widow , in her dwelling-house .

JOHN M'CONE. I live with Mrs. Sarah May , a widow, in Adam-street, Adelphi . On the 16th of April, these things were taken from the front parlour - I saw them on the side-board about seven minutes before Wood rang the bell. I left the parlour window shut down, and the closed. I returned to the room, and found them open, and marks of footsteps on a chair, of a person getting in and out. I have not found them.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. How long have you lived there - A. Nearly four years. They were plated goods and much worn.

ELEANOR WOOD . I live in Adam-street, Adelphi. On the evening of the 16th of April, about twenty to eight o'clock, I was passing Mrs. May's, and sawand another was taller than him, by Osborne's hotel - I passed on, and went to a public-house about twenty yards off, and changed a newspaper. As I returned I saw Herd stooping down rubbing his legs, close to the parlour window. The taller man was opposite the door with a bundle of things under his coat, about two yards from May's door; they had not got the bundle when I first saw them. I could not see what it contained - I found the blinds and the window thrown wide open - the tall one went away directly, and Herd stopped about two minutes rubbing his legs, and then went towards the Strand. I rung the bell immediately he was gone, which was in about five minutes from the time I first saw them. I did not notice the tall man sufficiently to know him again. I knew Herd before by sight - I had seen him and another frequently walking backwards and forwards in Adam-street, between seven and eight o'clock of a morning.

WILLIAM BOND. I am an officer. In consequence of the description I received, I took the prisoners into custody - I have seen them together before. I found 7 s. on Herd, and 9 s. on the other. I took Herd on the night of the robbery.

HERD'S Defence. The officer saw me at my own door at the time of the robbery.

WILLIAM BOND. That I deny.

HERD - GUILTY. Aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

PURSE - NOT GUILTY .

777. MARY ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , five yards of cambric, value 3 l., the goods of John Limbert , and William Limbert , in their dwelling-house .

THOMAS GIBBONS . I am shopman to Messrs. John and William Limbert , linendrapers , Oxford-street . On Wednesday the 13th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop alone, to match a piece of Norwich crape; another person attended to her; she went out and came in again five minutes afterwards, and I cut her off half a yard of Norwich crape. I shewed her other things; she bargained for a yard of French cambric; I began to cut it off, and I saw her put a whole piece of cambric in her pocket; she stood right opposite to me; I charged her with it - she denied it; I reached over the counter and took it from her pocket, and asked her how she came to do such a thing; she still denied it - we sent for a constable; it was one of the pieces I had been shewing her - it measures five yards and a half, and is worth five guineas - it cost my master that.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What did you pay a yard for it - A. Thirteen shillings. I have been eight years in the business.

JURY. Q. Your employer paid that, subject to 35 s. per cent, discount - A. There is a discount, but it is not so much as that.

WILLIAM C - . I am an officer. I was sent for and took the prisoner is charge. The cambric was delivered to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He took it out of my pocket, and mixed it with others, and said if I would pay for it, he would not prosecute me.

JOHN MILES . I keep the Feather's-tavern, Hand-court, Holborn. I have been in the cambric trade fifteen years. I should think 8 s. or 9 s. a yard the full value of this; I dare say there are shops who would sell it at a small profit for 7 s. 6 d.

COURT. Q. When did you buy a piece of cambric last - A. Three or four years ago.

HENRY DENNIS . I am shopman to a haberdasher, in Soho-square. I have been an apprentice three years, and a shopman three; I think this cambric might be bought for 7 s. 6 d. a yard.

COURT. Q. Have you ever seen it before - A. Never; I am attending here on business; we could sell it for 9 s. or 9 s. 6 d.; I could buy it at a wholesale house for 7 s. 6 d.; it is French.

GUILTY. Aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Eighteen Months .

778. JOHN FULLER and JOHN RODHAM were indicted for a burglary, in the dwelling-house, of Alexander Wyllie , in the night of the 6th of March ; and stealing therein, two hundred yards of cloth, value 200 l.; forty yards of kerseymere, value 18 l.; seven yards of princes cord, value 2 l.; a coat, value 5 l., and a table cloth, value 2 l. , his property.

MESSRS. BRODRICK and PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

ELEANOR BURCHALL . I was servant to Mr. Wyllie. On the 6th of March we went to bed about twelve o'clock. I looked at every door, to see that they were secure, and I am certain the back kitchen window was fastened, and the front area door bolted - I came down next morning, a few minutes before seven o'clock, and found the warehouse door at the foot of the stairs open, and things laying about, and the hall door also open; I had fastened it with two bolts and a chain; the cook got up before me, but did not notice this; I had left a large damask table cloth on the kitchen table, which was gone - I alarmed Mr. Wyllie, and then came down and examined the house; I observed a small square of glass cut out of the window, of the back kitchen, where the fastening was; a person could then push his finger in and push the fastening back; I also found a large piece of wood, cut out of the front area door, there were drops of blood about the area, and on the wall as if a finger had been wiped on it.

MR. ALEXANDER WYLLIE . I rent a house in Conduit-street, Bond-street . I saw the property safe the day before the robbery; next morning I missed two hundred and fifty yards of cloth, and forty of kerseymere, and two pieces besides, belonging to a manufacturer; mine was worth 270 l. I found the area door had been perforated by a centre bit, and marks of blood there; about a week afterwards I observed some blood marks on the white part of the wall, near the door post, as if they had dropped from a cut finger.

FRANCES PROCTOR . I was servant to Mr. Wyllie. On the morning of the robbery, I saw marks of blood by the side of the door. I found a knife close to the door post, which I gave to the officer.

JAMES BISHOP . I am a Hackney coachman, and live inGibraltar-court, Gibraltar-row, Lambeth-road. On the 6th of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was at the Elephant and Castle stand; I went to the Rulers' room at the corner of Marshall-street, and saw the two prisoners there; I knew neither of them before, but Gloyd was there, whom I had known from a boy; he spoke to me, in the hearing of the prisoners. they were all in company; he said,

"Have you got a coach in the rank," I said Yes, he said, well then, he should have a good job for me up in Conduit-street, Bond-street, about one o'clock, if I would be there, I said

"Very well, I will come, if I get a job any where near there." Fuller was dressed in a cut off blue coat. with blue buttons, kerseymere breeches and top boots. I was at Hatton-garden, coach-stand, and was ordered by a lady to drive to Argyle-street; I got there about one o'clock, in a few minutes after, I drove on to the stand at Conduit-street, and stopped in the rank; about half past one o'clock Gloyd walked by and went towards Mr. Wyllie, he had been gone about five minutes, then returned to my coach door with three or four rolls of something under his arm; my horses heads stood on a level with George-street, looking towards Bond-street - Gloyd opened my coach door and threw the rolls in, and then got in himself to place them; he remained in the coach - the two prisoners came with their arms loaded, in the same manner. I did not observe what the rolls were, but when they were taken out, I saw one was a large roll of dark cloth; Fuller then had no boots on, but shoes, that was the only difference in his dress. The prisoners returned backward and forwards four or five times, and brought something every time. The last time they came was a quarter past three o'clock. Mr. Wyllie's shop is on the left hand side going out of Regent-street - my coach was in the middle of the road, where the first coach always stands. They got into the coach, and shut the door, and told me to drive to Cornhill. I was going to stop in Cornhill - one of them let down the front glass, and said,

"Dont stop here, drive on to the first turning to the right after you pass the church," I did so, and they then ordered me to take the first turning to the left, which led into a little square. They pulled the string for me to stop, under a lamp on the left hand side; it was then about quarter past five o'clock, and then Fuller jumped out from the off side door, and knocked at the door on one side of the lamp, which was immediately opened by a man in his shirt sleeves; Fuller returned to the coach. They all three took an arm full of the rolls into the house. Fuller remained in the house with them, while the prisoners fetched the rest out; they all went into the house; the door was shut - they had been in the house about the space of five minutes, when Gloyd returned to me, and put five sovereigns, and a one pound note in my hand; he said

"Here, we shan't want you any more, you may go about your business," I had been on the stand a quarter of an hour or better. My horses each have a white star on the forehead; I talked with the watchman in Conduit-street about the badness of the weather.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. On what night of the week was it - A. Thursday. I saw them at the Rulers' room at nine o'clock; nine or ten people were drinking there. Gloyd sat with the prisoners; the conversation was in a low tone; I did not suspect any thing wrong; I did not ask where he brought the parcels from; they were nearly three quarters of an hour bringing the goods to the coach; it was above half past two o'clock when he came up, and a quarter past three when we started. I only saw the watchmen once.

Q. Have you come here from gaol - A. I have come from Tothill-fields; I was taken there because several threatened to kill me. I did not suspect any thing wrong till he put the money into my hand; I did not refuse it; and in the morning I told my mother I thought I had been carrying people who were after no good; I told nobody else; I was apprehended about three weeks afterwards, and related it to the officers.

Q. Why not give information before - A. I did not know what to do; I was as likely to be wrong as right; I do not expect to escape punishment by being a witness; I believe the magistrate did say if I told nothing but truth it would save me. The coach I drive is No. 77; it is my master's.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Did you not think it odd that a coach should be wanted in Conduit-street from the Elephant and Castle - A. Not at all; my being hired to Argyle-street was quite accidental; unless I had been there I should not have gone. I had a fare to Fleet-market first.

Q. Did you not think it suspicious for one man to wait in the coach while the others fetched the bundles - A. No; they brought the rolls in a direction from Mr. Wyllie's; I saw them come out of his door; the back of my coach was that way; I did not offer to pull up to the door; I was within twenty yards of the house; they told me not to drive up to the door; I could not tell whether they lived there or not; I believed it was their property. and only expected my fare. I did not speak to Gloyd while he was in the coach. I have not talked with him since.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. He was busy in the coach putting up the rolls - A. Yes; Gloyd has been in Tothill-fields. but we have been kept separate. Mine was the only coach on the stand; a chariot had driven off.

JOHN GLOYD . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Wellington-street, Newington-causeway. On Wednesday night, 3d of March, I went to a house in Conduit-street, with Fuller and Rodham, and I had known them nine or ten months - he, Rodham, and I had agreed to go two or three days before, and Bishop, the coachman was to ply there. On the evening of the robbery, I saw Bishop at the Elephant and castle, about four or five o'clock and asked him to ply at the West end of the town, in a street where there were some fine large new building at the end of it; I do not know the name of the street. I told him to meet me there at one o'clock. Nobody was with us when I said this - the prisoners were twenty or thirty yards off - they stopped in the street, not in a house - I afterwards went with the prisoners to Oram's in the Strand, where we stopped till a quarter past eleven o'clock - we then went to Tinkler's (Rodham's) lodging, in Shoe-lane, Holborn, and stopped there till a quarter before twelve; all three of us together; we then look a centre bit and some keys, we had with us before; they belonged to Tinkler - we then went to that end of the town, where the new buildings are, and where the robbery was to be committed; wewent to Bishop; he was in the rank before we got there, which was about one o'clock; I said nothing to him; Price and Tinkler went down the area to the kitchen door, with the centre bit; they unlocked the area gate. I saw no more of them till they came out at the private door; they then went back and fetched some cloth. I had been waiting about an hour and a half for them. It was two hours before we left the house for good. They brought rolls of cloth with them, I and Bishop put them into the coach, which was twelve or fourteen yards from the door, in the ranks. Bishop helped in with the cloths. I stopped with the coach while they went back for more. Tinkler and Price went backwards and forwards, and brought cloth to me, which I put into the coach. We told Bishop to drive to the first turning past Whitechapel church, and then the first turning to the right. The centre bit was Tinkler's; he had some keys also, and a stock. When the coach stopped, we knocked at a door, and the things were taken in. I returned to Bishop, and gave him three sovereigns first, and 1 l. in silver, and gave him two more sovereigns in the afternoon. I was apprehended about ten days ago. The robbery was advertized about a week after it happened. Tinkler and I went beyond Stoke Newington, and lived together there - he went by the name of Rodham, and I as Matthews. We were apprehended, and put in the watch-house, and on the Monday morning, when the watch-house man brought us some water, we pulled the door open and ran out. I was taken the next day in Rhodes-fields, Islington. We got 109 l. for the cloth, and it was shared between the prisoners and me.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long have you known Bishop - A. A good while. I saw him at the Elephant and Castle, about four o'clock, his coach was there then, he knew what we were going about. I did not see him before on that day. I gave him 4 l. at first, and told him, I did not know what there would be more for him, but it would be settled, and if he came to my lodging in the afternoon he should have it, which he did, and I gave him 2 l. more, as his share of the booty. It was part of the plan that his coach should be on the stand, and not at the door.

COURT. Q. Do you know the Ruler's room - A. Yes; I was there about a week before the transaction. Tinkler was there then, but not Price. I have seen Bishop there frequently, but not on the night in question.

Q. How do you know that he was aware of what you were going about - A. Because we applied to him one night - it was not done then, as we had not got the centre bit, and we applied to him on the next night.

Q. Did you see him at the Ruler's room, on the night you meant to have done it - A. Yes, in the day time Bishop and I were there, but neither of the prisoners; I told him we knew where to get some cloth; he knew all about it.

THOMAS DIXON . In March last I was watchman of Conduit-street. I heard of this robbery on the 7th of March. I was on my beat the night before, and saw a coach on the stand. I had some talk with the coachman. I never saw his face, and should not know him again. I particularly looked at his horses; they stood at the head of the stand, at the corner of George-street; they were very dark brown or black horses. I saw the coach there until I called three o'clock but not afterwards. I think one horse had a white streak on the face. The coachman appeared to me to have a large blue top coat on, which he wrapped all round him, and said he would have a sleep and threw himself back on his box; he appeared to be asleep every time I passed him.

JOHN TURNER SMITH . I am a dealer in spruce and ginger beer, and live in Sion-street, Whitechapel. On the morning of the 7th of March, about four or five o'clock. I was awake and heard a coach pass my door, and draw up about two doors further, towards the Commercial-road, at a house kept by Solomon's. I heard the coach door, and also the house door open; a person came out - there was passing and repassing several times, the coach was there about ten minutes or quarter of an hour, but it being dark and the coach just under the window, I could not see it; I heard of the robbery afterwards, and went to Mr. Wyllie.

LOUISA WHEELER . In March last I lived in Peter-street, Cow-cross - the prisoner Tinkler lodged with me there; he went by the name of John Owen ; he lived there five or six months, and left on a Friday. Mr. Wyllie came to me the day after he left; he gave me no warning. I did not know of his going - he paid me three weeks rent on a Friday morning, and he was out overnight; at least the young woman said so - I do not know it myself. He left me the day week after he paid me, and did not pay me for that week. The young woman went away four or five hours after him. I then looked about the room, and found a centre bit in the cupboard, and a key stowed behind the grate - it was given to the officer. There was a large hole in the centre of the closet, and one in the door. The large hole appeared to have been made by the centre hit. That mark was not in the closet before the prisoner came.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You know nothing of his being out - A. No. The centre bit was not there before he came.

BENJAMIN WHEELER . I keep the house No. 4, Peter-street, Cow-cross. Fuller lodged with me for four months - I think he gave me the name of Williams; he left some time in March, about the 11th or 12th. Neither me or my wife live in the house.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. When the rooms are empty, any one can get at them - A. They are kept locked.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. I apprehended Fuller in bed, in Clement's-place, Temple-bar, on Sunday, the 16th of March - Pace and Handley were with me. We found a coat and breeches in the room where he was; he said they were his - I did not notice his hand, but at one of the examinations I saw a cut on one of his fingers. We took Rodham and Gloyd on the 4th of May, about three o'clock in the morning, with another man - he denied all knowledge of Gloyd; we put them in St Margaret's watch-house; they afterwards escaped. I found a knife, a file, and a piece of candle on Rodham. I took Salter to Mr. Wyllie's, and to No. 4, Peter-street.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Do you know when Gloyd first said that he knew of the robbery - A. On the 6th of May, when he was taken - he said in the coach, hewould say something to the Magistrate if they would hear him.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I assisted in apprehending the prisoners. The breeches found in Fuller's lodging were stained with blood - he had a cut in his right hand, which looked rather fresh; it was not healed up - I think it had not been done above a week. We apprehended Rodham with Gloyd and another man, on Sunday, the 4th of May, and on Monday they had escaped. Rodham denied all knowledge of Gloyd or the other, and gave his address Northampton-row, Clerkenwell. Salter delivered me a key and centre bit.

THOMAS PACE . I have the coat found at Fuller's lodging. Bishop stated the dress Fuller wore, before he saw the coat.

JOHN GREEN . I am keeper of the House of Correction at Brixton. I know that the prisoners were well acquainted in May, 1822, and that they knew Gloyd.

RICHARD GREENHILL . I am keeper of St. Margaret's watch-house. Gloyd and Rodham were in my custody on the 4th of May. I went in for a pail of water which they had to wash in - Rodham knocked me down with the pail, and stunned me, and both got out.

GEORGE SALTER . I am a carpenter. I produce two pannels - one of which I took from Mr. Wyllie's door, and another from Wheeler's. There are marks of an inch and three eights, and a four inch centre bit on them; there are marks of the inch and three eighths centre bit on both. The centre bit found is a four inch one - it fits the mark on the pannel at Wheeler's, but not at the prosecutor's.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. The centre bit does not fit the marks in Mr. Wyllie's pannel - A. No; but there are marks on both pannels of an inch and three eights centre bit having been used. Centre bits are made of regular sizes, on a progressive scale. Every carpenter has a regular set of them.

MR. WYLLIE. I got the centre bit and a picklock key from Wheeler's on the 25th.

NOT GUILTY .

London Cases, Before Mr. Recorder.

779. SAMUEL HOLDEN was indicted for embezzling 133 l. 14 s. 6 d., which he had received on account of Matthew Wilson , and others, his partners, to whom he was servant .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

780. BLANCH ESTACE was indicted for a misdeameanor .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Week .

781. EDWARD THOMPSON was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury, in his evidence upon the trial of Robert and John Martin .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and BERNARD conducted the prosecution.

MR. JOHN FINCH, produced the office copy of the conviction of Robert and John Martin .

JOHN BLADES . I am an officer of this Court. I was present at the trial of Robert and John Martin , and recollect the prisoner tendering himself as a witness for the prisoners. I swore him upon the New Testament.

HENRY BUCKLER , short hand writer, read the evidence given by the prisoner on the 19th of April , on behalf of Robert Martin , in which he deposed among other things as follows:-" Q. Where do you live? A. In Long-acre, No. 17, - I lodge there on the second floor. Hollingsworth keeps the house. On the 20th of February last, about two minutes before six o'clock, I was coming down Crown-street, Soho, and a gentleman accosted me, and asked if I had any commands to Liverpool, he would take them - I told him No. I do not know his name - he was going to Ireland that way. I had seen him once or twice only. We stood in conversation in the street, opposite Mr. Martin's door; our conversation lasted upwards of twelve or fourteen minutes, as near as I can recollect, during which time I saw Robert Martin twice or thrice at the door and inside the shop. Immediately after the gentleman and I separated it struck a quarter past six o'clock - and I have nothing further to say. Q. How long have you lodged in Long-acre? A. Six or seven months." See Fourth Session, Page 250.

WILLIAM HUXTABLE . I live in King-street, Holborn; but my business is carried on in Theobald's-road. We place the candles out to cool in the street. On the 20th of February, there were some candles put out to cool. I was at my house in King-street, on the 20th of February, when James Adamson gave me information - it was then certainly not more then ten minutes or a quarter past six o'clock; I think it might be twenty minutes past six. Thirty-six candles were in three mould frames which were stolen.

JAMES ADAMSON . I live with Mr. Huxtable. On the 20th of February, some moulds were out in the street with candles in them. I missed three frames about six o'clock in the evening. I saw them safe at twenty minutes before I gave information to Mr. Huxtable.

WILLIAM TOURNAY . I am in the service of Mr. Huxtable. On the 20th of February, there were some moulds put to cool in the street - I saw them safe about a quarter to six o'clock, and missed them about twenty minutes past six o'clock. Three were stolen.

RICHARD GILBERT . At the time in question, I lived in Norfolk-street, Middlesex-hospital. On the evening of the 20th of February, I was returning home through Theobald's-road, about a quarter past six o'clock; it was a fair night - the gas was lighted. At the corner of Harper-street, I saw two men with mould frames on their shoulders - Robert Martin was one of them; I had an opportunity of seeing them. I followed them to the end of Harper-street, when they were overtaken by a third man, who also had a frame on his shoulder. I followed them across Queen-square, through a court into Southampton-row, into Great Russell-street, and Charlotte-street, across through Middle-row, in Monmouth-street, to No. 25, Crown-street, Soho - the name of John Martin was over the door; it was then about half-past six o'clock. They all three put the frames into the shop. I gave information, and accompained the officers next day to Martin's house - the candles were found; Robert Martin was there. I said in his bearing, I had no doubt that was the man who brought the candles; he said nothing. They took him into custody. We found thirty-six candles, and some bits of wood marked with tallow. One of the three men came out of the house, and said to the others,

"D - n your eyes look sharp." I have not the least doubt of Robert being theman who ran away with the candles. I saw his face all the way.

RICHARD MILLS . I live at No. 17, Long-acre. I have lived there a year and three quarters. The prisoner has not lived there since I kept the house; he is a perfect stranger. I have three lodgers. I had two on the 19th of April; one Gilks lived there before me. I never knew Hollingsworth. I have a lease of the house.

ELIZABETH HUGHES . I am servant to Mr. Mills, and was so in April last. I never saw the prisoner before, he did not live at the house on the 19th of April; I came into Mr. Mills's service, about a month after he came to the house.

JOHN WEAVER . I lodge at Mr. Mills's house, No. 17, Long-acre. I have lived there nearly four years. I never saw the prisoner before to day; he did not live there on the 19th of April, or at any time. Gilks was the landlord before Mills came. I never knew Hollingsworth.

THOMAS FORD . I am an officer. I went to the house of John Martin , on the 21st of February, about half-past nine o'clock in the morning, with a search warrant. Mr. Huxtable, was with me. We found thirty-six mould candles in a bag, concealed in a back out-house, and some solder melted down; also some small pieces of wood with tallow on them; they appeared part of mould frames; there were marks of these having been chopped up on the threshold of the door. Martin was a dealer in marine stores.

RICHARD SEEKINS . I am a mould-maker for tallow chandlers, and saw some pieces of the frames of moulds, produced on Martin's trial. I manufactured one of the frames. I selected twelve of the candles, which were made in my mould - the pieces of wood appeared to be part of mould frames, and some were greasy.

The prisoner put in a written defence, stating that he came into Court, to speak the truth and nothing but the truth, but that the multiplicity of questions put to him, so excedingly agitated him, that he did not doubt he had contradicted himself, but not wilfully.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Confined Six Months , and then Transported for Seven Years .

782. MARIA SMITH was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

CATHERINE CONNEL . I sell fruit and live in Catherine-Wheel-alley. On the evening of the 2d of May, I was at the Paul Pindar, public-house, Bishopsgate-street, between nine and ten o'clock at night, the prisoner bought 4 d. worth of raddishes of me and gave me a shilling; I gave her eight-pence change. I had no other shilling. I kept it in my hand some time, and when she was gone I examined it and found it very bad. I put it in paper, and kept it separate, and gave it to the officer - next night I saw her at the same place; she wanted two pennyworth of raddishes, but said she had only three half-pence, and would I trust her. I did not recollect her, till we got to the light, and would not trust her - she asked me to give her change for a shilling, which she gave me. I found it was a bad one. The officer came in and took her. I had no other silver about me.

JOHN GREGORY . I was at the Paul Pindar , on the night of the 8d of May. I heard Connel charge the prisoner with passing bad money, and took her to the watch-house, and found a good sixpence, a penny piece, and two halfpence on her. I produce the two shillings which Connel gave me.

JOSIAH SEWELL . I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. These shillings are both counterfeit and merely washed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not there on the Friday, for I was at Shoreditch workhouse, getting my weekly allowance. I took the shilling I gave her for some spoons, which I sold in the street.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year , and to find Sureties for Two Years .

783. JOSEPH DYNAM was indicted for a misdemeanour .

The prosecutrix did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

784. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , a watch, value 5 s. , the goods of Jane Wilson .

The prosecutrix did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

785. SARAH SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , three mackarel, value 2 s.; a crown piece,; two half-crowns,; five shillings, and four six-pences, the property of James Brown , from the person of George Knipe .

JAMES BROWN . I am a Fishmonger , and live in Fenchurch-street. George Knipe is my servant . I sent him out on the 8th of May, about twelve o'clock, with three mackarel and some money, to take to a customer. I gave him the money in consequence of his saying he was to give change.

GEORGE KNIPE . I am thirteen years old. On the 8th of May, I was taking two mackarel to Mr. Eames, No. 62, Fenchurch-street, and was going to call in Gould-square, for orders, the prisoner tapped me on the shoulder, and said

"This is not the way to your shop," and told me to bring four more mackarel to Mr. Eames, with change for a sovereign. I went and master gave me change. I was coming with it, and she met me and said

"Where is the change and the three mackarel. I gave them to her, she said she was to give me a shilling each for the mackarel, which was the price. I gave her the change - she told me to make haste back for the other mackarel, and she would wait there for me. I returned with it, and she was gone - she never gave me the sovereign. I did not see her again till Saturday.

PREST KNIPE . I am the father of the witness. I apprehended the prisoner from my son's description. No money was found upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in St. Paul's-church-yard - the boy came and asked if I had ordered any mackerel. A man then took hold of me.

NOT GUILTY .

FIFTH DAY. MONDAY, MAY 18.

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Recorder.

786. WILLIAM JUDE , WILLIAM LIVERMORE , and JOSEPH STARR were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , four pieces, of wood, value 2 l. , the goods of John Mould .

JOHN MOULD . I am a carpenter , and live at Enfield. On the 6th of May, this wood laid on Enfield-chase - I saw it about four o'clock on the Monday afternoon; it had been lately felled. We found it at Booker's next day.

ELEAZER BOOKER . I am a coach-maker, and live at Edmonton. Jude called on me on Friday afternoon, the 9th of May - I had seen him before. He said he had four or five hundred coach spokes to sell; I said if they were good, I would buy them. He brought a quantity next morning in a cart; I paid him 3 l. for one hundred and twenty-three, and returned some of them as bad. Mr. Mould saw them afterwards, and claimed them.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Jude dealt in wood - A. Yes. The bark is off it.

JAMES CREW . I am a carpenter, and live at Enfield-highway. I know the timber was safe on the chase on Monday evening. The prisoners live at Enfield.

BENJAMIN HAGGER . I am a wheelwright, and live at Lower Edmonton. The three prisoners brought me these spokes, which Booker had refused to buy - I bought twenty of them; I was to pay 6 s. for them. Mould afterwards came and claimed one of them. The bark was off them. I should not think it possible to match them.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners Jude and Livermore. I told them the charge; they denied it. Starr came and surrendered to me afterwards - he had told me in the morning before any charge was made against him, that he had taken some spokes to Booker's, and that they belonged to Jude. Starr deals in timber, and bore a good character.

JOSEPH GIBSON . I am a constable. I went with Mould and Hagger to match the timber with the stumps of the tree.

JOHN MOULD . Here is part of a tree, which I have cut off to bring here; it matches with some of the spokes, with the grain of the wood, and every mark.

LIVERMORE'S Defence. Jude employed me to help him load and unload.

JUDE - GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Three Months .

LIVERMORE - NOT GUILTY .

STARR - NOT GUILTY .

787. THOMAS BOWETER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , two thousand nails, value 5 s. , the goods of Charles Stable and Charles Montague Stable .

WILLIAM PLAYFAIR . I am in the service of Charles and Charles Montague Stable , ironmongers , of High-street, St. Giles's. The prisoner was in their employ as a nail-maker . On Saturday morning, the 10th of May, he came to get some iron, about quarter before nine o'clock; and having worked for us a long time, he was suffered to go into the warehouse by himself; he came to me almost directly, and said he could not find the iron; I went into the warehouse with him, and saw that his pockets were bulky; in each pocket there was a paper containing a thousand nails. I let him go out, and called him back. He denied having any thing; I told him to produce them, which at last he did. Our shop mark was on the papers.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined One Week .

788. BARNARD GREY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 10 lbs. weight of wax, value 15 s. , the goods of Edward Slater .

MR. PHILLIPS conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD SLATER . I am an upholsterer , and live in Queen's-buildings, Knightsbridge. The prisoner was in my employ about twelve months. On the 1st of May I went to Mr. Morgan's shop, and found him there offering a piece of wax for sale; I examined some more there, one piece of which had a mark on it which I made myself, and which I can swear to; seven pieces were produced.

Prisoner. Q. How did you mark it - A. I cut it round the edge, as I had let it fall, and made it rough.

JOHN MORGAN . I live with my father, who is a tallow-chandler, and lives in Tottenham Court-road. The prisoner came to our sale shop in Sloane-street twice to sell some bees' wax; he sold two pieces the first time.

GEORGE THRESHER . I am a wax and tallow chandler. I was at Mr. Morgan's shop about the middle of April. I bought a piece of wax of the prisoner; the prosecutor swore to it at Bow-street; I gave it to the officer. He said he had a brother, or brother-in-law at Hertford, who sent it him.

BENJAMIN MORRIS . I am an officer. I took him in charge on the 1st of May. The shopman said he had brought some wax for sale; he did not deny it, but said he got it from his brother in Hertfordshire.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Six Months .

789. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , a yard of silk, value 7 s. , the goods of James Frederick Duggan , her master.

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

JAMES FREDERICK DUGGAN . I am a silk dyer , and live in King-street, Holborn. The prisoner was in my service about five weeks. A silk dress was sent to me to dye; it contained three breadths, about a yard and a quarter long; the prisoner had it to tack for finishing, among other work; she returned all but one breadth to me; it had been dyed about a week before she had it. I sent for her, and she called at the shop, I neither promised or threatened her; she said she was sorry for what she had done. I had at that time a bonnet in my posession covered with silk; Warner delivered it to me.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Did you deliver the silk to her yourself - A, No; it was sent up to her; I told her parents that if she gave me much trouble it would be worse for her; I said, if she confessed relative to other business, it might be better for her.

MR. LAW. Q. Have you a piece of the silk - A. Yes; I know that on the bonnet to be part of the same from the colour and quality; it is a French silk.

SAMUEL WARNRR . On Wednesday, the 23d of April, I went to a house in Somers-town, where I found the prisoner; I told her I wished to see a bonnet which shehad been making up at our house on the Saturday before; she said she had not, she had made one up on Saturday week; I asked to see that; she went up stairs, and brought down a Leghorn straw black bonnet; I said that was not what I wanted, and I was determined to see the right, and told her to go up and fetch the other; after some hesitation she went and brought this bonnet; after saying she had acted very wrong in taking a breadth, and making it into a bonnet, I said I should send for an officer, and take her away; she fell on her knees, and asked forgiveness, and said she had taken it out of the silk box where they are kept; I said I could say nothing to it as, it was not my property - she got up and ran away with a young man, who was with her. I took the bonnet to Mr. Duggan. I have been a dyer, and I am certain that the silk bonnet is made of part of the dress.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you never see two pieces of silk of exactly the same colour - A. Yes; when they were dyed together. I did not knock her down. I believe she fell down as she ran out of the room. I was rather irritated but did not catch hold of her to my knowledge. She had been discharged.

The prisoner made no Defence.

ELIZA TURNER . I lived in the same house as the prisoner. I never saw this bonnet till Warner called. I was present; he told her if she came forward and acknowledged to taking the silk, he did not wish to hurt a hair of her head. I afterwards went with her to Duggans to deliver herself up.

MR. LAW. Q. Do you lodge in the same room - A. No.

Q. Was not the first thing he said,

"Bring down that bonnet, which you was making up on Saturday" - A. Yes, and after she produced it, he said what I stated. I was not present at the beginning of the conversation.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

790. MARY ANN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , four shirts, value 20 s. , the goods of Richard John Raymond , her master.

MR. RICHARD JOHN RAYMOND . I live in Budge-row, Chelsea . The prisoner was in my service three months. I missed these things between the 2d and 7th of May; some from a closet and some from a drawer. I discharged her on the 2d of May. Eight or ten shirts were found at the pawnbrokers, with my initials on them - she came for her box and was given in charge.

EDWARD CHAPMAN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner. I found the shirts at a pawnbroker's, by her direction.

EDWARD PERKINS . I am shopman to Mr. Thompson, Grosvenor-row, Chelsea. I have four shirts, two of which I took in pawn on the 11th of April, for 4 s., of a female like the prisoner, in the name of Ann Wright , Queen-street, two more were pawned with us next day.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Judgment Respited .

791. THOMAS BROOKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of April , a sheet, value 10 s.; a quilt, value 6 s.; and a pillow, value 4 s., the goods of James Thompson , in a lodging room .

JAMES THOMPSON . I deal in shell fish , and rent a house in St. Martin's-lane . The prisoner took a furnished room on my second floor, a few weeks before Christmas, at 5 s. a week - he remained there till the 9th of April; he was apprehended on another charge, and on examination we missed the property - he owed four weeks' rent; he said he was in town on a law suit.

JAMES LAWSON . I am foreman to Mr. Dobrie, of Charing-cross, pawnbroker. I have a quilt which I took in pawn of the prisoner for 3 s. I am certain of him - he used our shop several times.

JOHN RAGG . I am shopman to Ashman and Son, of the Strand, pawnbroker's. I have a pillow pawned on the 3d of March, by the prisoner for 1 s.

JOSEPH BURGESS . I am foreman to M. Harris, pawnbroker, Strand. On the 1st of February, I took a sheet in pawn for 3 s. 6 d. of the prisoner.

BENJAMIN SCHOFIELD . I am an officer. I apprehended him at his lodging on another charge; there was only one sheet on the bed.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never intended to quit the lodging, without paying him in the most honorable way, but was taken away suddenly.

GUILTY . Aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

792. MARGARET HUME was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , a table cloth, value 1 s. 6 d.; a shift, value 3 s.; a shoe, value 1 s.; a mattrass, value 8 s.; and a blanket, value 6 s., the goods of William Walden , in a lodging room .

WILLIAM WALDEN . I live in Stingo-lane . I let a lodging to the prisoner's husband, about two years ago; he dealt in matches and other things. They both remained there till the 6th of May.

MARY WALDEN . I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the 6th of May, I missed the property. The table cloth, shift and shoe, were taken out of my room, the blankets and mattress were let with the lodging.

HANNAH WALDEN . I am no relation of the prosecutor's, but I live in the lower part of the house. I went into the prisoner's room on the 6th of May, about eleven o'clock, to light the fire, and found her lying on the hearth with her head on the fender, and one of the prosecutor's shoes in her lap.

Prisoner's Defence. She sent me to pawn the things.

NOT GUILTY .

793. ROBERT FARMER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , from the person of Thomas Blagrave , a pocket-book, value 1 s., and a warrant for payment of, and value 10 l., his property .

THOMAS H. BLAGRAVE . I live in Symond's-inn. On the 14th of April, about eight o'clock at night, I went to Covent-garden Theatre . My pocket-book was in my pocket, with a cheque on Herries and Co. for 10 l. I went into the dress boxes. I did not miss my property till ten minutes past twelve o'clock, when I got home. I have since seen the cheque in possession of the constable.

The prisoner is a stranger; several of my cards were in the pocket-book.

HUGH GOLDICOT . I am cashier to Messrs Herries, Farqubar and Co. I have a cheque dated the 14th of April, made payable to the prosecutor. The prisoner presentedit for payment, on the 15th of April, a little before ten o'clock. I asked him how he came by it; he said he had met a gentleman at the top of St. James-street, who told him he would give him 2 s. if he would go to the banker's and receive the money for it. I said we had received a letter from Mr. Blagrave, desiring the person who brought it should be detained, and I gave him in charge, I did not send to see if any body was waiting. He presented one of Mr. Blagrave's cards, and said the person told him to say the money was for that gentleman.

ROBERT C. CHAPMAN . I took charge of the prisoner; he said a gentleman employed him to get the cash for it. I asked where he was to meet the gentleman, he said at the corner of the street, and pointed to Ryder-street. I gave him an opportunity of finding the man, he would point nobody out. I asked how he had spent the evening before, he said he was at home, and in bed after ten o'clock, at No. 13, Calmell-buildings, and that he was at his former lodgings, in the early part of the evening, No. 13, Bennett's-court, Drury-lane, and went from there to Calmell-buildings. I went into Bennet's-court; they said they knew him, but had not seen him for six weeks. I found he did lodge at Calmell-buildings.

Prisoner's Defence. On the very day the gentleman lost his pocket-book, I was at work at the shop all day, and stopped at Mr. Horrigan's, Bennett's-court, at a christening. I went home about ten o'clock and went to bed before a quarter-past ten o'clock, and in the morning met a gentleman, who gave me 2 s. to receive the cheque, and said if they asked who sent me, I was to give the card.

WILLIAM DENNE SMITH . I live in Fleet-lane, and am a boot-maker. In April I lived in Calmell-buildings, on the first-floor. The prisoner lived in the same house, and slept in the same bed; he is a boot-maker, and worked for Mr. Hale, of New-street, Covent-garden; he came home at half-past ten o'clock, on the night he was accused of this, and went to bed, and staid there all night. I had been at home all the evening from four o'clock. I had been with him till three o'clock that afternoon, and left him at Horrigans.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Years .

794. THOMAS HAMMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , a watch, value 1 l., the goods of William Hughes , from his person .

The Prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

795. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , a foreign silver coin, value 4 s.; a half-crown, and a farthing, the monies of William Wilson , from his person .

WILLIAM WILSON . I live in Swan-alley, near the London Docks . On the 17th of April, between nine and ten o'clock, I had a dollar and half a crown in my waistcoat pocket. I was quite sober. I went to a public-house just by where I lived, to get a pot of beer - the prisoner sat by my side; we were in company together nearly an hour - I went away first; I paid for my beer when I first had it; my money was then safe - he slept in the same bed with me. I expected he would have come out with me, but he did not, and in two minutes I missed my money, before I had left the door. I called the watchman, went in, and said,

"I've lost some money" - nobody said anything. It was found on the prisoner - he was taken. Other people sat at the table.

THOMAS HARRISON . I am the watch-house keeper. The prisoner was brought in on this charge. Wilson said he had lost a dollar and a half-crown. I went to search and while I was searching his right hand pocket, I saw his hand in his left hand pocket; I put my hand in, and found a dollar, a half-crown, and a farthing; he said he received it from his Captain, and after he was locked up, he said Wilson gave it him.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave me the half-crown to buy a supper, and the rest for liquor. I did not know the dollar was in my pocket, or I could have dropped it.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

796. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , 9 lbs. of leaden shot, value 2 s. 6 d.; 2 lbs. of gunpowder, value 4 s.; two powder flasks, value 15 s., and four silver escutcheons, value 2 s., the goods of John Manton and George Henry Manton , to whom he was servant ; and GEORGE CONNETT and JAMES CONNETT were indicted for feloniously receiving the said shot and gunpowder, knowing them to be stolen .

MR. GEORGE HENRY MANTON . I am in partnership with my father, Mr. John Manton . The prisoner has been in our service sixteen or seventeen years; he formerly lived in the house. On the morning of the 9th of May, Gray, the officer called on me. In consequence of what he said, Price was apprehended, and while the three were under examination at the office, the articles stated in the indictment were produced. I cannot swear to the powder and shots, but to the best of my belief the ten flasks are ours; they have no mark on them - they are made purposely for us. We took Price at his apartments - Gray found the flasks and escutcheons there. He said if I would forgive him he would serve me all his life.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. I suppose you sell thousands of these flasks - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. The escutcheons are frequently sold - A. No; they are in an unfinished state. We put them upon guns, but do not sell them.

THOMAS GRAY . I apprehended George Connett in the Strand, on the 8th of May, about a quarter to seven o'clock in the evening, and asked what he was carrying; he said powder and shot - that he had it from his son James, to carry home for him; he lived at Bankside. I asked where his son was to be found; he said at a building near the Hay-market; I found him there; he said he gave it to his father to carry home, and that he had it from a porter in Dover-street, Piccadilly - I went with him to Dover-street, and saw Price standing at the prosecutor's door; I asked him if he had given Connett any powder and shot - he said he had not. A few seconds afterwards he said he had given him a little in two cannisters. I took him in charge - I found 2 lbs. of powder, and 9 lbs. of shot on George Connett , in two flasks, not mixed together. Next morning I took Price at his lodging, and found the other property - I asked if it was his; he confessed that it was Mr. Manton's.The two flasks were concealed in a drawer among some dirty linen, and the escutcheons in a tea chest.

PRICE - GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months .

GEORGE CONNETT - NOT GUILTY .

JAMES CONNETT - NOT GUILTY .

797. JOHN TOMKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , a handkerchief, value 6 d.; two half-crowns; eight shillings, and a sixpence, the property of Mary Pryor , spinster , from her person .

MARY PRYOR . I am an unfortunate girl , and live in Duke-street, King-street, Westminster. On Saturday, the 26th of April, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I had come out of a house in Coventry-court, and went round by Oxendon-street - I was speaking to the watchman, when the prisoner came up, tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me if I would go and have something to drink - I went with him to the watering-house in Leicester-fields. I had two half-crowns, and seven shillings. He said if I would go to a house with him, he would give me 2 s. 6 d.; he gave me 18 d. I had it all tied up in the corner of my handkerchief, which was in my hand. I was about an hour and a half in his company. When I was in the room with him, he saw me put the 18 d. with the other money. I walked with him up to Windmill-street , and asked him for the other shilling; he put his hand in his pocket, and rattled his money, and asked what I wanted; I said

"The other shilling, and it rains hard; I wish you would give it me;" he waited till the watchman had cried the hour, and then he snatched the handkerchief out of my hand, and ran off - I called Stop thief! he was stopped by Princes-street, without my losing sight of him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not ask me to give you drink - A. No; he asked me to go and drink.

CORNELIUS LOVEGROVE . I am a watchman of Princes-street, Soho. On Saturday morning, the 26th of April, about half-past two o'clock, I heard a cry of Stop thief! from a female voice, and saw the prisoner running, and the prosecutrix pursuing him - I stopped him. Nobody else was running. She charged him with robbing her of a handkerchief, and 14 s. or 15 s.; he denied it. On the way to the watch-house, he produced a handkerchief, and asked Pryor if it was her's; she said, Yes - he said it was not, and he would make her take her oath of it, for it was his. I attempted to take it from him, but he kept it in his hand. In Titchbourne-street he threw it down, saying, if it was hers to take it - I took it up, and found two half-crowns, and 8 s. 6 d. in it - there was the letter B on the handkerchief. He did not claim it after throwing it down.

MARY PRYOR . A person named Bureau gave it me twelve months ago. The money in it is what I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a state of intoxication from the first, and went to a house of ill-fame with her, and while there she took a handkerchief from me, and refused to return it. She followed me, asking for more money - I snatched the handkerchief from her, supposing it was mine, but finding something bulky in it, I gave it her.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,

Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

798. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , a watch, value 30 s.; a seal, value 3 s.; a ring, value 1 s,, and a key, value 2 s., the goods of John Huffnell , from his person .

JOHN HUFFNELL . I am in the second battallion of guards - I was quartered in Clare-market. On the 30th of April, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the Butcher's Arms, public-house, and went with her to a house in Bennett's-court, Drury-lane - directly we got into the room she made a sudden snatch at my watch, got it from my fob, and ran away. I endeavoured to find her, but could see nobody in the house; I found her between six and seven o'clock, at the Marquis of Granby, public-house, in Chandos-street - she came out, and went into a cook-shop; I got a constable to take her. In trying to open her hand, I saw a piece of paper like a duplicate, and some coin - she immediately put them into her mouth, and swallowed them. When she rose to come away, a small gold ring fell from her lap, which had been attached to my watch at the time I lost it.

Prisoner. Q. Were you in liquor - A. No. I had not drank with any woman. She was rather in liquor.

SAMUEL LACK . I am a constable. On the evening of the 30th of April, I apprehended the prisoner at a cook-shop in Chandos-street; she would not come out of the box. A man who was with her escaped. I saw her put some paper into her mouth, and tried to get it out; but was obliged to let go, or she would have been choked. Something fell from her; she kept rubbing her feet on the floor, and found the ring under her feet. She spit a piece of paper out of her mouth, and said,

"There, now you may do as you like."

(Ring produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

799. EDWARD HOGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , a handkerchief, value 7 s., the goods of Henry Eaton , from his person .

HENRY EATON . On the evening of the 21st of April, I was in Little Rupert-street , with my wife. I felt something at my coat pocket, and missed my handkerchief. I turned round and saw the prisoner; he ran away; I pursued him, he dropped the handkerchief in Lisle-street, and told me not to touch him, as he had dropped it. He was secured. The handkerchief was handed to me.

CHRISTOPHER TUTING , I was at the corner of Ryder's-court, and saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief; it was picked up and delivered to Mr. Eaton.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HAMMOND WEBB . I am a constable. I heard the alarm, and took him in charge.

GUILTY. Aged 14.

Recommended to Mercy . Whipped and Discharged.

890. RICHARD MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , a handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of Robert Claxton , from his person .

ROBERT CLAXTON . I was in High-street, Shoreditch ,on the night of the 21st of April, and felt a tug at my pocket, and turning round, I seized the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, he threw it down, and my sister who was with me picked it up. I took him to the watch-house with it.

WILLIAM COX . The prosecutor delivered the prisoner over to me.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY. Aged 17.

Recommended to Mercy, having an excellent character .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

801. CAROLINE ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , fourteen yards of lace, value 30 s. , the goods of George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross .

HENRY DENNIS . I am shopman to Messrs. George Drake Sewell and Thomas Cross, haberdashers . On the 13th of May the prisoner came into the shop, and asked to see some thread lace, which I shewed her; I turned my back to get a boy some haberdashery, and as I turned round I saw her in the act of drawing some lace under her shawl, she told me to cut her off two yards of lace, for which she paid 4 s., and went away; I went after her, tapped her on the shoulder, and told her she had given me a bad shilling; she put her hand into her pocket and gave me another, saying it was of no use to go back; I said she had better; she came back, and on entering the shop pulled the lace from her left breast, and put it among some loose prints on the counter to hide it; I took it from there. She walked up the shop; Mr. Cross met us at the door; she begged forgiveness, and at the office said it stuck to her shawl. It is worth 30 s.

THOMAS PIZZEY . I took the prisoner in charge, with the lace.

(Property produced and sworn to).

GUILTY . Aged 35.

Confined Three Months .

802. THOMAS QUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , a table-spoon, value 10 s. , the goods of John Brenton .

WILLIAM SHARP . I keep a sale shop in Tottenham Court-road. On the 24th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came and offered this spoon for sale; he said he bought it six months ago, of a fellow labourer; I said I should detain him; he ran off, leaving it with me; he afterwards said he found it in the pig trough.

ELIZA DAVIS . I know the prisoner; he was about two years in Mr. Ireland's service, and bore a good character. Mr. Brenton lodged with Mr. Ireland; he missed a spoon about two months ago; this has his crest on it. I do not know that he has lost any.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Mr. Ireland keeps pigs, does he not - A. Yes; things used in the house are emptied into the trough.

NOT GUILTY .

803. JAMES ROLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , a stove, value 3 s. , the goods of Robert Davis .

ROBERT DAVIS . I am a tin-plate worker , and live in Shoreditch . About three weeks ago I bought a stove, which I missed on the 3d of May; it was in my work-shop, exposed for sale. Long-alley is about a hundred yards from my house.

THOMAS CHESHIRE . I am a broker. The prisoner lived two hundred yards from my house; on the 3d of May he sold me this stove for 4 s. 2 d., and said he had bought it for 3 s. 9 d.; I put it out for sale, and Davis claimed it. He is a smith. I have bought stoves of him before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man dressed as a bricklayer brought it to sell for 4 s. at my mother's shop; she is a broker. I live within twenty doors of Davis.

NOT GUILTY .

804. JOSEPH STEVENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , a desk, value 30 s. , the goods of James Emery .

JAMES EMERY . I am a cabinet-maker , and live near the Charter-house. On the 29th of April, about twelve o'clock, I was in my kitchen, a saw somebody go out of my shop with a desk under his arm; I ran out, and took the prisoner with it under his arm. I gave him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN WRIGHT . I saw the prisoner come out of Emery's shop with the desk.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Two Months .

805. RICHARD WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , a coat, value 30 s.; a pair of trowsers, value 8 s., and a gown, value 1 s. , the goods of Catherine Hammond .

CATHERINE HAMMOND . On the 17th of April I missed this property from my bed-room; it was safe the day before; I saw the prisoner going out of the house, followed and stopped him, and took them from him.

THOMAS HUTCHINSON . I took him with the things; he said the coat was his own.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months .

806. JOHN YATES was indicted for stealing on the 26th of April , a pair of shoes, value 4 s. , the goods of Robert Downes .

ROBERT DOWNES I am a shoe-maker , and live in Portpool-lane , my wife missed the shoes from outside the window and alarmed me. I saw the prisoner running, I pursued, and overtook him with them under his jacket.

WILLIAM THISLETON . I took him in charge; he begged for mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them of a young man, in Gray's Inn-lane.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days .

807. REBECCA HILL , MARY HURLEY and MARY DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , a pair of boots, value 6 s., the goods of Elizabeth Overett , privately in her shop .

ELIZABETH OVERETT . I keep a shoemaker's shop in Church-street, Bethnal-green . On the 8th of May, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon. The prisoners came in, Davis asked to see some plumb colouredboots - I was attending to a lady, and said I would wait on them directly; I afterwards attended to them; they bought nothing, and went out of the shop. In about twenty minutes or half an hour, I found a vacancy in the window, but did not suspect them - nobody had been in the shop after them. Vincent the officer came in in about an hour, with a pair of boots, which I knew to have been mine; but I might have sold them; they were not a minute in the shop.

JONATHAN VINCENT . I am a constable. I was fetched to a pawnbroker's shop, about five o'clock, to take the prisoners on another charge. The boots were upon the pawnbroker's counter - I asked whose they were; Hurley said they were her's. I locked them up, and carried the boots to the prosecutrix, by their being marked E. O. The other prisoners said they knew that she had had them a fortnight.

HURLEY'S Defence. I bought them of her a fortnight ago.

ELIZABETH OVERETT . She might have bought them.

NOT GUILTY .

808. HENRY CLIFFORD and MARGARET ANN HAWKES were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a bed, value 35 s.; a set of furniture, value 30 s.; two sheets, value 5 s.; three blankets, value 7 s.; a looking glass, value 3 s.; a saucepan, value 3 s.; a pair of bellows, value 2 s., and a rng, value 2 s., the goods of William Burgess , in a lodging-room .

MARY ANN BURGESS . I am the wife of William Burgess . I let some lodgings to the prisoners, (who passed as man and wife,) on the 4th of January. They remained there until April. On the 19th of April (we had not seen them for a week before) we heard the door was ajar. I found some hair on the stairs. My husband went up, and these things were gone from the room. I found them at the pawnbroker's the same day.

JOHN TURNER . I am shopman to Messrs. Magwood, and Co., pawnbrokers, Drury-lane. I have two blankets pawned by the female prisoner, on the 3d and 9th of April, in the name of Ann Jones .

JAMES BARNES . I am shopman to Messrs. Graham and Co., pawnbrokers. On the 3d of April, a candlestick was pawned - I did not take it in. On the 8th of April, I took in a sheet of the female prisoner, in the name of Ann Clifford .

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . On the 19th of April, I apprehended Clifford; he said he knew the hair was out of the bed, and he hoped he should replace it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HAWKES - GUILTY . Aged 45.

Confined Six Weeks .

CLIFFORD - NOT GUILTY .

809. SARAH BRIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , two table cloths, value 25 s.; a frill, value 1 s., and an apron, value 9 d., the goods of Frances Green , her mistress .

FRANCES GREEN I am a widow , and live in Howard's-green, City-road . The prisoner washed and ironed for me since September last, she lived in the house. On the 29th of December, I missed a table cloth, masked B. C. On the afternoon of the 15th of April she drank tea with me, and afterwards said she was going a little way, and should not be late - she never returned. On the Thursday I missed a frill, table cloth, and apron, and found them at the pawnbroker's. I had them to wash for Mrs. Illman.

SAMUEL FRYETT . I am a pawnbroker. A table cloth was pawned at our house on the 24th of December, in the name of Briggs.

JOB V. WATKINS . I am servant to Mr. Coombes. On the 9th of April, a frill and an apron were pawned with us, in the name of Sarah Briggs. I believe the prisoner to be the person.

MARY ALABASTER . On the 15th of April, the prisoner was at my house in Banner-street - she pulled a frill out of her pocket; I asked if it was Mrs. Green's - she said it belonged to Illman's, and told me not to mention it. It was like the one produced by Watkins.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

810. LEVY ALLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , a jacket, value 3 s. , the goods of William Clark .

WILLIAM CLARK . I am groom to Colonel Dickinson. On the 13th of May, I went into my room over the stables, in Woodstock-mews . I had left my jacket in the stable; I came down in about ten minutes after, and it was gone - I found the prisoner ten yards off with it in his bosom.

JOHN STABLES . I am a constable. On the 13th of May I took the prisoner in charge.

GUILTY . Aged 26.

Confined Six Weeks .

811. ELIZABETH ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , two gowns, value 10 s. , the goods of Matilda Bennett .

MATILDA BENNETT . I live in the same house as the prisoner, in King's Head-court, Norton-falgate . I had two gowns rolled up in a bundle, on the top of a bureau - I missed them. The prisoner was taken up two months afterwards with one of them. I found the key of her door would fit mine.

GEORGE DAVY . I am an officer. I found a gown on the prisoner's back. She said she bought it a fortnight before in Petticoat-lane. I took her on the 17th.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in Petticoat-lane.

JANE SANDERSON . I live in Wood's-court, Norton-falgate. I went to Petticoat-lane with the prisoner, one afternoon - she bought a chocolate coloured gown for 2 s., with a flower on it. It was made high up in the neck. She bought it at a stand, not at a shop; it was seven or eight weeks ago to-morrow.

NOT GUILTY .

812. SARAH BLAKENEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , a hat, value 4 s. , the goods of Moss Solomon .

MOSS SOLOMON . This hat belongs to my father, whose name is Raphael.

NOT GUILTY .

812. JOHN BRANDS was indicted for stealing, onthe 10th of April , forty-one books, value 5 l. , the goods of John Joseph Dillon .

GEORGE CHECKETT . I am clerk to Mr. Blake, of Lincoln's Inn - I have the care of Mr. John Joseph Dillon 's chambers. On the evening of the 18th of April, I missed sixty or seventy of his books, which were all safe on the 25th of March. The prisoner's mother is Mr. Blake's laundress.

WILLIAM BUNTING . I am a bookseller, and live in Clare-court. On the 9th of April, the prisoner came to my shop with thirteen law books to sell - I asked him how he came by them; he said his brother was a student, and wished him to sell them, to buy new ones; I said if he would leave them, I would perhaps buy them; he did so, and came again about five o'clock in the evening; I gave him a guinea for them. Next day, about twelve o'clock, he brought thirteen more, and left them with me. I gave him 25 s. for them. I sold the first lot to Mr. Rolph. He called again next day with more, and I had him secured.

CHRISTOPHER HARRIS . I am a bookseller, and live in Bow-street. The prisoner came to my shop, and bought a catalogue, about three months ago, and in April, he brought some books, which he said his brother had to sell. I bought them; he brought two or three parcels since that, consisting principally of law books. The last time he brought me twelve volumes of Reports - he said his brother had a great many more to sell. I said I had better see his brother - he said he would go and ask at what time it would be convenient; I did not see him afterwards.

CORNELIUS BROWN . I am a bookseller, and live in Duke-street. On the 25th of March a young man brought me several books - I cannot say that it was the prisoner.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer. I took him in charge on the 11th of April. I have the books.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

813. JOHN DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , 8 lbs. of mutton, value 3 s. , the goods of Samuel Summers .

SAMUEL SUMMERS . I am a butcher , and live at St. Pancras . On Saturday night, the 26th of April, I saw the prisoner lay hold of six pieces of breast of mutton - I thought he was going to bring it in to have it weighed; but he crossed the road, and I sent my man after him; they struggled together, and I went after him. They ran down a court, which was no thoroughfare, and we found him on the stairs of a house - he had not got it then. I picked up a piece of it in Phillip's-buildings, where he had been struggling with my man.

JAMES DRUCE . I am in the service of Mr. Summers - he sent me after the prisoner; I caught him with the mutton; he knocked me down, and got off. I tore his coat - I caught him again, and got part of it from him. He ran up a court, and was taken.

WILLIAM CLEWLOW . I heard the alarm, and found the prisoner struggling in the court. He said at the watch-house that he bought the meat in Tottenham Court-road.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it in Tottenham Court-road. This young man wanted to get it from me - I would not let him; some of them struck me, and I ran up a door-way.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Confined Fourteen Days .

814. THOMAS DOWNING was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , a rug, value 20 s. , the goods of George Richmond Wales .

GEORGE RICHMOND WALES . I am a broker , and live in Mortimer-street, Marylebone . On the 3d of May, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take a hearth rug from my door. I pursued him he threw it down, and I secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN SLATER . The prisoner was brought to the office with the rug.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Fourteen Days .

815. SAMUEL DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , two planes, value 4 s.; a pair of pincers, value 6 d.; and a mallet, value 6 d., the goods of William Deason , and a plane, value 1 s. , the goods of William Walker .

WILLIAM DEASON . I am a carpenter ; I was working at Shadwell from Christmas till April. On the 11th of April, the prisoner applied for a job; he was working on the same premises. On Saturday the 12th of April, I left my basket of tools under the floor; he had frequently seen me put them there. On the Monday, I found them all gone. I saw him next day and told him I had lost them; he said he pitied me. On the 28th of April, I went with an officer and found him at work, at a public-house, and a pair of pincers and two planes in his basket; he was using the mallet - he then said he took them through distress, as he had no tools to work with.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not offer to lend me tools if I could get a job - A. I said if I could spare any - he did not ask for these.

WILLIAM WALKER . I missed a plane on the 14th of April. I had been at the building, where I saw it on the 12th. I put it into the prisoner's basket. Deason's tools were put into the same basket, and was put under the floor in the evening. They were found in the prisoner's basket on the 28th. I never gave him leave to take my plane. I have often offered to lend him tools. It is common to lend each other tools.

JAMES WHITE . I am an officer. I was fetched and took him in charge. I found the tools in his basket; he said distress drove him to it. and he took them.

Prisoner's Defence. I told them on Saturday, that I should go to look for a job on Monday, which I did and got one at three o'clock, and went for my tools - none of them were present. I could not find them at the public-house which they use, so I took my basket not knowing that the tools were in it - they knew where to find me; for I told them the street, and said it was at a butcher's.

WILLIAM DEASON . I knew what street he lived in, but not the house - he did not say it was at a butcher's. He left a mallet behind on the premises.

NOT GUILTY .

816. JOHN FELMINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , a watch value 5 s. , the goods of William Birch .

WILLIAM BIRCH . I live in Spencer-street , the prisoner's mother was in my service - she left on the 9th of April, and I missed a watch out of a tea caddie, which I had not seen for some time.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. You have indicted the mother for robbing you - A. Yes; he visited her every Sunday, and there is no doubt but she had the opportunity of giving it to him, and I believe she did.

WILLIAM READ . I found the watch on the prisoner; he said his mother gave it him.

NOT GUILTY .

817. ANN FELMINGHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , a table spoon, value 10 s.; two tea spoons, value 8 s.; one blanket, value 3 s.; a carpet, value 10 s.; a curtain, value 2 s.; and an apron, value 6 d.; and a table cloth, value 3 s. , the goods of William Birch .

MARY ANN BIRCH . I am the wife of William Birch , the prisoner's mother was our servant. I went to her lodging and saw the prisoner; she had been to our house a fortnight before - the mother desired her to give me what she had, and she produced duplicates of this property.

NOT GUILTY .

818. MARIA FELMINGHAM was indicted for stealing on the 16th of April , six knives, value 3 s.; six forks, value 2 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 6 s.; a curtain, value 2 s.; two shirts, value 9 s., and a shift, value 3 s., the goods of William Birch , her master .

WILLIAM BIRCH . The prisoner lived in my service, and left on the 9th of April before the family were up; we missed the goods stated in the indictment with many more. I saw her afterwards in custody.

MRS. BIRCH. On the 9th of April I want to her lodging in Clerkenwell-close, and the daughter gave me up eleven duplicates, by the prisoner's desire. The officer afterwards found more duplicates of this property - some of what the daughter gave me related to the shirts, handkerchiefs, and shifts. She said she would return the things she had taken.

JOSEPH CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker and live in St. John-street. I have a shirt a shift, and handkerchief pawned by the prisoner, on the 29th of March. I have every reason to believe she is the woman, but I will not positively swear it.

MRS. BIRCH. Chapman's duplicates was among what the daughter gave me by her mother's desire.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Confined Six Months .

819. THOMAS JONES and GEORGE FREEMAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , a trunk, value 2 s.; a gown, value 20 s.; five spoons, value 15 s.; and two caps, value 3 s. , the goods of Amy Hancock .

ANY HANCOCK. I am a widow , and live at Stratford-grove, Essex. On the 8th of May, I sent a trunk containing this property by Newman's van, from Brompton, to go to Stratford-grove, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning.

GEORGE ELLIS . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the morning of the 8th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoners following a van, which was loaded with furniture; I followed them for twenty minutes. Jones took the trunk out of the tail of the van, and came on the footpath to Freeman, and delivered it to him; he received it from him and was walking away. I seized Jones, and told a person to stop Freeman, which he did, and I took the trunk from him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FREEMAN'S Defence. I was looking for work, and met Jones's who asked if I wanted a job, and gave me 1 s. to carry this trunk.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 17.

FREEMAN - GUILTY . Aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

SIXTH DAY. TUESDAY, MAY 20.

Middlesex Cases, Second Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

820. WILLIAM HENRY BURTON was indicted for stealing on the 18th of April , a box, value 4 s.; two gowns. value 5 s.; a pair of earings, value 6 s.; two pair of stockings, value 6 d.; a ring, value 1 d.; and six napkins, value 3 s. , the goods of Jane Cooper .

The prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Month .

821. ROBERT FIELD and CHARLES WOODHOUSE were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , 12 lbs. of hay, value 10 s. , the goods of John Kirkby .

MR. JESSOP conducted the prosecution.

JOHN KIRKBY . I am a farmer of Enfield. Field was in my service, and drove my waggon to town with straw. I allowed a truss and a half of hay for the horses to eat on the road. On the 1st of May, in the evening, he put a truss of green hay on the waggon for them.

ISAAC PYE . I am a Sheriff's officer. On the 2d of May, I saw Field in Mr. Kirkby's waggon, on the Enfield-road , untying hay, or rolling it off the waggon. I saw Woodhouse taking it off the waggon - Field gave it him, and he put it on a waggon which he was driving. The prisoners afterwards surrendered before the Magistrate, and said Field had borrowed hay of Woodhouse, and was repaying him with this.

NOT GUILTY .

822. SAMUEL COLE and LYON COHEN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , 48 lbs. of bacon, value 20 s. , the goods of John Ballingall Whyte .

JOHN BALLINGALL WHYTE . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Upper East Smithfield . On the 20th of April, at nine o'clock at night, I missed this bacon from the window, went out toward Butler's buildings, and in Brown Bear-alley, I saw Cole with it; another man was with him. I called Stop thief! he threw it down, and ran into the officer's hands - the salt and meal off the bacon was on his jacket. I knew him before, and am certain of him.

MARY WATKINSON . I live in Brown Bear-alley. Isaw the prisoners pass with the bacon. Cohen helped it on Cole's back. I am certain of them both - there was a third man with them.

ELIZA PARKER . I live at Aldgate. I was by this shop, and saw a man behind me stand by Whyte's door; he reached up his arm, took the bacon, and ran towards Butler's-buildings. I cannot say who it was.

WILLIAM DICKENSON . I am a patrol. I heard the cry, and Cole ran into my arms. He had the salt on his jacket.

COLE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

COHEN - GUILTY . Aged 32.

Confined Two Months .

823. THOMAS RICHARDSON and JAMES GROVE were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May , 300 lbs. of lead, value 3 l., the goods of the Reverend Arthur Robinson Chauvel , clerk, and fixed to a certain building .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Sir Thomas Plumer , Knt. , and John Rodbard .

THIRD COUNT, stating it to belong to the parishioners of Little Stanmore .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

JOHN HOLME . I am clerk of Stanmore . I saw all the lead safe on the roof of the church a few days before the 9th of May.

HENRY BARTON . I live at Edgeware. On the 8th of May, about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, I met Grove in a bye lane, about three quarters of a mile from the church, going towards it, and next morning I heard the church was robbed.

CHARLES FRENCH . On the 9th of May, about nine o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner in a cart, in Honeypot-lane, about a mile and a half from Stanmore church - it is a common thoroughfare, but a shocking road to travel on. I looked into the cart and saw that they had nothing, and was determined to watch them - they saw me and went up the lane as hard as they could, and I after them; the sound of the cart ceased. I came up and saw them start from a dung hill in three minutes. I saw a very heavy impression on the dung hill, as if they had taken something from it, and followed them into Edgeware, and gave information. I pursued them towards town, and stopped them on Silk-hill, and found the lead in the cart. There were marks of the wheels having backed to the dung-hill. I saw the lead compared with the roof of the church; it matched exactly.

ANDREW CARNEY . I am a horse patrol. I and French secured the prisoners on the 9th of May, at ten o'clock in the morning. Richardson said he found the lead on the dung heap.

JOHN BODEMEAD . I am a plumber, and repaired the roof of the church. I saw the lead compared, and have no doubt of it belonging to the roof.

WILLIAM TUTON . I know that Sir Thomas Plumer and John Rodbard, are churchwardens of the parish, and the Rev. A. R. Chauvel, rector.

RICHARDSON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

GROVE - GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Before Mr. Recorder.

824. BENJAMIN JAMES POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , a watch, value 29 s., and a chain, value 18 d. , the goods of Lawrence Notley .

LAWRENCE NOTLEY . I am a salesman , and live in Broad-street, St. Giles's . The prisoner was my shopman . This watch was safe on the 16th of February, when I look stock; on the 30th I found the prisoner's pocket-book in the privy, and in it a duplicate of the watch, and the shop ticket belonging to it; I called him, and asked whose pocket-book it was; he said it was his; I said,

"Do you know these things;" he said, Yes, it was the ticket of my watch, which he had pawned, but meant to redeem it again. He was two years with me; I had a good opinion of him.

GEORGE FROST . I am shopman to Mr. Hawkins, of Drury-lane. On the 22d of February this watch was pawned in the name of Powell.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Months .

825. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on th 8th of May , a watch, value 5 l.; a chain, value 2 l.; a seal, value 2 l., and a key, value 5 s., the goods of James John Dunch , from his person .

JAMES JOHN DUNCH . I am a surveyor , and live in the Commercial road. On the 8th of May, about eight o'clock. I was in the pit of Drury-lane Theatre ; the prisoner stood near me; he endeavoured to pass me behind, and in doing so put his right arm round me, and after two or three efforts succeeded in getting before me; the pit was crowded; he came back in a minute or two, and at the bottom of the steps turning into the passage, he was leaving the theatre; I put my hand to my fob, and missed my watch; suspecting he must have it, I immediately followed him into the passage, and called, Stop him! he ran out of the theatre, and was stopped in York-street, without my losing sight of him; the watch laid on an area bar when I came up, and he was within three feet of it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you not observe several people leave, who could not get standing room - A. Yes; he ran out of the theatre as soon as an alarm was given; he ran through the coach ranks, but I never lost sight of his logs.

GEORGE BOWES . I am employed at the Theatre, and saw the prisoner go out - a person called out, Stop him! he had not passed me then. I got from my seat, pursued, and never lost sight of him - I put out my foot; he ran against me, and fell. I saw him throw something away, which glittered. I am certain of him - a boy picked up the watch.

RICHARD MORTLOCK . I am fourteen years old. I saw the prisoner run out at the pit door - there was a cry of Stop thief! I followed. I lost sight of him when he ran round a carriage - I saw him thrown down, and saw a watch thrown from towards his hand; I think he threw it down. I picked it up, and gave it to Mr. Dunch. I live in Bedford-place, Catherine-street. I cannot say he is the man, as he is dressed differently now. I followed him to Bow-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN MASON . I took him in charge at Bow-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not get a seat, and went out, hearing the cry of Stop thief! I run, and was knocked down.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Life .

826. SARAH HARTNELL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , a sheet, value 18 d.; four petticoats, value 2 s.; four waistcoats, value 3 s., and a night cap, value 1 d. , the goods of William Broderick .

ANN BRODERICK . I am the wife of William Broderick , who keeps a coal shed in Whitecross-street . These things were tied in a bundle, just inside the door; it was missed at four o'clock - I had not seen it after two. I went to the prisoner's room in Paul-street, about seven o'clock, and found them. She and her sister were there - she said nothing.

ANN MACKEY . I live with my brother, who has a workshop opposite Broderick's. I was at the door, working - the prisoner came up in a direction from there, and asked me for the young man up stairs - I had seen her twice before. The mistress of the house said he was not within - she laid the bundle down, and went away. It was tied in a cheque handkerchief.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. This was near the prosecutor's - A. Yes. I was not there when she fetched it.

JOHN PAINTER . I keep the house where Mackey was. The prisoner came about three o'clock, and asked for Bill, who lodges there - he was not at home; she had a bundle tied in a cheque handkerchief, with a slit in it, and said she wished to leave it - I said she might. She fetched it at about a quarter to four o'clock, and said she would leave it at Bill's shop; he works in Old street.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am a constable. I went to the prisoner's room - it was locked; we waited till about seven o'clock, when she came home, unlocked the door, and I found the bundle untied - she appeared confused, and hoped I would not take her, and said her mother would make it all right, and satisfy me. As she went to the office, she said she did not do it herself, but was with the girl who did - I told her to bring her forward.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know the girl.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Week .

827. JOHN M'COWLEY , FREDERICK WYATT , and CHARLES ROONEY , were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of John Thornley , from the person of Ann Thornley , spinster .

JOHN THORNLEY . I live in Skinner-street, Somer's-town. On the 3d of May, in the afternoon, my daughter Ann, who is three years old, went out with my nephew.

JOSEPH DEARMAN . I am fourteen years old. I was with my cousin Ann - we went out between five and six o'clock, to go to Tottenham Court-road - she had a handkerchief on her neck, tied behind, and in the New-road, opposite Euston-square , the prisoner Rooney told me the child had dropped her bread and butter; I picked it up, and gave it her, and almost directly Rooney went behind, and the other prisoners came one on each side of me -

"Jack in the green" was close by, and there was a mob. I saw Rooney take the handkerchief off her neck, and run off into the middle of the road - I do not know what became of the others, for I let go of the child, and ran after him. The officer took him directly, and found the handkerchief inside his jacket. The others were taken in five minutes - they must have seen him take it.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Did you see him take it - A. No. I saw the officer take it out of his bosom.

COURT. Q. You said you saw him take it - A. I saw him running away with it in his hand. I did not see him put it into his bosom.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable. I was in company with Thompson and Goodhall - we followed M'Cowley and Wyatt for nearly an hour; the prisoners were all three together in the New-road. I saw the child with Dearman, and saw M'Cowley and Wyatt standing behind them - I could not see Rooney at that moment. The handkerchief was taken in a moment; I could not see by which of them, but saw it come from the child's neck all at once, and saw it in possession of Rooney, took him five or six yards from the child, and found the handkerchief in his bosom. Thompson and Goodhall secured the other two.

Cross-examined. Q. Rooney was not with them at first - A. No. I am sure the handkerchief was never thrown down. I saw him put it in his bosom.

JAMES GOODHALL . I was with Colton, and saw him take Rooney - we had followed the other two for an hour. I had seen Rooney dancing about with other boys, but not with them. I took Wyatt about thirty yards from the spot - Colton pointed to him.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I was with the witnesses, and watched M'Cowley and Wyatt for an hour. I did not see this transaction. Colton called out, and I took M'Cowley about five yards from the spot. Somebody threw a stone at Colton, and made his mouth bleed, while he held Rooney. We had a great difficulty to secure them.

M'COWLEY'S Defence. I had been following the sweeps for two hours, saw a row, and ran up, when they took me.

ROONEY'S Defence. These two and two others took the handkerchief off the child's neck, and threw it into the road - I thought it no harm to pick it up, and was bringing it to the boy, when I was taken.

WYATT'S Defence. I was talking to my brother, when they laid hold of me; it was ten minutes after the others were taken.

M'COWLEY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Life .

WYATT - GUILTY . Aged 15.

ROONEY - GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

828. GEORGE PURKISS was indicted for stealing. on the 28th of April , a handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Thomas Redfern , from the person of Alfred Redfern .

SARAH DAVIS . I am twelve years old, and live in Compton-street, Clerkenwell, and am servant to Thomas Redfern . Three weeks ago, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Northampton-square with his son Alfred,who is eleven months old, and saw the prisoner with three taller boys. I went round the square three times, and they all followed me, and as I came up Great Northampton-street, they asked me for a person named Clark, a gold and silversmith - I pointed out the house to them; the three stood before me, and said,

"Where? where?" and the prisoner stood behind. The three set off, and prisoner ran off with the handkerchief off the child's neck - I saw it in his hand, and ran after him as fast as I could. He ran up a yard which was not a thoroughfare - a gentleman caught him, and the handkerchief was produced; he was taken in about ten minutes; he had got out of my sight. I am sure of him, for I had seen him for three quarters of an hour.

THOMAS REDFEARN . I am a flax dresser . Davis took my child out. I know the handkerchief.

JOHN ROGERS . I am a cabinet maker, and live in Northampton-square. I saw Davis crying - she said a boy in a brown coat had taken the child's handkerchief; she was looking towards Percival-street. I saw a boy running - she said he was one, but not the one who took it. I pursued, and saw the prisoner running, in a brown coat, and caught him down a court, which was no thoroughfare; he had got into a cart. I saw him throw the handkerchief out of the cart before I pulled him out. Davis saw him in about ten minutes, and said directly that he was the boy.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Were there not two boys in the cart - A. No.

THOMAS GARVA . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house with the handkerchief.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a boy running, he dropped it, and I picked it up, and went down there for a necessary occasion.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

829. ANDREW HOLLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , twelve shirts, value 30 s.; two pair of boots, value 11 s.; two pair of shoes, value 12 s.; twenty yards of ribbon, value 2 s.; twenty yards of ferret, value 2 s.; two waistcoats, value 10 s.; three night caps, value 1 s. 6 d.; seventeen pair of stockings, value 1 l.; a pair of gloves, value 9 d.; ninety-six buttons, value 5 s.; a yard of muslin, value 1 s., and thirty pieces of cloth, value 1 l., the goods of Adam Payne , to whom he was servant .

ADAM PAYNE . I am a woollen draper and tailor , and live at Hammersmith. The prisoner was my under cutter , and lived about a year and a half with me. On the 16th of April I had him taken, and charged him with robbing me - he said,

"I am guilty, and deserve punishment." I went to his lodging, and found the articles stated in the indictment.

EDWARD EDGSON . I am a constable. I found the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Confined One Year .

830. HANNAH INGRAM was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , a rug, value 12 s., the goods of John Dimmock , privately in his shop .

MR. PRENDERGAST conducted the prosecution.

JOHN DIMMOCK . I am a linendraper , and live in Holborn . On the 12th of May, in the afternoon, the prisoner came to the shop, and soon after I was told a rug was stolen; she came in again soon after - I went and found my rug at the Three Compasses, public-house, Drury-lane. I got a constable, and took her at my shop - she fell on her knees, and begged forgiveness, saying she only took it in fun. I have known her for years; she was rather intoxicated, but knew what she was about.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Her family are respectable I believe - A. Yes. One of my men knew where she lived.

CATHERINE DOWLAND . I live at the Three Compasses. The prisoner came in, and asked if she might leave the rug in our bar - I said we never took in anything; she went out leaving it on the counter, put down 2 d., and said

"I will have a glass when I come back." The prosecutor came in soon after. She was so much in liquor that I think she did not know what she was about.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I took her in charge - she said it was taken in a joke.

NOT GUILTY .

831. ENOCH KING was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , a coat, value 20 s. , the goods of Joseph Burch .

JOSEPH BURCH . On the 12th of May I was at the Man in the Moor, public-house, in Noble-street . I had been in the skittle-ground, and put it on a crate - the prisoner was there. I missed it as soon as he was gone.

THOMAS VANN . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office, and denied the charge - I found the coat at Benjamin's, in Playhouse-yard.

HENRY M'FARLAND . I was in the skittle-ground, and saw the prisoner take the coat off the crate, and set on it for sometime. Burch asked for it - he said,

"I have got it, and will take care of it" - he crossed the ground with it in a few minutes, and I missed him soon after.

RALPH BENJAMIN . The prisoner sold me the coat for 12 s., about nine o'clock at night.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Six Months .

832. ANN KENT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a brass weight, value 7 s. , the goods of Samuel Lucas and Alfred Lucas .

ROBERT CAFFALL . I am shopman to Samuel Hural Lucas.

NOT GUILTY .

833. SARAH MARTIN was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , two pair of stockings, value 3 s. , the goods of James Wilson .

THOMAS VENABLES . I am shopman to James Wilson , linendraper . On Friday, night, the 2d of May, these stockings hung near the window - a pane of glass had been broken, and not stopped up. I missed them at ten o'clock, and found them next morning. We lost a quantity of things.

ROBERT LONDON . I am a watchman of Saffron-hill Some boys were brought to the watch-house, who had dropped a pair of stockings - in consequence of what theysaid, I went to the prisoner's room, in Lockwood-court, Saffron-hill, and found a quantity of shawls, and in a rabbit hutch I found eight pair of stockings, two of which Mr. Wilson can identify, and at the watch-house she produced a pair from her bosom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up as I came down stairs with him.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Six Months .

834. SARAH MORETON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a coat, value 4 s. , the goods of John Lapworth .

JOHN LAPWORTH . I am a coachman , and live in Seymour-place. On the 10th of May, I lost my coat; it was in Mr. Gregg's stable, York-mews . The prisoner lived over the stables. The key was left in the door. She is a very respectable woman.

JOHN STAPLES . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner - she handed me a box, and said all the tickets in it were duplicates of her husband's tools. I asked if she had no more; she walked to the fire. I saw something blazing, and snatched the duplicate of this coat out of the fire.

GEORGE PIGGOTT . I am servant to Mr. Neat. On the 10th of May she pawned this coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY .

Fined One Shilling and Discharged.

835. ISAAC PASSMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , a coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Susannah Dodd .

JOHN MURPHY . I work for Susannah Dodd , at Chingford; this coat hung over the seat of the cart, which stood at the end of the Seven Star-court, Rosemary-lane . I left for half an hour; I was told the coat was stolen; I ran in the way Mrs. Dodd directed me, and found the prisoner in custody with it on his back - he said he bought it in Rosemary-lane. It was safe ten minutes before.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Might it not have dropped - A. It could not.

MOSES FORTUNE . I stopped the prisoner who was running down Blue Anchor-yard with this great coat on.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am a clothes dealer and bought it.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months .

836. SOPHIA REED was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , 3 lbs. of lamb, value 18 d., and 2 lbs. of veal, value 1 s. , the goods of Samuel Somers .

SAMUEL SOMERS. I am a butcher , and live in Somers-town . The prisoner was in my shop. I believe this was a pure mistake.

NOT GUILTY .

837. GEORGE STEWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , a shawl, value 2 s.; a gown, value 2 s., and a pair of stockings, value 6 d. , the goods of Mary Mulloy , spinster .

MARY MULLOY. I am a single woman, in service at a public-house, in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square . On the 10th of April I slept in the attic; the prisoner came to lodge in the house for that night, he went to bed at ten o'clock, on the second floor, and after eleven, as I was going to my room, I heard a noise in the boy's room, which is also in the garret; I went in and found the prisoner; I asked what brought him there - he said he had made a mistake. I saw my gown drop, which I had seen that day in the drawers in my own room. I went and found my door open, and a shawl on the drawers, which I had left in my box - the drawers were pulled out. I came down, told my mistress - master came up and told him to dress and be off - he would not unless master returned what he had paid, and he was given in charge.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You found things misplaced - A. Yes; the gown was in the boy's room. I shewed the prisoner his room in the afternoon, but did not light him to bed; the boy's room is above the floor he slept on.

ANDREW ROBERTS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner; he stood in the tap room with his back to the table, and kept working with his hands behind him. I looked, and found a pair of stockings on the bench, close to his coat skirt. The girl claimed them. He had a bag half full of shavings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

838. THOMAS SPAULS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , four shirts, value 4 s. , the goods of Daniel Murphy .

ELIZABETH MOORE . I live in Bennett-street, Rathbone-place . I had four shirts to iron for Mrs. Murphy; the prisoner came and asked for his mother's shirts, and believing him to be her son, I delivered them to him.

FRANCES MURPHY . I am the wife of Daniel Murphy . I sent Moore these sheets to iron, and called for them about nine o'clock at night, and they were gone. The prisoner is no relation of mine. I never saw him before.

JOSEPH WEEKS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner near Bennett-street.

JOHN SIMONS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 10th of May, two shirts were pawned for 3 s. 6 d. I believe the prisoner to be the boy. He said he came from his father.

ELIZABETH BENTLEY . I keep a clothes shop in Monmouth-street. On Saturday week at nine o'clock at night, the prisoner sold me a shirt for 10 d.

GEORGE HALEY . I am a tailor, and live in Monmouth-street. I believe the prisoner to be the boy who sold me the shirt at half past nine o'clock at night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy told me to go round the corner, and ask for the bundle. I could not find him, and pawned them.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Confined Two Months .

839. JAMES SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a saw, value 1 s.; a knife, value 1 s.; a stock. value 1 s.; and a basket, value 1 s., the goods of Benjamin Hobbs , and three live tame fowls, price 3 s., and one live tame duck, price 1 s. , the goods of Thomas Dawe .

BENJAMIN HOBBS . I live in Kensington-gravel-pits, andman carpenter . On the 6th of May, about eight o'clock, at night, I left my inside Mr. Cheese's, I returned at six o'clock in the in Mr. Cheese's cottage - the prisoner was in custody.

JAMES D. I work for Mr. Cheese. I left five and six ducks in the hen-house adjoining the stable, at eight o'clock - next morning at six, three dead fowls and a live duck were shewn to me.

JOHN HARRIS . I live with Mr. Cheese, and was disturbed between two and three o'clock in the morning by the dogs. I sleep opposite the stable. I looked out and heard the fence break. I called Mr. Cheese up - I and Harris went towards the stable, and found the door open and some fowls stolen - the laths of the hen-house were pulled down; we found a basket thirty yards from the stable, with the carpenter's tools and poultry in it - about four o'clock we were in the adjoining meadow, about a hundred yards from the premises, and saw the prisoner and another man come over the fence of Cheese's garden, we ran after him nearly a mile and at last took him in the cock loft of his mother's house - he ran through the canal cut, and was quite wet when we took him. I am certain of him; the garden is no thoroughfare.

HENRY CHEESE . I am proprietor of the garden. Harris awoke me, we found the hen-house robbed, and pursued the prisoner. I am certain he is the man - he ran through the canal cut into the loft. We found the cover of a tinder box and a bundle of matches upon him.

ROBERT ALMOND . I am a servant to Mr. Cheese. I fastened the stable at night; I saw the prisoner come out of the garden. I kept behind and picked up the basket with the dead poultry and tools in it - the live duck was in a bag.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man in the path who asked me to pick up the basket of tools, and I did - he then said " Run, for there is my uncle, and if you don't run, he will shoot you."

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

840. JOHN THOMAS and HENRY MOIR were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , a handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of William Plane , from his person .

WILLIAM PLANE. I am clerk to Mr. Nevill, of the Strand. On the 23d of April, I went into St. James's-park ; my handkerchief was safe at one o'clock; I missed it in about ten minutes. I have not found it. I saw the prisoners there, but I know nothing against them.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There was a great crowd - A. Yes; the guns were firing, it was St. Georges-day.

THOMAS GOOK . I am a constable. I was in the park, and saw Mr. Plane go into the crowd where the guns were firing, and immediately after I saw the prisoners and two shore occasionally in their company; they spoke to each other at times, and then went away. I observed all four get behind Mr. Plane. Thomas was close behind him, and Moir on the right side, and the other two behind them. I saw Thomas put his hand into Mr. Plane's pocket, but could not see him draw any thing out, for the first gun fired which occasioned a move - he shifted to the right, and then Moir put his hand into Mr. Plane's other pocket, and drew it out without any thing, if either of them took the handkerchief it must have been Thomas. I followed them about the crowd for ten minutes or quarter of an hour, and saw them attempt several people's pockets. I saw Thomas lay hold of the pocket of a man named Harley. I then ran to Mr. Plane and asked if he had lost his handkerchief, he said,

"Yes." I went and seized the prisoners; the other two heard him say he had lost it, and ran away. I found nothing on them, but 3 s., on Thomas and a knife.

Cross-examined. Q. Why not give him back his money - A. The Magistrate ordered me to detain it. I said at Marlborough-street, that I knew them to be bad characters. I knew them to be in bad company.

Q. Perhaps you are not the person who was tried at Clerkenwell - A. Very likely. I gave evidence against Jay. I am a special constable now. I was suspended from office for not attending the House of Lords, when I was obliged to be here. I was suspended for twelve months, because constables are only returned once a year. I have seen the prisoners in company of those who I know to be thieves, because they loiter in the park every day, and must get their livelihood some how.

THOMAS'S Defence. I never saw Moir before. I am innocent.

MOIR'S Defence. I never had my hands in any body's pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Middlesex Cases, First Jury, Before Mr. Common Sergeant.

841. RICHARD SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , two chaise wings, value 7 s., and two chaise steps, value 12 s. , the goods of Henry Dolton .

HENRY DOLTON . I am a coach-maker , and live in Stracey-street - my manufactory is in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane . I missed a pair of chaise wings about the end of April, and found them at Bateman's. The prisoner worked for me towards the end of February.

HORACE BATEMAN. I live in Eagle-street, Red Lion-square. The prisoner came several times for work, which his master did for me, and on Good Friday he offered these wings for sale - I gave him 4 s. for them. He said he had taken them out as wages.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL STEVENS . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge on the 5th of May.

GUILTY. Aged 22.

Recommended to Mercy . - Confined Fourteen Days .

842. FRANCES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , 7 lbs. of mutton, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Summers .

SAMUEL SUMMERS . I am a butcher , and live at Somer's-town . On the 20th of April, the prisoner came into my shop - I saw a breast of mutton in her hand, and thought she was going to get it weighed, but turned round, and saw she was gone. I went, and took her with it in Brillrow - she said she had done it, and could not help it; but her husband would pay for it.

PETER WHITEHAIR . I took her in charge, and found 11 1/2 d. on her. She said she did not know what possessed her to do it - she bore a very good character.

NOT GUILTY .

843. FANNY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , a bag, value 2 d.; one hundred and fifty penny pieces, and three hundred halfpence, the property of William Buck , from his person .

WILLIAM BUCK . On Saturday night, the 3d of May, about a quarter to twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner in St. Giles's. I had a bag containing 26 s. in copper. I went with her to a house in Bainbridge-street , gave her 6 s., and put my money under the pillow - I was awoke by two men in the room; she was then gone, and so was the money. In about ten minutes I heard the watchman calling three o'clock, called him in, and gave one of the men in charge, then returned to the house, and found her in the front room, and went with her to a house, where she unlocked a box, and handed me out my bag of money.

Prisoner. Q. Were you not very much intoxicated, and did you not give it me to take care of - A. I was not sober, but am sure I did not give it her.

EDWARD YARRINGTON . I am a watchman. I was called to the house, and took charge of a man, returned with the beadle, and found the prisoner in bed, in the front parlour, with her clothes on - she said she had given the money to her pall, and would go and show where it was. She took us to to No. 9, Maynard-street, and gave the money, and charged the prosecutor with attempting to commit an unnatural crime. She did not say he gave her the money.

JAMES TAYLOR . I went to Maynard-street, and saw her produce the money.

The prisoner in her Defence repeated the charge stated by Yarrington.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

844. MAURICE MARK and SAMUEL LAZARUS were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , a necklace, value 7 s., the goods of Frederick Kendrick , from the person of Alfred Kendrick .

FREDERICK KENDRICK . My son Alfred is eighteen months old. On the 13th of May, between two and three o'clock, he was near the door in Charles-street, Hatton-garden , and came in in about ten minutes without his necklace. Somebody afterwards brought it in.

WILLIAM COLTON . I was at the corner of Charles-street. A number of children were round a shew - I saw the prisoners there; Marks put his arm on the shoulder of Kendrick's child - Lazarus went round behind. I saw the clasp of the necklace move round the child's neck, and all at once it was gone. I seized the prisoners and another. The necklace was picked up.

JAMES GOODHALL . I am a cordwainer. I was in Charles-street, and saw Marks go up to a little girl, and try to take her necklace, but seeing me, he moved - I saw the prisoners go up to Kendrick's child, and saw the necklace move round - Lazarus's hands were on the child's shoulder.

MARKS'S Defence. I stopped to see Punch and Judy, and two men laid hold of me.

MARKS - GUILTY . Aged 14.

LAZARUS - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Whipped and Discharged.

845. JAMES TRESLOVE and CAROLINE HALL were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , a sheet, value 3 s.; two blankets, value 8 s.; a rag, value 1 s.; a bolster, value 3 s.; a pail, value 1 s.; a tub, value 6 d., and a frying-pan, value 1 s., the goods of Thomas Boyle , in a lodging room .

THOMAS BOYLE . I live in Charles-street, St. Giles's ; the prisoner lodged in my second floor, as man and wife. On the 24th of April I went into their room, and missed every thing but the bed and bedstead; I have found none of them. The man said if I would let him alone he would pay for them.

PHILIP RILEY . I received Treslove in charge; he said he certainly knew some of the things were gone, and he believed they were pawned in Tottenham Court-road. I went to the pawnbroker's, but the prosecutor could not swear to them.

NOT GUILTY .

846. MARY COWLES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. and a tippet, value 1 s. , the goods of Ann Brown .

HARRIET BROWN . I am the daughter of Ann Brown ; we live in Beaumont-row, Mile-end . The prisoner charred for us for five weeks. I went to her lodgings and found these shoes and a tippet; when they were missed I had asked her about them; she denied ever seeing them.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. I took her in charge, and found the property in her room.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. I was distressed.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Fourteen Days .

847. WILLIAM FULSHER and SAMUEL SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , an eyeglass, value 8 s. the goods of William Bell .

WILLIAM BELL . I am a cutler , and live at Hackney . On the 16th of April the prisoners came in, and asked to see some shilling pen-knives; none would suit them, and on turning round to get more I saw Fulsher conveying something up his sleeve, and then put it into his pocket; they went out; I followed, and collared Fulsher, and told him he had stolen something; he thrust his hand into his waistcoat pocket, and threw something into the road; I sent Ward to pick it up; it was an eye-glass, which was on the counter just before they came in. They were in company.

EDWARD WARD . I picked up an eye-glass opposite Bell's shop; ran after Smith, and took him; he stood by a donkey, but was running away when I first saw him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

FULSHER'S Defence. I never touched it.

FULSHER - GUILTY . Aged 14.

SMITH - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged.

848. THOMAS JOHNSON and THOMAS JACKSON were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , thirty-eight yards of carpeting, value 50 s. , the goods of Charles Walker .

CHARLES WALKER . I am a linendraper , and live in King's-place, Commercial-road . A boy brought this carpet into the shop before I had missed it.

THOMAS KERR . I am a linendraper. Last WednesdayI saw the prisoners in the Commercial-road, loitering about backward and forward for near an hour, and then saw Johnson remove the carpet and Jackson take it away. I pursued, and he dropped it in King-street; I secured him, and am certain of them both.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 15.

JACKSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

849. DAVID LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , a bird-cage, value 5 s. , the goods of Dercy Drake .

ANN DRAKE . I am the wife of Dercy Drake; we live in Windsor-place, City-road . On the 22d of April, about ten o'clock in the morning, I missed my parrot and cage, which were safe at nine.

JOHN VANN . I am an officer. In consequence of information I went to Hartshorn-court, and found the prisoner there. My father asked him where the parrot was; he said he knew nothing of it; then took me to his mother's house in the same court, and brought the parrot and cage out of a coal-hole; it was locked up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to hold it for a few minutes; I waited a long time; he did not come for it, and I took it home.

JOHN VANN . He said nothing about this till afterwards.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged.

850. JAMES MILBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , a round frock, value 3 s. , the goods of John Lavender .

JOHN LAVENDER . I am a tailor , and live in East Smithfield ; I hung this frock at my door in the morning; Hugman brought in the evening; I had not missed it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BENJAMIN HUGMAN . I live opposite Lavender; at half past seven o'clock in the evening I watched the prisoner with another for twenty minutes; then saw the other untie the frock from that door, and give it to the prisoner; I went over and collared him, and took it from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know that it was stolen.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and Discharged.

851. JOHN COLLINS and CHARLES WHITMARSH were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , five brass weights, value 18 d. the goods of Isaac Butler .

ISAAC BUTLER . I am a smith , and live in Philip-street, St. George's East . On the 7th of May, between five and six o'clock, I went home, and missed these weights; they were safe on my stall before the door at four o'clock; Sarah Purdy pointed out the prisoners; I pursued and took Whitmarsh; four others were in his company; one of them ran away, and another joined them; I took Collins; he threw the weights down, and a boy picked them up in my presence.

SARAH PURDY . I live opposite Butler. I was working at the window between five and six o'clock, and saw three lads come round the corner, one went into the shop and the prisoners stood at the stall, and they took up several things and looked at them. I saw Whitmarsh take something up and give it to Collins, who put it into his pocket. Whitmarsh took something else, and they went away laughing - the one who went into the shop ran out. I went and told Butler.

COLLINS - GUILTY Aged 15.

WHITMARSH - GUILTY Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

852. RICHARD FITCH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , two axle-trees, value 30 s.; four bolts, value 4 s.; six nuts, value 3 s., and two plates, value 6 d. the goods of John Charles .

JOHN CHARLES . I am a carman , and live in Wilstead-street, Somers-town. On the 17th of April, I missed these things, which belong to my cart. Sharp gave me information. I went to the prisoner's house in Fitzroy-market, and accused him with it - he hesitated at first, and then said he did take them, and employed Sharp to sell them to Todd, of Tottenham Court-road. I went and found them there. Sharp is not here.

ROBERT FORKINGTON . I live in Palace-row, New-road. I bought two axle-trees of Sharp, on the 18th of April.

CHARLES COUSINS . I received him in charge, he acknowledged taking the axletrees and said he was in distress.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Six Weeks .

853. THOMAS HOPE was indicted for stealing, on 23d of April , a shawl, value 4 s. , the goods of John Stanley .

The prosecutor did not appear .

NOT GUILTY.

854. JOHN LINEY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 8th of May , five bars of iron, value 15 s., the goods of Charles Farmer ; stolen by John Redman , knowing them to be stolen .

CHARLES FARMER . I am an ironmonger . Having been robbed, I told my nephew to watch Redman, who was my servant.

JOHN WOOD . My uncle told me to watch Redman the carman, to see if he put more iron into his cart, then he was ordered. On the 5th of May, he had to deliver fifty bars at Hampstead; they laid on the ground for him. I saw him take five more from a stack, which stood up. I followed him to Tottenham Court-road, and told Weller to watch he came to me soon after, we went to the prisoner's premises in Mortimer-market, where I found the five bars. The prisoner was not there himself.

NOT GUILTY .

NOTE. In the case of FREDERICK JOHN WILLIAM NORTON , tried at the last Session, (Vide Page 207.) The Twelve Judges have decided that the dwelling-house and property were rightly described in the indictment, of belonging to Mary Johnson . The prisoner has accordingly received sentence of DEATH.