Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 18 December 2014), December 1821 (18211205).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 5th December 1821.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, AND Gaol Delivery for the City of London, AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery For the County of Middlesex, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey; ON WEDNESDAY, 5th of DECEMBER, 1821, and following Days;

Being the First Session in the Mayoralty of THE RIGHT HON. CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

Taken in Short-Hand by H. BUCKLER, (BY AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.)

London:

PRINTED FOR H. BUCKLER, By T. Booth, 31, St. Andrew's Hill, Doctors' Commons; and PUBLISHED BY T. KEYS, CITY LIBRARY, COLEMAN STREET .

1821.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the Peace, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX.

Before the Right Honourable CHRISTOPHER MAGNAY , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Right Honourable Sir John Bayley , Knt., one of the Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Garrow , Knt., one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Perring , Bart.; Thomas Smith , Esq.; Samuel Birch , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , Bart., D.C.L., Recorder of the said City; Anthony Brown , Esq.; Matthias Prime Lucas , Esq., and William Thompson , Esq., Aldermen of the said City; Newman Knowlys , Esq., Common Sergeant of the said City, and William St. Julien Arabin , Esq., his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Robert Corser ,

George Nightingale ,

Thomas Griffin ,

Charles Camfor ,

Lancelot Fearon ,

Robert Noble ,

William North ,

Thomas Gorton ,

Edward Caeser ,

Charles Brown ,

Robert Booty ,

Benjamin Willats .

1st Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Poole ,

Charles Gale ,

William Harwood ,

Thomas Mason ,

James Wood ,

John Smith ,

William Stocker ,

John Helyer ,

John Morrell ,

David Durrant ,

Thomas Hannan ,

Jonathan Godbold .

2nd Middlesex Jury.

Stephen Francis Rimbault ,

Robert Moore ,

Thomas Welch ,

Joseph Poole ,

David Jones ,

Joseph Tyler ,

William Rouch ,

William Stevens ,

James Tapps ,

Sampson Stevenson ,

William Ayton ,

John Chapman .

SESSIONS HOUSE, OLD BAILEY, DECEMBER 5, 1821.

MAGNAY, MAYOR: FIRST SESSION.

1. HENRY THOMPSON was indicted for that he on the 18th of May , at St. James, Westminster , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain order for payment of money, as follows, "Messrs. Jones, Lloyd, and Co., Lothbury, London, 18th of May, 1821. Pay to Mr. C. Thompson, or bearer 17 l. 6 s., (Signed Henry C. Thompson ;") with intent to defraud Francis Pontet , the elder .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering, and publishing as true, a like forged order, knowing it to be forged, with a like intent.

TWO OTHER COUNTS, the same, only with intent to defraud William Jones , Lewis Loyd , Samuel Jones Loyd , Edward Loyd , and John Tabor .

FRANCIS PONTET , JUN. I am the son of Francis Pontit , a snuff dealer , who lives at No. 124, Pall Mall . On the 18th of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came and gave an order, as a country tradesman, in the name of Charles Thompson , for 9 lbs. of snuff, to be sent to Blackwater, by the Exeter coach - it came to 6 l. 18 s., he gave me a cheque on Messrs. Jones Loyd and Co. I at first objected to take it, but shewed it to my father, and then gave him 10 l. 8 s. in change - I said nothing to him about the cheque, that I recollect; he left, I did not see him again till the 13th of October, and then charged him with having been with me in May - he said I must be mistaken, but I am certain of him. I paid the cheque to Messrs. Drummond's, our bankers, (looks at it) this is it; it has "Messrs. Drummond's" written across it, in my father's writing. I am sure it is the cheque I received of the prisoner.

JAMES TUESLEY . I am clerk to Messrs. W. Jones, L. Loyd, S. J. Loyd, Edward Loyd , and J. Tabor, Lothbury, and was so in May last. We have no customer named Henry C. Lloyd , (looks at the cheque) this is not signed by any of our customers. I do not know who H. C. Lloyd is.

WILLIAM HARDING THOMAS . I am a butcher, and live at Charing-cross. On the 13th of October, the prisoner came to my shop, and ordered some meat, which came to 3 l. 7 s. 8 d., to be sent to H. C. Lloyd, Esq., No. 26, Devonshire-place - I took the direction down, he offered me this cheque for 16 l., drawn by Henry Charles Lloyd , on Messrs. Jones Loyd and Co., Lothbury. Not knowing the prisoner, I took it to Messrs. Drummond's - he waited in the shop till I returned, I then had him taken into custody. I have not enquired at Devonshire-place. Mr. Pontet came to my shop, the prisoner said he was not the person who had been to his shop.

WILLIAM HOOK . I am a hay salesman, at St. James's market. On the 5th of May, the prisoner came to me, and paid me for a load of hay, which he had bought of a man who I employ - I believe him to be the person, I have no doubt of it. It came to 4 l. 2 s., he gave me a cheque for 9 l. 10 s., which I produce - I gave him change, and took it to Messrs. Jones and Loyds, it is drawn on them by H. C. Lloyd; they did not know the person, and it was not paid. On the 13th of October, I saw the prisoner again at Bow-street - I have no doubt of his person. The man who sold him the hay is not here.

JAMES TUESLEY re-examined. The cheques uttered to Hook, and Thomas, are neither of them the hand writing of any person who keeps cash at our house - I think all three are signed by the same hand, they appear to come from the same plate. We have no customer at No. 26, Devonshire-place. (Cheque read).

Prisoner. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 32.

Recommended to Mercy, by Mr. Pontet, believing, that though he knew he was uttering a cheque, not genuine, he did not know he was committing a forgery.

First Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Justice Bayley.

2. AARON ISAACS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one seal, value 3 l., and one key, value 1 s., the goods of Rowland Turner , from his person .

ROWLAND TURNER . I live in Upper Charlton-street, Fitzroy-square, and am a tailor . On the 29th of October, about nine o'clock at night, I was going up Holborn , passing French Horn-yard, between Red Lion, and Dean-street, the prisoner made a snatch at my watch and seals, he got off with the seals, and ran up the yard; I pursued, crying Stop thief! and the watchman secured him, without my losing sight of him - he gave me my property at the watch-house.

Cross-examined by MR. WALFORD. Q. Have you seen the prisoner's father - A. He called on me, it was not by my desire. It was a dark night.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAMES BOSTON . I am a watchman. I was in Eagle-street, coming out of the watch-house, heard the cry ofStop thief! and caught the prisoner, who was running, and Turner following close behind - he delivered the seal and key to Turner, who gave them to Hatton.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Several people were running - A. Yes; but he was the first.

WILLIAM HATTON . I am a watchman. The property was given into my hands by the prisoner, who said he picked it up in the street.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been on an errand, and was returning about nine o'clock, and heard the cry - I joined the mob, and picked up the seal and key, in the gateway.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

3. THOMAS FOY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 8th of December , one block of tin, value 15 l., the goods of Richard Wilson ; of which George Fletcher was, at the Sessions for the county of Surry, convicted of stealing; he well knowing it to be stolen .

MR. JESSOP conducted the prosecution.

RICHARD BUCKLAND . I produce the office copy of the conviction of George Fletcher , which I examined with the original document, at the office of Mr. Knapp, the clerk of assize. (read).

JOHN BUNDOCK . On the 8th of December 1818, I was clerk to Mr. Wilson wharfinger , at the bottom of Tooley-street, St. Olave's . George Fletcher was occasionally in his employ - I went to the wharf at seven o'clock in the morning, rang the bell, and the watchman let me in; and on entering the wicket, I saw Fletcher with his truck, it had a candle box, a soap chest, and two or three empty casks in it - he was allowed to convey these things from the wharf. There was a great many tin blocks on the wharf, which weighed about 3 1/2 cwt. each, and were worth 15 l. or 16 l.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You saw two other men with Fletcher - A. Yes, Griffiths and M'Cormack, they were taken up with him.

ROBERT KEY . I am a bedstead-maker. On the 8th of December, 1818, I lived in Hollywell-lane, the prisoner lived next door to me - I had seen George Fletcher come there with his truck several times; I saw him on this morning with his truck at the door - Foy came out and seized the handle of the truck, and turned it round; there was a small cask, and as I thought empty boxes, but when it was lifted up, one of the boxes fell out with something very heavy, it was metal - Foy let go the handle, and came and covered it over with one of the empty boxes with the things that fell out; I took it to be lead, it was about two feet long and ten or twelve inches wide - Fletcher and Foy took the box together, they turned it over and over till they got it in doors, and I saw no more. About half an hour after, Garton the officer brought out the same thing as I saw go in - It was a block of tin, which I saw drop from the box; I did not see Foy for two years after, he absconded - I did not know he was going to leave.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You are a tenant of Foy's brother-in-law - A. Yes. There was a dispute about my paying an advanced rent, I have had no quarrel with Foy - I think he has been home twelve months, I have seen him pass my door every day, I did not give information of his being there, as I supposed he had made the matter up.

COURT. Q. Did you know any reason for his absconding but this business - A. No my Lord.

THOMAS GARTON . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 8th of December, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went to the prisoner's house in consequence of information, he stood at the door - I said, "Foy you have had some metal or lead in this morning;" he said, "No, I have not." All in a moment, I saw a man across the way looking at me, he made off directly, and ran down Shoreditch as hard as he could, and I pursued, I said "I want you my friend," and immediately took him back to Foy's shop. (It was George Fletcher ) I there saw Foy, and said "Foy I want you too" - he then went back, and went up a ladder, he had no sooner got up, than his wife came down the ladder to me; I saw Kean at the door, and sent him for Armstrong, Foy escaped - I never saw him again till last Friday; I had a candle and searched the house, and at the bottom of the ladder, I found a block of tin - the ladder led up to the room over the shop, Fletcher appeared a porter. I found the truck, with the empty boxes, against a pump in Shoreditch, about one hundred and fifty yards off.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. The prisoner and another man could not lift that tin - A. I can lift one end of it. I overtook Fletcher, about one hundred yards from the shop - I had left Foy at the door, and found him in the shop, he saw me pursue Fletcher.

COURT. Q. Was the tin concealed - A. It was in a dark place at the bottom of the ladder, which led from the shop into a chamber - we could not see it without a light, I did not see it till I brought Fletcher back.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I was present when the tin was found. I never saw Foy.

JOHN BUNDOCK . The block of tin belongs to Mr. R. Wilson, I cannot say when I saw it safe - I am certain it was on the premises; I saw it most every day among the tin - I did not miss it, I know it by the quality, mark, and number, which is put on at the smelting-house, in the country, it is B. 65, each piece has a distinct mark, and all that manufacturer's tin comes to our wharf.

RICHARD WILSON . I am the proprietor of Smith's wharf. The tin was consigned to our house, from a smelting-house which has stopped seven or eight years before the robbery - I know it to be the block that was on our wharf. After the robbery, I compared the numbers with the blocks, and missed this and two others, it is worth 15 l. or 16 l.

Cross-examined. Q. Was any of it sold - A. Yes, seven or eight years before. The blocks are all marked different. I took stock two years and a half before the robbery, it was safe then - I cannot say when it was stolen; Fletcher had formerly been employed by me, but being weak, I allowed him to stand on the wharf with his truck, to convey empty boxes and light things for people. I was present when he was convicted of stealing the tin.

ROBERT KEY . I believe this to be the block, I saw carried in.

Prisoner's Defence. The man came to my shop about nine o'clock in the morning, and said, "Here are some goods for you Foy," I said "Very well" - I generally workedout, and left the shop to my wife's care; he asked me to give him a lift - I took hold of the truck, he told me to help him with it; I said my wife was not in the way, and she knew more of the business than I did. Garton came in, and said I had bought some stolen lead - I said to my knowledge, I had nothing of the kind; I never saw the man before, I did not leave the shop for some time - I had occasion to go out, and never heard that any charge was against me.

ROBERT KEY re-examined. I had seen Fletcher at Foy's many times before - they were together. I did not give the information to cause him to be apprehended.

THOMAS GARTON re-examined. I apprehended him by accident - I heard he had been at home some time, but could never meet with him; he lived a mile and a half from his former house. Kean gave me no information - I waited opposite his house on Friday morning, an hour and a half, but did not see him; in the afternoon I saw him at his door, and took him.

GUILTY . Aged 31.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

4. THOMAS DEAKIN was indicted for burglariously breaking, and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Ray , Esq. , at Edmonton , about four o'clock in the night of the 30st of October , and stealing therein, three pair of sheets, value 10 s.; one table-cloth, value 5 s.; ten towels, value 10 s.; three flannel petticoats, value 3 s.; one frock, value 1 s.; five cotton stockings, value 1 s.; four pair of stockings, value 8 s.; one pin cloth, value 1 s.; two linen bags, value 2 s.; one folding-cloth, value 1 s.; two muslin caps, value 5 s.; one tippet, value 2 s. 6 d.; two cloth great coats, value 40 s.; one other cloth coat, value 40 s.; one cloth waistcoat, value 15 s.; one pair of breeches, value 10 s.; one pair of drawers, value 1 s., and one piece of lace, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of the said Robert Ray , Esq.; two gowns. value 4 s.; three pair of stockings, value 5 s.; two aprons, value 2 s., and five frills, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Ann Harrington ; two handkerchiefs, value 5 s., and one piece of lace, value 2 s., the goods of Eliza Read ; four shirts, value 2 l.; six neckcloths, value 12 s.; one waistcoat, value 10 s.; one pair of breeches, value 10 s., and seven pair of stockings, value 12 s. , the goods of John Harland .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

ROBERT RAY , ESQ. I have a house at Edmonton, Middlesex. This is a correct plan of my premises, (producing it) the laundry is about eighty feet from the dwelling-house, a wall incloses it with the house, on the East side of the house, and extends round it, the laundry is within the wall, which is joined by an iron fence, and the whole incloses the premises.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. On which side is the laundry - A. On the West, beyond that is the wash-house, dairy, and a coal place - the wall is a continuation, it is completely inclosed with the dwelling-house; my garden is inclosed by a wall, and the drying ground by a paling.

COURT. Q. Are we to understand that the garden, and dairy, are under the same protection, as the other part of the dwelling-house - A. Yes, nobody could get at them without breaking over the fence or wall.

JULIA BRAMHALL . I am servant to Mr. Ray. I and two other servants had been washing on the 30th of October, I was the last person in the laundry - I was there at nine o'clock at night, locked the door, and took away the key; the articles stated in the indictment were there, part of them were Mr. Ray's, and part belonged to the other servants.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. In what state was the wash-house window - A. I cannot say, I know the laundry window was shut. The wash-house communicates with the laundry.

COURT. A. Do they communicate internally - A. Yes, you go from one to the other without going out. I locked one wash-house door, which is an outer door, but not the door between the laundry and wash-house - the window has iron rails before it, and nobody could get through it into the wash-house or laundry, without breaking them. It appeared in the morning, that they had entered through the wash-house door, which I had left secure.

GEORGE MOLD . I am servant to Mr. Ray. On Wednesday morning the 31st of October, at five o'clock, I came to the premises, and found the Lodge gate open, it is in the high road - I came up to the passage door leading to the coal room, which was burst open, and the bolt of the lock out from the lock, the catch was wrenched off - I found the wash-house door broken open, and there was a mark of a tool, on the door close to the lock, and I found the coulter of a plough there, which I applied to the marks, and it fitted, it was Mr. Ray's coulter, and was in the plough which lay under the haystack the night before. The laundry and wash-house windows have iron bars - I did not find them broken, the persons must have come in through the door.

Cross-examined. Q. How far are the bars apart - A. About four inches. The haystack is at the further side of the field, you go through the lodge gate into that field. It was very dark when I came in the morning.

THOMAS AUSTIN . I am a constable. I accompanied Harland and Bramhall with a search warrant to the prisoner's house on Saturday, the 3d of November, at noon; he lives at Bow's Farm, about two miles from Mr. Ray's. I found him and a woman there, I was reading my warrant, and Ray's servant said, in his hearing, "There is some part of the property," which hung by the fire. In a drawer I found some lace, a cap, and handkerchief. I went into the bedroom, and found a sheet hanging up to dry, and under some sacks there was a wet bundle containing towels and handkerchiefs, cut to pieces. I found other property in a chest in the same room, and up stairs, I found a pair of sheets hanging on the line wet and dirty, as if they had been in the dirt. I took the prisoner in custody, he said I need not touch them for they were his property, he said so when I found the handkerchief or frill in the bed-room. I said "We will touch nothing but what we want" - then he said "A manbrought them here for my wife to wash, and gave her 5 s. to do them." I took the things to the Magistrate, and they were dried there.

Cross-examined. Q. I suppose you said you was come to search the house - A. Yes; he said he had nothing there, and I was welcome; I began to read the warrant, and the servant said some of the things hung there - He spoke of a handkerchief or frill as being his, I did not take that.

COURT. Q. Did he say when the man brought them - A. No; they were wet when I found them.

EDWARD ROWE MORES , ESQ. I am a Magistrate. The prisoner and property were brought before me on the 3d of November; the articles were left at my house, for after the constable had taken the prisoner to prison, it was very dark and I was fearful of their being lost, and being wet, they might rot. My seal was put on them, that produced is the same. I kept the key of the room all the time they were there.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JULIA BRAMHALL . I know all the property; the marks are some picked and the rest cut out. Here is a pincloth with the initials picked out; the mark was in red silk, and the red stain still remains; if they were washed after it was picked out, that would not be there. They were all in the laundry on this night, and are worth above 3 l. - I swear to every one of them.

COURT. Q. In what state was the linen when you left it in the laundry on Tuesday - A. All the heavy things were quite wet; when I saw them at the prisoner's house they did not appear to be re-washed - if they were washed after the red silk marks were picked out, the stain would not remain.

JOHN HARLAND . I am coachman to Mr. Ray. One Tuesday night, I left a cloth coat, a linen waistcoat, and a pair of velvet breeches in the harness-room; I locked the door, and in the morning found it broken open - the coulter fitted the mark on the door, and these clothes were gone; out of my box, four shirts, six handkerchiefs, a waistcoat, nine pair of stockings, two pair of gloves, and other things; some of them are here - here is a worsted stocking with the mark picked out.

Cross-examined. Q. All that are here are washing articles - A. Yes; they were clean when stolen, and are clean now.

ANN HARRINGTON . I am servant to Mr. Ray. I lost three pair of stockings, five caps, two aprons, two gowns, and a flannel petticoat out of the laundry; here is a gown with my own work in it, with the mark cut out. They appear in the same state as when stolen - they want washing now, as they are dirty.

Prisoner. I leave it to my Counsel.

JOHN PERCIVAL . I am a publican, and keep the Black Bull, public-house, at Edmonton. I remember the Tuesday night that Mr. Ray was robbed; I do not know what month it was in, it was on the Tuesday before the prisoner was apprehended. I saw him at my house on that night, he appeared to be intoxicated, and left my house about half-past nine o'clock - there is a dirty ditch by my door, and I took out my lantern to light him. He lives nearly two miles from me.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. How long was he in your house - A. I cannot say, it might be two hours; I did not see him come in, he had a pint of beer and gave some of it to the people.

Q. How long after he left did you go out with the light - A. About twenty minutes; three men who carry fish about were in his company, they left him at my house. Mr. Whitbread's men were being paid at my house.

COURT. Q. Do you recollect when you heard of this robbery - A. On the Wednesday, I think. I heard they had got in at the laundry, but what was taken I did not know.

THOMAS MARRITT . I am a labourer, and lodge at Bow Farm. The prisoner was taken on Saturday - on the Tuesday evening before that, I was at his house when he came home very much in liquor; I helped to put him to bed, as he could not put himself to bed, he sat in a chair, and drunkenness came on more, and Mrs. Deakin had a good deal of trouble to get him to bed - we got him to bed about twelve o'clock.

Q. Did you then leave the house - A. No; Mrs. Deakin having a good deal of ironing to do, I sat in the house all night; he got up about six o'clock in the morning - I then asked him about carrying me some potatoes.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. Where did you live - A. About one hundred yards off, at the Old Cock, public-house. I thought I was locked out, and stopped there - I did not like to trouble them by knocking them up; I went to Deakin's about eight o'clock.

Q. What did you go there for - A. I used to dress his wounds when he was scalded, he had no wounds then; I went to sit there an hour or two, as I often do.

COURT. Q. Where did you sit - A. By the fire; Mrs. Deakin was ironing till about three o'clock, she was ironing Mr. Miller's things, who they wash for. His bed is in the back parlour - I live a mile and a quarter from the Black Bull, public-house.

MR. RAY re-examined. My family went to bed about eleven o'clock; I do not know what time I went to bed. The outhouses are about eighty feet from the house.

JULIA BRAMHALL . I fastened the laundry about eight o'clock at night, it was then dark and foggy.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow.

5. ANDREW NEWMAN and GEORGE WIGGINS were indicted for burglariously breaking, and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Dempsey , and John Ries , about twelve o'clock at night, on the 10th of November , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, 400 lbs. of sugar, value 14 l., their property .

JOSEPH DEMPSEY . I am in partnership with John Reis , we are sugar-refiners , and live in Wellclose-square . On the evening of the 10th, or the morning of the 11th of November, we lost 4 cwt. of loaf sugar from the lump-room, in the sugar-house. Our servants sleep in the dwelling-house, communicating with that room, it is not under the same roof - we have two ways into the sugar-house, one from the street, one from the yard, and a third from the men's apartments. I cannot say when I saw the sugar safe. The persons had entered at the garret windows of the sugar-house; nobody slept there, I saw the sugar on Sunday morning at Lambeth-street office, and knew it by marks on it.

MICHAEL MALARKY . I am servant to the prosecutors. I saw the sugar safe between four and five o'clock in the afternoon of the 10th of November - I saw Mr. Dempsey's brother fasten the warehouse up about five o'clock; it was not dark then, the garret windows were shut and fastened with a button inside. Between six and seven o'clock the next morning, I heard the sugar was stolen; I went to the garret window, and found it open and some things in disorder- I missed, I thought about forty loaves; they weigh from nine to eleven pounds each, they had been taken out through the garret window - I saw them that day at Lambeth-street office, and knew them by the marks; they got them out at the window, they must have carried them through Mr. Herbert's empty warehouse, they could then get down stairs into the street - half a square of glass was taken out at the garret window, there was then room to put a hand inside to undo the button - the window was quite taken out.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I am an officer. On the morning of the 11th of November, at a little past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoners very near the prisoner Newman's house; I went into that house, they were then a little way from the door; I went into the front room and up stairs, seeing the stairs were very dirty, and found a quantity of sugar there, neither of the prisoners came in - I came down and called Freeman, my brother officer in; they were then in a little place close by, standing by some harness. He bought them in, neither of them had their hats on, Newman had neither waistcoat or handkerchief. I told him to put his things on to accompany me; I handcuffed the other prisoner, and asked where his hat was, he said he had none, I said "You must have a hat," he then said it was up stairs; Freeman went up and brought one down, he said that was not his; I asked where it was, he said up in the bed or on the bed, I do not know which - Freeman brought another down from the room the sugar was in, which he said was his, and put it on. Newman's clothes were in the lower room on the ground floor; there was a bed in the room, I do not know who lived in it. The sugar could not be carried by one man, nor two, all at once; this place was about 150 yards from the prosecutor's. I examined the premises, but cannot say how many persons had been there; there were footmarks on the lead, but I cannot say whether it was from one or more persons. The prisoners said they knew nothing about it; the room it was in was open, I believe there was a lock on the door and the key was in the lock.

Prisoner WIGGINS. Q. I said I lent my hat to a young man who lived in that room - A. No.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. Foster's account is correct; I went up stairs for the hat, Wiggins at first said he had no hat, Foster said "You must have a hat," he then said it was up stairs. I did not know that either of them lived there till that morning; I have seen them in the same room at a public-house together, I cannot say they were in company. The first hat I brought down he said was not his; I found his own among the bedclothes - Newman occupied the ground floor; there are only three rooms, the other room was empty. I think one person could not have carried the sugar away, as it must be deposited in two or three places before it could be got away; they must have drawn a ladder from the sugar-house up to the garret windows, the garret is on a level with the windows; it must have been carried along the leads and through the tiles into Herbert's warehouse, and down by a loose ladder to the first floor; then the ladder must have been shifted and carried down to the bottom floor of the warehouse, which is where they first entered, and from that to Newman's, is 150 or 200 yards off. I think it is impossible for them to be carried into Newman's house without his hearing it; if it was carried when it was light, they must be liable to be seen by people - Newman's bed-room is on the right of the ground floor passage.

WILLIAM FOSTER . I had seen Wiggins the day before in Rosemary-lane; I have seen the prisoners walking very near one another, as if in company, before. When I got to Newman's, I found the outer door shut and fast; I knocked at the window, and his wife sent a little girl out to open it - the door has a spring lock.

JOHN BOUTLE . I am a headborough. I received information that stolen property was going to Newman's house, and set a man to watch. I went with Foster and Freeman, their account is correct - Newman has lived there six months, I think.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. DEMPSEY. They are worth about 8 s. a loaf. I think one man could not have got them away.

NEWMAN'S Defence. I have witnesses who know the whole particulars of it.

WIGGINS'S Defence. John Walker lives in the room where the property was found; he drives a cart. I lent him my old hat, as he was going to the fairs in the country, and did not wish to spoil his new hat. Next morning I was cleaning my horse, Foster asked where my hat was, I said, "I have no hat here," but recollecting myself, on the little girl saying "You lent your hat to Walker," I then said "Oh! my hat is up stairs." Freeman brought Walker's new hat down, I said it was not mine, and most likely it was in the bed.

JOSEPH POOLE . I live in Shorter's-rents, Rosemary-lane, and am a shoemaker. I went into Newman's house at about five minutes past seven o'clock on the morning the property was found, to ask him for a light; he was in bed, and said they had no light, for they were indolent that morning. I went into my privy, which every body must pass who comes up, and saw three men come up loaded, and one not loaded, they went into Newman's house, he lives three doors from me; curiosity led me to see what part they went to - I saw them go right up stairs, one had something very large wrapped in a green baize, the other had a large bag full of something; one was the man who occupied Freeman's first floor, his name is John Walker - I went home.

Q. Did you not think it very odd - A. Yes; the officers came about eight o'clock, Walker was then in the court. I did not tell them what I had seen - I had no concern with it. I told Foster of it the next day at the office, and told Newman was in bed.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

6. JOHN BUTTERFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , forty-six copy books, value 7 s. , the goods of George Byrom Whitaker , and William Budd Whitaker .

WILLIAM TODD . I am a cheesemonger, and live in St. Martin's-le-grand. On the 12th of November, the prisoner came to my shop and asked if I wanted to buy waste paper, and produced a quantity of copy books, not used, I believe forty-six. I asked where he got them, he said his fellow apprentice gave them to him, and that his masterswere Messrs. Baldwin Craddock and Joy, Paternoster-row. I said I thought they were not honestly come by, and I would not buy them; he said very well, he would take them back. I then thought I would buy them to detect him; they weighed 4 3/4 lbs. at 4 d. per lb. - I paid him 1 s. 5 d. for them. In about an hour, I went to Messrs. Baldwin and Co's., and from there to Messrs. Whitaker's, in Ave Maria-lane , and described the prisoner; I went there again at four o'clock with an officer and the books, they claimed them. About a quarter past five o'clock, the prisoner came in there, I charged him with selling me the books, he did not deny it, and was secured.

Prisoner. Q. Did I say I worked for Baldwin's - A. He said he had them from his fellow apprentice at Baldwin and Co's.

MR. GEORGE BYROM WHITAKER . I am in partnership with W. Budd Whitaker. The prisoner was in the service of our bookbinder, he frequently came to our shop with books; we sell copy books, he had access to them when he came to the shop - Mr. Todd came to me on the 12th of November, and produced forty-six, which I knew but had not missed. In about an hour, the prisoner came in with some more books, and was secured - they were not waste paper.

JOHN CLINTON . I am a constable. I received the books from Todd, he told me how he came by them, we went to Whitaker's, he described the person he had them from. The prisoner came in in about an hour, and did not deny the charge; he said he lived in Montague-court, Little Britain. - I went there, and found two more of the same sort of books.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined Six Months and Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

7. JOHN HARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Frederick Sharman , from his person .

FREDERICK SHARMAN. I am a shoe factor , and live in Cammomile-street. On the 9th of November, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was on the east side of St. Paul's church-yard , and saw two young men handing a handkerchief one to the other, which induced me to feel my pocket; I missed my handkerchief, the prisoner is the one who received it - I seized him, he was within two yards of me, the other went away. I asked him to let me see the handkerchief which was in his pocket, he said he had none about him - I found my handkerchief up his back, and gave him in charge.

NATHANIEL MINES . I am a constable. I was in St. Paul's church-yard, and saw Mr. Sharman there, holding the prisoner; he charged him with stealing his handkerchief, he said nothing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the churchyard.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

8. THOMAS NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , four yards and a half of cloth, value 28 s. , the goods of Richard Cleobury .

SAMUEL HARVEY . I am servant to Mr. Richard Cleobury , who is a tailor , and lives in Cheapside . On Monday evening, the 9th of November, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw a man put his hand inside the door and take a piece of cloth. I ran to the door, and while I was looking round, the prisoner was brought in; he gave me the cloth from under his frock, it measured four and a half yards, - it laid about two yards inside the door.

CHARLES ROULEY . I work at Mr. Cleobury's. On the 19th of November, I was coming from one of his shops, to the shop the cloth was stolen from, and saw the prisoner catch the cloth from near the door, he ran across the way, I brought him back, he pulled it from under his frock.

GEORGE WATTS . I am a constable. I took charge of him with the cloth.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

9. JOHN ROLFE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , one bushel of walnuts, value 15 s., and one basket, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Jolly .

THOMAS JOLLY . I live in Fleet-market . On the 26th of November, I lost a basket of walnuts from the market. I saw them a few minutes before, I was told they were stolen, and my man immediately returned with the prisoner in his custody.

EDWARD WEBSTER . I am servant to Mr. Jolly. I saw the prisoner eight or ten yards from where the walnuts were, carrying them away in a bushel basket. I asked where he was going with them, he put them down and ran off - I caught him in Stonecutter-street, and am sure of him.

(Basket produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 38.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

10. ELIZA CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , two shirts, value 6 s.; two other shirts unmade, value 10 s.; one shift, value 5 s.; one pinafore, value 1 s.; six napkins, value 2 s.; one bed-gown, value 2 s. 6 d.; four caps, value 2 s. 6 d.; one chaise cover, value 2 s. 6 d.; one apron, value 1 s.; one frock, value 1 s., and one pair of trowsers, value 1 s. , the goods of John Windus .

ELIZA FOX. I am a mangler, and live in Beer-lane, Blackfriars-road . On the 9th of November, I had mangled these things for John Windus , who lives at my house - about two o'clock I carried them up to him on the first floor, and left them in his room. I heard they were gone at seven o'clock in the evening. I saw them at Guildhall, on the Monday, and knew them.

JOHN WINDUS . I am a carman . The things are mine, I did not know they were stolen until I came home at night. The prisoner was a stranger.

JOSEPH POTTER . I am a constable of Blackfriars.About half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, of the 9th of November, I was sent for to Evangelist-court, and saw the prisoner, and took her in custody - she had all the articles stated in the indictment in her apron, she said they belonged to her uncle, and she would send for him, if I thought proper - did not tell name, or where he lived; she lived in Whitecross-street, I detained her on suspicion. At the examination Mrs. Fox claimed the things, as the property of Windurs. I found four keys, all of which will open Windur's door. I found one in the door at Evangelist-court, and three under the mat.

GUILTY . Aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

11. JOHN HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , six shillings , the monies of Henry Crane .

ANN CRANE . I am the wife of Henry Crane , we lived in Cannon-street , and kept a fruiterer's shop . The prisoner came in and bought two apples, for which he paid three halfpence - It was on Saturday night, between eight and nine o'clock; he asked me to have the goodness to look in my till for a new shilling, as he wished to make a child a present of one - I had a child at my breast, I took the till out, and put it on the counter, that he might see, there was 18 s. there, a few minutes before, he put his hand in three times to search for one - I told him I thought there was not one, but if he could find one he might have it; he turned the money over three times, there then appeared to be less in quantity. He wished me good night and left - I ran after him, and overtook him myself, and brought him back; I then counted the money, there was only 12 s. in the till - I had left the shop in care of the maid-servant, who is about eleven years old. I charged him of taking the money out of the till, which he denied; a constable was sent for, who found six shillings on him and one farthing.

Cross-examined by MR. JESSOP. Q. Was the till locked - A. No. I counted the money a few minutes before, and my husband counted it before that, there was then 15 s., and I took 3 s. more, which made 18 s., when I took him he denied being the man - he turned out his pockets, and said

"I have only 6 s.," the 18 s. was all in shillings, I at first said he took 6 s. or 7 s., as I had not counted it then.

HENRY CRANE . I am the husband of the last witness. About an hour before the prisoner came to the shop - I counted the money, there was 15 s. in shillings and sixpences. I took no money out of the till.

Cross-examined. Q. Your wife swore it was all in shillings - A. I cannot swear for her. The prisoner said "I have only 6 s. which I will give you sooner than have my character exposed."

WILLIAM WILCOX . I am a constable. I was sent for, and took charge of him, the six shillings were then on the counter; Mrs. Crane said he had robbed the till of 6 s. or 7 s., he said it was his own money, but he would sooner give it, than have his character exposed. I found a farthing on him.

Cross-examined. Q. He said, "Ma'am, you said it was 7 s., and now you say 6 s." - A. Yes, she said it was 6 s. or 7 s. she would not say which.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

SECOND DAY, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6.

12. JAMES HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one pocket-book, value 1 s.; one silver rule, value 1 s.; one pair of diamond tongs, value 1 s., and one almanack, value 1 s., the goods of Richard Thomas , the younger , from his person .

MR. RICHARD THOMAS , JUN. I am the son of Richard Thomas , and live in the Strand. On the 12th of November, I went to Drury-lane Theatre , these things were in my pocket-book, which was safe in my inside coat pocket an hour after I entered the Theatre - I carefully buttoned my pocket, as the prisoner was in the pit, in the same row, pressing rudely against me and my brother - he came in company with several others; I remonstrated with them on their rude conduct, and said I should insist on their moving, as we had taken the seat first - the prisoner said "We will not incommode the gentlemen," and then placed himself immediately behind me, one of his companions being on my left; he pressed a good deal against me, and turned his back rather towards me - I buttoned a little flap over my pocket, drew my coat tails up, and requested my brother to keep an eye on the prisoner; my brother was on my right, my pocket-book was in my left hand pocket. At the end of the second act, the prisoner and his companion rose instantaniously, to quit the Theatre - I immediately felt for my pocket-book, and finding it was gone, I charged the prisoner with having taken it; he denied it, he rose to go out, and his companion was going away in a different direction - I seized the prisoner, we struggled considerably for some minutes, in the course of which, we had moved towards the side of the benches, I saw him stretch out his arm as far as he could under the benches, apparently as if depositing something there - I asked the people who sat there to look if there was a pocket-book near their feet, Mr. Williams who sat third or fourth on the bench from the end, picked up my pocket-book, and gave it me. I detained him with some difficulty, and gave him in charge of Bond. I should know the person on my left, he went out on the opposite side while we were struggling, and when he stretched out his arm, no other person stood near us.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When you entered the Theatre, there were many people about you - A. Yes; the pit was not at all crowded till after the second price. Several people were with the prisoner, they left, only the prisoner and the other sat near me. The lining of my pocket was cut at the bottom, I charged him with it without asking any one if they saw him do it - he was genteely dressed - the pocket-book was found within arms reach of the prisoner.

EDWARD WILLIAMS . I live at Kennington-cross, and am teacher in a school. I was at the Theatre, and standing up at the end of the second act, I heard a scuffle behind me, turned round, and found the prisoner endeavouring to disengage himself from Mr. Thomas, who was calling for an officer. Directly after Mr. Thomas turned round in the direction in which I stood, and desired the persons near me to look for a pocket-book; I stoppeddown, and directly under my seat, picked one up, and gave it him, he claimed it - they were at the end of the bench behind me.

WILLIAM BOND. I am a constable, attending the Theatre. The prisoner was given in my charge; he was well dressed - the pocket-book was cut, I found a small knife on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Thomas seized me so violent, it would make any one struggle. I deny being guilty.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

13. WILLIAM WOOLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking, and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Ward , about one o'clock in the night of the 1st of November , and stealing therein one tea chest, value 5 s.; two ounces of tea value 1 s., and one time-piece value 2 l., his property .

CHARLES WARD . I am a tobacconist , and live in Great Russell-street . On the 2d of November at one o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by the bell next to my bed-room door ringing, I went down stairs, and found the watchman in the passage below, and several people standing round the door.

DANIEL SULLIVAN . I am a watchman. On the 2d of November, about half-past one o'clock in the morning, I found Mr. Ward's door open, a young man stood with his back against the shutters, I asked him why the door was open, he made no answer - I walked into the passage, and the man said, "Come out of there d - n your eyes, what are you doing there." He had no sooner spoke, than a man darted out of the back parlour into the passage, and I apprehended him, I took it to be the prisoner - I held him for three minutes, and then he broke away from me; I sprung my rattle, and pursued him, he was taken in about four minutes - I lost sight of him, as four hackney-coachmen stood in the way, ran, and crossed me, I did not lose sight of him a moment, and then saw him again - I noticed as he ran, that he had no hat on, I found a hat in Ward's passage after he was taken to the watch-house. When he was first brought back he was in custody of Vincent. I examined the house, but could find no marks of the door being forced - I suppose it must have been opened by a false key, no keys were found on him. I tried the hat on the prisoner at the watch-house, it would go on his head, but was rather too big for him. I went to the house, and alarmed Mr. Ward - I was absent from the house about five minutes; I then found the hat, the clock was missed.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You lost sight of the man who ran out - A. Yes; the coachmen interrupted my view. He said the hat was not his - I put it on, and it dropped down over his eyes. I did not see him secured, as I was on the other side of the coach - he got into the coach, and on my opening it, he got out on the other side, I kept my eye on him till he got into the coach. I had known him by sight four or five years, he is a hackney-coachman - when I first saw him, it did not strike me that it was a person whom I knew.

DORMAND VINCENT . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 2d of November, I was in Bow-street, and about half-past one o'clock, heard Sullivan's rattle spring - I came to the top of Charles-street, and saw the prisoner running, and Sullivan in pursuit - the prisoner then crossed the coaches and got into one of them; when I got up to the coach, Sullivan had the door open, and was going to pull him out, he jumped out on the other side - I came round the horses heads to the opposite side, and he ran down Charles-street again; I pursued him, he ran round the coaches, and came up the street again, and when he came up close against the third coach, he sat himself up close against the horses, and I took him - I cannot say whether he had a hat on when I first saw him; he had one on when I took him, and a coachman whipped it off his head and said it was his.

Q. During the time you pursued him had he any opportunity of getting a hat - A. I cannot say, for he went round the coaches different times. I am sure he is the person whom I first saw - I did not know him before; I might lose sight of him when he got into the coach, but at no other time.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not know him before - A. No. There were twelve or fifteen coaches there - I think he could not mix with the other coachmen, as more watchman were pursuing him - I did not lose sight of him, I only saw his back while he ran round the coaches; the hat might be put on his head, but I did not see it done. The coachmen did not interfere to stop him - I was within a foot of him when he stood up at the horses heads.

DANIEL SULLIVAN re-examined. Q. Did you see him get into the coach - A. I did not see him get in, as all the four coachmen crossed me at the time - I went to the coach to get him out, he laid back as if he was asleep - I went to catch hold of him, and he jumped out on the other side. I noticed his having no hat before he got to the coach, I cannot say where he got the hat, he had none on when I saw him in the coach.

JAMES BETHELL . I am the beadle. I joined in the pursuit when the alarm was given - I was with two or three watchmen within one door of Mr. Ward's, and saw people running, and crying Stop thief! I did not see the man who was running away, to distinguish him, till he got out of the coach - he had no hat on then; I saw him taken, I lost sight of him once for a moment, he ran round the coach rank two or three times - he had a hat on when he was taken; I saw a hat thrown from one of the coachmen to him, just before he was taken, but whether the coachman put it on his head or into his hand I cannot say, when he got it on, he turned round to the horses, as if he was attending to them - a coachman came and took the hat off his head, I caught hold of it and asked what business he had with it, he said it was his own, and that the prisoner took it off his head, the prisoner said nothing to it - he was within a yard of him. I cannot say whether he heard it.

Cross-examined. Q. It was taken off his head while he was being taken away in custody - A. Yes; we had not moved towards the watch-house, he was taken instantly.

SAMUEL LACK . I am a constable, of Bow-street. I saw the man who was running after he came out of the coach, he then had no hat on; I came to the horses heads, and found the prisoner was secured - I cannot say he was the man who was running; I was about a footfrom him when I first saw him, I seized him momentarily with the watchman; I am not positive that the man I seized was the man who ran, the watchman had seized him while I ran round the coach and met him, he was out of my sight for a moment - when I caught sight of him again, he had a hat on his head, a man knocked it off and said "This is mine;" the prisoner said nothing. There was a great noise, I heard him very plain, he was not out of my sight above a second - I saw nobody else running away.

Q. If the person you had seen without a hat had ran away, must you have seen him - A. Yes; I can speak with certainty to him, as I have known him for years.

Cross-examined. Q. You are not certain that the man who was taken is the man who ran - A. No; A handkerchief hung out of the hat down his back, which fell when the hat was taken off - I believe the coachman picked it up.

MR. WARD re-examined. My door was fastened when I went to bed at twelve o'clock, I was not the last person up, I saw it fast about a quarter before twelve o'clock, I always see it fastened, it was not bolted, only on the single latch, my lodger, (Mr. Allen,) being out at the time; and I left Mr. Gladstanes up with a friend. When the watchman came, I went into the back parlour and missed the timepiece off the sideboard; it was not carried away, only removed into the next parlour - it was nearer to the front of the house than the parlour in which it was; a small tea-chest was taken off the drawers behind the parlour door, and taken away entirely. I and my wife went to bed at the same time, leaving Mr. Gladstanes up - my back parlour door was not locked, but shut; a light was left there for the lodgers. There is a door from the front to the back parlour, which was left open, but the door from the front room to the shop was forced open; it had been locked, but was forced. Nothing in the shop had been moved, but I think they must have been there.

Cross-examined. Q. After you went to bed, your lodger let out a friend - A. Yes.

FREDERICK GLADSTANES . I lodge at Mr. Ward's, and had a friend with me on this night. I let him out at half-past twelve o'clock, and left the door fastened on the latch, on the spring lock. I am sure the lock had caught, for it being late, I shut it with violence that the prosecutor might hear that my friend was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. Are you sure it was fastened - A. Yes.

Prisoner. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

14. JOHN CHESTER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Ann Emma Grey , spinster , on the 2d of November , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , on the King's highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, one reticule, value 1 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 3 s,; one pocket-book, value 1 s.; six yards of ribbon, value 3 s.; four keys, value 1 s., and 6 s. in monies numbered, her property .

ANN EMMA GREY . I am a single woman, and live in Great Garden-street, Whitechapel. On the 2d of November, I was in Brick-lane , about seven o'clock in the evening, in company with Mr. Johnson; I had hold of his arm with my left hand and had my reticule in my right hand. I saw three men on my right, and two on my left hand - one man on my left hand called out "Now," and pointed to my reticule, when two of the three on my right caught hold of my bag, it was twisted round my hand; I pulled it towards me, and then the prisoner pushed me back and struck the back of my hand with his fist; it was a violent blow, and made me quit my hold - I am quite sure of his person. I let go of the reticule, the two men pulled it and broke the string, which they left round my hand. Mr. Johnson struck the prisoner over the head with a stick, which made him reel against the wall; Mr. Johnson then seized him, he tried to get from him, but he held him till the officer came and took him - the reticule was a black silk bag, worth 1 s., it contained the articles stated in the indictment.

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am a surgeon in the East India Company's service, and live in Ratcliff-highway. I was walking with the prosecutrix in Brick-lane, about seven o'clock, and at the end of Thomas-street, I saw the prisoner and two others on the right, and two on the left by a post; but as we came up, one of the three on the right snatched at her reticule - I struck one of them with my stick, I saw the prisoner strike the prosecutrix on the back of her hand as she was struggling for her reticule. I immediately struck the prisoner several blows on the head which made him reel against the wall, and I secured him. On his recovery, he said he had nothing to do with it, that he was merely passing by and he would run after the others, but I seized him by the breast and held him till the officer came - I am sure he is one of the three.

VALENTINE STOKES . I live in Thomas-street. The prisoner was brought to me, I took him to the watch-house. I am a headborough.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all false. I live two streets off and had just come from home, I was going to a public-house, and was entirely by myself.

John Adams of Wapping, waterman and lighterman, gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 22.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury, and prosecutrix, who stated that on enquiry, she found that previous to this he bore a very good character.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garoow .

15. WILLIAM HILLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , one watch, value 4 l., and one key, value 2 s., the goods of William Godfrey , in the dwelling-house of Richard Clively .

WILLIAM GODFREY . I lodge in Chapel-street, Park-lane . Richard Clively keeps the house; the prisoner is a poor boy who used to be about the neighbourhood, he used to come to light my fire two or three years ago, and I used to give him his breakfast for it. His parents keep a green-stall in Park-street. After he left me, he used to call occasionally; he called on the 25th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, and broke some flint stones in my area; I live in the kitchen. I took him to a public-house and gave him a pot of porter, we came back and I gave him sixpence. He wanted to do some jobs for me, he said "You have got something that wants cleaning in the cupboard I know" - I know, he opened the cupboardand took a bill-book out and covered it with a cloth. He said he was going to clean it. My watch hung in that cupboard - I saw him go to the cupboard again and take the watch down - I said "What are you going to do with the watch," he said, it was about four o'clock. He looked wild, I walked towards the door to look for assistance, he came and collared me, I found him too strong for me - he ran up and banged the door and took away my watch. I went up stairs and called Stop thief! but he was gone - I did not see him again till the last day of October, when he was in custody. I never got my watch - I gave twelve guineas for it, it was gold; I had had it thirty years, and bought it second hand - I have been told it would fetch seven or eight guineas.

ROBERT EAGLESTONE . I apprehended the prisoner on the 31st of October.

Prisoner's Defence. He told me to take the bill-book out of the cupboard to clean it, and told me to take the other things out of the cupboard and clean them.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I did not consent to his taking the watch, I would not have trusted him with it. It was a leaver watch and made abroad.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

16. ANN FRANKS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , at St. George in the East , one frock, value 4 l. 10 s.; seven caps, value 19 s.; two shirts, value 3 s.; four pincloths, value 5 s.; five napkins, value 7 s.; one frill, value 5 s.; one wine-glass, value 1 s.; one cup, value 3 d., and one saucer, value 3 d., the goods of Robert Harris , in his dwelling-house .

BETSY HARRIS . I am the wife of Robert Harris , who is a baker ; we live in Cannon-street , St. George's in the East. The prisoner lived servant with me four or five months, and has left me this ten months. I lost the articles stated in the indictment while she was with me, at different times; the frock was a child's frock, and cost four guineas and a half; it is Moravian work. I got a search warrant on the 14th of November, and went to search her apartments, near Cornwall-street, and found all the property, some in a drawer and some in a box; some were rough-dried, as I had lost them. She was in custody on another charge at that time. When I missed the frock, she assisted me in looking for it - She was married to a sailor, who is gone to sea - he was never at my house.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Where were they found - A. In the room she occupied. I know where to find the servant who lived with me before her. I missed the frock a fortnight before the prisoner left.

COURT. Q. Was the frock in your house after the prisoner entered your service - A. I cannot be certain; every thing else was there - she has washed them several times.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer. I went with the warrant, and found the property; I did not see her before I went there - I saw her after at Lambeth-street office. I told the Magistrate, in her presence, that I found the articles at her lodgings, No. 5, John-street, St. George's, in the one pair of stairs back room - she said nothing to it.

THOMAS DRISDEN . I live at No. 5, John-street. Fortune searched the prisoner's apartment. I let it her ready furnished for thirteen weeks - her husband came there also. I was present before the Magistrate - I did not hear her say any thing.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

17. WILLIAM HALL and JAMES BURTON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Draper , about nine o'clock, on the 6th of November , at St. Matthew, Bethnal-green , with intent to steal, and stealing therein one pair of shoes, value 2 s. 6 d., his goods .

JOHN DRAPER . I am a shoemaker , and live in Air-street , in the parish of St. Matthew, Bethnal-green. I rent part of the house, it is let out in tenements by the landlord, who lives two doors off, but he occupies the cellar under his own house; nobody belonging to him sleeps there. On the 6th of November, a few minutes before nine o'clock, I was in my shop; the sash of the window was forced up, and a pair of shoes taken from it. I saw the window shake as it went up, I ran to the street door and found it was tied outside - I gave it a jerk and broke the cord, ran out, and saw two boys running down the street very fast; I caught hold of one of them, which was Burton - I brought him back and fetched the patrol, he said he knew nothing about it, he and was innocent - nothing was found on him. I examined, and missed the shoes - I let him go as he had nothing, I have since seen my shoes in possession of Sutton, the other boy was rather bigger than Burton, it was not Hall - I only saw two boys; I am sure the window was shut down, they could not get the shoes without throwing it up, they were close to the sash - I have the cord here.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MARTIN SUTTON . I am a pawnbroker. I know Hall very well, he frequently came to our shop. On the 7th of November, about one o'clock in the day, I took these shoes in pawn of him for 1 s. 6 d. I did not ask who they belonged to; he was in the habit of coming from his master, who is a weaver.

JOSEPH OVEREE . I am a silk weaver. Hall was turned over to me, as an apprentice . On the 6th of November, he went out about five o'clock without my leave - I was ill in bed at the time, he returned at one o'clock. I asked where he had been, he said, to his father's; I said I should go to his father, but did not. About twelve o'clock the next day, I sent him on an errand, he was gone from twelve o'clock till three, and brought home a rabbit - I asked where he got the money from, he said, going along Air-street-fields, a lady asked him to carry a bundle, and while he carried it, he stole a silk handkerchief out, and sold it for 3 s. At nine o'clock, I told my brother of it, he said, in the prisoner's hearing, he had seen him tie a door in Air-street, and get under the window, and said he would not leave until he got a pair of shoes out; the prisoner said it was no such thing, but it was a handkerchief. Nothing more passed then. Next day, he said, if his mistress liked, he had got a pair of shoes cheap, I askedwhere he got them, he said he tied a door in Air-street, while he pushed the window up, took the shoes out, and pawned them for 18 d. The rope produced belongs to me, it was taken from my shop - I missed it on the 6th of November.

Prisoner HALL. Q. Have you not often asked me to get you a silk handkerchief, and you would buy it of me A. - Never; I never knew him bring any thing before. I took him to the watch-house myself, and went and told the prosecutor.

JURY. Q. How could you miss the cord when you were in bed - A. I did not miss it till the 7th, but it was taken on the 6th - I had left it tied to a stone - I have not often quarrelled with him.

JOHN OVEREE . I am brother to the last witness. I believe I am turned sixteen years old; I work at Fleur-de-lis-court. I was coming home, to Parliament-street, on the 6th of November, about half-past eight o'clock, I saw the prisoners and another, (I believe there was three) in Air-street - I called the prisoner, he came to me; I only knew Burton by sight, he was one of the two. I asked Hall if he was coming home, he said No; there was something to come very easy, and he should not leave till he got it. He asked me to jump it, I said "No, I sha'nt; I do not know what you mean." I went to the corner of Air-street, stopped there, and heard the window go up - I then looked and saw him take the shoes out; I then went home directly - it was him who pushed up the window. I told my brother he would hear something before long, and then went to bed.

Q. Then you live with your brother - A. We had moved into a new house which was damp, and I slept in his back room with Hall. I told my brother of it on the Saturday night - Hall was taken on the Monday following.

Q. Why not tell your brother before - A. He was ill in bed on Tuesday night.

Q. Why not tell him on Wednesday - A. I had not time; I go to work at eight o'clock and do not return till nine at night.

Prisoner HALL. Q. Did not you tie the door - A. I did not, nor did I tell you it would be a good scheme.

Q. You threw the window up and knocked the shoes down - A. I did not indeed; I asked him to come home, he said he should not, and I left.

Q. Did not you carry the shoes part of the way across Air-street-fields, and tell me to take them to my master - A. No; I did not pull out a knife and cut the string the shoes were tied with

JOHN DRAPER . The other boy who was running, was about the size of the last witness. The shoes were tied together when they were taken.

BURTON'S Defence. I was in Air-street when this gentleman came up and collared me; I asked what it was for, he brought me to his window and pointed to it. I said I knew nothing about it; the patrole found nothing on me, and let me go; he asked where i lived and worked, and I told him.

HALL'S Defence. I know nothing of this boy; it was only me and James Overee , we were together that night; he helped me to get the shoes, at last he knocked them down and I picked them up. At Worship-street he took a false oath, he swore that I and this boy tied the door, he tied it himself. Burton was not with me - I do not know him.

JOHN DRAPER . Hall's master came to me on the Monday after, and said his boy had stolen the shoes, and he had him at the watch-house.

One witness gave Hall a good character.

HALL - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 15.

BURTON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

18. WILLIAM PERCIVAL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Fausett , at St. George, Hanover-square , about twelve o'clock in the night of the 26th of November , and stealing therein, one watch, value 5 l.; two watch keys, value 2 d., and one watch ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of Caroline Frowd , widow .

CAROLINE FROWD . I am a widow. I was servant to Mr. James Fossett , who keeps the Red Lion, public-house, Chandler-street, Grosvenor-square . The prisoner was a soldier quartered at the house. On the night of the 26th, I went to bed, leaving my master up - I put my watch on the drawers in my room; I awoke about half-past six o'clock in the morning, and found my watch gone. It was dark then, but I heard that it did not tick. I found my room window a little way up, the watch could not be got at without coming into the room, as I had put it on the other side of the room, they must have come in through the window. I found a piece of tile broken off the wash-house, which was near my window - a person could reach the window from there. The prisoner never stopped out later than ten o'clock, we shut the door at eleven. I know he was at home at half-past five o'clock in the evening, but did not see him after. I never saw him again until he was taken - I locked and bolted the room door, and found it so in the morning.

JAMES COWARD . I am a corporal in the first battalion of Grenadier guards - the prisoner was a private in the regiment. On the 27th of November, about six o'clock in the morning, I met him in Coventry-street with a woman on his arm; the sergeant stopped him, and gave him in my charge for being absent from his quarters all night, he wished to go away with the woman - I refused to let him; he said the woman had his watch, I said if she got it by improper means, I would give her in charge, he said, No he gave it her as he had met her, and been with her all night, and she spent some money and he gave it her as security, he asked if I would lend him a shilling, to give her for the watch, I gave him a shilling, and she gave it me - I afterwards produced it to the prosecutrix, who claimed it. I gave it to Jeffery.

JAMES JEFFERY . I am an officer. Coward gave me a watch - I got the prisoner out of custody in the barracks. I examined the prosecutor's room, there was a wall ten feet high outside, and an iron railing round it - some person must have got on the iron railing, and then over the wall, they could then get on the wash-house, and through the window - the prosecutrix told me the name of the maker of the watch.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. The watch was given me by another girl. I did not tell the corporal that it was mine.

JAMES COWARD . The prisoner said the woman had got his watch, that she and him had been drinking, and she paid a shilling for him, and he gave it her to keep till he got the money.

CAROLINE FROWD . I was only five weeks in the house. The prisoner was quartered at the house before I came, and knew I had the watch.

The prisoner's sergeant gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy, on account of his character.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

19. ROBERT WATTS was indicted for burglariously breaking, and entering the dwelling-house of James Wight , at Wilsden , about three o'clock in the afternoon, of the 25th of October , (no person being therein), and stealing, two coats, value 1 l.; one pair of breeches, value 10 s.; one gold ring, value 5 s.; two pair of shoes, value 10 s.; two gowns, value 9 s., and 13 s. 6 d., in monies numbered, his property .

JAMES WIGHT . I live in the parish of Wilsden. On the 25th of October, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went out and left nobody in the house - I took the key with me, and returned at four o'clock, and found the casement window taken out of the back of the house, the coulter of a plough laid by the window, and the shutters open - I tried the key to the front door, and found it was bolted; I had come out at the front door, and locked it - the inside shutters were forced open; I saw marks of the coulter on them, the window is about one yard from the ground, they got into the house through the window, I had left it secure, the casement is lead and nailed in. The coulter belongs to Mr. Denow's plough. On going in I missed a great coat, a close bodied coat, a pair of breeches, and other articles, besides 13 s. 6 d., in money - there was marks of a man's foot about the house, I could not distinguish them to be more than the marks of one person. On Monday the 29th, I caught the prisoner with my coat on at Paddington, opposite the Coach and Horses, public-house, I followed him into the King and Queen, public-house, and got Humphries to take him - he took the coat off when he got into the public-house, it was worth 9 s.; it cost me 18 s., all the things together are worth 3 l.

(Coat produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner. Q. Can you say you found the coat on me - A. He was wearing it, but when the officer took him it was in the room - he said at the office he bought it of a Jew for 7 s.; when I charged him with it, he took it off and gave it to another man, who took it into the stable, but afterwards gave it us back.

WM. HY. HUMPHREYS . I am an officer. White applied to me to take the prisoner at the King and Queen, public-house, at Paddington - I asked him where the coat was, he said "What coat, I know nothing about a coat;" I said you must come with me, I took him down the stable yard, and found the coat on a man's arm, who said in his presence that he gave it him to sell, the prisoner heard him, but made no answer - I asked if that was the coat he had on, he said it was, afterwards he told me he bought it in Oxford-street of a Jew - this was twenty minutes after.

Prisoner. Q. You told the young man he ought to be taken in custody himself - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BUTLER . I live at Wilsden. I know Wight's house, and I know Mr. Denow's. On the 25th of October, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner sitting on the beam of his plough - I am sure he is the man, he was knocking the wedges out of the coulter, as if he wanted to get the coulter out; the plough was about forty yards from Wight's house - I did not speak to him, I am sure of his person; I saw him in custody on the Wednesday following. He was about ten yards from me.

CATHARINE BUTLER . I am the wife of William Butler . I was going out of my door, and driving two cows out of my neighbour's garden, about half-past three o'clock on Thursday, and as I came back, I saw the prisoner go away with the clothes on his arm - he was coming across a small field in a direction from Wight's house, he turned round and looked at me now and then - I have no doubt of his person, he had them all wrapped up together, and a white coat on the top of them.

Prisoner. Q. You said at Marlborough-street that you was one hundred yards off and would not swear to me - A. I did not say I could not swear to him - I said he was about his height, I was about one hundred yards from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I go on the canal with a boat, and about ten o'clock on Saturday night our boats were at Pickford's wharf, I went to see for my sister who lives at the Red Lion, public-house, and at the Coach and Horses, public-house, a young man was there with the coat on, we went to the King and Queen, public-house, he told me to put the coat on - I pulled it off in the room, and gave it him.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

20. ELIZA KENDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of November , fourteen knives, value 5 s.; fourteen forks, value 5 s.; three tea spoons, value 6 s., and two decanters, value 10 s. , the goods of Charles Bleaden , Richard Walter , and Stephen Brown Chandler .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 27.

Fined One Shilling and, Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

21. SAMUEL HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one watch, value 6 l.; one key, value 2 s., and one ribbon, value 6 d., the goods of William Porter , from his person .

WILLIAM PORTER . I am a farrier , and live at Manchester. On the 9th of November, about three o'clock, I was looking at the Lord Mayor's procession, my watch was in my fob, it had a ribbon and key to it; as I was going up Bridge-street , towards Fleet-market, I saw a crowd and suspected them - I put my hand in my fob pocket, I was hustled which made me let go, and at that moment I felt my watch violently wrenched out of my pocket, I saw the prisoner pull it out, and give to another person on his right - I collared him immediately, and kept him till an officer came and took him.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. There was a great crowd - A. Yes. I cannot be mistaken in his person.

Q. Have you enquired into his character - A. Yes; and I find he has been transported before.

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am a constable. I saw the prosecutor holding the prisoner by the collar, charging him with robbing him of his watch, he gave him to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw him, nor touched his watch.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

22. MARY SULLIVAN and ANN SMITH were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , one scarf, value 14 s. , the goods of John Hopkins .

THOMAS CHISLETT . I am servant to Mr. John Hopkins , who is a hosier , and lives in Fleet-street . On the 23d of November, at three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came into the shop together, and asked to look at some black silk handkerchiefs, I shewed them some at 6 s. 6 d., they offered me 5 s., while Smith was bargaining for the handkerchief, Sullivan concealed a scarf under her pelisse - I saw her hand under the handkerchief, she was drawing something away, but I could not tell what - I said I would take the 5 s., in order to detain them as they were going out; I came round the counter, and asked Sullivan to let me look under her pelisse - I then opened it, and down fell the scarf, both that and the handkerchiefs had been in one paper - she said it fell off the counter, but I saw it fall from her pelisse; the price was 16 s., only 2 s. 7 d., was found on them.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How many people were serving in the shop - A. Only a young lady. Only the prisoners were there as customers.

THOMAS SMITH . I am the ward beadle. I searched the prisoners, and found 2 s. 7 d., on Smith, and nothing on Sullivan.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SULLIVAN'S Defence. As I came out, two handkerchiefs fell off the counter, he said we had stolen them.

SMITH'S Defence. I was coming out, he said he would take the 5 s., I was taking the money out, and the handkerchief fell off the counter.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Six Months .

SMITH - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

23. JOSEPH BENJAMIN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , part of a neck-chain, value 2 l., the goods of Sophia Brain , from her person .

SOHPIA BRAIN. I live in Hampshire. On the 9th of November, I was in London - I had a gold neck-chain on with a reading glass attached to it; about half-past twelve o'clock I was in company with Mrs. Aust, at Mr. Baker's, a mercer, on Ludgate-hill , standing on a chair at the door, viewing the Lord Mayor's procession pass, the door was open, the chair was inside, there was a press towards the door, and somebody made a snatch at my chain which broke it, and they got part of it - I could not see who it was, I was so frightened; a gentleman behind me in the house handed part of it to me - I saw part of the remainder before the Alderman.

HARRIET AUST . I was with Mrs. Brain, and saw the chain taken from her neck - I did not see who snatched it, I had hold of her arm at the time.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. I suppose the pavement was covered with a crowd of people - A. Yes.

RICHARD SMITH . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I was about twenty yards from Mr. Baker's shop, I saw a great crowd, and saw something go from the lady's neck - I went in among the crowd near the door and saw a great many people together, I caught hold of the prisoner as he was nearest to me - I saw a chain drop from some of them in the crowd, but cannot say whether it was from him, I think not, but it was dropped very near him, nor can I say that the persons round were his companions; it was picked up and given me by Miller, in Bridge-street - Mr. Baker's is two doors from Bridge-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

THOMAS MILLITT . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was one before the prisoner, and Smith was behind him; there was a great crowd; I heard a lady had lost a chain, I turned round immediately, the prisoner was within one or two, I seized him, and Smith laid hold of him - the chain was delivered to me. There was thirty or forty boys and men round.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

24. EDWARD TUFFTS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Rachel Levi , on the King's highway, on the 26th of November , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one box, value 6 d., two gowns, value 4 s.; two pair of stockings, value 1 s.; one petticoat, value 6 d., and one bonnet value 1 s., her property .

RACHEL LEVI . I live in Worship-street. I was sent to Mr. Israel, button-merchant, of St. Mary-axe; on the 26th of November, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was in Duke-street, St. James's-place , I had a band-box in my hand, containing the articles stated in the indictment - I was just going to knock at Mr. Aaron's door, No. 16, and somebody snatched away my band-box, I made no resistance thinking it was a joke at the time, I turned round, they ran away - I then called Stop thief! the prisoner was stopped in my sight, I saw him throw the band-box down; he was quite a stranger to me, the box was picked up, it was torn, and some things fell out, part were found at one end of the street, and some at the other end, some are lost - the two gowns and bonnet were picked up.

SAMUEL JACOBS . I work in Duke-street, Aldgate, in the City. On the 26th of November, between nine and ten o'clock, I heard a cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was coming along with a flannel petticoat in his hand - I seized him, nobody but him was running, the watchman came up directly, I did not see Levi till we came to the watch-house, she said she had lost a gown and others things, and a box, she claimed the petticoat which I took from his hand, and the gowns picked up.

JOHN HOSKINS . I am a watchman; my box is close to where the robbery was committed. Levi passed my box, and after that I heard a cry of Stop thief! I pursued and picked up two gowns - I found the prisoner in custody, nobody was running but him.

WILLIAM TRIPP . I am the watch-house-keeper. Theprisoner was brought to the watch-house, the things produced, and claimed by the prosecutrix.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Of stealing from the person only.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

25. ROBERT WILCOX was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , two chaise cushions, value 10 s. , the goods of John George .

JOHN GEORGE . I am a coach-builder , and live in London-wall . On the 29th of October, between one and two o'clock the cushions were on the premises in a chaise.

JOHN GRIFFIN . I am servant to Mr. George. I was at work in the gateway, and went into a loft for something, I heard a noise, ran to the loft window, and saw the prisoner and another man going out of the gateway - the prisoner had a bag under his arm, I ran down and caught him about two hundred yards off, I asked what he had in the bag, he said, "What is that to you?" I shook the bag and one of the cushions fell out, the other was in the bag - they were in the chaise before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to carry them to Hounsditch, by a young lad for 1 s., I was to stop at the corner of Hounsditch for him.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

26. WILLIAM SIMON TOFTS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one handkerchief value 1 s., the goods of Charles John Adam Schwartz , from his person .

CHARLES JOHN ADAM SCHWARTZ . I live in Bell-yard Goodman's-fields. On the 9th of November, about half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in King-street, Cheapside , looking at the Lord Mayor's procession, my handkerchief was in my side jacket pocket - I was by the side of Alderman Thorp's carriage, in the road, the prisoner was along-side of me, I saw my handkerchief in his hand, I had not felt it taken - I cast my eye on him, and he threw it in my face, I had said nothing to him - a man behind him said, "You have been fishing for this," he said, "No I have not," and immediately ran away - I pursued and seized him. No part of my handkerchief hung out.

ROBERT FIELDING . I am a constable. I received charge of him - he said he had taken it, but meant to return it again.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. His handkerchief hung out, I took it, and gave it into his hand, I did not mean to keep it.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

27. JAMES PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one watch, value 3 l.; one chain, value 6 d., and two keys, value 1 s., the goods of Samuel Dove , from his person .

SAMUEL DOVE . I live in Nassau-street, Middlesex Hospital. On the 30th of October, about seven o'clock in the morning, I was in Lombard-street , my silver hunting watch, was in my fob, and a bundle in my hand - three men stood, two with their backs against the post, and one against the wall at the corner of Clement's-lane, leaving just room for one person to pass between them; I attempted to pass, but they rushed upon me, and took my watch; I am sure the prisoner was one of them - I pursued them, crying Stop thief! they all three ran as far as Birchin-lane, where they separated, the prisoner went up there, and the other two along Lombard-street - I did not lose sight of the the prisoner till a post stopped him, my watch has not been found - I charged him with the robbery, he denied it, and said he was only walking along the street. I am quite sure he was one of the three.

Prisoner. Q. Was I running when I was stopped - A. I think he was, I came up immediately as he was stopped.

CATHARINE WELSH . I am a market-woman, and live in Gilbert-street, Bloomsbury. I was going up Lombard-street, about seven o'clock in the morning, and heard the prosecutor crying Stop thief,! and saw three men coming along with pipes in their mouths, one ran and the other two walked to the end of the street - the one ran up Birchin-lane, I went up the lane, and called out Stop thief! the prisoner walked with another person to the end of the street, and then ran, he was stopped.

Prisoner. Q. You told the Lord Mayor that another man passed me in Birchin-lane - A. The first man ran up there, then the prisoner ran up also, he was one of the three I am certain.

THOMAS THOROUGHGOOD . I am a constable. The prisoner was given to me in Birchin-lane - I found nothing on him, Welsh was by, and said he was one of the men who ran away, he said nothing till after I took him away, he then said he knew nothing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Snow-hill, and turned down Birchin-lane, I heard the alarm, saw nothing, and went on, the prosecutor and woman turned the corner, and said "Stop that man, he is one of them", I said I knew nothing of it, he said he would hang me if it laid in his power.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

28. JAMES DALE was indicted for embezzlement .

BENJAMIN ROBERT ROSE . I am an oilman , and live in Cheapside . The prisoner was my porter , and entrusted to receive money for me. Mr. Kerridge was a customer of mine, and owed me 2 l. 5 s., I had not directed the prisoner to apply for it - it was for two parcels of goods, the first parcel was delivered eight or nine days before. He lived about six weeks with me - I had a good character with him.

GEORGE KERRIDGE . I keep the Bedford Arms, public-house, in South-street, Manchester-square, and deal with Mr. Rose, I owed him 2 l. 5 s., I generally pay as the goods come in. On Thursday, the 29th of November, the prisoner brought some oil; the previous quantity had not been paidfor - I desired my wife to pay him for it, and I saw her give him two sovereigns, and 5 s. in silver; I saw Mr. Rose a few days after, and told him I had paid the prisoner.

BENJAMIN ROBERT ROSE re-examined. He should have given me the money immediately on his coming home, he never accounted to me for it.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I apprehended him at his master's, on the 1st of December, he said nothing.

The prisoner begged for mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

THIRD DAY, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7.

29. JAMES JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , 60 lbs. of lead, value 10 s., the goods of Thomas Philip Weddel Lord Grantham , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

FRANCIS HARRISON . I am a watchman, my beat is in Charles-street, St. James's-square . On the 13th of November, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I was opposite Lord Grantham's house, and heard glass break. I immediately went to search, and on the square side of the house, I found two pieces of lead on the top of the scullery in the area, cut off and rolled up, and one piece cut off and not rolled up, the porter was called up - I stood in the square to prevent an escape; I went into the area with the porter, he got up on the scullery, and found it was cut from there - we found the prisoner concealed under a water cistern; I took him to the watch-house, and found a large knife on him, which appeared to have cut the lead, it was crooked pointed as if made for the purpose, and had lime on it, we found sixty-eight pounds of lead, which I saw matched to the place, it fitted; there appeared to have been as much more taken away - I know it was all safe the beginning of the night, as I saw it.

THOMAS FENNILL . I am servant to Thomas P. Weddel Lord Grantham, who lives in St. James's-square. I was alarmed, I was up at the time, and searched with Harrison in the area - I got up on the scullery, there was a deal of lead taken off, and two pieces rolled up, and one piece cut but not rolled - I could see nobody at first, I went a second time on the other side of the scullery, and found the prisoner concealed under the cistern, I had locked the area myself, he must have got over the rails - I called to him to come out, he came out at the second call, and pretended to have been asleep, he surrendered quietly, the lead was entire the day before; the prisoner had a blue livery jacket on, with a fleur-de-lis on the button.

SAMUEL BARNARD . I am a patrol. I went to Lord Grantham's, on hearing glass fall, and found the lead cut away - I had been there a quarter of an hour before, it was safe then, the prisoner was found under the cistern, a knife was found on him, which appeared to have been used in cutting lead - I saw the lead fitted.

EDMUND PEPPER . On the 13th of November, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house - I found the knife in his waistcoat pocket, with lime on it, I fitted the lead to the scullery, it corresponded.

Prisoner's Defence. I was shut out of my lodging - I met a man who gave me a half-crown, I walked through the square into Pall Mall, it was near one o'clock, I got over the railing, and sat down in the area, and was asleep when the man called me.

GUILTY . Aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

30. WILLIAM PAGE alias WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , at St. Matthew Bethnall-green , one mare, price 10 l. , the property of William Hewett .

WILLIAM HEWETT . I live at Red-hill, Reigate, Surry. I work for my father, who is a butcher, I had a mare which I used to turn out on Red Hill-common , she had a clog on to keep her from straying - I saw her safe on the 30th of October, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, and about five o'clock that evening I missed her - I had turned her out that morning; I could not find her till the 7th of November, when I found her locked up in the pound at Bethnal-green. I am sure it was mine - I took her home. I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at Worship-street; he lived in the parish of Challard, about six miles from Reigate.

JURY. Q. Was any thing done to disfigure her - A. No. I found the clog on Haleswood-common, adjoining Brickhill - I knew it by the chain and strap.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Is there any thing particular in the strap - A. No. The mare was my own, I kept her from fold, I work her occasionally - I bought her of my uncle. The common is not enclosed, the clog was old, they sometimes come off - I thought she might have strayed after her colt, which I had sold about a fortnight before, it was at Reigate - I had had the mare four months, and knew her well, she was marked white down her face, and had two white fetlocks, and a large udder.

COURT. Q. When she got home did she appear to know the place - A. Yes. I put her on the common next morning. Redhill is twenty miles from town.

WILLIAM SHINGLER . I am the patrol of Bethnall-green. On the 31st of October, about half-past two o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner near Cambridge-heath turnpike, near Hackney - he had a mare with this cord on her head, leading her; I went up and asked him what he had got, he said a horse, I said "Is it your own," he said Yes, and that he bought it of the jockeys six months ago - I said "You have a fancy bridle on," he said, Yes; I said "Where did you come from;" he said from Horsham, and that he was going into Hampshire to buy nuts and almonds, that a man told him he could buy them very cheap there; he said he did not know what town or village he was going to - I said he had nothing to bring them home in, he said he should buy a sack there; I detained and searched him, and found 20 s. about him. I put the mare in the Green-yard, and on the 7th Hewett, saw it, and claimed it, and took her away, it appeared quite tired, and was all over clay, as if it had come from the country a considerable distance.

Cross-examined. Q. Where did you take the mare - A. I took her to the pound, the people belonging to the pound fed her - I am sure Hewett saw the same mare I took from the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 21.

Recommended to Mercy, by the Jury, and prosecutor, who stated that the prisoner's mother by his desire gave information where the mare was.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

31. JOHN CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Eleanor the wife of William Wade , on the 26th of November , on the King's highway, at Christ Church, putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, one pocket-book, value 1 s.; two gold rings, value 24 s.; one Bank note, for 10 l., and one Bank note for 5 l., the property of the said William Wade .

ELEANOR WADE . I am the wife of William Wade , an auctioneer , and lives in Red Lion-court, Spitalfields. On the 20th of November, about ten o'clock in the evening, I was returning home; I was near a house which was on fire, which alarmed me, and as I got up Brick-lane, the crowd was very great. I had the apprentice-boy with me, and sent him home to see that my husband was at home, as the fire was very near our house. I went up Brick-lane, a young lady accompanied me; I could not get by church in consequence of the crowd, and went down Princes-street - and at the corner, we were beset by a set of men, I knew nothing of them; one held me by the pelisse, they all appeared of one party. There was a gaslight over my head, and a number of torches about, I was about fifty or sixty yards from the fire - I noticed the man who held me particularly, the prisoner is the man, I am certain; I knew him the moment I saw him again, and have no doubt of him.

Q. While he held you, what happened to you - A. My clothes were lifted up and my pocket torn down and picked, it was not cut off - they ran away, the man who held me ran at the same time. A gentleman took hold of me as I fainted away, and I was taken home in a quarter of an hour. About an hour after I got home, I was fetched to the watch-house, and saw eight or ten men there, the prisoner was among them - I knew him immediately, and selected him from the rest as the person who held my pelisse - he was not pointed out to me, I have no doubt that he is the man. I lost a pocket-book, containing one 10 l. and a 5 l. Bank note.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. You was in considerable alarm in consequence of the fire - A. Yes; but I am certain of the prisoner, it was done in an instant - I suppose it must be near eleven o'clock when I got to the fire.

Q. Did you not say at the watch-house "I cannot tell who robbed me, but he had a blue coat on, if you will examine and find he has a red pocket-book, that is the man" - A. No; I said I could not identify the man who took it, but the man sat there who held me - I did not charge the officer with being one of them at the office; I said one of them had a white coat on, like his, and was much such another man. The gentleman who assisted me said I was robbed; I felt, and missed one of my pockets.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a butcher, and live in Union-street, Spitalfields. On the 20th of November, I was a special constable. I went to the fire about twenty minutes before nine o'clock, and saw the prisoner about one hundred and fifty yards from the fire, in company with two young women. I apprehended him about eleven o'clock that evening, not in consequence of any information - I was at the watch-house when Mrs. Wade came, that was between eleven and twelve o'clock. The watch-house was full of people, some standing and some sitting; she pointed out the prisoner herself, and said she believed him to be one who robbed her. I took no particular notice, and did not hear what she said further, as I went to the fire again.

Cross-examined. Q. She said she believed he was the man - A. I think she said she believed, and at the office there was a man who she believed to be one - I said that was impossible, as I had him in custody at the time she was robbed. After speaking to the prisoner, she turned round to me and said she believed me to be one of them; I said "You do not think I was one," she made no answer - I had a light coat on.

COURT. Q. You are sure she said she believed you to be one - A. Yes; she only spoke to the prisoner and another besides me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at a public-house in Lambeth-street, and about half-past ten o'clock, was coming down Brown's-lane, to go home, and in Red Lion-street Miller took me.

JURY to WADE. Q. Do you know the gentleman who assisted you - A. No; he appeared a respectable tradesman, and had a white apron on. He took me to my door, and called on me the night before last, but I was out.

ELIZA ATKINS . I was servant at the White Hart, public-house, Lambeth-street. On the night of the fire in Spitalfields, the prisoner came to our house about a quarter of an hour past eight o'clock, to a raffle, and did not leave till a quarter past ten - the raffle was to be at seven o'clock, but they could not get members enough.

Q. How do you know the exact time that he left - A. Because the fiddle was to be stopped at a quarter past ten o'clock, and I went to tell the man my master would not let it play any longer. The prisoner was up stairs, sitting at the corner of the table with Harriet Sanders .

COURT. Q. How often have you raffles at the house - A. Not often; but a neighbour asked my master to let it be there, there was a good many people there - Sanders did not dance, not did he, she came in, and went out with him, they drank rum and water - I served them with two glasses. Scott was also with them and went out with them - a young man was with her.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was you in the room all the time - Yes; I am sure neither Sanders nor the prisoner danced - Scott did. The rest of the company had beer - nobody waited on the company but me.

HARRIET SANDERS . I was at the White Hart, public-house, on the evening of the fire. I went with the prisoner at a quarter before eight o'clock, and staid till a quarter past ten o'clock - the raffle did not take place, we came away at a quarter past ten o'clock; Scott came withus, we came away together - I think we had three or four glasses of spirits and water, the first was run and water. Scott and myself danced, we went to the fire together - I never lost sight of him till he was taken.

COURT. Q. Why did not the raffle take place - A. I believe it was because the landlord stopped the music, it was for a beaver hat. I danced the greatest part of the evening, I had three partners - I was not intimate with Chapman, the young girl waited on the company, and staid in the room. More persons left the room with us, but they were not in our company, we three went away by ourselves; I know the girl brought some rum and water, and while I was dancing some gin and water was brought.

SOPHIA SCOTT . I live with my mother in Lambeth-street. My father was a custom-house officer; I was at the White Hart, public-house, on the night of the fire was in Spitalfields - I went at a quarter before eight o'clock. I knew the prisoner by his living servant at a house with his mother - I saw him and Sanders there, there was music and dancing, but it was stopped very early, at a quarter past ten o'clock. I danced - two girls waited on the company, we drank some rum and water, three or four glasses. I drank with the prisoner out of two or three glasses, and with another young man. We came away together at a quarter past ten o'clock, we three came out with another young man and woman, and all five went towards the fire. I was with Chapman till he was taken - I was behind him.

COURT. Q. What distance were you behind - A. Very little; Sanders had hold of his arm, Atkins waited on the company, she went down to fetch what was wanted - I had walked behind Chapman ten minutes before he was taken, as there was a crowd at the fire.

Q. How many partners did you dance with - A. Perhaps five, they were all neighbours.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

32. WILLIAM CORDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , at St. Mary, Whitechapel , one gelding, price 7 l. , the property of Joseph Baldwin .

JOSEPH BALDWIN . I am a carrier , and live at Chigwell, Essex . I had a gelding, I saw it safe on Thursday, the 15th of November, about nine o'clock at night, and saw my lad take it out of the stable, to take it to pasture, about fifty roods off - I came home at ten o'clock, and then the boy was at home and in bed. Next day, I went to the pasture, between one and two o'clock, and the gelding was not there then - I saw it on Saturday, the 17th, at the Nag's Head, public-house, Whitechapel, in the care of Gibbs, at Mr. Lewis's - I am sure it is mine, I took it home on the Monday, it knew the way home and the place; it had a white face, and its two legs were white up to the hock, and it had a saddle-mark on its back - it was not cropped, it was stiff and tired - I do not know the prisoner.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long had you had it - A. Eight years; I do not know of my own knowledge that it was in the pasture - Chigwell is eleven miles from Whitechapel.

JAMES GIBBS . I belong to the Bow-street patrol. On Friday morning, the 16th of November, at four o'clock, I was on the pavement in Whitechapel, and saw the prisoner jogging on on a horse - I found it had no saddle, and I stopped him. I asked where he was going with the horse, he said. to Smithfield, to sell it. I said it was very early to take it to Smithfield, he said he did not know but it was - he said he brought from Attfield Broad Oak, and that he belonged to his master; I asked who his master was, he said, " Nat Dorrington , of Attfield Broad Oak." I said I thought it queer he should be sent so early - he then said he was going to Dorrington's brother, in Kingsland-road; I said I should detain him and the horse, he resisted a little, I called my brother officer, he said "You need not hold me, I will go." I took him to the watch-house, and searched him for tickets, but found none; I found 1 s. 9 d. on him, I took the horse to Lewis, the hostler, of the Nag's Head. public-house, and was there when Baldwin saw the horse.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not the prisoner appear half a fool - A. Not then.

DAVID JOHNSON. I am a patrol, Gibbs's account is correct.

WILLIAM BALDWIN . I do not know Attfield Broad Oak, it is not near my neighbourhood. I looked about the pasture, there was a gap in the field and more horses had got out and were found in a bye lane - I do not think it could have strayed, as it was used to the field. I do not know whether the gap was there the night before - It was worth about 7 l.

JAMES GIBBS re-examined. The horse was very tired and had the appearance of a horse fatigued - Attfield Broad Oak is six or seven miles further than Epping, which is seventeen miles from Whitechapel.

The prisoner made no defence.

WILLIAM CORDELL . I am the father of the prisoner, he is nineteen years old, he has been subject to fits from four years old. I live at Broad Oak, about seventeen miles from Chigwell, he worked for me at times, and at times ran away bird's-nesting, and is half silly. I could never make any thing of him, he was frightened at four years old by a hostler, who I had before the Magistrate for doing so - He did farming work, and would go away at particular times. I have worked for - Hampton, Esq. for thirty years. He went away about twelve o'clock last Tuesday three weeks, and was taken up on Friday morning - The fits caused a kicking and trembling.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy on account of the state of his mind.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

33. CHARLES YATES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Beecroft , about six o'clock in the night of the 26th of October , at St. Mary, Whitechapel , with intent to steal .

ROBERT BEECROFT . I am a coal-meter , and live in Raven-street, Whitechapel . On the 6th of October I went out on my business and returned about six o'clock, and observed a light in my house, I had left nobody there, and had the key of the street door in my pocket. I looked through the key-hole into the passage, and saw two persons - After observing them about three minutes I opened the door, and then saw them distinctly in the passage; one had a candle, which they blew out, and both ran down stairs. I kept guard over the street door, and alarmed the neighbourhood. I have a yardbackwards, which joins my neighbour's yard. In about a quarter of an hour the prisoner was brought to me by Schmollinger, I knew him to be one of the two I saw in the passage, and have doubt of it. I lost nothing.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You returned at six o'clock - A. Yes, to fasten up the house, knowing that nobody was at home. I looked through the key-hole, their backs were towards me. When I went in they came out of the parlour and ran down stairs. I was inside the door when they blew the light out. I am certain of him. When I went out I left the door fast and nobody in the house. They must have entered at the front door.

JOSEPH SCHMOLLINGER . I live three doors from the prosecutor. In consequence of information I went into the privy of my yard and found the prisoner there, standing with his face close to the wall, I secured him. Beecroft saw him in my passage. I found a candle and some matches in the privy. I asked him how he came there; he said "Do not hold me fast, I have done nothing." I said "What business have you here?" he said "I do not know." A person could come from the prosecutor's to my privy; there is a wall between my yard and his, five feet high.

GEORGE BUGG . I live next door to the prosecutor. I heard the alarm and went into his privy and found in the soil of the privy four skeleton keys there, and a bottle and matches; the bottle contains a liquid to produce fire. I found them there an hour after the prisoner was taken, I tried two of the keys to Beecroft's door, they opened it with perfect ease.

Prisoner's Defence. When he came to the privy I said I was come to make water. I came to render assistance.

JOSEPH SCHMOLLINGER . He was not making water, nor did he say he came for that purpose. He could not get there without getting over the wall.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 23.

Recommended to Mercy on account of his youth.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

34. WILLIAM BOSWELL and JAMES JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , one coat, value 2 l. 10 s., the goods of Sir William Adams , Knt. , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM GODDARD . I live with Mr. Round. No. 25, Albemarle-street, Piccadilly . On the 23d of November, about three o'clock, I was cleaning the drawing-room windows, and saw both the prisoners come and stand with their backs to my master's front door, one of them walked down Sir William Adams 's area, which is next door, and then the other after him; the first that went down went into the cellar, the other followed - in about a minute the first came out of the cellar and both went in doors, and in about half a minute one came out and looked back for the other, who brought out the box coat, rolled it up, and gave it to the other, who walked into the cellar with it, the other looked up and said "Away with it," and flung his hand out; I ran down into the street and shut myself into the area with them - rang the door bell - the footman came and they were taken in the area.

Prisoner BOSWELL. Q. Where were you - A. In the middle balcony.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I live with Sir William Adams . In consequence of what Goddard said, I looked down into the area and saw the two prisoners, I immediately locked the gate, and then went into the hall. Goddard said they had brought the coat out and put it in the cellar. I looked into the cellar but it was not there, there was a coal cellar just by, I did not look there but went back into the servants' hall, but it was not there, I went up and alarmed my master, and when I came back I found it thrown on some lumber in the hall, rolled up; it was not there when I went up. I suppose it was in the coal cellar, which is about a yard and a half from the dust-hole. I do not know the value, it had been in wear two years I should think. I saw it safe at twelve o'clock hanging in the hall.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM GODDARD re-examined. I staid in the area with them but did not keep my eye on them, as one or two friends came to the gate and talked with me. I said it was in the cellar, both the dust-hole and coal place are cellars, they could have moved it while I ran down stairs.

BOSWELL'S Defence. A woman sent me down for a box.

JONES'S Defence. He has perjured himself in two or three instances.

BOSWELL - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

35. HENRY TURNER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sir John Osborn , Bart. , about eight o'clock in the night of the 18th of November , at St. Martin in the Fields , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, four sheets, value 20 s.; three table-cloths, value 12 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 1 s.; three bed-gowns, 5 s.; fifteen yards of linen cloth, value 18 s.; two shirts, 1 s.; two yards of printed cotton, value 2 s.; two hatbands, value 4 s., and two egg cups, value 1 s., the goods of William Airley .

WILLIAM AIRLEY . I am coachman to Sir John Osborn , Bart., who lives at the Admiralty. I have an apartment in the gallery of the Nag's Head yard, Whitcomb-street , my master pays the rent. I left town on the 27th of October, and remained out of town till the 24th of November, my family were with me. I left my apartment locked up safe. I had two rooms, one opened into the gallery, and the other led out of that room into the bed-room. It was not connected with the Nag's Head, public-house. When I came home on 24th of November I found the lock prized open, and the locks of the drawers opened, and the articles stated in the indictment gone, which are worth above 3 l. I knew the prisoner when he was a boy, but had not seen him for years. Clemence produced the property to me in Branch's presence.

THOMAS BRANCH . I am a sawyer. I have the first apartment in the gallery; I saw the prisoner in the gallery, on the 18th of November, in the evening, at the prosecutor's door, going in. I watched him, and thought he wanted to break the door open, he came five different times up and down the gallery. I kept watching, and atlast saw him come out of the prosecutor's room with a large bag on his back. I stopped him and asked what he had, he said his own clothes, which he got from his mother, Mrs. M'Gray. I said it was false, for he brought them out of the coachman's room. I took him into Potter's room. When we got to Mrs. M'Gray's room which is in the gallery, he ran into her room and got under the bed, we secured him. I gave Clemence the same property as I took from the prisoner. I found the staple of the outer door forced back, and all the boxes and drawers broken open.

WILLIAM CLEMENCE . I went to the gallery of the Nag's Head I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, and found two egg cups upon him. The property was given me in Potter's room. I found the prosecutor's door forced open, also his boxes and drawers. I think he must have done it with a knife which I found on the drawers, broken to pieces. I found a jacket in the room.

WILLIAM AIRLEY . The property is all mine, the knives and forks were in good condition when I left the room.

JAMES POTTER . I am a stable-keeper, and live in the gallery. I was at home when the alarm was given, it was dark. Branch brought me the bundle, I took the prisoner in Mrs. M'Gray's room, under the bed. I know the jacket found in Airley's room, a man came to me two or three days before to enquire for the prisoner with it on.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

36. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Read , about one o'clock in the night of the 5th of December , and stealing therein, two keys, value 1 s., his goods, and two candlesticks, value 19 s. , the goods of John Jackson .

CHARLES READ . I live in Judd-street, Brunswick-square , and am a taylor t Yesterday morning between one and two o'clock, I was alarmed - got up, and heard the cry of thieves. I opened the door and saw Mr. Jackson with a candle, he said there were thieves in the house. I ran to the window, called Watch, and went down and let him in - they searched the house - the prisoner was found in the next house. The things in the back kitchen dresser drawer were taken out but not taken away. Two keys belonging to the first floor rooms were taken out of the doors, brought down, and left in the passage by the front door. Mr. Jackson's candlesticks were found on the stairs. I found the back kitchen window thrown up, which would enable them to get in. I put it down myself the night before, but I cannot say whether it was fastened. All the other doors were safe, I was the last person that was in the back kitchen that night. The candlesticks are worth 19 s.

JOHN JACKSON . I lodge in the house. I heard a noise in the bed-room, and saw somebody put his head into my room, I made a catch at him but he ran down stairs to the back of the house. I went down stairs with Mr. Read to let the watchman in. We traced the foot marks to the wall of the next house, three watchmen went over. The candlesticks were left in the drawing-room the night before, I found them on the stairs near the bottom. They must have entered through the back window.

JOHN BERRY . I am a watchman. I went into the adjoining house and found the prisoner behind the door in the attic. I found the back windows of the house open. There was no bed in the room. I asked what business he had there; he said he had no place to sleep, and went in there to rest; it was an empty house. He had attempted to get up the chimney, and had knocked down all the mantle-piece. A knife, one shilling, and some halfpence were found on him. I charged him with having been in the next house - he did not deny it. There were wet foot marks on the stairs before we went up.

Prisoner. Q. I told you a woman knocked my hat into the area and I got down for it, heard the alarm, and was afraid to come out - A. Not a word of the kind passed.

ROBERT SOUTHERN . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner in the attic of the next house, which is under repair; he said he came there to sleep, as his brother was ill at home, and he could not go there to sleep. He was all over lime, and appeared to have been up the chimney.

ROBERT WEST . I am a watchman. I went to the adjoining house and found the prisoner in the attic, he at first tried to stop us from opening the door, and said "What do you want here?" we said "We want you." He said he came there to sleep.

Prisoner's Defence. I was talking to a woman who wanted me to treat her, she knocked my hat off, I got into the area for it, and hearing a call of murder and thieves, I was afraid to go up stairs and went into the house.

JAMES ANDERSON . I am the prisoner's father, and a hackney coachman. I received the coach of him at half-past eleven o'clock that night. I expected he was gone home; his brother was ill, he used to sleep with his brother; he slept in my room for a night or two.

JOHN BERRY re-examined. I guess that he got in at the back window of the empty house, as it was open, it was the only place he could enter at.

CHARLES READ . He must have got through the area of the empty house, then through the empty house and out at the back. There were foot marks in the area of the empty house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

37. NICHOLAS ALEXANDER BRYSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , one mare, price 3 l. , the property of John Jones .

JOHN JONES . I am a labouring man , and live on Woolwich-common . I had a black pony which was at work on Thursday night, and turned it out on the common, on the 26th of May, 1820, with more horses. I missed it the next day, and found it in Smithfield the same day, in Sweetman's possession - it is worth about 3 l., it cost me 6 l. twelve months before.

JOSEPH SWEETMAN . I am a horse-slaughterer, and live in Grub-street. On the 26th of May, 1820, I delivered a pony to Jones, at the Bear and Ragged-staff, Smithfield. I received it that day from the prisoner, who gave his name as Ripley, of Charlton. He came to my shop and said he was recommended to me by Hulk and Williams,to sell me a horse, he said it was neither big nor little, that it was alive, and was at Westminster. I went there with him. As we went along, several men who appeared to be soldiers, spoke to him. I asked if he had been in the army, he said he had been a serjeant in the Coldstream Guards, and had his discharge. He took me to the Angel public-house, in Tothill-street; he went out and the mare was brought to the door, he said "Here it is, come over the way, we do not wish every body to hear our business;" he asked 3 l. for it, I said that was too much by half; I gave him 30 s. or 36 s. for it - we went and dined at a cook's-shop, and as I brought it home, the officres surrounded me in Smithfield.

Q. Pray are you licensed to carry on this business - A. Yes; now, but was not then - I did not give any information to the Magistrate, I did not know it was necessary, I attended at the office a month or five weeks ago, I gave no information before that, all the officers knew it; I gave no information till the 3 d of November last. I went to Tothill-street the day after I bought the mare, and found he had given me a wrong name.

Q. Did not you tell the Magistrate that you made the bargain at the Angel, public-house, but you did not know the name of the street - A. I do not think I did, my examination was read over to me.

Q. You say, in the examination, that you did not know the name of the street - A. I recollect I did say that.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

38. JAMES LEFEVRE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , six sets of harness, value 10 l., and one silver spoon, value 10 s., the goods of John Houlditch and James Houlditch , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN HOULDITCH , I am in partnership with my brother James; we are coach-makers . The prisoner was our apprentice for a year and a half, and a brother of his was also our apprentice - we missed nothing while the prisoner was with us.

WILLIAM DUTTON TOWNSEND . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Little Rusel-street, Covent-garden. The prisoner came to my shop on the 20th of September, and asked me to advance him 9 s. or 10 s., on this spoon; it having a crest on it, I asked whose it was, he said it was his father's, who lived in Princes-street, very near me, and that he lived with him, but he was an out-door apprentice to Mr. Winstaple, a bedstead-maker, in Drury-lane. I said I wished to see his father before I advanced any money; he then left, to send his father, as I supposed, I sent one of my lads to follow him, he returned and said he had gone to Mr. Houlditch's - he immediately came into the shop again with a young man a little older than himself, saying, he was his brother; he said the lad had called on him, and that he worked at the prosecutor's (Houlditch's), and that the prisoner actually was an apprentice of Mr. Winstaple's, and that the spoon was the property of his father, who had been butler in a family. and had received this with many others, as a reward for his past services, which precisely agreed with what the boy had stated. I then lent him 9 s. on the spoon. On the 12th of October, he came again and brought a set of gig harness, and said Mr. Hinton, his brother, in Long-acre, had requested him to come with it - he said Mr. Hinton kept a shop; I advanced him 1 l. on it. On the 17th, he brought a coach harness, on which I advanced 30 s., after making a great deal of enquiry. On the 24th of October, he came again with two more sets of gig harness, I refused to advance any more till I saw Mr. Hinton; he said he would send him, and in the afternoon he came again with the same man whom he brought about the spoon - he said he came to speak to the correctness of the harness; I said I must see Mr. Hinton, they left, and did not come again, nor did I ever see Hinton.

Cross-examined by MR. NORTON. Q. Was the harness in parts - A. No; it was buckled together all in one set; my house is not five minutes walk from Houlditch's, he was absent about long enough to go there - the man who he brought was about twenty-four years old; I understand he has absconded. The coach-harness was brought all together - it was heavy.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. HOULDITCH. The prisoner's brother is not sixteen years old, he has been a year and a half with me. My brother and I live together, the boys occasionally go into the kitchen, where the spoons are. The value of the coach-harness is three or four guineas, they are not new; our shop and dwelling-house join, they are all one set of premises, but part of this property might be took from our premises over the way - here is one set of coach-harness, I am sure was taken from the house, it is worth above 40 s. I am not certain that it had not been moved - one Clemence was in our employ, has absconded - he is about twenty-five years old.

Cross-examined. Q. Is it customary to take harness over to the other premises - A. Yes; I saw this harness in the loft a few days before he was taken, part of the harness which was buckled to it still remains there. I should think the prisoner could not carry it away all together.

HENRY STOWELL . I received the harness from the witness. When I apprehended the prisoner, he said two more men used to come to the shop a little after eight o'clock in the evening; they used to take the things away for the night, and bring them to him in the morning, and he pledged them. He said he took the spoon from the kitchen and pawned it, and gave the money to the two men. He took me to a public-house to find them, but no such men were to be found - he mentioned no particular harness, but said they used to come and stand opposite the shop, and he used to give them a harness at a time, and that Clemence, who has absconded, was concerned.

Cross-examined. Q. Did he say from where it was taken - A. From the warehouse.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Of Larceny only.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Bayley.

39. JOHN OXLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , twelve pair of stockings, value 18 s. , the goods of Valentine Smedley .

MR. LAW conducted the prosecution.

VALENTINE SMEDLEY. I live in Mumford-court, Milk-street, Cheapside . The prisoner was my porter for nearly four years, I noticed he never went out with goods withoutgoing down stairs first. On the 9th of November, I suspected him, and observed him do the same before he went to dinner - I got the keys of my wine-cellar and went down, he made a violent rush from the cellar to the privy; I asked his reason for doing so, he said he had a bowel complaint. He went to dinner, I again went down with a candle and found in an iron safe, not in use, four pair of stockings. I sent for Mr. Maynard. When he returned I demanded his reason for rushing from the cellar to the privy, and said he would save himself much trouble by telling; he said he had done nothing to my injury, and was ready to answer it. I took him to the cellar with his father and shewed him the stockings, and asked if he put them there, and said "I presume they are the remains of a dozen," he said "Yes; a man in the street induced him to do it," and he had sold or given them to him.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am a constable. Mr. Smedley's account is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

40. WILLIAM WRIGHT and JAMES BARTLETT were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , one reticule, value 2 s. 6 d., two half-crowns and three sixpences, the goods of Caroline Williams , from her person .

CAROLINE WILLIAMS. I am a single woman , and live in Marman-street, Commercial-road. On the 9th of November, about three o'clock, I was in Cheapside , waiting for the Lord Mayor's procession. I had a reticule in my hand, containing 6 s. 6 d., a key, and a handkerchief, it was snatched out of my hand, I saw it go, but could not tell who took it, there were a great number of persons by, I saw it at Guildhall the next day, when the prisoner were in custody - I saw them at the watch-house about an hour after; the 6 s. 6 d. was in it then, as also my handkerchief and key.

MICHAEL HOY . I am a watchman. I was on duty at the corner of Watling-street, near St. Paul's; Mines, the constable, beckoned to me to follow some persons; about three o'clock, we saw the prisoners at the corner of Cheapside, next to St. Paul's, in company, together with many others. I watched them towards Queen-street, I heard Miss Williams cry out that she was robbed, she was then down on her knees, and her scarf half off her shoulder. I saw Bartlett snatch the reticule from her hand; Wright was a very little distance from him - I noticed them in company all the way. I immediately seized Bartlett, he threw the reticule to Wright, whom Hughes secured and took it from him; I saw it in his hands. We took them to the watch-house - the reticule fell open as it was snatched.

NATHANIEL MINES . I am a constable. I saw Hoy at the corner of St. Paul's church-yard - I called him to my assistance, we followed a gang; I first saw the prisoners near St. Paul's church-yard. I saw Miss Williams against a door, she complained of having lost her reticule; the prisoners were both near her, I did not see it taken. Foy seized Bartlett and Hughes took Wright - there was a great crowd, I took Wright to the watch-house, the reticule was torn with the violence of the pull - I found 10 s. 6 d. on Wright and a gold ring on his finger.

FREDERICK HUGHES , I am a watchman. I saw the prisoners in Cheapside, in company; I followed them with a great many more, they kept rushing about the mob. I heard the prosecutrix scream out and say somebody was robbing her. I saw Wright receive the reticule from Bartlett, it was a little dirty with the mud.

JAMES KNIGHT . I am a constable, and was in Cheapside. We followed the prisoners from Ludgate-hill, to where this happened - I did not see the prosecutrix till Foy called, and gave Bartlett's hand into mine; he had a ring on, I took it off, and Foy said, "Take him, here is another;" he seized Wright, who had the reticule in his hand, which the prosecutrix claimed - it is torn, there were thirty or forty persons in the gang.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

BARTLETT'S Defence. I went to see the show, and heard the cry of thieves - I stood by the lady, but am innocent.

WRIGHT'S Defence. I heard the cry, the mob drove me on the pavement - I saw the reticule on the ground, and picked it up to find the owner.

WRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 20.

BARTLETT - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

41. WILLIAM BEATTY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , two pieces of printed cotton, containing forty-eight yards, value 2 l. 4 s. , the goods of William Harrington .

WILLIAM HARRINGTON . I am a linen-draper , and live at Aldgate . On the 26th of October, as I came home about a quarter before five o'clock, I met the prisoner about a rood from my door, with one of the prints in his arm, and dragging the other behind him, running in the middle of the road - a waggon was passing between us; I stepped towards him, and then he let it fall out, a cry of Stop thief! was rose, and he was secured - on going into the shop, I missed the cotton from about a yard inside the door; I picked it up myself.

JOSEPH STONE . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner running, he was secured by Church-row.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

42. CHARLES PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , 3 lbs. of tea, value 21 s.; 14 1/2 lbs. of sugar, value 14 s. 6 d.; 28 lbs. of other sugar, value 16 s. 4 d.; 2 lbs. of muscatell raisins, value 3 s. 4 d., and one bag, value 6 d. , the goods of Walter Rochford .

CHARLES GREENING . I am servant to Mr. Walter Rochford , who is a grocer , and lives in Bishopsgate-street , the prisoner was a stranger. On Saturday, the 12th of October, about noon, a person called at the warehouse, and delivered me an order in writing, and also verbally ordered 2 lbs. of muscatell raisins, to be packed with them, and sent to Messrs. Taylor and Co., Lime-street, Leadenhall-market . I packed them up in a bag, (they were the articles stated in the indictment), and sent them by William Quinsey , directing him not to leave them without the money - he returnedwithout either goods or money; I have not seen them since. On the 24th I saw the prisoner in custody.

Prisoner. Q. Was not the money offered you for the goods - A. Yes; after he was in custody two persons called.

WILLIAM QUINSEY . I am porter to Mr. William Rochford . I received a bag from Greening to take to Lime-street, with a bill and receipt, and received orders not to leave them without the money - I went between one and two o'clock, and the prisoner opened the door to me, I said "I have brought some goods for Mr. Taylor;" he said "Mr. Taylor is not within, he is gone on Change," and would be in in an hour - I said I had orders not to leave them without the money, he said, "You may leave them till you go to your master's, and if he does not like them to be left, call again in an hour, and you shall have the money or goods, as they will be dry and quite safe here, I will take great care of them," this induced me to leave them, he said "I will send the money in an hour, or Mr. Taylor shall call in the course of the afternoon and pay for them" - I left them in consequence of the appearance of the warehouse, thinking it was all right, I told Greening what I had done - I went again in two hours, I did not see the prisoner then, but a dark young man named Ball. The name Taylor and Co. was on the door - I have called three or four times, but can find no Mr. Taylor there - the house was shut up about the 27th. I never saw the prisoner or Taylor until he was taken; I went with Hawkins on the 24th, to No. 12, Lime-street, and saw he prisoner there - I said "That is the man I delivered the goods to," and he took him. I have never seen Taylor nor the goods since.

THOMAS COLE . I live in Newgate-street, and am a carpet manufacturer. On Friday, the 26th of October, I went to No. 12, Lime-street, Taylor and Co., was written on both sides of the door - I did not see the prisoner there, I called twice on the same day. On the 27th I went to the house, it was completely closed then, and remains closed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was engaged as clerk to Taylor and Co. The man brought the goods, I received them with a bill and receipt - I said I had not sufficient money, and Mr. Taylor was not within, he said he must take them back, I said, very well; he hesitated for a quarter of an hour, I said "It rains hard if you like to leave them, and ask your master if you may leave them, I will take care of them," he did not return, and at four o'clock I left the warehouse. I told Mr. Taylor the goods were left, he said he would call and pay for them. On Monday and Tuesday, I was helping a man who opened a new shop, on Wednesday I went to the counting-house, and was apprehended - next day Taylor said he had tendered the money - he was taken in custody. Mr. Corf the partner, was arrested, and is in Whitecross-street prison. Taylor lived at Blackheath - I cannot find him.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

FOURTH DAY, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8.

43. JOHN PAUL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , six spoons, value 1 l. , the goods of Nathaniel Smith Machin , and Robert Debenham .

The prisoner pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

44. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , two coats, value 2 l.; three pair of trowsers, value 20 s.; one jacket, value 3 s.; one shirt, value 2 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 3 s., and one pair of braces, value 3 d., the goods of Frederick Knott ; and one wherry, value 8 l. , the goods of John Drummond .

FREDERICK KNOTT . I live at Leith, and am master of the Grasshopper , which laid in Horsleydown . On the 26th of November, these things laid in the cabin, the prisoner was a stranger - I slept on board; I went to bed about half-past nine o'clock, they was then safe. I awoke about half-past six o'clock, and missed my clothes - I found part of them at the Thames Police office, three days after.

JOHN DRUMMOND . I am a waterman , On the 26th of November, about twenty minutes past six o'clock. I left my wherry fast at Hermitage-stairs, Wapping . It was worth 8 l., I was only a short distance from it, and missed it in five minutes - I got another and rowed about, and found it about a quarter past two o'clock, in the custody of the Thames Police, the prisoner was in the Police boat then, my boat was about the width of the river from the Grasshopper.

Prisoner. Q. How was the boat fastened - A. With two ropes.

DANIEL BLYTHE . I am a surveyor of the Thames Police. On the 26th of November, about two o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner off Iron-Gate stairs, in Drummond's wherry - I boarded the boat, and said "What are you doing with this boat," it had "J. Drummond, Hermitage-stairs" on it, he said he was going to the Phoenix. I found part of a pair of braces in the boat, and in his trowsers pocket, a pipe key, which he said was the key of his lodging, at the Maze, in Tooley-street - I asked how long he had left White's-yard; he said six weeks. About four or five o'clock in the morning, I went to No. 2, White's-yard, where I knew he lodged, and the key opened the door of the front room - I found a shirt and two handkerchiefs there; a woman was there whom I knew he lived with. I shewed the things, and told him where I found them, he claimed them, and on Wednesday, Knott saw and claimed them - I had seen him at that house before in September.

Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I fell in with this girl, and lived with her till my money was gone, and then left - I lodged up stairs, not in that room, I had left some handkerchiefs with her, and thought these were mine.

GUILTY . Aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

45. THOMAS SAXELBYE was indicted for that he, on the 20th of September , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain last will, purporting to be the will of Thomas Robinson , of the town of Kingston-upon-Hull,merchant, deceased, which said will is as follows, "The whole of my property I wish to give to my mother-in-law, if she survives me, my uncle having bad conduct - I hope she will be good to him, when she finds it necessary. Thomas Robinson ." With intent to defraud Thomas Robinson , of Sutton, in the county of York, labourer , Richard Robinson , The Reverend William Hurn , clerk , Sarah Hurn , William Swiney , Esq. , and Hannah Swiney , against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be false and counterfeit.

NINE OTHER COUNTS, varying the manner of laying the charge.

MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL LUKE . I am a clerk in the Prerogative Office, Doctors' Commons. I produce the proceedings in the cause of Thomas Robinson , against Robinson, and others; I have the assignation book, the scripts, allegation, and deposition, I also produce the assignation book for the year 1815.

WILLIAM TEBBS , ESQ. I am a Proctor of Doctor's Commons. I find an entry in the assignation book, that I attended on a certain day, when some witnesses were produced - the proceedings must have commenced in 1815, Mr. Nathaniel Gosling was the Proctor concerned, he is now dead. I was not in the cause, I only attended for him. The allegation bears date in Hilliary Term, 1816.

THOMAS DYKE , ESQ. I was the Proctor engaged for Eliza Robinson , in this proceeding. The allegation is dated Hilliary Term, 1816, that is not the commencement of the suit - I brought the allegation in, and have the deposition signed Thomas Saxelbye , referring to that allegation, it appears to have been repeated before Dr. Creswell on the 9th of May, 1816, it has the attestation of G. Silk, notary public. I corresponded with Galon and Wilson, attornies at Hull, on the subject - These are two scrip's in the proceeding marked A. and B. Here is a letter dated the 26th of August, 1815, which I wrote to Galon and Co. on the subject.

MR. TEBBS re-examined. Q. Look at the deposition signed Thomas Saxelbye - A. It is dated the 8th of May, 1816, and was repeated and acknowledged on the 9th - I was not present, it was taken in private; I know nothing of the case except attending for Mr. Gosling, when witnesses were produced - I cannot say whether the prisoner was one of them.

MR. GEORGE SILK . I am a notary-public, and one of the examiners of the Court at Doctor's Commons. My signature is to the deposition - I took the deposition from Thomas Saxelbye , I do not remember the person who swore by that name - it was signed in my office in Doctor's Commons. I find by looking at the script marked B. that it was certainly produced to the person making the deposition.

MR. DYKE. (Looking at the assignation book for 1815.) The first entry made of this suit, is on the bye day after Trinity Term the 2d of June, 1815, that only shews that the cause was pending. I find by the Court caveat book, that script A. was exibited on the 5th of September, 1815, script B. was propounded on the 22d of November, and repropounded on the 31st of January, 1816 - script A. was propounded in September, and abandoned when B. was produced. Neither A. nor B. bear any date.

COURT. Q. Was any thing done in the suit before the 26th of September, when script A. was propounded - A. Nothing, but the usual assignations were made, there was an order, that unless further scripts were produced, the Court would pronounce against A. if paper B. had been pronounced, we should have proceeded again on paper A. there was no unnecessary delay with reference to script A. I had notice from the other party, that unless I proceeded on the 5th of September, they should move the Court to grant administration - the notice is dated the 23d of August, and on the 5th of September, A. was exhibited, I gave notice of to my correspondents at Hull. There was no unnecessary delay.

MR. JOHN KIRBY PICARD . I am perfectly acquainted with the prisoner, and have seen him write frequently - I have no doubt of the signature to the deposition being his writing. He lived some years in my service.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT HULLOCK . Q. You reside at Hull - A. I do; the prisoner also lived there, I have known him since 1810, and some years before that; between that time and the present, I have known him intimately, he came into my service as manager of my white lead works, in 1810, and remained till 1816 - he was principal manager; very important interests were entrusted to him, he always conducted himself exceeding well - he might have defrauded me of thousands of pounds without being detected, and I believe he never defrauded me of a penny, but behaved with fidelity.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. When did he leave you - A. About August, 1816. he went to reside at the end of the town, and commenced business on his own account, as agent for the sale of lead, he might have done business for himself while with me. I gave him 150 l. a year, house rent, taxes, and coals - he had a wife and two children. I knew where he lived. If there was any change in his mode of living after he left me, it was for the worse, there was no improvement. I believe he lived at Hull, up to the present time, except being abroad a short time.

COURT. Q. Then he was forthcoming if any application had been made for him - A. Yes. There was no appearance of his having increased in wealth. He was abroad two or three months.

The deposition made by the prisoner at Doctor's Commons, was then put in and read: - It stated in answer to the third article of the assignation put in by the opposite party, the deponent says, on the 30th of April, he called on the deceased after dinner, about three o'clock as was his usual custom, and found him ill, of the illness of which he died, the deceased was sitting with Eliza Robinson, and having enquired of him about his health, Eliza Robinson left the room, and he and the deponent being together alone, and the deponent seeing him ill, and thinking it improper he should die without a will; he addressed himself to him, and said he hoped he had made his will - the deceased replied "I have not done it, but will be obliged to you to do it for me," and said something about not liking attornies, and deponent said he would get it done, and taking out a piece of paper, being a piece of a letter, asked how he would have it done, and he by word of mouth gave instructions for making the will, and agreeable to what he said, deponent wrote on paper, and read it over orderly and distinctly to him, and askedif he approved of it - the deceased said Yes, and deponent asked him to sign it, and the deceased having the paper in his hand, did also peruse what was written, and after so doing, having a pen in his hand, subscribed his name thereto, and gave it to deponent, saying it was right and what he wished, and desired him to get a will drawn from it - that the deponent then left, to let the will be more properly drawn up, and in three quarters of an hour left him, and that the deponent verily believes the deceased intended to give and dispose of his property as in the paper marked B. and the deponent judging from the deceased's general manner, verily believed that the deceased was of perfect sound memory and understanding, that he talked quite rational, and well understood what he said, and what was said to him, and was fully capable of making his last will, and acts of the like nature.

To the fourth article, the deponent refers to what was before deposed, and says that when he left the deceased on the said Sunday he (the deponent) did not consider him to be in any imminent danger, and being much engaged on the following day did not apply to any person to make a more formal will, and on the next day the 2d of May, in the morning, he called at Eliza Robinson 's house where the deceased lived, and enquired for him, and was informed he was insane, and therefore thought it useless to apply to any person to make the said will, and that he never saw the deceased afterwards.

To the fifth and sixth article, (looking at paper B.) the deponent, referring to what was by him pre-deposed, says, he knows that the name, Thomas Robinson , subscribed to the said will, is, and was the proper hand-writing of the said deceased; and that he did write and subscribe the same in the presence of the deponent; and further says, that the said will remained in deponent's possession till two or three months after the said circumstance, when he delivered the same to Eliza Robinson , and having perused the same, he verily believes it to be in the same condition as when he read it over to the deceased.

To the second article, the deponent stated, he believed Thomas Robinson to be the natural son of Eliza Robinson, till he was given to understand the reverse, and that Eliza Robinson treated the deceased with every tenderness, and believed the deceased entertained a very high regard for the said Eliza Robinson , and conducted himself to her as is if she was his mother; and the deponent remembers once, when talking of wills, that the deceased said, "Mine is made, in a few minutes, I shall leave my mother-in-law what I have."

(Signed) THOMAS SAXELBYE .

MR. SILK . I only know by the recital of this paper that it is the same. I have no mark on it.

Q. If a paper of the same contents were produced would you have given the same testimony as you have done now - A. Allow me to see it again. I observe there are some formal words on it, which leads me to believe it came from the Prerogative Office, any paper endorsed the same would be the ground of the same evidence. I produced the paper myself to the deponent, I received it from the Prerogative Office, and returned the same to them.

MR. DYKE . The paper marked B. was pronounced and propounded as the will, I have no doubt of it from its contents and the indorsement.

Q. The indorsement was made at a subsequent period - A. Yes; I got it from Messrs. Galon and Co. of Hull, and brought it into Court on the 3d of October, 1815, it was propounded on the 22d of November. The script A. was brought in on the 5th of September, 1815, the Court gave me time to consider whether I propounded it, and in the course of that time B. was brought in. In September Gosling gave notice of his intention to oppose script A. being propounded.

COURT. Q. What is the mode of commencing a suit - A. One is by a caveat being entered by a party (interested in the testator's effects) against the will being pronounced without their knowledge. The other is calling on the parties to bring in a decree if they have any. The caveat is entered in a book kept at the Commons, it is not here. After the caveat we give notice to the Proctor who enters it, to appear to say why he opposes, and he enters his reason. The entries which have been referred to are all subsequent ones.

MR. BRODRICK . Q. Is not the caveat a mere preliminary proceeding - A. Certainly so; if that continues, a suit commences. The Court caveat book has the commencement of the suit. I should call the notice to state the reason of opposition the commencement of the suit.

MR. SERGEANT HULLOCK. Q. You received a paper marked B. from Messrs. Galon and Co. agents for Eliza Robinson - A. Yes; the letter enclosing it is dated the 28th of September, 1815, I received it about the 30th. I have no mark on it, I only know it by the actuate at the back, that is put on after the decree. I gave it personally to Mr. Richard Creswell the Registrar of the Court. The witnesses opposing it were examined and cross-examined by the opposite party in London. The cross-interrogatories were furnished to me by Mr. Gosling, they are not known till publication. I produce the witnesses in Court, they are then sworn by the Judge, and the Proctor hands the interrogatories over to the examiner. No witnesses were produced on the the other side; it appears by an entry in the book that time was allowed the opposite party to bring witnesses - none were brought. I prayed publication on the 8th of May, 1816, and on the 1st of June, Mr. Gosling declared he gave no allegation except objecting to the witnesses; the case then stood for them to give their objection to the witnesses; and on the 26th of June he declared he gave no objecting allegation. Jane Hewson and Ann Stevenson were examined in support of the paper B., I believe Mr. Martin was the opposite attorney.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was there incidental to this proceeding, what you call a decree by ways and means - A. Yes; it was respecting a man abroad having a right to oppose, by the assignation book it appears it was ordered on the 8th of December; the termination of the suit was in July, 1816, as the party did not appear in that interval. The letter enclosing script A. is dated the 2d of September. I have no doubt of script B. being the paper pronounced as the will, or that the allegation and depositions refer to that paper, it is deposited in the Prerogative Office with the clerk of the papers before probate. The Registrar receives it from me and hands it over to him, and after probate it goes into the possession of the Record-keeper.

SAMUEL LUKE . I brought script B. from the Record Office.

MR. DYKE. Here is a caveat entered in the book on the 8th of May, and in the Court caveat it is entered that I appeared on behalf of Eliza Robinson , on the 14th of June, 1815, and claimed letters of administration with the will annexed, which was script A.

MR. PICARD. The whole of script B. except the signature,

" Thomas Robinson ," is the prisoner's hand-writing.

(Script B. read.)

"The whole of my property I wish to give to my mother-in-law, if she survives me, my uncle having bad conduct; I hope she will be good to him when she finds it necessary.

THOMAS ROBINSON ."

MARY BAILEY . I was in the service of the late Mrs. Robinson of Hull, from 1814 to 1819. I remember her son-in-law, Thomas Robinson , he lived with her, and died in the house; they did not live affectionately together, I never saw any love between them.

Q. At all times that was the state of their behaviour - A. At all times. I knew the prisoner perfectly well; after Mr. Robinson's death I was the only servant, I attended the door and did every thing. Mr. Robinson died six or seven months after I went there. I recollect Mr. Saxelbye being there only once in that time. I do not remember whether it was on a Sunday or week day. I do not know what he came for.

Q. Were you at home on Sundays, or had you leave to go out - A. I went out after tea, sometimes every Sunday, and sometimes once a fortnight. It was not usual for Saxelbye to come to see Mr. Robinson on a Sunday. Mr. Robinson was taken ill on Monday, the 1st of May; I remember the day before that (Sunday) Mr. Lockwood was with him most of that day, he came in the morning before ten o'clock, or a little after, and continued till one o'clock, and in the afternoon he came again, a little after two o'clock, and continued till six o'clock. Between twelve and one o'clock, Mr. and Mrs. Ballan called, they might stop half an hour. They dined at half-past one on that Sunday; Mr. Robinson, Mrs. Robinson, Miss Ann Hewson , and Eliza Philipson sat down to dinner. When Lockwood came dinner was off the table - I believe there was some wine on the table. Miss Hewson went away, and Miss Philipson stopped, they continued all in one room together, and drank tea about six o'clock, I never saw Mr. Robinson go out of the room. Mr. Saxelbye never came into the house during that day. Mr. Robinson was not particularly ill on that day - he made no particular complaint, he complained of the coldness of the day. Mr. Martin his attorney called next day, and his clerk came, they both saw Mr. Robinson together. On Monday night, at eleven o'clock, or half-past, he was taken ill, quite deranged, and died on the Monday following; he was generally light-headed all that time, and had a nurse for two days.

Q. How soon after his death did you see Mr. Saxelbye at his house - A. Perhaps six or seven weeks after; he was frequently there, two or three times a week for a long time. I never heard him talk with Mrs. Robinson or any one about the will. I knew Messrs. Galon and Wilson, the attornies, Mr. Galon frequently came to our house, I cannot recollect whether he was ever there when Saxelbye was. I took a note to the prisoner at Mr. Picard's office from Mrs. Robinson, six or seven weeks after Mr. Robinson died, it was before he came to visit so frequently. I was ordered to deliver it into his hands, and ask what time he would call, which I did.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT HULLOCK. Q. Mr. Galon was a very respectable attorney - A. Yes. Miss Jane Hewson is dead, Miss Ann is living - Miss Hewson is Mrs. Robinson's sister, and Mrs. Stevenson was another sister, she is also dead. This was the first place I was at in Hull. I saw Saxelbye in the house once before my master died, but did not recollect his person till Mr. Robinson mentioned his name.

COURT. Q. You saw him once when Mr. Robinson was alive, did you at that time know his name was Saxelbye - A. I did afterwards, for I heard Mr. Robinson mention Mr. Saxelbye many times over after he was gone.

MR. SERGEANT HULLOCK. Q. Mr. Robinson was not particularly ill in April - A. No; he had been ailing some time, he was not very ill, he could go out on business; he was not out on Sunday, but on Saturday he went out airing, in a post-chaise hired for that purpose; he had walked out within a week before.

Q. How often will you swear he was out walking within a week of the 30th April - A. I will swear he was out once, but will not swear to more than once. I cannot say on what day it was. That was the first time of his going out in a chaise. Mr. Young was his medical attendant. Mr. Robinson had sent me for him once or twice before the 30th of April, it might be a week before, he was not there on the 30th.

Q. That you swear - A. Yes.

Q. At no period of that day between ten o'clock in the morning and ten at night did you see Mr. Young there - A. No; I did not let him in nor see him, he could not be there without my seeing him.

Q. You swear distinctly he was not there on the 30th of April - A. I do, nor on Saturday. I was not out after tea on the 30th of April, nor at any time in the day. Mrs. Philipson was there.

Q. On your oath did you not go out on that day about three o'clock - A. I did not, nor did she let me in. Mrs. Stevenson has a son, he was not there.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Robinson having some celery on that day - A. There was no such thing in the house, if there had I must have seen it, I never remember it being sent at any time by Mr. Stevenson, he was not there on that day; nobody could let themselves in and out without my seeing them, for the kitchen door is right opposite the street door, and it was always open, if I shut it my master always opened it; I must see every body who comes in if I am in the kitchen, the street door is the only entrance to the house. Mrs. and Mr. Robinson did not live affectionately together.

Q. Robinson could have left the house if he liked - A. Yes. They went out airing together. I left Mrs. Robinson in 1819, she died in 1820. I still reside at Hull.

Q. Were you examined before to day on this matter - A. Not in Court. I was not examined at York, I was there last Assizes, but was not examined before the Grand Jury there, nor at Hull. I have known Mr. Rushworth, the attorney, above a year, I cannot say when I first saw him on this subject, it was better than a year ago; he applied to me - he did not say how he found me out - I had lived with Mrs. Robinson nearly down to this time - I was never asked about this before that. I was here in October on this business - I have been twice before the Grand Jury, but only once before this time. I left Hull last Sunday,and was in London a month or six weeks before on this business, they were the only times. The first time I communicated this to Rushworth was twelve months ago.

Q. Did you communicate any thing to any one on the subject before you left your mistress's service - A. No; I first mentioned it eight or ten months after. I believe Mr. Lockwood first questioned me about it.

Q. What time did Lockwood come on Sunday - A. A little after ten o'clock, and continued till near one; he returned, and was there till near six o'clock.

Q. Then he knew every thing that took place during those hours, and must have known that you knew as well as him what took place - A. Yes; I let him in and out; the first time he applied to me was eight or ten months after I left Mrs. Robinson's. I believe I left at the latter end of April, it might be the 27th, it was on a Thursday. I saw Rushworth about two months after Lockwood applied to me; he came to me, I did not know him before - I told him what I have stated to-day.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. You have been examined before the Grand Jury within the last few days - A. Yes; and once before that, only these two times. I did not leave my mistress on any ill terms - I have had no quarrel or dispute with the prisoner. I left my mistress in April, 1819, I did not tell Lockwood or Rushworth about this business till I was enquired of about it. I have been in service ever since I left Mrs. Robinson.

COURT. Q. Whose service are you now in - A. Mr. Ansell's, he is single, his wife is dead, she was not living when I went; he has four children - I am the only servant.

Q. Do you happen to know whether you were out on the 23d of April, 1815 - A. I cannot recollect; nor whether Lockwood was there on that day, he is a merchant. I do not recollect whether there was any company there on that day.

Q. Do you recollect whether you were out on the 17th A.- I do not; I was not out on the 7th of May, there was company on that day, several people came to see Mr. Robinson, some of them saw him. Before I went to Robinson's, I lived in service at York - my father's name is Thomas Bailey , he lives in Adolphus-place, Hull.

Q. What makes you so positively recollect what happened on the 30th of April - A. From what I saw and heard. My attention was not called to it till after Mr. Robinson's death.

THOMAS LOCKWOOD . I am a general commercial agent, and live at Hull. I was acquainted with the late Mr. Thomas Robinson , and knew his mother-in-law, Eliza. I first became acquainted with him in 1812; he lived with his mother-in-law occasionally, I was on terms of intimacy with him, and visited him. He sometimes lived in the country, and sometimes with his mother-in-law, principally with her - I visited him frequently there.

Q. How often before his death, used you to go and see him - A. Perhaps once or twice a week, he came to see me, and I went to see him. I cannot exactly tell when he died, I do not know the day of the week.

Q. Were you at his house a short time before he died - A. Yes, on Sunday, the 30th of April, 1815, and saw him on Tuesday.

Q. Did you see him after the Tuesday - A. Yes; he was virtually struck with death then, he was not dead, but his senses were taken from him.

Q. That circumstance enables you to recollect that you were with him on the Sunday preceding - A. It does; I do not recollect being with him on any preceding Sunday, I might be. On Sunday, the 30th of April, I went to his house about half-past ten o'clock, and to the best of my recollection, staid with him till about twelve o'clock, or a quarter past. I went again about two o'clock, and staid till about five o'clock or half-past, to the best of my recollection. Miss Philipson and Miss Hewson were sitting in the room with him. I cannot remember whether they remained there all the time or not - I did not see the prisoner there on that day, I am positive of it.

Q. Are you sure he was not there between two and half-past five o'clock - A. To the best of my recollection, he was not. I think I met him there once, about twelve months after Mr. Robinson's death. I never remember meeting him there before his death, I was there frequently - I saw Bailey there on the 30th.

Q.Had you an opportunity of observing on what terms Mr. and Mrs. Robinson lived - A. I thought they were usually quarrelling - I have seen Mr. Robinson write once or twice, and am able to speak to his hand-writing.

Q. Look at the signature to this paper, (script A,) is that his hand-writing - A. I do not believe it is.

COURT. Q. Look at the other paper; do you believe that to be his - A. Yes, I do. Will your Lordship allow me to explain. I have sworn now that I believe it not his, but before yesterday, I should have come into Court and have sworn and believed it was his writing, in consequence of the s being entwined in the first part of the R in the high part of the letter R, but when I observed last evening another paper with the same blundering son to the latter part of it, and without a turn, and the T not taken over the ho, I am compelled on my oath to say what I have; that I believe it not to be his writing. I did not visit Mrs. Robinson after his death.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. What do you mean by a general commercial agent - A. A broker, I have been so ten years, I think I have seen Mr. Robinson write once or twice - I have seen him sign a cheque to the Bank.

Q. And on that knowledge, you come to prove a man guilty of forgery - A. I do not come to prove a man guilty of forgery, I am come to prove it is not Mr. Roinson's hand-writing.

Q. If you had not seen some paper yesterday, you would have said you believed it was his - A. Yes. I should; I told the Grand Jury I could not take on myself to swear it was not Mr. Robinson's writing; I only swear it is not now, from the reasons I have given. I have known Mr. Rushworth twenty-two or twenty-three years - I never spoke to him about the hand-writing.

Q. Now will you swear that - A. Mr. Robinson asked me about it, I might have spoken to him about it. I was a witness before the Grand Jury, at York, last assizes, on an indictment for perjury, it was for perjury on this business altogether, on the facts of it being wrong, I was to prove I was there at the time Saxelbye swore the will was made.

Q. Did you not before the Grand Jury, at York, swearthat name was not Mr. Robinson's writing - A. I believe I did; I said it did not appear like his writing.

COURT. Q. Have I taken you down correctly, that at York you swore before the Grand Jury, that you did not believe it to be his writing - A. Yes; Mr. Beverley and Sir George Armitage when he brought it down, said, "I think Mr. Robinson must have been tipsy when he wrote this;" I said, "If he was, he must have got tipsy at the end, by the way he has finished the name" - the first part was firmly written, and the other not.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. You told his Lordship he took you down correctly, that you told the Grand Jury, at York, you believed it was not Mr. Robinson's writing - A. Yes.

Q. And did you not say that but for the papers shewn to you yesterday, you should have said you believed it was - A. Yes; before the Grand Jury, at York, there was about fifty documents of his writing. I said, from the difference between them, I must say I did not think it was his writing; it deviated so much from the others. Mr. Samuel Martin shewed me the papers last night, he was a practitioner in the law, and has retired. I have been before three Grand Juries, one at York, and two here - I gave them the same account I have to-day. Mr. Rushworth conducts this prosecution. I came from York by his direction, I believe he conducted the prosecution at York, I heard him say so - I have not been paid my expences.

Q. Perhaps you are to be paid out of the money when it is recovered - A. No; I have had no promise of the sort. I cannot say who laid the documents before the Grand Jury, at York, I did not see them in Rushworth's possession. Sir George Armitage shewed them to me; I said,

"It is a different way from what my friend Mr. Robinson used to write, and you must judge for yourselves."

Q. Will you undertake to say he always wrote his name one way - A. Every time I saw him, that was twice, when he sent cheques to the Bank. (The witness was here shewn two letters, some bills and receipts, which he stated to be Mr. Robinson's writing; they were doubled down, so that the signatures could not be seen)

Q. Now look at the names, and say is that the way he always wrote his name - A. Yes.

Q. Now look at these which you have sworn to be his writing, they are different to one of the others - A. Yes; this is a different T.

COURT. Q. Now having seen them, do you believe the other to be his writing - A. There wants the turn in the n.

MR. CURWOOD. Q. Look at these three, are the T's in the way he usually wrote - A. No; the T's are all written the same way the others are.

COURT. Q. The letter T on each of these is the same as on the document - A. The very same. In his usual way of writing he turned the letter n over, and it is not done here, and but for that, I should have thought it was his.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT HULLOCK. Q. You were examined several times before Grand Juries, Mr. Rushworth was always attorney - A. Yes; I did not tell him what I was prepared to swear. I first saw the paper last October twelve months, in Doctor's Commons, I saw Rushworth before I came up to see it. I came up on purpose to examine it, when I returned, I told him that on the first flush of the business I considered it Thomas Robinson 's, I thought it looked like his writing, as I said before Sir G. Armitage, at York, but that he must have forgotten how to write his name, for he wrote different to what he usually did, I had seen him write twice, and had seen different papers.

COURT. Q. You did not see them before you went to the Grand Jury at York - A. No.

MR. SERGEANT HULLOCK. Q. Do you mean to swear you did not see the papers till you went before the Grand Jury at York - A. No. I saw some before, Rushworth shewed them to me.

Q. You said, on your oath, you had not inspected those papers before you went into the Grand Jury room at York - A. No, not one half of them, there was a score of them, I examined about six.

COURT. Q. You said there were fifty before the Jury - A. I cannot say how many there were.

MR. SERJEANT HULLOCK. Q. Do you mean Rushworth only shewed you six, has he not shewn you fifty at different times - A. No; he has not, perhaps he has shewed me half a dozen, I always told the Grand Juries I would not swear it was not Thomas Robinson's writing, and told Rushworth so all along, he might have sent me before the Grand Jury for other facts, I was not sent for that exact purpose. Rushworth's servant paid my expences to town, I never told him I could swear it was not Thomas Robinson's handwriting. Mr. Martin shewed me a paper last night, Mr. Goodey was present, I altered my mind from the signature to that paper. The name at the head of one of these papers would confirm my opinion that it was Robinson's writing, but the others would not.

Q. Well now, this being the last you have seen, you can swear that the signature to script B. is his writing - A. There is not the turn in the n.

Q. Here is one with a turn, is that his writing - A. Yes. I am now confirmed in my opinion that script B. is the writing of Thomas Robinson .

COURT. Q. You are now convinced that it is the signature of Thomas Robinson - A. Having seen these papers, I am convinced that I am wrong in altering my opinion last night, I told the Grand Jury it did not appear to be his writing, but I would not positively swear it was not.

Q. Well, but till last night you believed it was - A. No; I could not say whether it was or not. When I was before the Jury in October, I gave the same reply, I did not believe it to be his, but I would not swear it was not, I was only once at York, Rushworth paid part of my expences, and Mr. Goodey the rest. My expences at York were about 3 l., I was there a day or a day and a half, the indictment was not tried at the same assize that it was found, I was there twice, Goodey paid my expences the first time, they were within 3 l., or 4 l., I suppose there were six or seven witnesses. Thomas Robinson left about 10,000 l., all in personal property. I have been examined twice before a London Grand Jury, I was here in October 1820, and 1821, Rushworth paid the expences. I came with Mr. Goodey last October, and he paid the expences, I do not know that he is any relation of Robinson's, I came up by myself in 1820, when I returned, Isaid to Rushworth "I have seen the hand-writing, and I declare I do not know whose it is." I believe I never told him I thought it was Robinson's, after I had seen it yesterday, I said, "Mr. Rushworth, I firmly believe it is Thomas Robinson 's hand-writing," this was after I saw Martin's papers.

Q. Were the same witnesses here in October as now - A. No; I do not know how many of them are changed, I believe they all came in their real names. Mr. Goodey is a friend of mine, and a corn-merchant.

Q. Has he ever helped you out of difficulties - A. Just before I came to town a person took out a town action against me for 15 l., and Goodey became bail for me, that is the first time I was ever arrested.

Q. Did you ever make a settlement with your crediditors - A. Yes; about seven years ago, not since.

GEORGE CLARK . I am a schoolmaster, and live at East Stockton, Lincolnshire, I was clerk to Messrs. Peas and Co., bankers, at Hull, for eight years, up to 1812, Thomas Robinson had an account there, I knew him perfectly well, from a school-boy, and knew his hand-writing well; I was ledger-clerk, and well acquainted with his writing. I have seen cheques of his, (looking at script B), I believe the signature not to be his writing, if a cheque so signed had been presented, I should not have recommended the clerk to pay it.

Cross-examined. Q. Your duty was not to pay cheques - A. Yes; there was a paying clerk, we both were in the habit of seeing his writing, I was often called to the counter, I cannot say I was ever called to the counter when Robinson's cheque was produced. George Turner was the pay-clerk, I do not know whether he is alive.

Q. Look at these three papers, do you believe them to be his writing - A. No; I think not. I think none of them are his. I think I have seen him write on many occasions.

Q. Look at the whole face of this letter, do you believe it to be his writing - A. Yes; I think it is, and believe the signatures to be his. I was discharged from the bank for want of employ, no fault at all was found with me.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Messrs. Peas's bank continues to this time - A. Yes. I entered the cheques that were paid every afternoon, if there was any doubt about the hand-writing I was consulted about it, if cheques came signed like those papers I should not pay them, I should cause enquiry to be made, they are different to the letters, they are merely memorandums or bills, not signatures.

COURT. Q. What is your reason for thinking the signature to one of the letters is not his - A. There is no similarity whatever of his writing in any of the letters. Here is another paper which I should almost consider his writing, there is no signature to it.

Q. Did Goodey live at Hull when you were there - A. Yes; I knew him, but was not particularly intimate with him. I did not know Rushworth when I lived there, I have known him about three years, I went to York with him last October. I have seen the paper produced four times, I first saw it at York, last August, and again in September, before the Grand Jury here, I came up again in October, and saw it again on Saturday, I came free up and down, and at York I do not know who paid my expences, or what they came to; Mr. Martin and Goodey did not shew me any paper yesterday. I live fifty miles from Hull, I went to Cottingham in 1812, that is only five miles; I sometimes received a note from Robinson there. I was witness on a bill for perjury also, against the prisoner.

SIMON HORNER , ESQ. I am a merchant, and live at Hull. I was acquainted with the late Thomas Robinson , but not intimately, I was executor and trustee, under his father's will - I have seen Thomas Robinson write a few times, so as to enable me to speak to his writing, (Looks at the script), in my judgement it is not his hand writing - I think the will and signature to it, are not in the same ink; I have seen them before at York, last August, and yesterday or the day before. I was not in London in October.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT HULLOCK. Q. Look at the body of this paper before you look at the head - A. I should think it not his writing; (Looks at two others) I should think these were.

Q. Have you compared the will with other papers - A. I have a variety of documents and letters. I speak from my recollection of the signature on them, not from comparison.

Q. Then speaking from your recollection of his signature when he dealt with you as his father's executor, you think it not his - A. Yes. (Looking at some papers) I think both these are his. Rushworth gave me 2 l. towards my expences, before I went to York - I think that covered my expences, he paid my expences here.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. You have a number of papers, do they all bear signatures - A. I think twenty of them, I corresponded with him.

COURT. Q. Up to what date did your correspondence continue - A. I have signed documents and letters from 1810, to 1815, (looks at a paper), I am inclined to think this is not his writing. I think all three are one handwriting.

Q. You said before that you thought one was his, and the other two not - A. Now I think they are all three his writing, and I think the signature to the will may be written by the person who wrote those three documents.

Q. And if they are his hand-writing, the will must be so also - A. Yes. Hand writing often varies, but I never saw a man write a more regular signature.

SAMUEL MARTIN . I was formerly an attorney at Hull. On the 1st of May, 1815, I called on the late Mr. Robinson to get him to execute the conveyance of a lease, which a person had bought of him for 1200 l., I saw him in bed, it was twelve or one o'clock in the day, my clerk F. Stamp, went with me - before I went up, I saw his mother-in-law, some conversation passed about a will, in consequence of what she said. I had seen him execute a release before this; I cannot say I was well acquainted with his hand writing, I saw him write six or seven times in 1810, when he was of age, and settled with his father's executors - I can only give an opinion of his writing, from a comparison with other documents; I can speak from my memory of what I saw him write. I do not believe script B. to be his writing. I knew him from a child; when he died he had two maternal aunts, Susan Swiney , and Sarah Horn , and a paternal uncle Thomas Robinson , they were the only kin,I knew, I understood there was another uncle - I am not connected with his family, he had an uncle Richard who was transported, I do not know whether he is living.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT HULLOCK. Q. When did you first see this script - A. In the Prerogative Office at the latter end of 1815, I compared it afterwards, it enables me to make up my mind. When I first saw it in Doctor's Commons, I could not give an opinion on it - I compared them together afterwards. - I found a total dissimilarity between that and the signature to my letters, and from that I have come to the conclusion that it was not his writing, it is not at all like his writing, I allude to his writing in 1810, and when I last saw him.

Q. Were you not professionally employed for the next of kin when you went to examine the will - A. Yes, I was desired by my partner Schofield to go and examine it, I think it was in November. I know Rushworth, he was clerk to Mr. Wilson, in Hull - his clerk sent me eight guineas with my subpoena. I was at York in August, on this subject - I was here last October, and gave evidence before the Grand Jury, I saw Goodey and Lockwood last night.

Q. You made a convert of Lockwood last night - A. He desired to see the documents, he was shewn every signature that I had, and said the paper was a forgery.

Q. You have heard him say that, before last night - A. Yes; not often, perhaps once, I think he said so at York.

Q. What made him examine the documents last night - A. He gave no reason, he came to me, and requested to see them, Mr. Goodey was with him; I shewed them to him, he was perhaps a quarter of an hour examining them, I do not exactly know what he said.

Q. Look at these receipts, and give me an opinion whose hand-writing the body of them are - A. The deceaseds; I am pretty clear that one of them is the deceaseds writing - I am not so clear about the second, but my belief is that it is also - I am not so clear about the third, but believe it; the first I believe is unequivocally his.

Q. Look at paper B. compare it with the three receipts, and say on what you ground your opinion of its not being his writing - A. The Thomas Robinson on the top of this, has certainly some resemblance to the signature in the script, and the T in this receipt has the same character as the script, but in the documents I referred to, it is different, and it appears that he had a coxcomical way of writing, he would write Tho at the end of a letter different to what he would write at the beginning of a note.

Q. If that T had been at the end of the script you would have judged that it was his writing - A. No; the son is distinctly different from the three receipts, and from my documents, the son in the script wants a period, and it is quite different from this. The signatures to my documents are uniform.

Q. Lockwood said you shewed him a document with a T which changed his opinion - A. I will produce it; the T in that is more like the forgery than any of the others which I have. He appeared to have a great command of his pen.

Q. You are subscribing witness to some of these documents, perhaps if it was not for that, you would not be so positive to them - A. No.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. These papers which you have attested are written in 1810 - A. Yes, I have a deed which was executed in 1815, it is a lease, release, and a receipt, and was all signed by him on the 1st of May, they have the same variations from the script as the others - all my other papers are dated 1810, they are signed exactly like the deed.

Q. Does not an attorney always pay the expences - A. They ought.

COURT. Q. And the attorney may be a great loser if he has not somebody to repay him - A. Yes. I think the deceased had a great command of penmanship - when he wrote a letter, the T was very different to when he signed anything, but signatures to his letters were the same characters as these documents I have.

Q. You examined the script in November, 1815, if at that time you suspected it to be a forgery it would be your duty, to communicate it to your clients - A. A communication was made to them, and we were before the Court, but we could not meet the proof, and did not plead, we had not the means to prove it forged - we could not contradict the prisoner's oath; the documents were in the hands of Mr. Horner, the executor to Robinson's father.

Q. You knew of that then - A. Yes, but I did not interfere in the suit, my partner conducted the suit. I knew who the deceased's banker was.

Q. Hold this in your hand, (a stock receipt), and then take the lease, compare the two together, and say if they are not very different hand-writings - A. Yes they are.

Q. The T at the bottom of the deed, has the head of it continued to a considerable length, but in other respects the hand-writing differs very materially - A. They differ, but not very materially.

Q. Look at the script and say how that differs from the deed - A. The T. on the deed appears to be written from the bottom, and the one on the script from the top, that is the only difference as to the name Thomas, the son at the end of the name is materially different, and the R varies a little, and the o in the script, differs from the deed - the bin appears to be the same character. The deed is signed the same as the lease.

Q. Then there is the same difference between the one and the other of them - A. Yes.

GEORGE JEFF . I am a taylor and draper at Hull. I was acquainted with Mr. Thomas Robinson from 1804 till his death. I have not frequently seen him write, I have had notes from him. (Looks at the script.) I think this is not his hand-writing.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You have not frequently seen him write - A. No; probably six times in the course of eleven years. I think it is wholly unlike his writing.

Q. Just look at this and say whose hand-writing you believe it to be - A. I think it is Mr. Thomas Robinson 's. I think the script could not deceive any one who knew his writing.

Q. In what respect is it unlike his - A. The letter R particularly, it seems to be more extended. There is some difference in the T, but not so much as in the R, the T might pass as it is better than some of it. The son is particularly unlike his.

Q. Look at the signature on the paper you say is hiswriting, and the script, what is your judgment - A. I conclude it is very unlike it - I was not a witness at York, I was there but was not subpoenaed. Rushworth paid my expences to York, Mr. Goodey paid them here. I was not here in October.

RICHARD GOODEY . I am a merchant, and live at Hull. I was acquainted with the deceased, Mr. Thomas Robinson , many years, and visited him at his mother's, she and my wife were intimate.

Q. Did his mother-in-law and him live on good terms or otherwise - I believe quite otherwise. I have heard both him and her declare it many times, I have heard them speak very disrespectfully of each other. I know Mr. Robinson's hand-writing, I have seen him write on many occasions. (Looks at the script.) I have seen him write many score times, to the best of my belief this signature is not his writing. I think I have seen this four times before, and have always been of the same opinion, I speak from my memory of his writing - I believe he has two aunts, and two uncles named Richard and Thomas.

Cross-examined by MR. SERGEANT HULLOCK. Q. Is Richard the traveller - A. I do not know. I believe he expects some money from abroad. I believe he is poor now, and his brother is poor.

Q. Who supplied the money for this - I at first supplied him with money, but I found it more than I could do. I am not in advance at all now. One Carter advances the money, he is a gentleman, he did keep a public-house at Hull, and lives in that neighbourhood now; he has advanced all the money.

Q. Did not you go with Carter to try and get 200 l. on the strength of this business - A. No; Carter went. Wilson asked me to join him in a note for it, but I declined. I said the suit would cost 1000 l.

Q. You did not say it should cost 1000 l. more - A. No; I expect nothing whatever. Richard Robinson offered to reward me if he was successful; he said at the commencement of the business that if I would supply the money he would reward me.

A. You paid some of the expences to town this time - A. Carter gave me money to bring to town to the attorney, when Rushworth told me who to pay it to, I did; I gave him the money, and he returned what I was to pay.

Q. When did you first interfere in the business - A. As soon as the person arrived from abroad. He was an acquaintance of my wife's before he went abroad. I have been married thirteen years, my wife is fifty-two years old, she was intimate with Thomas and Richard - Thomas now lives about four miles from Hull; he never applied to me, nor gave himself any trouble about it; but when Richard came from abroad he called and requested me to enquire about it; that was in February or March, 1820. I applied to Mr. Frost, an attorney, he said he was engaged for the other party. I did not apply to Mr. Rushworth. I have seen Mr. Robinson write letters, and he has shewn them to me, and asked my opinion on them, he has shewn me letters which he had received, and his answer to them, the script is dissimilar to every signature of his letters.

Q. Then no person who knew his writing could be mistaken - A. I should think not; I said so the moment I saw it. I have compared it with other signatures, and if I could have found one like it I would have done nothing in it.

Q. Look at these and say whose writing they are - A. I think two of them are his, and two not, I should think they are not all written by one hand. I perceive a complete difference between them and the script, in the T, R, and n, they do not differ so much as other signatures which I have seen, but are still so different that I should give my opinion that it is not his writing.

COURT. Q. Did you advance money at any time - A. At first I advanced I think 100 l. in different sums, I never expected to be rewarded unless he succeeded in the suit. I think I met with Carter in June or July, and he paid me what I had advanced; I think he has advanced 500 l. and upwards, besides the 100 l. he paid me. I think he advanced 150 l. before the summer, and about 100 l. in September.

Q. How much in October - A. I do not recollect, there was an advance, I think, to Mr. Rushworth - He sent up 150 l. by me for this trial. I do not know what bargain Mr. Carter made. I expected nothing besides what I advanced.

Q. Did Mr. Lockwood ever tell you he thought the signature was Mr. Thomas Robinson 's writing - A. No; I never heard him say so, but quite the contrary. Nobody else has advanced money that I know of. Mr. Carter boards in a house in French's-gardens - he is a man of property - he has two rooms worth about 10 s. or 12 s. a week.

ESTHER HORNER . In 1812, and 1813, I kept an inn, at Cottingham, about five miles from Hull. I knew Mr. Robinson, he came to my house at different times, I dare say he was there fifteen weeks during the latter end of 1812, and 1813, at different times - I have seen him write his name very often.

Q. Was there any circumstance which called your attention to the mode in which he wrote his name - A. Yes; particularly (looks at the script,) I never saw him write in this manner - I do not believe it to be his writing.

Cross-examined by MR. TVNDAL. Q. When did you first see that writing - A. At York. I was there at the summer assizes.

Q. You were taken to York as a witness, before you saw that paper - A. I went to speak that it was not his writing, if I thought it was not. I had not seen it before I went there - my expences were paid before I went, I do not know who by; I had nothing to pay.

Q. Look at the word North Shields, and William Wilson , on this paper; what do you think of that - A. It may or may not be his writing - I never saw him write any thing but his name.

Q. Look at this - A. I never saw him write in that way. I do not believe it to be his, it is not his writing.

MARY MILLNER . I am a widow, and live at Hull. My brother's name is Wallis; I had known Mr. Robinson, who is dead, many years; I used to meet him at my brother's, and have frequently seen him write his name. He has got my brother to go out with cheques and things, and written many little things (looks at the script) I never saw him write in that way; I do not think it is his writing.

Cross-examined by MR. SERJEANT HULLOCK. Q. Wasit you that carried in a bill after his death - A. My brother sent one, I did not take it; I had no quarrel with Mrs. Robinson. I only know Mr. Saxelbye by sight.

Q. Have you never called him an "Old rogue, and said, though your mind was so tender, you did not like to see a dog hung, you should like to see him hung" - A. No; I never said so. I will not swear I have not used expressions of that sort, I will not swear it.

Q. Have you never said "That the prisoner, Saxelbye, was a wicked old rogue, and though you could not yourself bear to see a dog hung, that you could see him hung with the greatest pleasure in life;" have you not used that expression to the gentleman who sits here? - A. I do not think I ever did - I do not recollect it.

COURT. Q. Look at these three papers; whose handwriting is the body of them - A. I do not think any of them are Mr. Robinson's.

Q. Look at this, (a deed) - A. That is Mr. Robinson's, I have seen him sign in the way this is signed.

Q. Whose writing is this - A. I do not think it is like the other, I do not think it is his.

Q. Tell me if you think it his - A. Yes; I do not know, I am sure, I have a little doubt. I am no relation to Carter or Goodey.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an attorney, and was in partnership with Mr. Galon, at Hull, from 1813 to 1816, at the time a suit was pending, respecting the papers of Thomas Robinson . I believe it began in Doctor's Commons, in May, 1816, or the beginning of June. The prisoner came many times to our office respecting the suit, I had very little to do in the business, and am not able to say when he first came. A paper marked A, was sent up to town, but I never saw it, we corresponded about it with our agent in town. A paper, marked B. was afterwards sent, the prisoner came to the office between the time the first and second were sent, I think he came a month or two after the first was sent up, he was a witness in support of both the testamentary papers, he was at the office several times before the second was sent, I had no communication with him at all, I had nothing to do with the suit. I know he repeatedly fetched the letters from the Post-Office, to our office, and gave them to me, or Mr. Galon, I never knew him open letters, he had no other business at our office that I know of, My partner had the entire management of the business, he died on the 19th of Sepetember, 1817.

Prisoner's Defence - My LORD - I must request your indulgent permission to read the short statement I have to offer in my defence, because I am wholly incompetent to address you by speaking, not only from being overpowered by the awful situation in which I stand at the bar, but because it is foreign to all the habits of my life to speak before a public Court. My Lord, it is my unhappy lot, at the age of seventy-three years, to be put upon my trial, on an accusation affecting my life and character, before a Court and Jury, far distant from my own home, and far distant from the place where even the fact for which I am to answer is alleged to have been committed, instead of being brought to trial before a jury of my neighbours, who know my conduct and character, and (which would be far more important for my interest,) who equally well know the character of my prosecutors. Although I now stand here before the Court, a poor miserable old man, accused of a most base offence. I have in earlier life known the bounties of fortune, I was once in an easy, and I may say, in a wealthy condition; and although by the vicissitudes incident to men, who are highly engaged in commercial concerns, I am now comparatively poor, yet until this accusation was raised against me, my moral character was never impeached, and so all my neighbours would have known, without producing witnesses, if I had been brought to trial before a Jury selected from amongst them.

Gentlemen of the Jury, the facts of the case are shortly told; the testator, Mr. Robinson, whose will I am accused of forging, was an intimate friend of mine, and I was in the habit of continual social and friendly intercourse with him. In the early part of the year 1815, he was in declining health, and on Sunday, the 30th of April, in that year, I called upon him, as I frequently did. Finding his situation as I thought precarious, and being alone with him, in friendly talk, I asked him if he had made any dispositions of his property, he said he had not, but that he wished his step-mother to have it. At the same time, he added, he would be glad if I would get a will drawn out for him, as I knew he had very strong aversion to any intercourse with lawyers himself, I promised him I would get it done, and accordingly wrote down on a slip of paper his directions, by way of instructions, from which to get a will formally drawn up, and that is the paper which has been produced in evidence. I believe I wrote as nearly as possible in the very words he uttered, I then read them to him, he said it was right, and signed it. I took away the instructions, meaning to get a formal will drawn up from them, and to bring it to him for his signature. At that time I did not consider Mr. Robinson to be in immediate danger, and being particularly occupied the next day, (Monday,) I had not an opportunity of getting the will prepared. On the following morning, (Tuesday,) I learnt that Mr. Robinson had become delirous, and as he never afterwards recovered from that state of mind, I thought it useless to proceed further. The paper remained unnoticed in my possession, as I conceived it a thing of no value, not then knowing or supposing that a little loose memorandum of that sort could have the force of a formal will.

A day or two after Mr. Robinson's death, another paper was found in his desk, altogether in his own hand-writing, by which it appears, he bequeathed to Mrs. Robinson the purchase-money of a house, he had then lately sold it, and was doubtful whether the papers did not make Mrs. Robinson universal legatee, and I understand, the opinion of Mr. Hart, the Chancery barrister was, that it bequeathed to her the whole of her son-in-law's property. Under this paper, accordingly Mrs. Robinson claimed Mr. Robinson's property, but the will was deposited in Doctor's Commons, by the testator's relations. On hearing these circumstances, I thought the paper which I had written, under his direction, might be important, and therefore I sought for it but was unable for some time to find it, at last, in the month of September following, I happened to discover it among some loose papers, and I immediately gave it over to Mrs. Robinson. Until that suit was instituted, I never conceived that this little slip of paper would in law amount to a will. Gentlemen, in that suit I wascalled upon to make a deposition, which I did, stating the same circumstances as I have now stated to you; and although that is all I have had to do with the business, I am now called upon to answer, at the hazard of my life, the charge of wilfully having forged that will.

Gentlemen, I would ask you, what motive I had to be guilty of such a crime? I got no legacy, nor a farthing benefit under the will. There was nothing improper in the conduct of the testator, in leaving this property to his step-mother in preference to his uncle or aunts; for although he was not the actual son of Mrs. Robinson, yet she was married to his father when he was about a year old; and from that time, until the hour of his death, with the exception of a short absence at Shields, he had continued to live with her. She had, throughout his infancy and youth, been an affectionate mother to him, as he frequently acknowledged, and he, apparently, had all the affection of a son towards his mother; insomuch, that it was not till after I was intimate with him for several years, that I learned she was only his step-mother; and indeed, from their conduct to each other, I had, until then, always supposed her to be his natural parent. The paper which was found, altogether in his hand-writing, will sufficiently prove his affection for her. Of his uncle, Thomas, he had often said, he would waste whatever he had; and with respect to his uncle, Richard, it was not at all unnatural that he should overlook him entirely. In truth, he had known nothing of that uncle, who had been long absent at Botany Bay, to which place he had been transported for a felony, which he had committed many years before, when his nephew was not more than a year or two old. This uncle, and his attorney, Mr. Rushworth, and other persons, disappointed of expected legacies, are my prosecutors. I can believe the uncle may be disappointed at the loss of his nephew's property, but it is awful revenge to seek the destruction of my life and character, because I was the unfortunate hand to write down his nephew's last wishes.

Gentlemen, You will bear in mind that this is not the first time the validity of this paper has been questioned. After a long suit in the Ecclesiastical Court, where all the evidence which my now prosecutors could bring forward to impeach the paper, and shew it to be a forgery, might have been legally heard, and deliberately considered, that Court decreed the paper to be a genuine instrument, and established it as a legal will. Nor did it rest there. Early in the present year, the prosecutors applied to the Ecclesiastical Court, to re-hear the case, but after hearing all the allegations which could be further adduced, the Learned Judge refused the application, and confirmed the former sentence, thereby establishing the genuineness of the instrument.

Gentlemen, after an ample investigation of this matter, before a Court of competent jurisdiction; I should have thought my prosecutors would have been satisfied of my innocence of the crime which they now allege against me, but you may judge from their subsequent harassing conduct towards me, whether they are actuated by motives of justice, or of revenge, for disappointed expectations. Five years after the will had been established, by the Decree of the Ecclesiastical Court, which was in the year 1816, they preferred an indictment for perjury against me and Mr. Stephenson, at the York Assizes, against me for making the deposition of the facts, under which I wrote the paper, and against Mr. Stephenson for deposing that he believed the signature to be the testator's hand-writing - as these indictments were prefered in my own country, where all the parties were known, myself, the prosecutors, and the witnesses, I readily and cheerfully prepared to meet the charge, but the first delay the prosecutor interposed, was the removing the indictment by certiorari, which delayed the trial for the late then assizes - In dus course, however, they stood for trial at the last York Assizes, in August, and again we were ready to meet the charge, but on the evening before the day of trial, the prosecutors withdrew the records - in the mean time they came to London, and at the last September Session, they presented a bill for forgery against me, before the London Grand Jury, but this bill was thrown out - again in the last October Session, they presented another bill, which is the one I now stand here to answer.

Thus, Gentlemen, I have detailed all the instances of this case, and I earnestly but humbly intreat you to give them your attentive consideration. Consider the disadvantages I am placed under; called upon to answer so heavy an accusation, at a distance from the place where the fact is alleged to have been committed, and before a Jury to whom my former life and character are unknown. Consider too, that my prosecutors have evaded bringing the matter to trial before a Jury of that county, where both they and I are known. Consider also, Gentlemen, that the whole business has been already fully canvassed before a Court of competent jurisdiction, who have patiently heard all that could be adduced against the paper, and that having established it by their decree, they have thereby virtually pronounced that I am Not Guilty of the charge imputed to me by this indictment. But above all, Gentlemen, I pray you to remember the time at which I am called upon to answer for this supposed offence; It is now near seven years since the date of that transaction - in the course of that time, death has removed from my aid three persons who would have been material witnesses for me on this day - Mrs. Robinson, the mother of the testator, Mrs. Stephenson, and Miss Jane Hewson , the two latter were witnesses in the suit, in the Ecclesiastical Court, and spoke to material facts respecting the testator's intercourse with his mother. With regard to Mrs. Robinson, as it is clear I took nothing by the will - it is insinuated I must have had some bribe from her, she rests now in the silence of the grave - death has sealed her lips, and she cannot now give testimony in my favour to prove the falseness of that accusation so long as she lived; no charge whatever was made against me.

Gentlemen of the Jury, these are the circumstances under which I stand before you, and although I am greatly weighed down, and depressed by the magnitude of the accusation, knowing that both my life and character depended upon the issue of your verdict - yet I do not despair, I have voluntarily surrendered myself to take my trial, I know and feel my own innocence, and I have the firmest reliance on your justice. But above all, knowing that there is a God who judgeth the world in righteousness, I cannot believe he will desert me in my old age, and deliver me a victim to the malice of my disappointed enemies.

RICHARD CARR . I remember the late Thomas Robinson of Hull. He was clerk in the counting-house of Messrs. Coulson, with me from 1802, to 1805, my acquaintance with him ceased with his clerkship, we sat at the same desk together, and I frequently saw him write, (looking at script A.) I believe it to be his writing; I am also of opinion that script B. is his writing.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you a knowledge of his writing after 1805 - A. No; I had no conversation with him after that; I have very often seen him sign papers.

Q. Look at this receipt - A. It is very like his writing, though it varies from the other, I cannot swear to it. I consider the deed to be his writing, there does not appear to be any resemblance between script B. and the paper which I cannot swear to be his writing - I am certain the signature to B. is his writing, the rest of the papers is a different hand. I speak simply to the style of the hand-writing.

COURT. Q. Was he a good writer - A. He wrote a free hand, his writing varied a good deal, he had a good command of his pen.

JOHN LEVITT . I am clerk to the Dock Company, at Hull. I knew Thomas Robinson while he was clerk with Messrs. Coulsons, I think from 1801, to 1804, I had frequent opportunities of seeing him write - I believe the signatures to script A. and B. to be his writing.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Have you seen him write since he left the place - A. I think not. I think he was then about eighteen or twenty years old - I have often seen him write his signature.

Q. Do you believe this paper to be his writing - A. I should rather think not, let me see it again (looks at it) I think it is.

Q. Look at this (script B) and see if it is the least like that - A. Yes, I think the letter R and b is like it, the T is not so much like it, then I think is like it, the stroke of the pen at the termination is not like it, but I think it is his writing.

JOHN YOUNG . I am a surgeon, and live at Hull, and was in the habit of attending Mr. Robinson, professionally, for eight or ten years preceding his death. The family consisted of Mr. and Mrs. Robinson, and the son Thomas, who died in May, 1815, his mother lived with him at that time, I attended him for the last fortnight before his death, at least, twice every day; I can undertake to say I called regularly twice every day for a fortnight, his disorder took an alarming turn about the 26th or 27th of April, I believe he went out on the 26th. On Monday, the 1st of May, he became delirious in the afternoon.

Q. On the preceding day, (Sunday,) did you call - A. Yes, twice, once before twelve o'clock, and then in the evening. I do not recollect who let me in, for I frequently opened the street door and walked in. I had intimated to him, during his illness, that it was always right to have his affairs settled, this was a few days before the 1st of May, he said he should do so, but never mentioned the nature of the distribution. I have frequently seen him write, and can form an opinion of the general character of his writing. I believe the signature to script B. to be his.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Do you remember being there on Sunday the 30th of April - A. Yes, twice, before twelve o'clock, and between seven and nine o'clock. I have seen the prisoner at the house during his illness. I was examined at Doctors' Commons.

Q. Did you not swear in you deposition that you had no recollection of having seen Saxelbye at Mr. Robinson's during his illness - A. If I did, I believed it to be correct at the time.

Q. Look at this paper, do you know whether it is Mr. Robinson's writing - A. I think it like it, I think it resembles the signature to B. I am not accustomed to examine minutely, there is a little difference in some of the letters, but such a difference as I have frequently made in writing my own name.

COURT. Q. Do you believe the signature to script A. to be his - A. Yes.

EDWARD BARRETT . My wife is legatee under Mrs. Robinson's will. I was well acquainted with Mr. Robinson for upwards of twenty years, and was acquainted with his hand-writing; I have not the least doubt of the signature to script A. and B. being his. I was in the habit of visiting Mrs. Robinson, and have seen him and her together, they were on very good terms.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Your wife derives property under the will of Mrs. Robinson - A. Yes, I cannot say whether it is property that came to her from her son-in-law, I do not know of any other property which she had, my wife's legacy has not been paid. She administered to Mrs. Robinson's will.

Q. Did you not know they lived on very bad terms - A. No, I frequented them much during the latter part of his life, I might go there two or three times a-day. I lived within a few yards of the house.

Q. Did you ever meet Saxelbye there - A. No, except by appointment to tea or so, I do not remember meeting him there for six months before Robinson died, I was not there on Sundays generally, I might go occasionally, I boarded with Mr. Robinson's family ten years before I married, and saw him write very frequently.

COURT. Q. Did you ever meet Saxelbye at Mr. Robinson's during his life-time - A. Yes, I have been invited to meet him there to dinner and tea, I have frequently heard Mr. Robinson say Saxelbye had been there, and have seen him dining there.

ELIZA PHILIPSON . I was servant to Mr. Robinson's family during Mr. Robinson's first wife's time, I lived about fourteen years with them, I have left twenty-six or twenty-seven years, I went to visit them frequently, down to the time of Thomas Robinson 's death, and remember that happening; I remember the day he became delirious, I went there on Tuesday morning and found him so, I went there on Sunday, the 30th of April, between four o'clock and twenty minutes past; I rang at the door, Mrs. Robinson herself let me in, I found Mr. Robinson there, nobody else. I remained there till half-past ten o'clock at night, the servant, Bailey, was not in the house when I first went, she came in while I was there, Mr. Robinson was uneasy about her not returning, and when she came home I let her in myself about five o'clock; I did not see Mr. Saxelbye there nor Lockwood, I was not out of the house, I did not see Mr. Stevenson, I remember some celery being brought to the house, I dressed it myself for Mr. Robinson, he was uneasy for the servant to come home to dress it, and I did it, I had not been in five minutes when it came. When I came inMr. Robinson told me to fasten the door, for he had had Mr. Saxelbye there - I know Mr. Young the surgeon, he came while I was there, I think it was between eight and nine o'clock, Bailey let him, for I did not, I was in the sitting-room at the time with Mr. Robinson. I knew Bailey was in the house.

Q. On what terms did Mrs. Robinson and her son live - A. When he was himself, very comfortably, but when he had too much wine they at times quarrelled; she quarrelled with him because he was in that state. She used to fret, and say "Thomas it will ruin you." Mrs. Robinson paid the house-keeping, I have repeatedly heard her say he owed her three years board, and say "Thomas you pay every body but me," and he said, "Well, mother, I shall give you what I have." He had been very poorly for six months.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What relation were you to Mrs. Robinson - A. None. I had a legacy of 20 l. which I have received. They dined at one o'clock on Sundays, and took tea at five o'clock. I think on that Sunday it was a few minutes past five o'clock, as the servant was late. I washed the celery and took it into the room between four and five o'clock, Mr. Robinson eat it then, just as it was, I cannot say how many heads there was, it was a large plate. Mr. Young came about half-past eight o'clock, I think Bayley opened the door to him; when he came in, I went up stairs. I do not remember whether there was any wine on the table when I went in. Nobody drank tea there besides him and me. I went there every night all the week, Mr. Robinson was poorly then, he did not go out, that I know, but I was not there all day. I never missed being there on Sundays.

Q. Was any body there on the Sunday before - A. I think Jane Hewson . Ann Hewson had dined there on Sunday the 30th, and was gone when I came. I had often seen Mr. Lockwood there, he was not there on the 30th, while I was. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson were in the room together. Mr. Robinson did not leave the room.

MR. SERGEANT HULLOCK. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at Mr. Robinson's - A. Frequently; I have seen him there at tea at different times. I have seen him and Mr. Robinson together talking about business. I saw him there with two little boys about a month before Mr. Robinson died.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Was that the last time you saw him there before Mr. Robinson died - A. No; I saw him there after that, both on Sundays and week-days, I frequently saw him call on Sundays as he went to church, and sometimes he has stopped the afternoon there.

MARY BARRETT . I was sister to the late Mrs. Robinson. I knew that from Mr. Robinson's infancy he generally lived with her, except three or four months, when he was at Shields. I was very frequently at the house, they lived on terms of friendship, except when he got a little wine. He was ill some time before his death. I have been in the habit of receiving letters and notes from him (Looks at scripts A. and B.) I believe them to be his writing.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Are you residuary legatee to Mrs. Robinson - A. Yes; she left her property to all her relations.

ANN HANNAH HEWSON . I was sister of the late Mrs. Robinson. I remember Mr. Thomas Robinson being taken delirious on the Monday night. On Sunday, the 30th of April, I was at his house, I got there about one o'clock, and went to dine there, only him and his mother were there, I remained there till three o'clock; after dinner Mr. Stevenson came, and staid about half an hour. Mr. Robinson was regretting that he had not a head of celery at dinner, and Mr. Stevenson sent some, I understand, but I was not there when it came. Before I went away, (about three o'clock,) Mr. Saxelbye came, I let him in, I saw him through the window, and opened the door to him; he went into the parlour where Mr. Robinson was, I left the house a few minutes after, leaving them together. I did not see Mr. Lockwood there. Mr. Robinson was in the front parlour all the time I was there. I have often seen him write (Looks at scripts A. and B.) these signatures are his writing.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. How long were you there before dinner - A. They sent to me to say dinner was on the table. I am sure Mr. Lockwood was not there on Sunday, the 30th of April, and did not dine there. Bailey assisted at dinner, it was over about two o'clock, and I left about three o'clock. Saxelbye came before I went.

MATTHEW HENRY STEVENSON . I am clerk in the Custom-house of Hull. I was acquainted with Mr. Robinson, and on the 30th of April, 1815, I went to his house about half-past one, or a quarter before two o'clock, and found him in the front sitting-room with his mother and Miss Hewson. I staid till half-past two o'clock, and did not see Mr. Lockwood there during that time. Something was said about celery, I went home to prepare some and sent it him. I knew him very well, and have often seen him write, I believe the signature to scripts A. and B. to be his writing.

MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. Is that the way he usually signed, or did he sign differently - Q. I have seen him sign different ways, the scroll of the T is different from this - I have often seen him write like this.

ANN BEACH . I was acquainted with Mr. and Mrs. Robinson, and know the prisoner was intimate with Mr. Robinson. I have seen him there at different times.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

46. THOMAS SAXELBYE was again indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

MR. BRODRICK declined offering any evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

FIFTH DAY, MONDAY, DECEMBER 10

47. JAMES BEW was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , two sheets, value 5 s.; two pillow-cases, value 6 d.; one towel, value 6 d.; one candlestick, value 1 s., and one key, value 3 d., the goods of James Child , in a lodging-room .

ELLEN CHILD . I am the wife of James Child, we livein Bedfordbury . On the 8th of November I let the prisoner a lodging, he said he was a shopman out of employ; I let him the one pair of stairs back room at 2 s. 6 d. a week; these things were let with the lodging. On Tuesday, the 13th, he left. I found the door locked about three o'clock in the afternoon, and the key gone, he had given me no notice. When I got the door open I found the articles stated in the indictment gone. I saw him at Bow-street on the Saturday after, I found all the things.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was he the only one who took the lodging - A. Another young man named Evans, slept with him, who had been some time with me. I let the bed to two, both paid for the use it, he is now with me. I told Evans another young man was coming, and he consented to it. One Brown lodged there before the prisoner, he had left some weeks. Evans then occupied it by himself till the prisoner came. Evans only paid half, he did not see the prisoner till he came. I told them each that another man would sleep there. There was only one key between them, they used to lock the door and give me the key.

THOMAS PIKE . I am beadle of St. Sepulchre's. On Tuesday, the 13th of November, about eleven o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner in Smithfield, and a woman holding him by the coat, I took charge of him and found a screw-driver, seven keys, and four duplicates in his pockets. Child claimed one key, I found a candlestick in his hat, also a towel and a pillow-case, two pieces of soap, and a pair of scissars. I took him to Guildhall, and observed a lump on his back, one of the marshalmen pulled out a sheet from there, and in his trowsers I found another sheet, and a pillow-case. Child claimed them.

Cross-examined. Q. You took him the very day he left, and kept him in custody - A. Yes.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBETTER . I am a marshalman. I was attending at Guildhall, the prisoner's back appeared bulky, he said he had nothing there. I took a sheet from under his waistcoat, and saw the other things found in his trowsers by Pike.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

48. GEORGE GOLDING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of November , one mare, price 20 l. the property of William West .

WILLIAM WEST . I am in partnership with Thomas Fearman , and live at Pangborn, Buckinghamshire . On Thursday, the 15th of November, I had my mare in a cart until half-past four o'clock in the afternoon; I then put her in the stable, and missed her the next morning, about ten o'clock. About halfpast nine o'clock at night, I set off for London, and got here at seven o'clock in the evening, and went into Oxford-street, about half-past ten o'clock, and saw my mare at the off wheel of the Ealing. coach, kept by Thomas Ives . I got on the coach and went down to Ealing with him; in consequence of what passed, the prisoner was apprehend at Ealing.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long had you had it - A. Twelve months.

CHARLES WEST . I am the son of the last witness. Between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, I turned the mare into the straw-yard with five more, and missed her about ten o'clock the next morning - the mare which came from the Ealing coach is the same, she was brought to our house on the Monday morning.

THOMAS IVES . On Saturday morning, the 17th of November, West went down to Ealing with me, and claimed the mare which was in the coach. On Tuesday, the 16th about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner brought two mares to my back yard, at Ealing. He said he had two useful mares which he thought of service to me; I I said I had plenty, and I did not want any. We at last agreed to swap one, I exchanged one of mine for one he brought, and gave him a 5 l. note, and eight half-crowns to boot; he said he had rode her a great many miles, and could recommend her. I was to give him another 1 l. if is turned out well - he said he had had the mare some time. I do not recollect whether he said how long he had this one.

Cross-examined. Q. Did not a young man come down with the prisoner - A. Yes; I have not seen him since, the prisoner said he went to London, and had come from there; Studbury was present when we agreed for it - its legs were swollen, as if it had come some distance; he said he had put a boot on in travelling, and had tied it rather tight, which caused it.

JOHN STUDBURY . I live at Acton, and was present when the prisoner brought two mares into Ives's yard; he offered them to him, Ives said "I do not want horses, I have more than I want." I advised him to make a chap - Ives's horse was brought, and 6 l. given to boot, and the other mare, but it was not the mare in question, he never said how long he had had that mare, this was the other. After dealing for that mare, he requested Ives to drive the other in his coach to London, and when Ives was returned with the coach from London to Ealing, I was there; West claimed the mare in the coach, and had her away afterwards.

Cross-examined. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I have known him twenty-five or twenty-six years, he invariably bore a good character, he has brought from a hundred to a hundred and fifty colts that road, and was well known in the place.

COURT. Q. Did he say how long he had had the mare in question - A. He did not say a word about it.

THOMAS IVES re-examined. Q. Was it the mare that you swapped, that you took in your coach, or the other - A. The other; I took it by his desire, it was too heavy and big for me.

THOMAS WARWICK . I live at the Roebuck, public-house, three miles from Reading, half way between there and Pangborn. My servant keeps the house; Pangborn is forty-five miles from town. On the 15th of November, I saw the prisoner at the Roebuck, public-house, he dined there with another man, they staid till about three o'clock.

Cross-examined. Q. Had he any horses with him - A. No; he did not say where he was going.

JAMES THOMPKINS . I live at the Green Man, public-house, at Ealing. The prisoner was at our house on the 16th, with another man, before six o'clock in the morning.He had three horses with him - I know the mare in question to be one of them.

Cross-examined. Q. Another man was with him - A. Yes; the horses were put in the stable. I had seen him at our house three or four times before with horses - I have not seen the other man before or since.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Rugby fair, early in the morning of the 17th, and met Johnson, who I knew, by seeing him at fairs; another man was with him, he said he was coming to Smithfield, and had three mares to sell, and as he had seen me buying horses, he thought they would suit. I took him to Thompkin's between six and seven o'clock, and put the horses in the stable; he said he had them from Whitney, in Oxfordshire, of a Welshman, who had rode them some time. I took his word and bought the mare which West claims, for 22 l., he would not warrant them sound. He went to London by the coach, I took them to Ives, exchanged one, and left the other for trial.

THOMAS WARWICK . I did not know him before, I am sure he is the person.

Q. How came you to recollect that it was on the 15th of November - A. I wrote a letter that day to my wife. I heard of the horses being stolen the next morning.

JURY to IVES. Q. Did you ever buy horses of him before - A. I have no recollection of it, but my horse-doctor says I bought one about four months ago.

JOHN STUDBURY . He said at once, when he was apprehended, that he bought them of a man named Johnson.

JAMES BLAKE . I am a constable. I apprehended him, he said he bought them of Johnson, at the Green-man, public-house, the day before he was taken. I have seen him about Ealing with horses.

Several witnesses gave the prisoner a good character, and stated him to be a dealer in horses.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Bayley.

49. THOMAS BERTRAND was indicted for feloniously assaulting Evan James , on the 6th of November , at St. Mary, Whitechapel , on the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, 4 s. 6 d., in monies numbered, his property .

EVAN JAMES . I am a tailor , and live in Wentworth-street. On the 6th of November, about a quarter past twelve o'clock at night, I was standing at the corner of Essex-street, Whitechapel , going from the Catharine Wheel, public-house, in Catharine Wheel-alley, I had been out, from ten to twelve o'clock, with a friend, I was perfectly sober. I was going by Essex-street, and standing at the corner, four young men came up to me, the prisoner was one, he asked me what I wanted to give charge of them for; they had insulted me before, by pushing me about, and kicking me. I threatened to give charge of them, and then went ten or fifteen yards further, and then the prisoner asked what I wanted to give charge of them for, I said, because they kicked, and insulted me; he then struck me with his fist, and knocked me down, the other three picked me up, and as they were doing it, I called out, Watch! the watchman came, and caught the prisoner; we went to Whitechapel watch-house, and I gave charge of him for an assault - he was sent to Spitalfields watch-house, and after that, I found my three pockets turned inside out, and missed 4 s. 6 d., and a few halfpence, which I am sure I had when they first insulted me. I cannot say what time it was taken, as I was almost stunned; I cannot tell what the prisoner did when I was down, they were all four about me, I did not see any of them take my property. I had said I would give charge of them, but I did not call the watch till they knocked me down. I have never recovered my property. They had insulted me near Castle-street.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What had you drank - A. Part of three pints of beer, and a glass of gin. My friend keeps the house, in Castle-street; I was alone when this happened.

Q. The blow appeared from revenge - A. I cannot tell. He said, "Why did you charge me?" and immediately struck me; he was one of those who insulted me, for I I had looked in his face in Castle-street, we had no quarrel at all; I had called watch! the first time, and the watchman came - he ran away. I then went fifteen yards, and they came up again, it was about a quarter of a mile from the public-house, they had to go to another watch-house, as the Whitechapel one was under repair. I found I had lost my money after he was sent to the other watch-house. I had been waiting in the watch-house all the time, as the officer said, he would stop me, if I could not have bail to appear against him, as he did not know me. The watch-house is a quarter of a mile off, only one man went with us, a good many watchmen came up, but did not go to the watch-house. I discovered my loss half an hour after he was taken to the watch-house, I was detained at the first watch-house till ten o'clock, when my bail came. I waited with the officer, I am sure my money was safe after the first time they insulted me, because I looked for it. The prisoner had gone about two doors from where I was knocked down, I had followed, holding him. I am certain he is the man who struck me, I never lost sight of him. My pockets could not have been turned out after he was taken.

JOHN POWELL . I am a watchman. On the 6th of November, there was a cry of watch, I was about ten yards from where the prisoner and prosecutor stood, when I came up they both stood together, the prosecutor had hold of the sleeve of his coat, and gave charge of him for knocking him down. He said, he was certain he was the man, I took him, the watch-house keeper would not take charge of him unless the prosecutor gave bail for his appearing before the Magistrate; I got the prosecutor's friend, who answered for his appearance. Five or ten minutes after he came in, I saw that his right hand breeches pocket, and his waistcoat pocket, were turned inside out; he said he was sure one of the four had stolen 4 s. 6 d. from him, and some halfpence. The prisoner said, he knew nothing about striking the prosecutor, he knew nothing of it. The prosecutor was perfectly sober.

Cross-examined. Q. You did not come up till after he was in custody - A. The prosecutor was holding him. I am well acquainted with bad characters; I never knew the prisoner before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from the Royalty,he was crying out watch, and took me, I never saw him before.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 20.

Recommended to Mercy by the prosecutor, on account of his youth and character.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

50. RICHARD WOOD was indicted for that he, on the 31st of October , upon Charles Satchell Mattock , feloniously maliciously, and wilfully, did make an assault, and with a sharp instrument, did strike and stab him in, and upon his arms and thigh, with intent of his malice aforethought to kill and murder him .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating, his intent to be to disable or do him some grievous bodily harm.

CHARLES SATCHEL MATTOCK . I am apprentice to Mr. Bartholomew, a hearth rug manufacturer, and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green , the prisoner was also apprentice there, and has been there three years or more, he was there before me. On the 31st of October we had a quarrel about some worsted, I went down to dinner about half past one o'clock, and when I returned, he shewed me a piece of worsted, which he had taken from my part of the shop and said it was his, and was in his possession before, I said it was mine, I went to the loom and caught hold of the worsted, he was working with it, and said, whether it was mine or not I should not have it, I said, I would, and kept my hold, he got out of the loom where he was sitting at work, and dragged me a yard or two, a scuffle ensued, he gave me two or three blows to get my hand loose, I struck him two blows, not more, neither of our blows were very violent, I cannot tell where I hit him, he struck me one or two more, and finding it did not good, he dragged me about two yards backwards, and called for a pair of scissars, he snatched a pair off my master's loom, grasped them in his hand, and thrust them into my breast; I endeavoured to pin his arms behind, but I had not much strength, as the blood came very violent from the wound, he changed the position of the scissars and ran them into my thigh, and then into my arm, in nine places; he then let me go. I was afterwards examined by Mr. Thomas the surgeon. We were not on good terms before, I thought I could beat him, he thought he could beat me; we fought several times, but it was never decided.

Cross examined by MR. BRODRICK Q. You first went to claim the worsted - A. Yes; be had taken it from my loom, and accused me of taking it from his, he was sitting in the loom when I came up, and shewed me the worsted, he was sitting in the loom when I caught hold of it; I did not strike the first blow, I did not bite him, I did not fetch a pair of scissars when we separated; after he wounded me I got a pair, and said, how could he be so cruel as to run a pair of scissars of that kind into any body; he said, "I am ready for you again." I did not offer to strike him with them, he continued to work there till he was taken, which was a week after.

Q. Had you a quarrel with one Naggs - A. Yes; I did not threaten to stab him.

COURT. Q. Was he in a great passion at the time - A. Yes; my Lord, the scissars were about two yards from where he sat. Our worsted is not weighed out to us, it did not matter which used it. He got the scissars directly after I struck him, I do not suppose he meant to strike me with them when the quarrel began, he was in a passion at my not letting go of the worsted. I endeavoured to pinion his arms after he struck me, he had the scissars in his hand while he was struggling to get loose.

THOMAS CURTIS . I was in the shop at the time of the quarrel, Wood was at work at his loom, and missed some red worsted and went to look for it while Mattock was out, and when he came up, he said, "What did you take this for?" Mattock insisted on having it, and in the scuffle pulled him out of his loom, and they scuffled down to my master's loom, which was next to them, he found Mattock too strong for him, and got the scissars, but but in the moment of irritation, I suppose, he did not know what he was about. I saw no blows pass between them, they were scuffling for the worsted, I do not think he intended to strike him with the scissars when it first began.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

51. THOMAS TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , one coat, value 3 l., and one waistcoat, value 15 s., the goods of Joseph Garritt , in his dwelling-house of Richard Whiting .

JOSEPH GARRITT . I am a painter and glazier . In April last, I lodged at Mr. Whiting's, Elm-street, Gray's Inn-lane , the prisoner lived in the same room. On the evening of the 17th of April, I went to my box, and found it locked as usual, he had slept there the night before. On opening it I missed a coat and waistcoat and some money, I saw them safe the night before. I expected him to sleep there the next night, but he never returned to the lodging. He had a small box in the room, which he kept locked. I saw Mrs. Whiting break it open about six weeks after, and found a duplicate of my property. The coat cost me 4 l. 5 s., and was nearly new, I had only worn it about three weeks. There was only an old shirt and some stockings in his box.

ELIZA WHITING . I am the wife of Richard Whiting , who keeps the house. The prosecutor and the prisoner lodged in the same room, the prisoner was there last on the day the prosecutor missed his things, about ten o'clock in the morning. I did not know he was going to leave, he paid me for his lodging, and gave me to understand he was going to stop. I did not see him again till he was in custody, which was about the 17th of November. He had left his box in the room, locked. About five or six weeks after I took it to the ironmongers, they had no instrument that would open it - it was in the same state as when he left it. I at last broke it open in the prosecutor's presence, and found two old shirts, a pair of stockings, and a duplicate of a coat and waistcoat. It was his Sunday great coat and nearly new.

JAMES JORDAN . I am a constable of St. Giles's. I apprehended the prisoner in Crown-street, Soho, on the 12th of November, and found several duplicates on him. I told him I took him for robbing a young man whom he lodged with. He said he had committed the robbery - was sorry for it, and did it through distress.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Barnet, to see my sister,and at Hadley I was engaged to fill a young man's place who was ill. I wrote a note by the Barnet coach to say it was uncertain when I should return; and just as I came to town I was apprehended. I lived with Mrs. Keath, the widow of the late rector of Barnes. Three other men lodged in the same room.

JOSEPH GARRITT . Nobody lodged in the same room, one slept in the next room, whose cousin caused him to be apprehended.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Garrow .

52. RICHARD JAGO and THOMAS BECK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Ord , Esq. , at St. George, Hanover-square , about ten o'clock at night, of the 10th of October , with intent to steal, and stealing therein, two clocks, value 17 l.; one looking-glass, value 10 l.; one watch, value 2 l.; two coats, value 6 l.; two waistcoats, value 4 l.; three pair of breeches, value 3 l.; five pair of boots, value 5 l.; one dress, value 5 l.; two pair of buckles, value 3 l.; one pair of lace ruffles and frill, value 6 l.; eight yards of black velvet, value 5 l.; five yards of satin, value 4 l.; 6 gowns, value 3 l.; one veil, value 20 l.; one shawl, value 10 l.; ten table-cloths, value 20 l.; three sheets, value 3 l.; sixty napkins, value 10 l.; fourteen towels, 1 l.; twelve cloths, value 12 s.; one hundred sulphor casts, value 3 l.; one box value 10 s.; one gold chain, value 5 l.; two necklaces, value 8 l.; two rows of stones, set in gold, value 7 l.; two pair of ear-rings, value 4 l.; one garnet cross, set in gold, value 4 l.; one gold neck ornament, value 4 l.; twelve gold buttons, value 5 l., his property ; and MARY BECK was indicted for feloniously receiving, one table-cloth, one pair of breeches, one hundred sulphor casts, part and parcel of the said goods aforesaid stolen ; and HENRY LEWIS for receiving, one table-cloth, and one sheet, they well knowing them to be stolen .

MR. CURWOOD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM ORD , ESQ. I live in Berkley-square , in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square. Jago's wife lived seventeen years in my family as servant, she left in October, last year, having married the prisoner shortly before that. On the 23d of June my family left town, and I left the house in the care of Jago's wife, he resided in the house with her by my permission.

WILLIAM HOOPER . I am a watchman of St. George's parish. I know Jago. On the 10th October about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, (my beat is on the cast side of the square, by Mr. Ord's door) he called me to him. I saw his wife standing at the area gate, they said they had been down the area and could not get in at the kitchen door, he put the key in the door, and said, "Now it is locked," he unlocked it, and said, "Now I cannot get in." - He tried it once or twice, and told me to try it, which I did, and said it must be fastened inside. We at last got in by breaking the door open. Jago, my brother watchman, and myself all went in, the door had been bolted inside. We went into the housekeeper's room, in the passage, I asked him if all was right; he said, "Yes;" but turned round and said, "This door is not right." The door hung on one screw. Supposing there was thieves inside, we got more watchmen, and went into the back kitchen, saw the window half up and one iron bar loose, this was in the back area. We went into the area, and Jago took hold of the iron bar and pulled it, and said "This is where they have got in." We went up to the hall, and on the first pair of stairs, we found a candle, not a-light, the house was quite in disorder, and a cutlass in the front parlour, and a bundle of keys, some clothes and things were scattered about the room. We went up to the next floor and found all the drawers broken open and the locks forced, the house appeared to have been plundered from bottom to top. We found the scabbard of the cutlass at the top of the house, but could find nobody, though we searched the whole neighbourhood.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. At what time was your attention called to the house - A. About a quarter past ten, it appeared to me to be plundered.

JOSEPH GATES . I have known Beck six week, or two months, I believe I knew him a week or a fortnight before October last, he came into a chandler's shop where I was, Pugh lodged with me.

Q. Do you remember, on any occasion, Beck's letting you into any secret - A. After I bought the duplicate of a coat of him, which was lined with silk, and trimmed with fur, he told me I must get it out, for they were going to make a crack, where it came from. I did not know what that meant then, I have since been told it meant they were going to break into the gentleman's house where it came from.

Q. Do you recollect the night of the 10th of October, last A. I do not know the night, but it was on a Wednesday night; Beck, and the hackney coachman came to my lodging, and brought a bundle each, Beck asked me to lend him 2 s., to pay for the coach, he took the bundles to his lodging, I do not know where they were put at that time, but he took them to his lodging, and then came to my lodging, with a white bundle under his arm, this was the same night, it was a white bundle that I saw both times, this was between eight, and nine, or ten o'clock I believe; I saw the bundle opened, and saw, what I supposed to be a Coronation dress, it was a buff, or white cassimere jacket, trimmed with light blue silk, and a star on it, it was embroidered with silver; there was also a little time-piece, about nine inches long, with a yellow face, and in bronze, and a pistol, about twelve inches long, these things were brought down into the cellar, of No. 19, Vine-street, where I lodge, I held the light. On that same night I received from him a sheet and a table-cloth, marked, H. O.; and I think there were more letters, but I will not be sure. I wanted to pay Beck for them, he was to have 18 s. I took them next morning to the prisoner, Lewis, to raise me money to pay for them, I said, "Lewis, can you dispose of these, for I want to pay the men for them." He said I do not know, but if you will call on me, or meet me at a public-house, in the evening, I will do what I can for you; I left them with him. He was to meet me at the One Tun, public-house, in Chandos-street, in the evening, and did so, he went by the name of Lewis, I always knew him by that name. I have said his name was Jones, I told Pugh so, who was there, he met me and Pugh there, he brought a bit of linen with him, with a mark on it, it was the mark thatcame off the sheet or table-cloth, he gave it me, and said, "We won't be done." I do not know what he meant.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What are you - A. A tailor. I live in Vine-street, Chandos-street. I have been assisting in a chandler's-shop and coal-shed, for two years. I know Mrs. Toole who lived in the same house as Lewis, I never employed her, I knew her by her lodging there. The sheet and table-cloth were brought about seven o'clock in the morning, on Thursday, I had no part of the contents of the first two bundles; Beck brought them. Lewis lodges about a quarter of a mile from Vine-street. I was apprehended at work, last Friday three weeks, I did not ask to be a witness. I advanced money on the things before I went to Lewis's, I got it from Pugh, and to repay him I took it to Lewis. After I was apprehended, I sent to Lewis to give me a character, if I should want one.

CHARLES PUGH . I lodged in the same room as Gates. Beck came there about half-past eight o'clock, in the evening of Wednesday, the 10th of October, he brought nothing with him the first time, he had some conversation with Gates, and presently went out. Gates asked me for the key of the cellar, which I gave him, and presently Beck came in with a bundle; they both went into the cellar with the bundle.

Q. Did you see any second bundle that evening - A. I cannot say, as it was dark; but I believe Beck went out again, and brought in another, but I am not certain. About five minutes after, they both came out of the cellar, and the key was given me, I went from curiosity into the cellar, to see what the things were, and I saw a large table-cloth, loose out of the bundle, I noticed no mark. I saw a large bundle tied up in a cloth, and in it I saw a time-piece, the face was a gold colour, I lifted it up, the cloth appeared very heavy. I was with Gates, at the One Tun, public-house, the next day, the 11th of October, about one, in the day, when I went in Lewis sat there with a pint of beer before him, I did not then know his name; but a few minutes after, Gates told me his name was Jones.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you know Lewis before - A. No; I delivered myself into custody, and told the officers what I seen.

COURT. Q. When you were there, did any thing pass between Lewis and Gates - A. They had some close conversation between themselves, I did not hear it, I did not see either of them give any thing to the other.

SAMUEL LACK . I am a Bow-street patrol, I took Mary Beck into custody, on the 21st of October, about six o'clock, in the evening, and found on her a table-cloth, and a pair of gentlemen's small clothes, she said, she had them from a young man to take care of, but she did not know who.

WILLIAM TILL . I am a dealer in coins and medals, and live in Great Russell-street, Covent Garden; the prisoner, Mary Beck , came to me in October, and sold some sluphor casts of Greek coins, I sold the whole of them, they were wrapped up in this piece of serge, which I produce, and am certain it is the same, they were casts of very fine coins of the Grecian kings.

THOMAS WEBB . I am shopman to Mr. Turner, a pawnbroker, of Bridges-street, Covent Garden, I have a sheet and a table-cloth, pawned the 11th of October, by a woman in the name of Toole, the marks have apparently recently been taken off and fresh hemmed. I did not notice this at the time, but one hem is fresher than the other.

LUCY TOOLE . I pawned these things with Webb, I had them from the wife of the prisoner, Lewis, she lived with him.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You live in the same house as Lewis - A. Yes; I work for Mrs. Lewis, I pawned them in her name, and put the money and ticket on her shelf, I do not know what became of it, she was in the room, I got 16 s. on them; I went away immediately, and do not know who took up.

SAMUEL PLANK . I received information of this robbery two days after it happened, on the 12th of October, and saw the prisoner, Jago, that day, he said, the house had been robbed, and wished me to apprehend a person, whom he said had been seen in possession of two or three articles which he believed to be Mr. Ord's, he pointed him out to me, his name was George Bailey ; I took him, he was committed, and discharged on the 20th, there being no evidence to implicate him. On the 16th of November I took the four prisoners in custody, Gates and Pugh also wished to be taken, and I took them. I was present at the examination of the prisoners before Mr. Dyer, the Magistrate, and heard them tell their different stories, neither threat or promise was held out to them, quite the contrary, for the Magistrate cautioned them. Jago wished to say something to me, but I took him to the Magistrate. I saw their examinations taken down in writing, and signed by the Magistrate, they were read over to them, and they signed them; it is all the Magistrate's hand-writing.

(Here the witness separately identified the confessions, as being signed by the Magistrate.)

The voluntary confession of Richard Jago .

One day towards the end of last summer, Mary Beck with whom I had before had an intimate connection, watched me out of Mr. Ord's house, in Berkley-square, about eight o'clock in the morning, and asked me to give her some money, or something to raise money upon - I told her I would consider of it, I met her again about a week afterwards in the Piazza of Covent-garden, and told her I could do nothing for her; she said three shillings a week, which I was then allowing her, for a bastard child, was not sufficient to keep it, and she threatened if I did not give her more, to come and make a disturbance round the house in Berkley-square - she then suggested that I might bring her something of Mr. Ord's, to sell or pledge; I objected to that, she said if I would only let her have something for a time to pledge, she would take it out again, and let me have it back. I still objected; in the course of another week she watched me out of the house again, about half-past seven o'clock in the morning, as soon as I opened the front door of the house, she rushed in, and insisted on my letting her have something - she went into Mr. Ord's dressing-room, and through that into a passage, and I went with her; she pulled open a drawer in the passage which was not locked - there was a quantity of Court dresses there. I told her that the drawer contained Mr. Ord's clothes, before she opened it - I was induced to do so by her urgent way of insisting on my compliance with her wishes. She took a coat out of the drawer, which was trimmed with fur about the collar and sleeves, and carried it out of the house - I went out with her as far as the Covent-garden Piazza, when I got there, she asked me to go and pledgethe coat, which I said I could not think of doing; she continued to entreat me, and at length prevailed, and I went and pledged the coat at Mr. Lamb's, the pawnbroker, at the corner of Stanhope-street, Clare-market, for 1 l. 10 s., she remained out-side; when I came out I gave her the whole money, and the ticket, we separated - I went to my work in Duke-street, Lincoln's nn-fields. This was about the 21st of September. I did not see any thing of Mary Beck , for about nine days, she watched for me as I was coming home from my work, and having met me, she told me if I did not give her something more, she would send to Mr. Ord, and let him know what had been done: I refused to let her have any thing more, saying I had done wrong, and I must and would get out Mr. Ord's coat, and I hoped she would not say any thing about it - she insisted she would have something more. She said she was acquainted with two or three men, and the best thing I could do to clear myself, would be to let them break into the house before Mr. Ord returned to town - I said I could not consent, this was on a Friday evening, she then proposed that she should come to the house the next day (Saturday,) and that I should let her in, and give her something to pledge, which I refused, and we parted. On the next evening (Saturday,) she watched for me again as I was going home, and asked when she met me, whether I would do what she proposed; I said "No." She then produced three keys, and asked me to try if they would not open some of Mr. Ord's drawers - I told her I could not think of doing such a thing, and that I had done enough for her; in reply she again threatened me with a disclosure if I did not comply. I refused; she then seized me by the collar, and said if I did not comply with her wishes she would immediately carry me to Bow-street, and charge me with having robbed Mr Ord - I then consented to take the keys and try them, she then left me, and I went home. On Sunday I tried one of the keys, and it fitted one of Mr. Ord's drawers; I took a silk pelisse out of the drawer, and locked the drawer again. On the Monday morning following, she waited for me outside the door; and as I was going out, I took the pelisse with me, and gave it to her, and I also returned the three keys; I do not know what she did with the pelisse - I walked with her as far as Bond-street, and then we separated. About a fortnight after this, or less, I met Mary Beck again, in New-street, Covent-garden, she said she wanted to see me, she was desirous to get the coat and pelisse out of pledge, and she appointed me to meet her on the Tuesday evening following, at a public-house in Chandos-street, I went there at the appointed time, and in about a half an hour she came in, and her brother, Thomas Beck , was with her. I asked her what she wanted with me, and said I wished she would get the things out of pledge, she replied she was not going to be such a d - d fool as that; I asked her what I was to do, she answered, I must do as I had done before, and again produced the three keys - she also pressed, and so did her brother, my consenting to have the house broken open, but this I resisted; however I took the keys, and promised to take something more out of the drawers for her, and she was to meet me in Berkely-square, the next morning. On the same evening when I got home I opened the same drawer I had opened before, and took out another pelisse or cloak, and a petticoat of silk; I think the colour of the pelisse or cloak was green, and it was wadded; I think the petticoat was of a pink colour, and it was trimmed round the bottom with lace, I also took a blue skirt - I tied them up in a bundle and gave the whole to Mary Beck the next morning, in Bruton-street, where she was waiting for me as I went out; I walked with her as far as the Burlington Arcade, and there we separated, she carried the things away with her, and I do not know what she did with them. A few days after this Mary Beck again met me at the corner of Duke-street, where I was at work, and Mary M'Laughan was with her - she asked me whether I had considered about having the house broken open, I said I did not know what to do about it, it was a sad thing; she said it might be done and should not hurt me at all. Mary M'Laughan asked me what I meant to do if I did not agree to have the house broken open; Mary Beck then said, if I would send my wife out some evening, and let in one of the three men whom she had spoken of, I might then go out myself, and the door should be bolted after me, and that that man would let the rest of them in, and they would manage the business among themselves during my absence, without my appearing to have any thing to do in it; she then for the first time told me the names of the three men, namely, her brother, Thomas Beck , Charles Marsh , and Joseph Gast , Mary M'Laughan said I had better do the thing in that way, as it would be safe for me, and I could not come into any trouble for it; we came to no conclusion then upon the business, and I left them. A few days afterwards I met Thomas Beck in the afternoon, and he made an appointment for me to meet him again that same evening, at the same public-house in Chandos-street. I went there and met him and Mary Beck , they again urged that the house had better be broke open on the next evening (Wednesday,) upon their promising that I should not be brought into any trouble, I consented; Thomas Beck said he had spoken to two young men, not naming them, and they would meet him on Wednesday evening, at Ingram's in Bedfordbury, and would be at the house in Berkely-square by half past seven o'clock - I met Thomas Beck accidentally on the Wednesday afternoon, about half-past three o'clock, and he told me to make haste home, and get my wife out of the way as soon as I could; I went home, and as I knew my wife had to go and order the char-woman to come the next day, I said nothing particularly to get her out of the way - she went out about a quarter before seven o'clock, she had not been gone more than five minutes before Thomas Beck came and tried the area gate; it was open, and he came down the area steps. He opened the door which leads from the area into the passage below, and came in, I met him in the passage, and said, "For God's sake what do you mean to do with the things you mean to take away," He said, "Never you mind, you shall get into no trouble through it." He then proposed my going out as soon as possible, and accordingly I went up the area steps, and out at the area gate; I locked the door below after me, and I heard him bolt it within; I also locked the area gate, and took the key with me; as I passed the front door to go away, I saw the two men Charles Marsh , and Joseph Gast , standing close to it, I had seen them both before, and I recollected them. I observed Thomas Beck open the front door, and let them in. I then went up to Mr. Noble's, the Coach and Horses, public-house, in Horse-shoe-yard, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square; I got there about a quarter past eight o'clock, having stopped in my way at Mr. Parrotts the apothecary in Mount-street; I met my wife there, whom I had appointed to meet me there before she quitted home that evening - my wife and I stopped at the Coach and Horses, public-house, till about half-past nine o'clock, when we went back together to Berkely-square. I opened the area gate, and went down, the door below being found bolted, I called out to the watchman for assistance, he forced the door open, and several other watchmen having come to him, the house was searched, and it was found that the door of the cupboard in the housekeeper's room, and several drawers in that part of the house, were broken open; a bunch of keys was also found on the carpet in Mr. Ord's dressing-room, which the watchman tried, and found to fit some of the drawers - there was a trunk broken open in the maid's room, and a bunch of keys found there also; there was nobody found in the house; I know nothing of what articles weretaken from the house; my wife was much alarmed, and I appeared to be so. When the first alarm was over, I quitted the house leaving my wife at the next house, and several watchmen about the door, to go down to Mr. Scott, Mr. Ord's brother-in-law, in Downing-street, to let him know what had happened. I arrived at Mr. Scott's about half-past twelve o'clock, and told him, and he said he would go to Bow-street next morning; I then went back to Mr. Ord's house, and Lord Kinnard's servant remained with me all night, while my wife continued at the house adjoining - I went to Bow-street next morning, and hearing Mr. Scott had already been there, I returned home. After this I never saw any thing of Charles Marsh , Joseph Gast , Thomas Beck , Mary Beck , or Mary M'Laughan, till I saw the three last named persons at this office last Friday - I do not know Joseph Gates or Charles Pugh , who were in custody here, also on Friday last; I know Sarah Beck , but she had no concern in this transaction as far as I know.

his RICHARD X JAGO. mark.

The voluntary confession of Thomas Beck : - About five weeks before the robbery at Mr. Ord's, Richard Jago came to my lodgings in Vine-street, and asked me if I knew where my sister Mary lived; he shewed me a large basket containing ostrich feathers, and asked me if I knew any place where they could be sold, I told him No, that was a woman's business; he said they were the property of his wife, and were given to her by the mistress of the house where she was. We had a pot of beer, and conversed about a quarter of an hour, he asked me if I would sell for him some tickets, as he was in want of money; he then shewed me an immense lot of beads, ear-rings, necklaces, two crosses, (one with hair, and the other garnet set in gold) which I declined doing; he invited me to call on him in Berkely-square, where he wished to converse with me, in the absence of his wife. I expressed my doubt of his having come honestly by all those things, he said he had; that he had possessed them for a long while, and now wished to raise money on them, in consequence of his having a brother who was threatened with an execution for debt, and who he wished to serve; he then told me that the house was No. 17, in Berkely-square, and appointed me to come at four o'clock, I was not able to get there till a little after six o'clock - I knocked and he let me in, he shewed me all over the house, his wife was absent, and he was in a hurry in going over the house with me, for fear she should return; he asked me if I would take away a sword for him, with a cut steel handle, which he said had been made a present of to his wife - I took it to my lodgings, and the next day he came and had it away. I told him I was afraid he was doing something wrong, he said, "Never mind that he wanted money for his brother, and he must have it," A day or two after he brought me a pair of pistols, and asked me if I would sell them for him, which I declined, he then asked if I would tell him a place to sell them at, I told him there were many gunsmiths, where they would buy such things; he then again pressed me to tell him where my sister was, as he said he would be a pound or two in her way, as he was sure she would tell him a place to sell the pistols at; I declined to tell him. In about two days after, he came to me again, and brought me a ticket of a watch, which was in pawn for 5 s., and asked me to take it out for him. I declined; he then left me in my room, the two pair back, saying he would find a person; he returned immediately, I asked him what he had been about, he said he had found a woman at the door whom he knew, and that he had given her the ticket to bring out the watch - shortly after a woman whom I did not know came and knocked at the door, and called to him, she gave him a watch, which he said was the one he had sent for, I then looked at it, it was a gilt one and small, there was a gold key, with a black ribbon to it, he asked me if I knew where he could sell it, I told him if it was his own, he had better pawn it; he took it away, but brought it another day, and I sold it for him for 16 s. I sold it to Joseph Gates - in about a week after he brought two valuable scarfs, and shewed them to me, and then he took them away again, one was very large, and of a red colour nearly new, the other was black and worn, he also had several yards of black velvet, and some red sattin. He then, for the first time, said he had been doing something wrong, and he must now go on with it; I asked him if his wife knew any thing of it, he said, "No," I advised his never letting her know. He said upon one occasion, he was afraid she would know by his being in a room which she asked him about, and he satisfied her. I asked him how long the family was to remain out of town, he said about three weeks longer.

On the day after I sold the watch, I sold for Richard Jago , the ticket of a coat which was in pawn for 30 s, I sold it also to Gates, he gave me 3 s., which I handed over to Richard Jago - I also sold Gates the ticket of a cloak, which was in pawn for 10 s., he gave me 2 s. for that, which I delivered to Richard Jago .

On the night of the robbery of the house, I went there with Jago at his request, and I remained in the square outside the house till he sent his wife out, he then let me in at the area gate, this was just at eight o'clock, he took me into the front parlour, and gave me a bundle, he then told me he was determined to have the house robbed that night, and that he was expecting his brother Samuel, and Turner. I came out of the front door, and when I had gone a few paces, I looked round and saw two men go in, they were Turner and Samuel Jago , brother of Richard Jago . I knew them both by having seen them at the Ben Johnson , public-house, in Wild-street, Turner had on a long great coat, colour blue, and Samuel Jago a close bodied coat, the bundle was given to me for my trouble. There was a time-piece in it, a large sheet, and a table cloth, I carried them to Gates's lodging at Mr. Basay's, he lent me the key of his cellar and gave me a light, I went into the cellar and deposited the bundle and its contents, Gates; knew nothing of what they were, I kept the key, and the next day I went there again, opened the cellar, and brought the bundle away, I then returned the key to Gates. As I was taking the bundle away part of it was open, and Gates might have seen part of its contents, he asked me what I had got there, I said nothing. The next day Turner and Samuel Jago came to me, and asked me to give them the bundle back, saying, they knew a man who would sell them for them - the same evening they brought me 30 s, as the produce of the sale. After I saw Turner and Samuel Jago go into house, I walked sometime (about three quarters of an hour) in the square, I saw Turner bring out a large glass on his shoulder he carried it towards Berkely-street, Samuel Jago brought out at the same time a large bundle and went the same way. Richard Jago had come out just before them, but was not carrying anything, and also went the same way - Samuel Jago had shut the door after him. I then went away myself. About eight o'clock the next night, I met Richard Jago, near Bedfordbury, and he told me he had been to Bow-street, and given information of the robbery, he told me there was a woman next doorto Mr. Ord's, who said she had seen a man with a short jacket, and another with a flapped hat, and dressed in blue go into and come out of Mr. Ord's, I asked him if there were such persons, he said no, there was none besides his brother Samuel and Turner - I asked him how he could trust them, he said he could depend on them - he also stated his dependance on me - I come to tell what I know about it, to save innocent people from being implicated - I saw my sister Mary Beck in conversation with Richard Jago in Chandos-street, a short time before the robbery, When I met Richard Jago the night after the robbery, I asked him how he managed about the people getting into the house - he said they had got into the area gate, and then into the door below, which they bolted after them, that he had represented at Bow-street, that they must have got out at the back as the back doors were open.

his THOMAS X BECK. mark.

The voluntary statement of Mary Beck , who says, I deny that I ever forced myself in at Mr. Ord's door, and opened the drawers and took away a coat, nor did I ever urge Richard Jago to let the house be broken open, or said I could find men to do it, nor did I take him by the collar, and say I would take him to Bow-street if he did not agree to the robbery, or that I ever fitted three keys for that purpose, or that I ever had the least idea of the robbery, or even knew where Mr. Ord's house was; the several articles that I pledged and sold were brought to me by Richard Jago , and he desired me so to do; and having cohabited with him for a number of years, and having a family by him, and being now in the family way by him, and unconscious that I was doing wrong, I consented; as he told me the articles belonged to his wife, who was a lady's maid, and that her mistress had given them to her. Sometime towards the end of August last, I went in company with John Jago , to Mr. Myer's shop in York-street; Covent-garden. Jago had a large parcel of feathers, which he gave me to take in and sell while he waited in the street; I sold them for 2 l.; the four feathers now produced are part of those I sold there, a lady's court plume of white ostrich feathers, and a down plume and yellow feathers were also among them; he told me that the feathers were the property of his wife, I also admit that I pledged the silk pelisse at Mr. Harris's, in the month of August last, and also a silk cloak at Mr. Ashman's for 10 s. I then returned the ticket for the cloak to Richard Jago .

her MARY X BECK. mark.

Witness SAMUEL PLANK .

H. M. DYER.

Taken before me the 1st of Nov. 1821.

JANE GEE . I lived in Mr. Ord's family. I have reason to believe the piece of cloth produced by Mr. Till, to be a piece of Mrs. Ord's, shawl, she had such a shawl, which was left among other things when the house was robbed. I left town with the family, I know she left a red pelisse behind her, not a green one.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. You believe the cloth to be part of her shawl, from the colour - A. Yes; it is a common shawl, and here is a sheet, which I am quite confident of, it was in the house when the family left town. I have every reason to believe the table-cloth to be one which was left in the house; one end of it was hemmed by a person in the house. The marks are gone off all the linnen, it appears fresh hemmed where the mark ought to be.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Will you swear they are Mr. Ord's - A. I swear to the sheet, there is none of my work in it; the linen goes out to be washed every week. I left town in June, and returned in October, I have the care of the linen, this is one of the sheets left out for Mrs. Jago's use.

MR. ORD. I can swear to the breeches being mine. I lost a masquerade dress exactly corresponding with the witnesses description, I also lost a pair of pistols, a sword, a great coat, with a fur collar, and cuffs, two time-pieces, one a gold face, and one not. I know my wife had a puce coat, lined with red, I know nothing of the pelisse.

SAMUEL LACK re-examined. Q. On the 8th of October, at seven o'clock, how was the day-light - A. Dark; I believe it was not quite dark, I should think it was dark a little before seven; I know, ten days after, it was dark at a quarter before six.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Could you distinguish a man's face at the time - A. I think not.

JAGO. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

THOMAS BECK'S Defence. With great difference, I submit the following statement: I was innocently led into this; Jago called on me where I live, and asked me to sell the duplicate of a coat and waistcoat, which I did, having no suspicion that he came dishonestly by them, as he said they belonged to his wife's brother, who lived in the country - Some days after, he again came, and I gave him the money I sold the duplicate for; he asked me to walk with him to a public-house, he asked me to walk to Berkley-square, where he said he lived, which I declined, he asked me if I could come about eight o'clock; I asked the reason he was so urgent for me to meet him there; he said it was not of much consequence, but if I would, he would be obliged to me; I accordingly went, and met him outside of the door; he said "I expected you sooner," and asked me to carry a bundle home for him; he gave it me, and I carried it home, without knowing the contents, and the next morning he came to me I gave it him. My character, up to this time, was unimpeached; I served three years in a seventy-four gun ship, Captain Sir C. Cole, was then drafted on board the Fly, was servant to Captain Baldwin eighteen months, I was then paid off, and went on board the Bulwark, bound for St. Helena, I then returned to London, and met an officer of the Conqueror, who recommended me to a ship at Woolwich, I could not get money enough, and have been looking for a ship. I declare myself entirely innocent. I implore you to consider my case, and hope my character will induce you to shew me mercy. The whole of Gates's evidence is false.

MARY BECK 'S Defence. I humbly beg permission to state, that, my fellow prisoner, Richard Jago 's confession, at Marlborough-street police-office, of Wednesday, the 28th of November last, with respect to me, is utterly false.

That I ever forced in at Mr. Ord's door, and opened the dressing-room drawers, and took away a coat, and repeatedly urged him to let the house be robbed, or could findmen to do it; or that ever I took him by the collar, and threatened to take him to Bow-street, if he did not agree to the robbery; or that ever I fitted three keys for that purpose. I most solemnly, before God, utterly deny it, so much so, that I do not even know where the house is situate, or had any idea of the robbery. I acknowledge I have pledged articles for him, but not with a felonious intent; for he brought them to me, representing them as the gifts of his wife's mistress to his wife, whom he stated to be a lady's maid, and desired me to pledge them; and consequently (having cohabited with him myself for a number of years, and having a family by him,) I was induced to comply, being entirely unconscious that he would draw me into a snare; however, my present unfortunate situation is the result of my ignorance.

I beg leave also to state, that at the time of my committal for trial, I was actually in the family way, by Jago; and unfortunately, on being removed to my present place of confinement, I miscarried on the road; having also two of his children living, without a mother's protection.

When we went down to be measured, as I understand is usual, Jago requested me to forgive him, for his false conduct to me, and said that he would not have done it, had he not been urged so to do; and was fully convinced he had done wrong to me, and told me told me to keep up my spirits, and as atonement, he would use every endeavour to cause my acquittal, as also my brother's, Thomas Beck .

Richard Jago , since his committal to Newgate, has actually confessed to my poor unfortunate brother, that it was at the instigation of Plank, the officer, that he stated what he did, against me, in his confession.

MR. ORD. The dress cost 10 l. it might sell for half that, there was a good deal of silver fringe on it; the time-piece, with a yellow face was worth 6 l. or 7 l., it cost 10 l., one pistol was worth 5 l., the brace cost 30 guineas.

Six witnesses gave Jago an excellent character.

JAGO - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 28.

THOMAS BECK - GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged. 19.

MARY BECK . - NOT GUILTY .

LEWIS. - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

53. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , 10 lbs. of tea, value 3 l.; 6 lbs. of coffee, value 15 s., and one bag, value 6 d. , the goods of John Johnson and others, his partners.

JOHN STANTON . I am in partnership with John Johnson , we are wholesale tea dealers , and live in Nicholas-lane . The prisoner was our carman ; I only know that we missed a considerable quantity of property.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am warehouseman to the prosecutors. On the 5th of December, Forrester came to our warehouse with the prisoner in custody. I went with him to our stable, and on searching the loft, I found a green bag containing about 3 lbs. of green tea, and half a pound of black, it was loose in the bag. I afterwards saw some coffee and tea in the officer's hands; the stables was under the prisoner's care, he had the key. I compared a sample of the tea with ours, it corresponded in my judgment.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Up to this time you had a good opinion of him - A. Yes.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a constable. On Thursday the 4th of December, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner in Petticoat-lane, and asked him what he had got; he had 7 lbs. of coffee and 7 lbs. of tea - he told me to follow him - I refused, he would not tell me where was going, nor where he lived, nor his name. I searched and found a key on him. He would give no account how he came by the property. I took him to a public-house and told him to write to his friends, which he did, and from that I found out where he belonged to. I went to the warehouse, the key opened the stable door, it was a very particular key, and in the hay loft the tea was found in a bag, concealed under some hay.

CHARLES THOROWGOOD . I am a constable. I went to the stable, and found the bag of tea behind a china crate, covered with hay.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Two Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

54. PAUL SEDDENS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , one coat, value 5 s.; one waistcoat, value 2 s. 6 d., and one pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the goods of John Chester .

JOHN CHESTER . I lodge at the White Hart, public-house, Giltspur-street . My things were in a three pair of stairs front room, the stair-case comes into the tap-room. On the 28th when I went out of town they were safe in my bed-room, I took the prisoner into custody myself, in the passage leading to the street door, as suspicion fell on him - he asked what authority I had to detain him. I went for an officer. He lodged in the house for about a week.

JOHN AARON . I am servant to Mr. J. R. Castle, a pawnbroker, who lives in Old-street. I took a coat in pawn in the name of Smith, on the 1st of December for 5 s. I believe the prisoner pawned it, but could not be positive; the duplicate found on him is mine.

HENRY THREADER . I am servant to Mr. Flemming , a pawnbroker, of Fleet-market. On the 30th of November, I took in a waistcoat and pair of stockings for 2 s. 6 d., I believe of the prisoner; the duplicate found on him is mine.

GEORGE H. WORRALL . I am a constable. I was sent for and took charge of the prisoner last Tuesday, the 3d of December. I found three duplicates of this property in his fob, he said nothing.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found the duplicates in Fleet-market, wrapped in brown paper.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

55. SARAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , five pair of stockings, value 3 s.; four handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; three waistcoats, value 4 s.; one night-cap, value 6 d., and one shirt, value 1 s. , the goods of Samuel Stokes .

SAMUEL STOKES . I live in Five Foot-lane, Old Fish-street . On the 10th of November these things weretaken out of my lodging, on the third floor; the prisoner was a stranger. I left about seven o'clock in the morning, they were safe then in a bundle. I had asped the door, I returned about five o'clock and they were gone, she was in custody with them.

ELIZA ROTTRY . I lodge on the second floor. Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I came out of my room, and heard a step on the stairs below; I went down and overtook the prisoner with something under her shawl. I asked the landlady if she knew her, she said No, she rushed by and shut the street door, the landlady went after her. I am sure she is the woman; she was brought back directly with the bundle which belonged to Stokes.

CHARLOTTE BALDUCK . I keep the house, the prisoner passed us and shut the street door, I pursued her to Old Fish-street. I am certain of her person, she was brought back with the bundle, she said she had got nothing but her own property, and she had not been in the house. Then she said she went in to tye up her garter.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a constable. I took her in charge, and found three keys on her.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a bundle on the ground, a woman advised me to pick it up, which I did, and two women came and asked what I had got. One key belonged to my lodging, and the others to a shop and parlour which I had taken.

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

56. SARAH WOODWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , three frocks, value 2 s. 9 d.; one gown, value 4 s.; one coat, value 2 s.; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d.; one pinafore, value 7 s., and one book, value 5 s. , the goods of Michael Davis .

REBECCA DAVIS . I am the the wife of Michael Davis , who lives in Baker's-court, Aldgate . The prisoner was my servant for eight weeks. On going to bed on the 14th of November, I missed the hearth rug, which induced me to look further, and I missed a white frock from a box in a closet, which box was not locked; I said nothing to her but went for an officer. I came in before the officer, and asked what had become of the hearth rug? she said she wanted money, and made money of it. I had paid her wages a fortnight before. I asked about the white frock, she said she had made money of that, and a blue stuff gown; she delivered the duplicates to the officer of all the property.

JOHN FORRESTER . I took her in charge. She gave me ten duplicates of the property.

ROBERT LINWOOD . I am servant to Mr. William Corden , a pawnbroker, of Aldgate. I received the articles stated in the indictment in pawn from the prisoner, between the 24th of October and the 14th November.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to return them when I got money.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

57. CATHERINE ROOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , 6 lbs. of bacon, value 2 s. 6 d., and one knife, value 6 d. , the goods of Thomas Pithouse .

THOMAS PITHOUSE . I keep a chandler's shop , in Sea Coal-lane . On the 29th of October, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, I was opening my shop when the prisoner came to the door and asked for a halfpenny's worth of tobacco, which I gave her, she filled her pipe with it - I struck a light for her - she went away. I missed the bacon - pursued and caught her in Fleet-market with it, it was 6 lbs. the knife was taken with it.

GEORGE H. WORRALL . I took her in custody, and found the bacon concealed about her person.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 55.

Confined Six Weeks .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

58. GEORGE WICKHART was indicted for embezzlement .

JAMES BAMPTON . I keep a coal-shed , in Brackley-street, Golden-lane . The prisoner was in my service five or six weeks, and received monies for me. Sarah Wilson was a customer of mine, she lived in Leather Seller's-buildings, he had delivered her coals. On Saturday, the 17th of November , I sent her two bushel; he gave me 1 s. 5 d., as having received it from her, she owed me 2 s. 10 d.

SARAH WILSON . On the 12th and 17th of November the prisoner delivered me coals, which came to 2 s. 10 d., I owed 1 d. before. On the Saturday morning I gave him 3 s., he could not give me 1 d. change.

Prisoner's Defence. I could not get my money. I only had 8 s. a week.

JAMES BAMPTON . He had 10 s. a week. I paid him as he wanted money.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

59. GEORGE WICKHART was again indicted for a like offence .

JAMES BAMPTON . The prisoner took a bushel of coals to Mrs. Peck's, which came to 1 s. 5 d.; when he came back said he had not received the money, I did not owe him any thing then.

E. A. PECK. I live in Union-place, City-road. The prisoner delivered me a bushel of coals on the 19th of November last, for which I paid him 1 s. 5 d., I cannot say how.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

SIXTH DAY, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1821.

60. JAMES HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one shilling , the property of the Reverend Richard Chapman .

MRS. EMILY ANN CHAPMAN . I am the wife of the Rev. Richard Henry Chapman , we live at No. 15, Beaumont-street,Marylebone . The prisoner was our footman , he lived about nine months with us. On Sunday, the 19th of November, in consequence of some suspicions which we had, Mr. Chapman put two half-crowns, eight shillings, and two sixpences, into my purse, in my presence, and marked them all. I left my purse in a little work basket, on the back drawing-room table, it was all safe on Monday, at about a quarter past one o'clock. About three o'clock, I missed a shilling out of it; the prisoner had been in the house all the time.

REV. RICARHD HENRY CHAPMAN . In consequence of suspicions entertained by me, I marked two half crowns, eight shillings, and two sixpences, so that I should know them again. Mrs. Chapman brought the purse to me about three o'clock, and I missed one shilling out of it, I called the prisoner to me, he had been sent out to get a watch glass for me. I asked him how much he had paid for it, and gave him a half sovereign, desiring him to give me change, he gave me two half-crowns, one shilling, and sixpence, saying he would give me the remainder afterwards. I instantly perceived that it was that shilling which had been taken out of the purse; it had my mark on both sides, I charged him with the theft, and talked to him some time, on the consequence of such proceedings, and promised never to disclose it; he trembled exceedingly, and sat down. I continued to talk to him, he offered to swear that he had not touched the purse, I said, I was sorry he should say so, as the money was marked. He then said, the housemaid had paid him one shilling that morning, and that must be it; the housemaid was called down, and in his presence, she stated, she had paid him a shilling, but persisted in her innocence. I sent him on an errand, when he returned, he appeared to have been drinking; for he was very violent, and said, he would not live with a thief, and positively fetched an officer to take the girl up. I produce the shilling, I have had it sealed up ever since, I swear positively to it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Where is the mark - A. Under the chin; I did it with the point a knife.

Q. You talked to him about it, and he became frightened, and went to a Justice - A. He became frantic. Mr. Burgess, my fellow curate, called, and he wished him to examine the girl, to try if she would confess; he persisted throughout that he was innocent, I said if he would confess, I would not disclose it, it was his madness and infatuation that made me bring him here.

MR. ANDREWS to MRS. CHAPMAN. Q. Was not the basket in which your purse was left, in the room the greater part of Sunday and Monday - A. It was accessible to every person in the house. The last time I looked at the purse, was eleven o'clock in the morning, but I remained in the room till a quarter past one o'clock.

SARAH WORREL . I have lived with Mr. Chapman about three months, I recollect, Monday, the 19th of November, I paid the prisoner a shilling, about twelve o'clock, that day; I am sure it was not twelve o'clock. I owed him 6 s., he did not ask for it, I had had the shilling several days, I took it out of a small drawer, in the kitchen, where I occasionally keep silver.

Cross-examined. Q. How many shillings had you - A. Only this one; I had a sixpence at the top of the house. Jane Rushbrook came down the area steps at the time I was paying him.

JANE RUSHBROOK . I am cook to the prosecutors. On Monday morning, at twelve o'clock, I was coming down the area steps, Worrel was sitting in the kitchen, and the prisoner was in the pantry. On the 10th of November, I remember I received 18 d. of Worrell, she gave me half a crown, out of the kitchen drawer, and I gave her 1 s. I believe that was the only shilling she had.

Cross-examined. Q. Does she keep the drawer locked - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I have lived in highly respectable families.

JURY to MR. CHAPMAN. Q. You only received 1 s. of him; if he received one, and stole one, he would have had two - A. He had been out.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

61. CHARLES LAMB was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , one watch, value 10 s., and one chain, value 2 d., the goods of William Marshall , from his person .

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I am a gardener , and live at Hampton . On the 29th of June, I was at Hampstead, in a field, I went out of the field at ten o'clock, and laid down in the next field to rest. I fell asleep, and on awaking, at four o'clock, I missed my watch, which was safe when I laid down. I had left the prisoner in the other field mowing, I had known him from a child. At eleven o'clock, I saw him, at the Three Horse Shoes, public-house, Hampstead, and accused him, and another, named Richards, with robbing me. The officers came up and took him, it was not found. Merritt shewed me the watch four days after. The prisoner always denied it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

62. WILLIAM CRIGHTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charlotte Williams , on the 8th of November , on the King's highway, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one shawl, value 5 s., her property .

CHARLOTTE WILLIAMS . I am a single woman , and live in Lucas-square, Whitechapel, I am an unfortunate woman. On the 8th of November, about seven o'clock, in the evening. I was in the Star, public-house, Well-street, the prisoner was in the public-house, and joined my company, he sat in the same box. We continued in company till one o'clock in the morning, drinking all the time; he was quite stupid with liquor, and I was a little intoxicated. I asked him to go to my lodging, he was going, but I found he was so much in liquor, that I endeavoured to leave him.

Q. Could he walk straight - A. No; I had got about five yards from the public-house, he came after me, insisted on going with me, he caught hold of me by the shawl, and being unpinned, it came off. The watchman came out and took him, I did not tell the watchman that he had robbed me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

63. RICHARD JAGO was again indicted, for stealing, on the 21th of August , at St. George, Hanover-square , one pelisse, value 4 l., the goods of William Ord , Esq. , in hisdwelling-house ; and MARY BECK was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

WM. ORD, ESQ. I live at No. 17, Berkeley-square , in the parish of St. George's Hanover-square. My family left town the latter end of June, leaving the house in the care of Jago's wife, with permission for Jago to be there with her. On returning to town I found the house had been rifled and plundered.

WM. COOPER . I am a watchman, of St. George's Hanover-square. My beat is on the East side of the square. On the 10th of October, about a quarter-past ten o'clock in the evening, Jago and his wife called me; Jago said "Watch man, come here, I cannot get into the house." I went up, his wife stood at the door, he put the key in the area door, but could not get in; we broke the door open, the house appeared to be plundered from bottom to top, the drawers and cupboards were broken open. Jago said he supposed they came in at the front door, for it was unbolted top and bottom, the back area window was half up, Jago took hold of the iron bar which was loose, and said "They must have got in here."

SAMUEL PLANK . I received information and took the prisoners up, they denied the robbery. I was present when they were taken before the Magistrate, at Marlborough-street - neither promise or threats were used to induce them to make any statement. Jago was very desirous of making a disclosure, and was cautioned against it. What they said, was taken down and read over to them I saw them sign it. These are the confessions of the prisoners; Jago's statement was read over in Beck's presence, which was the cause of her statement.

(That part of Jago's confession relating to the pelisse, together with the whole of Beck's statement were here read, for which, see the former trial.)

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am shopman to my brother, a pawnbroker, who lives in the Strand. I have a silk pelisse which was pawned for 2 l. by two women. I do not recollect them. I do not recollect Beck, it was pawned on the 21st of August, in the name of Ann Thompson , Bedfordbury.

COURT Q. Do you take silk pelisses from every body - A. No, women of the town often have such things; it is worth about 50 s. to the trade - it is nearly new.

JANE GEE . I am servant to Mr. Ord, when the family left town, a quantity of wearing apparel was left behind, and this pelisse among it; it was gone with the rest of the property; it was quite new - Mrs. Ord sometimes gave her ladies' maids clothes.

JAGO'S Defence. I never saw that pelisse till to-day.

JAGO - GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 28.

BECK - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

64. RICHAD JAGO was again indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , one cloak, value 1 l. , the goods of William Ord , Esq.; and MAKY BECK, was again indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

MR. ORD. I left my house in the care of the prisoner's wife, on returning, I found it was plundered.

SAMUEL PLANK . I apprehended the prisoners, and was present at their examination, and saw their confession taken. Mary Beck denied all knowledge of the robbery - a week after she made this statement.

(Jago's confession respecting the cloak, and Beck's statement were put in and read.)

JOHN BURTON . I am shopman to Mr. Ashman, pawnbroker, who lives in the Strand. On the 10th of September, a cloak, similar to the one produced, was pawned at our house, in the name of Ann Edwards , Bedfordbury, and in October, Joseph Gates redeemed it - I never saw Mary Beck to my knowledge.

JOSEPH GATES . I live in Vine-street, Chandos-street, and am a tailor. I redeemed the cloak at Ashman's, I got the duplicate from Thomas Beck one Saturday in October, I afterwards pawned it again at Driver's, in St. Martin's-lane.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Is that one of the things you received from the man who was convicted yesterday - A. No, I received the ticket, I suspected it was stolen after he brought it, the man who was convicted is Beck's brother - several things, which were stolen, were brought to my cellar. I wished them away, Jago and Beck were tried yesterday.

WILLIAM VAUGHAN . I am servant to Mr. Day, of St. Martin's-lane, on the 15th October, Gates pawned the cloak.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JAGO - GUILTY . Aged 28.

BECK - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

65. RICHARD JAGO , and MARY BECK , were again indicted, for stealing ten feathers, the value of 5 l., the goods of William Ord , Esq., in his dwelling-house .

No Evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

66. WILLIAM GRANT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Renner , about seven o'clock in the evening, of the 16th of September , (no person being therein,) and stealing therein, one watch, value 20 s.; nine spoons, value 40 s.; one pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s., and part of a brooch, value 1 s., his property .

THOMAS GRAY . I know Ralph Renner , he lives in Brook-street, Ratcliffe ; on the 16th of September, I had information there were thieves in the house; I went, there was no person in the house, I found the doors all fast, and in about two minutes, the prisoner came out, I supposed he he belonged to the house, and asked him if he did; he said, "Yes;" I asked his name; he said it was no matter to me, what did I want with him? he went on a little way from the door; he said he was going down to his wife; I said, I doubted whether he belonged to the house; he pushed me away and ran off, I pursued and stopped him; he was not two minutes out of my sight. I do not know the property to be Renner's, I do not know where he is.

DANIEL GILL . I took him in charge, and found this property on him. I do not know Renner's Christian name.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

67. WILLIAM MASON . ROBERT CLARK , MICHAEL DALEY , and JOHN HITCHINGS , were indictedfor stealing on the 15th of November , one box, value 2 s. 6 d. ; the goods of Joseph White .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE WARRINGTON . I am waggoner to Mr. Joseph White of Winwaldon, in Essex, about twenty-six miles off. On the 15th of November, about seven o'clock in the morning, I drove my waggon into Whitechapel , the box was on the top of the waggon, secured by a cord; I took it off to deliver it to Mr. Parkins, it was a blue wooden box; my waggon stood at the door near the church; I set it on the shafts, I had a boy with me, I went to the hind part of the waggon, to tie the rope, and in the mean time it was stolen, it contained apples. Reynolds came up, and I saw three men run up George-yard.

THOMAS REYNOLDS . I am an officer. About seven o'clock in the morning, I was in Whitechapel, and saw the four prisoners, with three or four others, stopping at the corner of George-yard, about twenty-five yards from the waggon, I knew them well before. When I had passed them about fifty yards, I looked back, and saw they had advanced near the waggon, and at that instant, Mason went from the others, and took the box off the shafts, and returned with it on his shoulder to the others. All ran away together as far as George-yard; Mason, Daley, and another, (not in custody,) ran up George-yard with the box. Clark and Hitchings went with the rest up Whitechapel. I informed the man of his loss, and we followed up George-yard, but they turned into a court, and I lost them. I went into Whitechapel, and took Hitchings and Clark in less than five minutes. About an hour after, I apprehended Mason, at the corner of George-yard. Daley was taken on Sunday. I am certain of them all. It was a blue wooden box.

DALEY. Q. Did you not say I took it - A. Never.

JOHN BARRS . - I am an officer, I apprehended Daley on Sunday evening, at a house in George-yard, I told him I took him for stealing a box out of Whitechapel; he said, he thought there were two or three committed already for it; I said, Yes, and I wanted him also; I took him from the description Reynolds gave me.

MASON'S Defence. I was in bed at the time.

MASON - GUILTY . Aged 23.

DALEY - GUILTY . Aged 22.

CLARK - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

HITCHINS - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Confined One Year , and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

68. ELIZABETH KINSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , one watch, value 4 l.; one seal, value 15 s., and one key, value 5 s., the goods of William Miller , from his person .

WILLIAM MILLER . I am a carpenter , and live in Church-street, Bethnal-green. On a Tuesday evening, about eleven o'clock, I was at the corner of Osborn-street , returning home; the prisoner ran after me, and caught hold of my arm, and asked me to go with her, I refused, she walked about one hundred yards with me. I still refused to go; and she all of a sudden ran off into a court, I felt and missed my watch, I called out, "Watchman, I am robbed," I went with him to the watch-house, and stopped there till she was brought in with the watch; the outside case was off, nobody but her could take it; I did not give it to her.

JOHN TATES . I am a watchman. I went after the prisoner, and found her in a quarter of an hour, at the top of Windfield-street, I took her to the watch-house, and in the way, she was rather obstinate, I laid hold of her left arm, and saw her put her right hand into her breast; as she pulled it out, I heard something fall, and picked up the watch; when I got to the watch-house I found the case was gone; my brother watchman brought it in; the prosecutor was sober; it must have dropped from her.

THOMAS HOBBS . I am a watchman, I picked up the case in the way the prisoner was taken; I saw the watch fall from her.

(Property produced and sworn to).

The prisoner begged for Mercy.

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

69. RICHARD HILL and THOMAS COLLYER were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one copper boiler, value 5 s. , the goods of William Vinall .

WILLIAM VINALL . I keep the Flying Horse public-house, Chelsea ; the copper boiler was in my back yard; I missed it on the 13th of November; I had seen it about four o'clock in the afternoon of the 12th. I found it on the 14th at Mr. Purcell's.

JOHN SNOWSELL . I am a constable of Bow-street. On the 13th of November Mr. Vinall sent for me, and the next day I took Hill in the New-road, near Vinall's, he denied it; I took Collyer, he denied it also; I took him to Mr. Vniall's; he then said he did take it, and that Hill sold it in Ellis-street, in Sloane-street, I went there and found it.

MARTHA PURCELL . I am a dealer in marine stores, and live in Ellis-street, Sloane-street. Hill brought me the copper to sell, on the 12th of November, at a quarter past six o'clock, I gave him 4 s. 7 d. for it, it weighed 17 lbs. it had no lid. I asked him no particulars about it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

HILL'S Defence. I met Collyer about twelve yards from the house, with the copper, we met Purcel's son, who said his mother would give as much as any body for it.

HILL GUILTY . Aged 18.

COLLYER GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

70. JOHN ROBERTS and ROBERT NIGHTINGALE were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one hand-saw, value 3 s., and one jacket, value 2 s. , the goods of Thomas Squire .

THOMAS SQUIRE . I am a carpenter , I was at work at the Circus, Piccadilly . On the 14th of November, at twelve o'clock, while we were at dinner, my saw and jacket were stolen; I had left the door locked. I was fetched at half past twelve o'clock, and found them in Powell's possession, the prisoners were in custody. They could get down the area and take them.

WILLIAM POWELL . I am a plaisterer, I was at work at the opposite house, Blunt called me from the public-house,we followed the prisoners into Windmill-street, I seized Roberts, and asked, if he had not something which did not belong to him, he said, "Yes; the man behind gave it me to carry," Nightingale was just behind. I turned, and saw he had turned back a good distance, he was stopped, and said he knew nothing of it. I found the saw and jacket on Roberts, they were going from the Circus, and crossed the street together.

THOMAS BLUNT . I am a plasterer, I saw Nightingale go down a ladder, into the area of a house, in the Circus, and bring up a bundle under his arm. Roberts stood at the top of the ladder; I called Powell, and pointed them out to him, Robert's had got the bundle then, it contained the jacket and saw.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

ROBERTS'S Defence. It is a great falsity to say I was with him.

ROBERTS - GUILTY . Aged 24.

NIGHTINGALE - GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined Three Months , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

71. JOSEPH STRATTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , one handkerchief, value 1 s., the goods of Henry Ball , from his person .

HENRY BALL . I am a taylor , and live in Brownlow-street, Holborn. On the 3rd of November, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Oxford-street , at the corner of Wardour-street, Cook asked me if my handkerchief was gone. I felt, and missed it from my coat pocket, he took me to a wine-vaults, at the corner of Charles-street, Soho, and charged the prisoner with it, he was there, and denied it. It has not been found.

GEORGE COOK . I am an umbrella maker, and live in High-street, St. Giles's. The prisoner passed my shop with a man and woman, about two o'clock, they were trying to take Ball's handkerchief, I went out, and watched them to the corner of Charles-street, and saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of Ball's pocket, and wipe his nose with it. I pushed him into the wine-vaults, and asked where the handkerchief was, (the man and woman were at the corner) he said, "What handkerchief?" I said, "The handkerchief you took out of the gentleman's pocket;" I said he had it when I laid hold of him. I give him in care of the people while I fetched Ball, who returned with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched it.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

72. CHARLES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one waistcoat, value 10 s.; and two yards of cotton, value 2 s. , the goods of John Carnelly .

ELIZA CARNELLY . I am the wife of John Carnelly , we live in Sneyd's-court, Piccadilly . These things were in a box, in the kitchen, where I lodge. I went out at six o'clock, in the morning, after locking the door, I returned at two o'clock, and found the prisoner in custody, with the cotton; the waistcoat is not found. He lived at No. 10.

THOMAS SUTTON . I live in Sneyd's-court, Carnelly lodged in the house. On the 29th of October, I saw the prisoner come into the passage, he left the passage, I went out, and on turning round, I saw him getting in at the kitchen window, he shut himself in. I waited till he opened it, and then said, "What are you doing, you have no business here?" he said, he had come to look for Carnelly's son, who owed him a penny. I let him go without searching him, but said I should tell Carnelly, he said I might if I pleased. He was apprehended next day, and told me the things were hid in Lord Coventry's garden. I went with Medbury, and found the cotton under the leaves.

WILLIAM MEDBURY . I am a constable, I took the prisoner, and went to Lord Coventry's garden, and found the cotton.

(Cotton produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry, and will do so no more.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

73. MARY BUCKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , two pair of spectacles, value 30 s., the goods of Thomas Coles , from his person .

THOMAS COLES . I am a plaisterer , and live in Woolwich. On the 7th of November, I had been at the Black Horse, St. Giles's , from ten o'clock, in the morning, till nine at night, I was a little elevated, the prisoner came out of the house after me, and forced her hand into my pocket, and took my spectacles out; he said she would have them, she had drank with me in the house, but I was not in her company. I cried out, that I was robbed, the watchman came up, and found them on her.

LEWIS ROBERTS . I am a watchman. I heard him call out, she went from him, I followed her into the passage of the next house, and took one pair of spectacles from her hand, and saw her drop the other, she said he gave them to her.

Prisoner's Defence. He gave them to me, I refused to go with him, and he gave me in charge.

THOMAS COLES . I never agreed to go with her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

74. ROBERT PERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , 40 lbs. of lead, value 4 s., the goods of George Holme Sumner , Esq. , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be fixed to a building.

JAMES BALL . I am a watchman of St. George's, Hanover-square , Mr. Sumner lives in Grafton-street . On the 4th of November, about three o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming from the corner of Grafton-street, he could hardly walk, I took him to the watch-house, he had 40 lbs. of lead hung on each side of his trowsers, divided in two pieces with a string round his neck. Next morning I fitted the lead to the vault of Mr. Sumner's area, the edges were quite fresh cut, there were several more rolls ready to be carried away, about 1 cwt. in all.

WILLIAM GORDEN . I am a watchman. I found the prisoner with the lead, and saw it fitted to Mr. George Holme Sumner 's house. I know the house is his.

JOHN BURKE . I look after Mr. Sumner's houses, the lead was safe the day before.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw it on the step of a door.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

75. SUSAN MAYS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one watch, value 1 l.; one pocket-book, value 6 d., and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s., the goods of Sophia Allen , and two dresses, value 5 s., one handkerchief, value 1 s.; two sashes, value 2 s.; and one piece of net, value 6 d. , the goods of Eliza Allen .

SOPHIA ALLEN . I am a single woman , and live in Great Marylebone-street . The prisoner came into our service on the 25th of October, from her mother, she remained four days with us - my watch hung at the head of the bed; I saw it safe at four o'clock in the afternoon, the other things were in a drawer - my father keeps a public-house. At half-past four o'clock, she asked for 1 d. to buy tape, and never returned; I had left the key in the room door. I found my watch next day in pawn, I went with the officer, and found her at her mother's, at Wapping.

ELIZA ALLEN . I lost my things from the bed-room; I had seen them safe at three o'clock.

JAMES JEFFREY . I am an officer. I took her at her mother's, she said she knew nothing of it - I found a pocket-book on a box in her room, and in it was the duplicate of a watch, pawned in Cable-street, the pawnbroker gave it up; I asked where she slept the night before, she said in Gravel-lane. I went to a house where she said she slept, and found two handkerchiefs, the dress, and sashes; Allen claimed them in her presence, she then acknowledged taking them, and buying a pair of stays for 9 s. 6 d., of the pawnbroker.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

76. JOHN MALLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one ounce and a quarter of gum, value 1 s. , the goods of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East Indies .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HILL . I am in the East India Company's service. The prisoner was employed in the warehouse in Cutler-street , I watched, and saw him take gum out of a cask five times, and put it in his breeches - I told Heyburn.

CHARLES HEYBURN . I am a commodore. Hill gave me information, I saw the prisoner searched, and one pound and a quarter of gum found on him, he said he only took a few pieces to suck, and produced some from his waistcoat pocket, but I found this concealed in his breeches.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Confined Three Months .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

77. JAMES LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of September , seven pieces of paper hanging, containing twelve yards each, value 2 l. 19 s. , the goods of William Cox and Thomas Cox ; and JOHN ASHMAN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen .

MESSRS. ALLEY and ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM COX . I am a paper-hanging manufacturer , my warehouse is in Plough-yard, Whitecross-street , and am in partnership with Thomas Cox . Long was seven years in our service as porter , we lost a considerable quantity of paper-hanging - he was taken in custody on the 13th of November, in consequence of an anonymous letter which we received.

GEORGE DUGDALE . I am one of the prosecutors travellers. I went to Long in prison, and told him he had sent a letter to the prosecutor, he said, Yes; I said "It is only an acknowledgement of your guilt, but it gives no explanation" - and I was come to know the extent of the robbery, and if he could tell me who else was concerned. I neither threatened or promised him; I said "Ashman is in custody," he said, "Yes," I said, "Do you think you have stolen five hundred pieces," he said he should think not, but it might be three hundred; that he generally took them out in the morning, and delivered them to Treble in Whitecross-street, and that he carried some home to his own house. Nothing was said about the satin papers in question.

JOSEPH TREBLE . I have come from Clerkenwell prison, and am a paper-hanger. I lived at No. 232, Upper Thames-street. About sixteen years ago, I was introduced to Ashman. I was then a clerk in the Crown Office, and he was servant to Miss Thurlow, the late Lord Thurlow's daughter. In 1815, I took him to learn my business, he worked for Mr. Lawrence with me. About the beginning of this year, he asked me to assist in doing some painting at his brother's in Long-lane, Borough, which I did, and while we were there, we agreed to share in what work we each did. The last job we did was at Mr. Fox's, Blackfriar's-road. I procured paper for him to paper a house in Dorset-place, he gave me the job to paper it for him, as a journeyman, at so much a piece. I got the paper from Long, who was then porter to the prosecutors; one room was satin paper, and the rest common. I did not get it all from Long. Ashman afterwards called on me, and said he had five or six houses to paper, for Mr. Clemence, and asked me if Long could procure him some paper; he knew Long was servant to the prosecutors. Long also kept a little chandler's shop, and lived in the back parlour. Ashman knew he did not deal in paper. I said I would speak to him about it, which I did; he said he would procure some, and brought two parcels of twelve pieces each, they were not satin paper. Ashman took the two parcels of common paper away. I lodged at Long's, and on Saturday morning Long brought some satin paper home into my room. On the day before I had seen Ashman, who said he was coming to my place to know if Long had brought the papers. I said he had not; he said he particularly wanted them to finish his job, and would call to-morrow morning for them, and if he could get one of his rooms papered he could get a bill on Clemence for 20 l. or 25 l. Long brought them on Saturday, and about ten o'clock in the morning Ashman cameand saw them on the floor; he was to give 5 s. a piece for it. The trade price was 8 s. 6 d. he carried the papers and I carried the paste and kettles, over the water, to Dorset-place. We met Clemence near Kennington chapel. Ashman crossed over and had some conversation with him; they then crossed over, and we shewed him the patterns, of the paper; he said he thought they would do very well. We put the paper up on Monday. I went with him to Clemence's house that day, and waited outside, and when he came out, he said Clemence had accepted the bill, and he would get the money to pay Long; for Fox, in Blackfriar's-road, owed him a bill. I waited while he went to Fox, he came out and said he had got 2 l. on account.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. How long have you lived with Long - A. One year. I have only taken goods from him within twelve-months. I have paid him 2 l. or 3 l. at a time for paper. My wife has seen Ashman and Long together, and he has asked my wife to ask Long to get him paper. He never paid for these particular papers. I have sold twenty pieces of paper to Mr. Scuddy of Edmond-place, and to several people.

Q. Have you not held out to them that you could get paper much lower than any one else - A. I have said I could get them as cheap as any one, not 40 per cent. lower.

Q. Did you not tell Ashman you could get paper much lower on account of your connexion with the tradesmen who built Furnival's Inn - A. No, I worked at Furnival's Inn, I was in custody a week, and applied to be admitted as a witness.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you often go to Long's, where he worked. - A. I never went to the factory, I believe I went with Long that morning to fetch them, he brought them to me at the bottom of Whitecross-street, and I took them to Thames-street. Ashman came and took them away. I lived with Cox and Co. in 1819. I was not turned away. I was walking between Whitecross-street and Golden-lane, when he brought the paper. Ashman always bought the paper, it was his job, he knew how it was got, and knew they could not be got honestly at the price. I have told him the fair price, and he has bought of the makers. I received the paper between Whitecross-street and Golden-lane. I believe it was in the city.

MARTHA TREBLE . I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoners met at the house once, about a month before my husband was apprehended.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did Long come often to your rooms - A. Yes, with paper; it has been opened in my presence sometimes, he has brought satin paper to me for Ashman; he came once and waited for Long to bring the paper. I delivered him seven pieces which my husband knew nothing of. I pawned some paper for Mrs. Long, and gave Ashman the duplicate.

SAMUEL CLEMENCE . I am a builder, and live in Suffolk-street, Borough. Ashman papered three houses for me in Dorset-place. I met him one Saturday while he was about it, on Kennington-common, with Treble, they had some paper and tools, he ran across the road to me, and said he had got the papers at last, and was going to complete the house, and asked me for 25 l. I said I was short, and he asked if he might draw a bill for 20 l. I agreed, we crossed over to Treble, they shewed me a roll of paper which I approved of, and they went on. About two hours after Ashman called with the bill, and I accepted it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. He charged a fair price - A. Yes; 24 l. Mr. Paul had done two houses for me at nearly five per cent. less.

WILLIAM SLARK . I am a painter, and live in the Borough. Ashman left some paper at my house five or six days before he was apprehended. He asked me to allow him to leave a parcel there.

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. On the 17th of November I found Ashman at a public house, in the London-road. I asked him to walk out and lay hold of my arm. I told him I had something unpleasant to communicate to him. He asked me what it was. I said, I believed he had pawned some paper in Blackfriar's-road; he said he never pawned any paper in his life. I asked if he had pawned any in the name of Green - He denied that, and after walking some distance towards the pawnbroker's, he said, "I believe I know what you allude to, I received some tickets from Mrs. Treble." I asked if he had the duplicates, or had taken the paper out. He said he had not - he afterwards said he believed he took three pieces out to finish a job; he had said once or twice before, that he knew nothing of the paper or duplicates. I said then you have the duplicates; he said, No, he had burnt them. I got some paper from Slark.

WILLIAM COX . These papers are ours. The pattern is quite new, nobody else made it, we only sold twenty pieces, and those went to Edinburgh. The paper on Clemence's drawing-room is ours - I have seen it. The trade price for satin paper is 8 s. 6 d. a piece.

Cross-examined. Q. Tradesmen sometimes sell at low prices - A. Yes; but not 40 per cent. below the price.

The prisoner Ashman made a long defence, the substance of which was that Treble supplied him with the paper, representing that he was able to procure it at a low price, from his connexion with the tradesmen at Furnival's Inn, and that he paid him a fair price.

DANIEL B. LEADBETTER . I am a marshalman. Beech-street is between Whitecross-street and Golden-lane, that part, as far as Whitecross-street, is in the city.

GEORGE GUDE , ESQ. I have known Ashman seven or eight years, He was clerk in the Crown Office. On Saturday morning, the 17th of November, on Long being apprehended, Ashman come to me for advice. He never absconded, but was anxious to surrender himself, and I went with him to Mr. Harmer, the solicitor, for that purpose.

LONG - GUILTY . Aged 40.

ASHMAN. - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

SEVENTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1821.

78. THOMAS HART was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , one whip, value 3 s. , the goods of William Downing .

WILLIAM DOWNING . I live at Enfield . On Wednesday night, the 17th of November, I lost a whip from the stable, and some ducks from the pond. I observed the traces of a man with high shoes, and another with low shoes. The prisoner worked on the premises three days before, and wore low shoes.

JOHN MEAD . I am a constable of Enfield. On Saturday, I went and found the whip in the prisoner's room.

WILLIAM ROSE . I am servant to Mr. Downing. I hung the whip in the stable, and locked it at eight o'clock, the night before; the key was kept over the door, the prisoner knew that.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

79. JOSEPH TUBBS and WILLIAM JUDSON , were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 10 lbs. of lead, value 5 s.; and one brass cock and boss, value 5 s.; the goods of Lady Charlotte Denys , and fixed to a fence belonging to a dwelling-house of hers ; and CORNELIUS REYNOLDS , was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating them to belong to Edward Humphreys .

MR. BOLLAND conducted the prosecution.

EDWARD HUMPHEYS . I live in the New Road, Chelsea , the house, No. 1, Chapel Court, belongs to Lady Charlotte Denys - this lead pipe was fixed by two lead straps, to the pales in the yard, to serve the water-butt, there was a brass cock to it. On the 17th of November, at nine o'clock, I found it wrenched off, and in consequence of information, I took Tubbs, Judson, and Ball, in custody, and from what Ball told me I took Tubbs to Reynolds's, and asked him, in Reynold's presence, if he had sold a lead pipe, brass cock, and boss there, both him and Reynolds denied it. I went again at five o'clock, with Ball, who said to Reynolds "I and two others sold you the lead which was melted down in an iron pot, and it weighed 10 lbs., and you gave us 1 s. for it, and 5 d. for the cock and boss;" he said he could not deny it, if he had bought it of them, it was gone, for a cart came every other day and took away all his goods; there was six feet of pipe stolen, worth two pence halfpenny a pound, as old lead - the cock was sound and cost 7 s. five years ago.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. What are you - A. A carpenter. I know the value of lead, I have exchanged it for new, reckoning it at twopence half-penny a pound. Reynolds said he dare say he did buy it, I asked if he bought the cock and boss with the pipe, his wife said they did buy it in that way, not joined together.

SAMUEL BALL . I live in Chapel-row, New-road, the prisoners live at Chelsea. On the 12th of November, about six o'clock at night, I was with them, we got over the paling of No. 1, Chapel-street, Tubbs proposed it; we broke off the lead pipe with the cock at the end, took it to Tubbs's house, and melted it in an iron pot; his father is a carpenter. We then took it to Reynolds, which is a quarter of a mile off; Tubbs carried it on his shoulder in a basket, he took it in, and said "Mr. Reynolds, will you buy this lead," Reynolds weighed it, and said it was 10 lbs., and gave us 1 s. for it. He then weighed the cock, and gave us 5 d. for that; we came away and divided the money. I was taken up, and told if I spoke the truth, I should be saved.

Cross-examined. Q. Did you all go into the shop - A. No, only Tubbs and I went in, Reynolds was in the shop when we first went in - I am fourteen years old, and was never in trouble before.

RICHARD MAYBANK . I am a constable. I took them in charge and went to Reynold's with Tubbs, he denied buying it. I then took Ball, who said to him "You bought 10 lbs. of lead of Tubbs and me, and gave us 1 s. for it, and 5 d. for the cock," he then said, if he had bought it, it was gone.

Cross-examined. Q. He neither denied or admitted it - A. No; he denied it in the morning, positively.

ANN BRAYBROOK . I saw the prisoners and Ball getting over the rails of No. 1, Chapel-court, about six o'clock on Saturday evening - I do not know what they did.

WILLIAM MANNING . I am agent to Lady Charlotte Denys . Old lead melted down, is worth two-pence halfpenny a pound.

Cross-examined. Q. You mean from the manufacturer - A. Yes; I do not know what old-iron shops give - the house is unoccupied.

REYNOLD'S Defence. Maybank has sworn false.

TUBBS - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

JUDSON - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

REYNOLDS - GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

80. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , three coats, value 8 l.; two whips, value 5 l.; two shirts, value 1 l.; five pair of trowsers, value 50 s; one pair of drawers, value 2 s.; nine waistcoats, value 50 s.; one handkerchief, value 1 s.; five neckcloths, value 5 s.; two neck scarfs,; value 10 s.; one pair of mud boots, value 1 l.; five gloves, value 2 s.; one pair of shoes, value 5 s.; six razors, value 1 l.; one shaving pot, value 1 s.; two brushes, value 2 s; one pair of boot-hooks, value 2 s.; one pair of scissars, value 1 s., and one copper-plate, value 2 s. ; the goods of William Cocks Johnson .

MESSRS. CURWOOD and ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

CHARLES MEADS . I entered Mr. Johnson's service in June; he lived at Hill's house, Southampton. I was postillion and the prisoner was coachman ; I came to town with my master in August, he was at Hatchett's hotel , I was employed in the stable; the porter's waited on my master, he had a portmanteau of wearing apparel there. My master was arrested, I and the prisoner attended on him at Radford's house, the sheriff's officer; the prisoner slept in Little Coram-street, and attended at his brother's in Torrington's-mews, Keppel-street. On a Friday, ten or twelve days after my master had been arrested, we lodged together, and were going home from my master; the prisoner said, "Charles, I have got orders from my master that you are to go and fetch his clothes from Hatchett's, and deliver them to me;" he said, "Go, and put all thethings in the bag that you can, and bring them to me here;" he waited in Dover-street, I went and got the articles stated in the indictment, put them in a bag, and took them to him; he then said, it was by way of getting his wages, he did not say how much was due to him; I should not have fetched them if he had not said it was my master's order, we went to his brother's stable, and left them there. I told him he should not have done so, considering Mr. Johnson's situation; he said Mr. Johnson would never get out, and he intended to keep them for his wages.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

81. GEORGE CRUTCHFIELD was indicted for feloniously putting off to one W. H. Findley, five counterfeit sovereigns, at, and for a lower rate than the same did, by their denomination, import, and were counterfeited for, viz., for 1 l. 17 s. 6 d .

MESSRS. BOLLAND and BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

WILLIAM HENRY FINDLEY . I have been out of employ for the last six months, I was a warehouse clerk , I live with my mother in North-street, Chelsea, and have known the prisoner for six or seven years, by sight; I saw him last October at a free-and-easy in Bedfordbury, and saw him again two or three days after at the same house; we talked together some time, he said he expected to meet a person there about some canaries, which I have since learnt, meant counterfeit sovereigns; he said he was going to buy some for a person in Portman-square; I saw him at the house every evening, he shewed me three counterfeit sovereigns, and asked my opinion of them, and asked several times if I could pass some; and said, he thought, as I was a respectable person, I could; I said, I could not purchase, but a friend of mine wanted some; he said, the price was 8 s. each, if I took three at once, and by the score or half score, 7 s. each; he promised to meet me on the following Monday, at a house in Rupert-street, Cavendish-square. I informed Furzman, the officer about this, and he took me to Plank. In consequence of what passed, I met him in Rupert-street, on the following Tuesday; I had seen him on Monday, and he agreed to bring me two sovereigns, which I was to buy of him. I received 9 s. from Plank before I went to the house; he asked if I had the money for the two sovereigns; I said I had money for one, but could not take two; he said, "You first said you wanted two, and now only one; I must go out for some little time, and will return and let you have it." He returned in two minutes, and gave it me, I gave him 9 s., as he said he could not sell a single one for less; I said the sovereign was wet, he said Yes; in consequence of my not taking the two, he thought I was going to play him a trick, and he had planted the other outside, in the water spout but now his suspicions were at rest; he asked when I should want more, and told me to advise the person to take more at a time, as it would be very advantageous; I said, I should want three on the following night, and agreed to meet him there for them. I gave the sovereign to Plank, and got 24 s. from him; and on Wednesday evening I met him there. He said, as I did not before take what I wanted, he had only got one; I said, I could not take one, as the person expected three; he said it was of little consequence, as I could meet him next morning and have the two, and wished me to pay for the three, as he had some money to make up by the morning, as he had to meet a party with some at nine o'clock, or forfeit 6 s., if he had not got them. After some conversation, I gave him 24 s. for the three, and took one, which I gave Plank. I went next morning, found he had been there; I met him in two minutes in Jeremy-street, he said he had been to the party, but something had happened in the country, they had not arrived, and he should have them in the evening. I met him in the evening in Rupert-street, he produced five, but said he was going into the country, and could only let me have one. I said in a day or two I would take half a score; he said I could have them on Saturday, and if I enquired at the house in the morning, I should hear if he had left town; I took the one, and was to have the other, with the half score, and was to give him 7 s. each. I went on Saturday, and waited him in; he asked if I wanted the quantity that I said; I said Yes; and he told me to meet him in half an hour; I went out and saw Plank at a house in King-street, and got four crowns, three half-crowns, and seven shilling and a sixpence in marked money from him, and another sixpence, unmarked, to spend. Jefferies and Furzman were there, they followed me to Rupert-street, the prisoner was not there, he came in a few minutes, and asked if I had got the money; I said Yes; he said he was very sorry, but he only had three; I said I must have the quantity I stated, he said, as I had the money, if I waited half an hour, he would return, he left, returned, and said, "Well, I have them for you;" I said, in consequence of his delay, I had been to the person who would only take five; he said, then he could not let me have them for less than 7 s. 6 d. each; I said I only had the money for five, at 7 s. each, and could only give that; he said it was of no consequence whether I had them or not; I said I could not pay 7 s. 6 d. without seeing the person; he said I could not have them at all till he had gone out for half an hour; we both left, I went to Plank, at the end of the street, and got half-a-crown from him; I met the prisoner at the house, he took me into the yard, and asked if I had all the money right for the five. I gave him 1 l. 17 s. and he gave me five sovereigns. (I had no money but what Plank gave me.) He had four more in his hand; I said I expected to have five, and the one I had paid for before, at six o'clock, that evening, to compleat the half score. I paid for some porter with the sixpence, and parted with him at the door, after drinking some beer, for which he paid 1 s.; the moment I got out, Jefferies took me into a printing-office and took the five sovereigns from me.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Q. What age are you - A. Twenty-eight. I was clerk to Mr. Delapre , of Bond-street, and left him three years and a half ago. I have served other people since, and have kept a furnished house at Lambeth, which I laid out 300 l. upon. I am a married man. The house in Bedfordbury is the Rising Sun, public-house, kept by Mr. Ingram. I now sleep at my mother's, my wife lives in Lisle-street. I called at the prisoner's house once before he was taken, and once since. I had met the prisoner a week before, he talked about thesovereigns. He said he planted both the sovereigns in the water-spout. I had seen Furzeman about five years ago, but never spoke to him afterwards till I accidentally met him and stated the case to him.

Q. In what way do you get your living now - A. I have property in pledge which I am living on, and my wife has 35 l. a year and her business.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am officer, of Marlborough-street. Furzeman brought the last witness to me, the Mint directed me to do the best to detect the dealer; and on the 6th of November, in the afternoon, Jefferies was with me, I gave Findley 9 s., to buy a sovereign. I watched him into the Crown and Punch Bowl, public-house, Rupert-street, he came out in a few minutes with the prisoner, they remained a short time in conversation, and then separated. I followed him into Pultney-street, and he gave one a sovereign, which I produce. I saw him next day, at the Marlborough Head, public-house, and gave him 24 s., followed him to the same house, and saw him come out in company with the prisoner; it was then dusk, I saw Findley give him some silver, and heard the prisoner say,"You shall have them in the morning." Findlay said something, and the prisoner said, "I shall loose 6 s., by them." Findlay said, "Then you will let me have them in the afternoon." He said, "Yes, about ten o'clock;" and they parted. Before that, when they first came to the door, the prisoner went away, and I followed him to a house, in Bedfordbury, I went back to Rupert-street, he returned to the Crown and Punch Bowl, public-house; they then came out together, and I heard the conversation I have stated. I followed Findley, and joined him, he delivered me another sovereign. The next day, I saw Findley again, and followed him to the house, in Rupert-street. I saw them come to the door, they parted, Findley gave me another sovereign. On the 10th of September, Furzeman and Jefferys were with me, at a public-house, in King-street, Golden-square; we searched Findley, to see that he had no money, and I gave him four crowns, three half-crowns, seven shillings, and a sixpence, all of which I had marked - I gave him an unmarked sixpence to spend. I saw him go into the Crown and Punch Bowl, public-house, the prisoner went in soon after, and came out in a very short time, I watched him into Coventry-street, and there saw a man speak to him, who was waiting with a bag under his arm; they stepped up by a door, and the man delivered something to the prisoner; they parted, the prisoner went along Coventry-street, he returned in half an hour, and went into the Crown and Punch Bowl, public-house, they remained there half an hour, they then came out and parted. I took the prisoner about twenty yards off, his right hand was in his breeches pocket, I had great difficulty to get it out. I found a sixpence in his left hand, unmarked. I searched him at the office, and in his right hand breeches pocket I found four crowns, marked; four half-crowns, three marked; six shillings, and a sixpence, marked; it was the money I gave Findley, one shilling was wanting. Furzeman took four sovereigns from his left hand pocket. I went to the Crown and Punch Bowl, public-house, the landlady gave me a shilling, which was one I had given Findley. The prisoner said he lived in Bury-street, with his mother, and attended on gentlemen, who lodged there, and got the silver from them, and the gold he had had some time. He said he had been at the Crown and Punch Bowl, public-house, with Findley.

Cross-examined. Q. You went to his mother - A. Yes; he did live there, his friends are respectable. I lost sight of him when he came out on Saturday, there is a court opposite the house. The house in Bedfordbury is a most desperate place.

CHARLES JEEFERYS . I was with Plank, his account is correct. As Findley came out of the house I took him into Glindon's printing office, and found five sovereigns on him.

SAMUEL FURZMAN . Findley applied to me, I took him to Plank. On the 10th I saw Plank, gave him the marked money, and followed him to the house. Plank's statement is correct, I found four counterfeit sovereigns on the prisoner.

CATHARINE THOMAS . I am landlady of the Crown and Punch Bowl, public-house. Two persons came on Saturday, and as they went out, they had two glasses of rum, one of them gave me a shilling, which I gave Plank, I had no other shilling.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. All the eighteen sovereigns are counterfeit, and of the same die.

The prisoner put in a long written defence, stating, that Findley first employed him to obtain the counterfeit sovereigns, and directed him where to procure them.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

82. JACOB BARNETT was indicted for feloniously putting off thirty-nine counterfeit shillings, at a lower value, than the same did, by their denomination import, and were counterfeited .

JOHN ISAACSON . I am a twine dealer , and live in Shoreditch. Handley and Gleed applied to me to detect some persons putting off counterfeit coin. On the 28th of October , I went to the Seven Stars, public-house, Whitechapel, and saw King, Gleed, Handley, and Patrick. Gleed marked one shilling, and two sixpence, and gave them to me. I and King went to the corner of Essex-street; a short man came up and spoke to King, he left us, and came up again with the prisoner, the short man told me to go to the side of the prisoner, and he would give me the things; I went, the prisoner asked how many I wanted, I said seven. The short man then said, we only wanted to play tricks with them, and began to abuse me, we left them, and as we went up Osborne-street, the short man came up and said, "When can you get the other money?" He could not let me have less than forty, and for them I was to give ten shillings; the prisoner was not with him, I said in about an hour, I then went down Brick-lane, to Slater-street, Gleed followed, and gave me eight marked shillings, I returned him one of the sixpences he before gave me. We then went towards Essex-street, I met the prisoner before I got to the corner, he asked if I had got the money? I said, "Yes." I gave him nine shillings, and two sixpences, and he gave me a paper, containing the counterfeit money. Gleed came up, took us into a public-house, took the counterfeit money from me, and the good from him.

JAMES HANDLEY . I am a constable. I and Gleed applied to Isaacson, we all met at the Seven Stars, public-house, and marked one shilling, and three sixpences, and gave them to Isaacson; he and King went together, we followed them, and in a few minutes, I saw the prisoner, and another Jew, conversing with them, we were on the opposite side, they went towards Osborne-street. The prisoner parted from the other, we followed Isaacson to Slater-street, and gave him eight shillings, and took a bad one from him, we followed him into Petticoat-lane; Gleed took the prisoner and him in charge.

BARNARD GLEED . The last witnesses account is correct. I saw Isaacson with the prisoner, and saw something pass between them; I seized Barnett's hand, and found all the marked money in it, and a bad shilling in his pocket. I found a paper on Isaacson, containing thirty-nine shillings.

MR. POWELL. The shillings are all counterfeit, of the same die, and have never been in circulation.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

83. MARY HALEY was indicted for a like offence .

JOHN ISAACSON . On the 9th of November , I went to the prisoner's lodging, No. 26, Angel-gardens, St. George's in the East ; I knew her before, King spoke to her in Irish, she then said to me "How many will you take now," I said twenty, she asked for the money, I gave her a half-crown, four shillings, and two-pence; she told me to wait, and she would not be gone above an hour. Before she went she put a flat iron in the fire - I waited, when she returned, she took it out, and put the shillings on it, wetted her finger, and touched them, she then poured some hot water out of the kettle into a mug, took a white powder out of a paper, dipped her finger in the water, and rubbed them, she put them in the water again, and washed them; she then got a piece of yellow soap, rubbed it on the black part of the tea kettle, smeared them over with it; and after taking the black off, she gave them to me in a paper - I took them to Handley. I saw her again on the 12th, at seven o'clock in the evening, she called me aside, and asked how many I wanted, I said twenty, and gave her 6 s. 8 d.; but before the dealing was complete she was secured.

JAMES HANDLEY . I had information about the prisoner, and gave Isaacson 6 s. 8 d., to buy money of her, he brought me twenty counterfeit shillings. On the 12th, I gave him 6 s. 8 d., more and that night took the prisoner in custody, in Back-lane; Hamilton and Isaacson were with her, as I took Hamilton, she threw down a paper containing forty bad shillings, and a bad half-crown, she said in the prisoner's presence that she gave them to her to carry.

BARNARD GLEED . I have heard Handley's account, it is correct. I found a good shilling on the prisoner, Hamilton said, "Mary you have brought me into this," she said Yes, I have, and shall take it all on myself.

ELEANOR HAMILTON . I was with the prisoner, she gave me the money to hold while she went into a public-house.

MR. POWELL . The shillings are all counterfeit, and of one die, they have never been in circulation. The blacking is done to take off a brightness, and make them appear to have been in circulation - they use cream of tartar to restore the colour of the metal; the fire makes them sound well.

GUILTY . Aged 33.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

84. JAMES EGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 5 lbs. of tobacco, value 2 s. , the goods of the London Dock Company .

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am a Thames Police constable and London Dock gate-keeper. On the 30th of November, I saw the prisoner go into the back warehouse, and come out again - I suspected him by the manner he had his hat on, I took it off, and found it full of tobacco; I found more under the waistband of his breeches, inside his shirt, and Slater found some in his stockings, there was 5 lbs. in all - he had been an extra labourer , but was not at work that day.

JAMES SLATER , I am a constable. Griffiths called me, I found 2 1/2 lbs. of tobacco in his stockings.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a sailor, who asked me to get it out for him, I refused, but being half drunk when I went there, he gave me this to put about legs, saying it was his own.

GUILTY . Aged 28.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

85. MICHEAL ROACH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of September , twelve glass-bottles, value 1 s.; and nine pints of fish sauce, value 5 s., the goods of Eliza Lazenby , and Henry Lazenby ; and one basket, value 2 d. , the goods of Daniel King .

HENRY LAZENBY . I am an oilman , and live in Edward-street, Portman-square , I pay my mother an annuity out of the business, which is carried on in our names. The porter of another warehouse brought me an order for fish sauce, of which we have the exclusive sale - the bottles were put into his basket, he left it in the shop while he went further; he called for it in an hour, and it was missed.

WILLIAM MOORE . I keep a glass and china shop, in Church-lane, Strand. On the 30th of October, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner brought in a basket, and said he had some fish sauce to sell - I considered he had not obtained it honestly, and detained him. I sent for an officer, who opened the basket, and found it was twelve bottles of Harvey's fish sauce; I did not know him before particularly.

DANIEL KING . I am porter to Mr. Read, of King-street. On the 30th of October, I went to Lazenby's for six pints and six half-pints of Harvey's fish sauce, to be packed up by the time I returned from Bryanstone-square; on returning it could not be found. The basket is mine.

HENRY GROVE . Moore sent for me. I knew the prisoner, I asked what he had got, he refused to tell, and objected to my examining it - I found it contained this fish sauce. I took him to the watch-house, it was about six o'clock. The labels on the bottles, led me to the prosecutors.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man who comes to the Green Man public-house, Oxford-road; I had a ham which weighednine pounds and a half, he offered me the sauce for the ham.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

87. WILLIAM SAMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , five brushes, value 3 s. , the goods of Charles Rooke .

CHARLES ROOKE . I live in Back-lane, St. George's, in the East . On the 29th of November, about half-past seven o'clock at night, there was a fight opposite my door, one of the parties ran into my shop to deposit his clothes, my back was towards the door. My neighbour said something was stolen; he pointed to the prisoner - I pursued and took him under a gas-light, and found fifteen brushes concealed under his frock. I gave him in charge.

GEORGE GARDENER . I am a broker, and live in Back-lane. I heard a great noise in the road - went out to see what was the matter, and saw ten or eleven people pushing into Rooke's shop; there was a dispute between two men. I saw the prisoner very busy, pushing towards the shop; he went to the threshold of the door, and leaned towards the post. I saw him take something but could not see what. In about a minute he deliberately turned round and walked away. I pointed him out to Rooke, who took the brushes from under his frock. He said, "I beg your pardon."

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Confined Three Months and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

88. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , six goblets, value 5 s. , the goods of John Watts .

JOHN WATTS . I keep the King's Head, public-house, Hampstead . The prisoner came and had a glass of porter in the parlour, which he paid for. There is a large cupboard in the parlour, with a quantity of glass in it. My servant was going along the passage, and gave an alarm. I went and missed some glasses, and ran after him, calling Stop Thief! and from under each arm, he pulled out a glass, and threw them down. He was pursued and taken in Shepherd's-fields, and a boy brought me four glasses. The cupboard door was not locked.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Did you see him come in - A. No; but I saw him go out, and pursued him. I might not have looked in the cupboard for six months.

MARY KING . I am servant to the prosecutor. The the prisoner came in and called for a glass beer, my master's daughter served him. He asked for the newspaper and had it; and in about twenty minutes I saw him go out of the parlour with the glasses under his arm. I called my master, and followed him, and saw him throw two glasses down against the wall.

THOMAS NEVILLE . I am the prosecutor's son. I pursued and caught the prisoner in the middle of the field. He told me to use no violence, and he would give himself up. He was taken to the watch-house and in the evening I took him some bread and cheese. He told me he took six glasses, that he threw two down, and four in a ditch. He only had a halfpenny on him. I have learned that he was in great distress.

JOHN EDMUND WILSON . I took him in charge, and found only a halfpenny on him. He said he had disgraced himself, and was very sorry for what he had done, but he was actually starving. He conducted himself with great propriety.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

89. JAMES LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , four pieces of paper hanging, containing twelve yards each, value 2 l. , the goods of William Cox and Thomas Cox ; and JOHN ASHMAN was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, he well knowing it to be stolen .

(MR. WILLIAM COX and GEORGE DUGDALE being examined, gave the same evidence as on the former trial, it is presumed unnecessary to repeat it here.)

JOSEPH TREBLE . I was in the paper-hanging business . I learned Ashman my trade. In August, last he employed me to assist him in papering a house for Mr. Mullin's, we did the job together; he was to receive the money and pay me. I got the paper from Long that the job was done with, by Ashman's desire. He knew Long was the prosecutors porter, I am certain of it, for I have told him so. I then lodged in Upper Thames-street. Ashman and I took the paper from Thames-street, Long had brought it to my apartment. A flock border was also put round the room, which was obtained from Long. Ashman was to pay 8 s. a piece for it, the trade price was 25 s. He was to give 5 s. a piece for the paper, the trade price for which was 8 s. 6 d.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Who made the bargain with Mullins - A. Ashman. I was to share the profit, but I appeared as the journeyman. I took some patterns. I have a memorandum in my book which enables me to say it was in August, (reads) "10th of August, received of Ashman, 1 l." That was the day the rooms were finished. I am sure Ashman took it from Thames-street. I never delivered him a bill made out as bought of me. My friends advised me to become a witness, and I sent to Mr. Harmer offering to be a witness. Ashman told me he was have 20 l. each for two houses he was to do for Clemence.

MR. ALLEY. Q. Whose hand-writing is this book - A. Ashman's; it is the book he kept to enter up the account. Here is an entry, (reads) "11th of August, paper to Mullins's job, 20 s. cash, to Treble." This tallies with my book, I altered my book on comparing it with his, as he said mine was wrong.

MR. DUGDALE. I saw that book found in Ashman's house.

MARTHA TREBLE . Deposed to the same effect as on the former trial.

WILLIAM BOUSTED . I keep a public house, at the corner of Addle-hill, opposite to where Long lived. I once saw him carry paper into his house in the Summer,he came out with it and went towards Blackfriar's-bridge; he went in at one door and out at the other with it.

SAMUEL MULLINS . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Newington-road. Ashman papered two rooms for me, in August. Mr. Cox saw the rooms afterwards; here is the bill he gave me for the work done, the paper is charged 7 d. a yard. He once pawned eight pieces of paper with me. Treble assisted in the work. I have seen a woman named Cardinal, with Ashman; I always understood her to be Mrs. Ashman.

JANE CARDINAL . I know Ashman. I recollect when Treble was taken up; about that time Ashman spoke to me on the subject. When Treble brought the paper to the house, I told him I did not think Treble got it honestly. He said if he did not he paid a fair price for it. I said he would get himself into trouble. He said if he did, he did not care, they could do nothing to him but transport him. This was a few days before he was apprehended.

Cross-examined. Q. I wish to fix you to some time - A. I cannot say the day. I did not know Treble was taken till the 17th of November; he has worked in my house occasionally, but not for twelve months. I never liked him.

Q. What are you - A. A widow, I live at No. 1, Prospect-place.

Q. You say you were not intimate - have you not lived together - A. I said I was not intimate with Treble. I lived eight years with Ashman; he left me ten months ago, and has married another woman. I told him when he came that there had been a search warrant in my house.

Q. Did you caution him before the search warrant - A. Yes; repeatedly. I never knew he was married till after he was apprehended. I did not cause any communication to be made to Messrs. Cox and Co. I never told Mr. Gude that I had given information to them. Mr. Gude called on me and said Ashman was surprised at my not attending to his letter. I said I had taken advice, and could take no notice of any letter. Mr. Gude said Ashman had reason to believe I was at the bottom of the communication to Messrs. Cox and Co. I said "If he is not guilty, and has harboured that opinion, let it rest so."

MR. ALLEY. Q. You often admonished him on the danger of associating with Treble - A. Yes. Ashman came to me on the 17th, he said he had heard Treble was in trouble and that he himself must be off, and asked if I had any money, I had half-a-crown, which I gave him, and told him I had told the gentleman I should be at five minutes call if I was wanted; and he said

"Whenever you go tell the truth."

JOHN CLINTON . I am an officer. I apprehended Ashman on the 17th of November. (The Court read over the witness's evidence on the last trial, which he confirmed.)

WILLIAM SLARK . My evidence given last night is correct.

MR. COX. The papers are all our patterns. Here is a pattern of the satin paper which was on one of Mullins's room, and is our manufacture. The other is Treis paper, it is 14 d. a yard, or 14 s. a piece; the border was 28 s. a piece. The room had not been papered above five months.

ASHMAN'S Defence. My Lord's, and Gentlemen of the Jury - After the proceedings of last night I did not expect to appear at this bar again, but if the prosecutors are determined to proceed, I must submit. I know I can expect justice at your hands, after the trial of last night; but when all the ingenuity of talent, and all the perfidy of this man and the ingenuity of his wife have failed, I cannot expect you will receive that evidence again, unless supported by witnesses of character and reputation, which I am happy to say it is impossible to produce. Treble preyed upon my credulity, I never had any dealings with Long. I am very sorry the prosecutors have introduced an unfortunate woman to strengthen their case; I trust her evidence has not injured me, and I shall therefore not attempt to expose her.

LONG - GUILTY . Aged. 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

ASHMAN - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

EIGHTH DAY, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1821.

90. MARY ASHERWOOD was indicted for unlawfully uttering to George Elsam , a counterfeit half-crown, well knowing it to be counterfeit .

MR. ANDREWS conducted the prosecution.

GEORGE ELSAM . I am servant at Mr. Wilton 's wine-vaults, in Leadenhall-street . On Saturday night, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner and another came and had a glass of gin each, the prisoner tendered me half-a-crown, which I looked at, and said it was bad, she said, it was not, and it was impossible it could be for she had just taken it. I returned it, and asked her to give it me back - and thought it was bad; she said, she was certain it was not, and that I did not know good from bad. I asked for another; she said she had no more money about her. Ferris, the officer, came in, I gave it him, he said it was bad; the other woman also denied having any money; four-pence halfpenny was found on her, and on the prisoner was found another bad half-crown and seven-pence; she said it was impossible both could be bad.

GEORGE FERRIS . I am officer. I went into the shop, the prisoner and another woman were there, the half-crown was given to me, I said it was bad; and asked her if she had any more money? she said No; I found another half-crown and seven-pence on her.

MR. CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the solicitors of the Mint. The half-crowns are both counterfeit, from the same dye, and have never been in circulation.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a gentleman who gave them to me. I did not know they were bad.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months and find Sureties .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

91. WILLIAM FRAZER was indicted for feloniouslyuttering a counterfeit shilling to Eliza Kemp , knowing it to be counterfeit .

ELIZA KEMP . I keep the White Bear public-house, Great Eastcheap . On the 8th of November , at dusk, the prisoner came with another man, and had a pint of beer, and paid 1 s. for it; after he was gone, I looked at it and told my daughter to tell me if he came again, which he did, on the 18th, and asked for a pint of beer and some bread and cheese; the same man was with him, who staid at the door; he tenit was bad; I cautioned my daughter to let me see the dered a shilling, my daughter said it was bad; and his companion went away immediately. I sent for an officer; he then offered me another shilling, I kept both.

ELIZA KEMP . I saw the prisoner give my mother 1 s.; he came again on the 14th. My mother's evidence is correct.

WILLIAM APPLETON . I am an officer. I took him in charge, and found 4 s. 6 d. in good money on him; he begged to be forgiven, and said he would never come again.

MR. POWELL. The shillings are both counterfeits, and of the same dye.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know it was bad.

GUILTY .

Confined six Months , and find Sureties .

London Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

92. JOHN SMITH , SAMUEL HUCKS , WILLIAM FOREMAN , and DANIEL HALL , were indicted for a conspiracy .

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET, MESSRS. BOLLAND and WALFORD conducted the prosecution.

THOMAS ADAMS . I am principal cooper at the West India Docks . On the evening of the 17th of August , the men had notice that unless they stopped ten minutes after four o'clock, when the bell rang, they would be paid off; they preferred being paid off; part were paid off that night, and part the next morning. I had directions to read a paper to them, to invite them to return on the old terms; they met in a field near the Dock, there were nearly three hundred of them. I read this paper audibly to them: (reads.) "Notice to extra coopers, employed in the West India Docks. Those men who do not answer to their names, and come to work as usual, will not be again employed in the Docks." They appeared to consult among themselves. I called Armsworth out from among them, to answer; he came from the body, and told me the men would not come to wait the ten minutes beyond the time; and, if ever they did come to work, they would have 6 s. a-day, instead of 5 s., which they were paid before. Their hours for work, were from eight till four. I gave no answer to it, but walked away with my officers about me; they remained some time assembled, and as I passed by them, they cheered once or twice, I think three times.

Q. Was that the first time you knew of any general dissatisfaction - A. I had given notice on the 4th, they expressed dissatisfaction before that, Saturday was the first day. The rum and sugar coopers are under different officers; this regulation did not apply to the rum coopers. We were very busy at the time. I think there were as many men employed as I ever remember.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You are minister to the Dock Company, at the sugar department - A. I am principal cooper; I had the foreman of the coopers with me. The order for them to stay till ten minutes past four o'clock, was issued on Saturday, the 4th; they walked out at four o'clock, on hearing the order, without a murmur, they would not stop. They had 6 s. a-day from 1812 to 1816; the Dock-master then gave me an order to pay them 5 s.

Q. Having first reduced their wages, they then cut them off to half days sometimes - A. They did reduce them to half days, they were first paid for a quarter of a day, and then for half a-day. After reading the paper, I saw them consulting together, and called Armsworth out, as he was a man of intelligence; he was one of the sugar coopers, he was generally active, and was so that morning, he was one of the most active. I did not see any of the defendants when I read the paper.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. How long have you been in the Company's service - A. From 1802. Captain Parish came into the service five years ago; he has done a great deal of good for the coopers.

Q. He did away with the quarter of days, and did not allow refreshment from the masters of the ships to the coopers. - A. That was never allowed. We pay the men by the day; if they only work one day, many of them want their money, but if they expect employ to the end of the week, they wait. The permanent men are paid at the end of the week. I only know Smith by name. I believe neither of the other defendants were ever in the Company's employ. I know they were not at that time when the 1 s. a-day was added in 1812; it was done by the men petitioning. I never heard of their petitioning against it, when it was taken off. Petitions are sent to the Dock-house. I do not remember Smith and Kirk delivering me a petition in 1816.

Q. After the dispute, the men on the rum side, continued at work - A. Yes; a paper was handed about among them. Petitions are sent to the Dock-house, that is the mode in which the men state their complaints.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. There was a paper handed about in 1816 - A. I do not recollect it; a paper was handed about in the rum department, the men wanted 6 s. a-day. Captain Parish is principal man in the Docks, the 1 s. a day was taken off in 1816; when he came into the employ; the half days were made about that time, and the men were thankful for it.

Q. They insisted on their stopping ten minutes, and then the murmuring began - A. There had been papers handed about before, but there was no regular murmuring, they murmured when they were reduced from 6 s. to 5 s. Some of them continued in the employ, they are only extra men who could not get work elsewhere.

Q. Was there any murmuring till they were kept ten minutes longer - A. No. The men were discharged on the 7th, a constable was stationed at the gates on the 7th.

Q. Can you tell what the three hundred men assembled near the gate for? on your oath was it not to go to work - A. No; for they gave it out that they would not come to work, they did not attempt any violence to the docks, they said the night before, they would not come to work without another shilling.

Q. Who did you hear say so - A. One Keamer and Armsworth, he was generally a prominent man, I cannot say how long Smith has been in the service of the Company - I never heard any complaint against him.

MR. BOLLAND. Q. To how many warehouses did this order apply - A. There are eleven, one was unoccupied, the order applied to the five beyond the clock, the most distant from the gate. I have the order here, it is dated 7th of August, 1821, and addressed to myself, signed Charles Parish; (reads) "You will give orders to the foreman of the coopers, at No. 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10, that any cooper who declines to wait at the warehouse, where he has been employed, till his name has been called in the usual way; is to be informed he will not be employed on the following day, and is to be paid that day for the work already performed."

Q, They assembled on the 8th, and said they would not come to work without another shilling, was that said by Keamer and Armsworth among a number of them - A. They were in the ring, and spoke for the whole of them.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. The side the order was made for was not Smith's - A. No. I do not know whether he was among the men.

MR. CHARLES COMPTON PARISH . I am principal Dock-master at the West India Dock. I have the charge of the warehouses, and property therein, I am answerable for the subordination and sobriety of the men. The order produced was written by me, in consequence of what I understood to be an objection on the part of the coopers; my first order was that they should not proceed to the gate from the middle of the dock, till ten minutes after the bell rang, to prevent too great a crush; the bell rings at four o'clock; we had 300 men in the docks at the time, besides revenue officers - the coopers had resisted the search at the gate, and had collared the constable, it is usual to search every labourer as he leaves the gate - there are two narrow, and one large gate. The order was to prevent too great a crush to prevent a search, they were not to work during the ten minutes; it is usual to call over the men's names going in, and coming out, to see that they have been at work all day. The order was issued on the 4th of August, we had one hundred more men in the docks then, than was ever employed in my time before; we had fifty ships laden with sugar unloaded on the 4th.

Q. Between the 4th and 7th was any intimation given to you by the coopers - A. None whatever, the first intimation I had, was on the morning of the 7th after twelve o'clock, and I sent Adams down to explain to them the intent of the order, that it was for their comfort as well as the regulation of the Dock. There was about three hundred less at work on the 8th, than on the 7th, we had occasion for an equal number, the deficiency continued fifteen days and during the time, ships came in daily; there was ninety-four ships when the body returned, some few men returned before that; we worked from six o'clock till six, instead of four o'clock, to make up the deficiency. At this time orders were issued to get coopers from Bristol, and Liverpool, Thompson and Newman were sent down for that purpose, and about ninety men came up from the two Ports; I gave an order to the foreman of the rum coopers, for them to assist on the sugar side, they declined it to a man. I received orders to employ any coopers who offered themselves, and put a notice up at the gate to that effect - I have a copy of it, the orignal was torn down, and I have not seen it since; I had forty or fifty copies of it from the printer; twelve were stuck up, and I gave some to be sent to places where coopers resorted. I will swear this is one of those the printer sent me, for I have had it ever since. (reads.)

Notice, A communication having been laid before the Court of Directors, purporting to contain the grounds of the coopers leaving the Company's service, and the terms they intend to return to their duty. Notice is hereby given that the coopers having been dismissed, is not true, and those who chose to return at the original pay are welcome to do so, but the Directors will not pledge themselves to any other terms.

H. LONGMAN.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. When did you first come into the Company's service - A. In June, 1816. I have authority to make orders, for regularity, I issued the order for the ten minutes extra, myself; I made regulations, which I thought for the improvement on the Dock. I ordered the half days as an improvement on the quarter days, in consequence of a representation made to me by the principal cooper. I did not make an order for the quarter day. The order for staying ten minutes, applied to about one hundred and forty men out of three hundred; I never heard of a petition about the half, and quarter day. When I entered the service, the men had 6 s., a day, being the war wages; they were not allowed to work over time then; the wages were reduced by an order of the Court, about six months after I entered the Company's employ, I have no authority to reduce wages, I made no representation to the Court previous to the reduction. Petitions go through my hands, I heard of none on the subject.

Q. Was the Dock gate shut against the men in the morning - A. No; there was always two constables at the gate. I gave orders, that unless they returned to work they would not be admitted.

Q. What had they done the night before - A. Run away from work, and rushed out at the gate the moment the bell rang.

Q. Were they not refused admission in the morning - A. Nobody applied, they kept at a distance from the gate, to make a treaty.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. What office do you hold - A. I am called principal dock-master, and sometimes principal store-keeper; I am called captain from courtesy. Smith was in the service when I entered it, he was on the rum side, I gave an order for the rum coopers to work over time, and they did, for two or three day, that was a few days before the coopers returned, or a few days after, I am not sure which. The act of parliament is imperative, that the men shall work eight hours a days without cessation, a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes, is given by the officer, for refreshment. I presume, some of them came from a considerable distance, I considered it my duty to order them to remain ten minutes, to prevent them being crushed, or resisting the search.

Q. Did you ever hear of a resistance before the order was made - A. The resistance was in consequence of the order; they collared the constable on the third,, the day before the order, they would not be rubbed down. Most men on the rum side have been on the sugar side;I believe Smith is a good workman, I do not remember his bringing me a petition when the wages were reduced, it must have been years after, I never had any intercourse with him about the reduction; I have some recollection of him, and Kirk bringing a petition, about three years ago, which caused two men to be made permanent. Smith was discharged about three weeks ago, by his foreman, he was one of those who worked overtime, I had no occasion to find fault with him; I had given orders, that the one hundred and forty men should not come to work, some of them came for their tools.

WR. WALFORD. Q. On the 3rd, a report was made to you of a great pressure and disturbance at the gate - A. Yes; that was the sole reason of my issuing the order. I believe the men had drank too much beer, the rum coopers worked two or three days over time on their own side, and were paid for day and a half.

Q. What was the order about half days - A. In the busy time, every man who came was employed, and when we were not busy, we could not employ all; good workmen could get employ in the trade, and indifferent ones stand at the gate every day for employ. Our work is very precarious, and at times we want a man in the middle of the day; if they worked an hour, they were only paid for an hour; my order was, that they should be paid for half a day, if they worked at all, and that they should be employed for half a-day or the whole, if they worked more than half a day, they were paid for the whole day.

MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know the regulations about half days and hours, before you came to have the superintendance - A. When I came they were paid for the time they worked, these regulations do not apply to permanent coopers, they are always paid, whether they work or not.

THOMAS FARNSWORTH . I was employed in the West India Docks, as sugar cooper, in August last. On the morning of the 8th, there was a meeting of the coopers, near the Dock gate, there were upwards of three hundred men, I was there; Adams spoke to me. On the next evening, Thursday, I attended a meeting, at the Lord Hood, public-house, (on the 8th,) there were a great many coopers there, but none of the defendants. On Thursday, the 9th, there was a meeting, at the Angel, public-house, in the Minories, there was so many, the room would not hold them; I was in the room, I do not know how many there were outside, there was more than hundred in the room; Smith was there. I saw the other defendants down stairs, I think I saw Hall at the door, but only saw Smith in the room. I am not positive that I saw the others, it was after seven o'clock, in the evening. I took the part of conducting the sugar coopers, I sat in the chair, the proposition was about supporting the men, several strangers spoke. Smith proprosed, that the men should have 3 s. a day, for the time they were out of employ; the proposition was carried. Some said 3 s. was too much, they could not meet the demand. I did not hear Smith say any more, he stood on the bench to propose it, and when carried, he got down. The purpose they met for, was to be supported while they were out employ, on the sugar side of the West India Docks. The money was to be rose by subscription, men were proposed to go round to the different shops, cooperages, brewhouses, and vinegar yards, and all trades that required coopers; and the men in work were to pay 2 s. 6 d., a week, to make the fund. It was said at the meeting, that the rum coopers were likewise to contribute, they were not to strike, but work, and support us while we were out of employ; I do not know who made this proposal, it was carried. We met again, on Saturday night, the 11th, at the same place, to receive 7 s. a man, which was to be distributed, I saw Hucks, Smith, and Hall there, no chair was taken, Forman was not there. I received 8 l. 15 s., at the rate of 7 s. a man, for my twenty-five men, who belonged to the warehouse, No. 9, on the sugar side, I received it off the table, Hucks counted it out. I went and gave it to my men.

Q. Do you belong to the Cooper's Union, or Philanthrophic - A. I have entered it since that. We met again, the next Saturday night, the 18th, at the same place, Hucks was there, but I am not sure that I saw Smith, nor either of the others, there were thirty or forty in the room, they were coming and going. I received 4 s., for twenty-three of my men, I received for two short, as they had got employ, or had left. I attended a meeting, at the Angel and Trumpet, Stepney-green, on Monday, the 13th; Hucks was there, I cannot say who else, it was a meeting, to distribute 2 s. a man, I received for twenty-two or twenty-three, money was distributed for all the warehouses. I attended another meeting, at the Ship, Bethnal-green, on the 22d, the day before we returned to work, and received 2 s. each for my men there. I saw several men go in and come out with money. Smith was there, I saw none of the others. I saw Hall on the green in the day time; nothing passed at that time. I attended at the Ben Johnson , public-house, Stepney, every one of the fifteen days that we were away. On the second Monday, in the morning, I saw Hall in the tea-gardens of the house, there were two or three hundred sugar coopers assembled, and Hall came in with fifteen or twenty men who had come from Bristol and Liverpool. Hall said he had brought the men who had come up by coach for the Dock Company, and we must take care of them, they were taken from there, and refreshment given them. Hall went away with them. On that day week, after we returned to work, I attended a meeting at the Angel, public-house, and saw Smith, Hall, and Hucks there. Forman was not there, there were nearly two hundred coopers. Smith presided, the business was for the sugar coopers to subscribe 2 s. 6 d. a week, to refund back to the Philanthropic Society, the money paid to the men; which they had advanced, different persons brought in accounts of money advanced to the Philanthropic Society. Hall claimed, and had allowed him 5 s. a day for his loss of time in conducting the Liverpool and Bristol men to the Ben Johnson public-house, and from there to the coaches, and for maintaining them whilst they were in his charge. I believe he also brought in a bill of 45 l. besides, for expences. I took a memorandum of it, (producing it) I took it to satisfy the sugar coopers that the money had been faithfully distributed. 5 l. 18 s. 6 d. was claimed on the part of Foreman, for his expences to Bristol and back, he went to inform the coopers that the West India Dock coopers were discharged, and that there were more coopers out of employ in London than could find work, he was not present. Hucks made the sameclaim as Hall for time and expences in attending in Lambeth-street, in consequence of a warrant issued against him by Bull and Hawkins, who, he said, charged him with carrying them from the Dock gates as they were going in to work. He was allowed 2 l. expences, and 11 l. for the lawyer's bill. Price in the Commercial-road was his lawyer. The money was voted to him, and he said he was satisfied. Hall was with Hucks at Lambeth-street. I was appointed by the meeting to inform the sugar coopers at the West India Docks of the expenditure of the money, and solicit their 2 s. 6 d. subscription.

Q. Look at this paper? - A. This is a paper I got from the meeting, where the accounts were adjusted; it is the receipt and expenditure of the money - it was just written when it was delivered to me.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q.Don't you think you were one of the worst among them? - A. I am not my own judge: I heard of no meeting at which I was not present.

Q. Whose service are you now in? - A. When at home I am at my own service, now I am at your service. I am not in the employ of the Dock Company. I returned for about a fortnight, and then went away because I did not like to stop. I gave information when I was stopped from going into the Docks; they did not receive me, but ordered me to go to the Dock House: I went and worked three days after the men went in. I was never here before.

Q. Perhaps never in any other Court? - A. I have been in Chancery.

Q. Any other? - A. I am but a single individual, if you come to the point I will give you an answer; if you flurry me I may perjure myself. I have been at Hick's Hall.

Q. Are you the gentleman who was convicted at Hick's Hall of knocking down your own father? - A. I was convicted of an assault; but it was through three prostitutes whom my father knew: the Lord Chancellor is in the possession of the whole of it. I always thought, that by the laws of this country, a man was not to be told of conviction. It was eight years ago. I was tried for a libel in charging my father with murder.

Q. You were spokesman at the Dock gate? - A. Yes, I was picked out by the principal master cooper; I did not set myself up to speak for them, they quite forced me to it. The same men attended at the meeting, and they put me in the chair. I did not assume the power of keeping order, I was quite a novice at it. I stated to the meeting, that the object was to get a livelihood; others spoke before me. The meeting was in such a confused state I sat in a chair; but was not aware that I was to rule when the people belonging to the club were there; mine was like another chair, only larger, but too low for me to be chairman. They were all speakers at one time, and no hearers; the club might assemble without my knowledge, they did not always inform me; they sent a man to Bristol without my knowledge. I was present when it was agreed for one to go to Bristol and one to Liverpool. When I was sent for I went.

Q. You went to the club, intending to betray whom? - A. Oh! dear Sir, quite the reverse, my principle is, I had rather be convicted.

Q. Have you been forced to be a witness? - A. By the law I am forced to be here.

Q. When you returned to work, did you not tell the men, that as you had headed them out you would head them in? A. I said, "As we all came out together, let us go in together:" I never used the word heading.

Q. Did you ever propose going to Liverpool or Bristol free of expense, to prevent the coopers from coming up? - A. I said, "If you are such a lover of your trade, I would go for nothing." I addressed the whole meeting; I told them I could not go down, as I had a law suit to attend to. A committee of eleven was appointed, but not by me. I was appointed first; the whole body of coopers forced me into the chair.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. After you were accused of assaulting your father, were you imprisoned twelve months? - A. Yes. He was dead when I came out.

Q. You was on the sugar side? - A. Yes: I worked beyond the clock. The order applied to me - I was not a permanent man. I was there when the Dock was built in 1802.

Q. Did you not stimulate the coopers to resist the order, and say, if they did not resist there would be further encroachments? - A. I told the foreman I was subject to the rheumatism, and could not stop, for I was always in a perspiration when I left work, and if I stood ten minutes I should be laid up. I disapproved of the order. I recommended no man to resist. I said I could not put up with it, as I was subject to the rheumatism; but they might do as they liked. I was determined to leave the employment as my health would not admit of it. The order was, that if we did not obey we must be dismissed. Several men said they would take their money and not come again. I went to the gate next morning for my money, and went into the Dock to fetch my tools. The body of them left the service. I was not addressing the men when Adams selected me; he said they were all speaking, and he could not hear them, and selected me: three or four men came to me and said tell him this, and I told him they would not come to work unless they had 6 s. a day. I did not propose to lead them to any public house, nor propose that the rum men should be invited to join us.

Q. Did you attend before any of the directors when Read was there about a petition? - A. I did; and told the committee that the Docks were considered a disgrace to the slave market in the West Indies. I was sent by the men, who desired me to repeat those words: it met the general approbation of the men. A gentleman named Hurcott interfered; I was censured for concurring with him in getting the men back. I said the rum coopers were determined we should not go in, and I had been very ill used by some of them, and said I would leave it altogether, and went to Hurcott. I was ill treated and knocked down for persuading them to go in. I did not urge the men to resist the efforts which Read and Raven were making to get them to go back, not to my recollection: I said, "Stick altogether, all go in, or all stay out, don't go away to different places; as we all come out let us all go in together." A list was to be made of who would go in or stop out: I said I was determined to go in, and at last the list was turn up, and all were going in. The rum coopers wanted us to stop out another day. I asked the rum men if they would throw away a day; they said no: then, said I, "We will not:" this was the night before we went in. I did not make a speech to the men.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Can you write? A. Yes.

Q. Look at this and say if you ever saw it before? - A. It is not my writing, I never saw it before to the best of my knowledge. I was convicted of assaulting my father in 1813; he was 70 years old. He owned on his death bed that he purchased the witnesses against me. I have been tried twice for common assaults. I was not forced to go to the meeting, I was appointed by the men to go, and went to serve them. I believe I spoke once or twice at the Angel.

Q. It was all unwillingly? - A. Unwillingly; I never heard about the advance till I was out of the Docks. I did not make a speech at the gardens when the Bristol and Liverpool men came. Hall came and asked me to request the men to give them three cheers, for it was a great victory obtained in falling in with them from the different coaches; we gave three cheers, and the countrymen returned it. I attended a committee of the Dock Company after Hurcott interfered: the committee said I espoused the cause too warm.

Q. Did you ever go to the newspaper office about this business? - A. Yes; to put three advertisements in; I did it at the request of the body. Smith said the rum coopers were to stop in and contribute alike to support the others. He did not tell me to advise them to petition.

MR. SERGEANT BOSANQUET. Q. Have you been paid your wages? - A. Yes; only what was due to me for work.

JOHN OWEN . I am a cooper employed on the sugar-quay. I worked in warehouse No. 4. I attended a meeting at the Angel three days after the strike, on a Friday morning. I saw Farnworth in the chair; a man named Smith was there. Farnworth was chairman, and was holding forth before them all what was best to be done. Several persons spoke; and one called Smith said,

"You certainly men have been very ill used, but if you are willing to enter into a subscription for these men who stand out for wages, they shall have at the rate of 3 s. a day." Farnworth said, "How is this to be supported, and from whence to come?" - Smith said, "I make a motion that the whole trade shall support it, as we have a bye-law that those men who are in work shall subscribe 2 s. 6 l. a week to support those who are not, to protect the rights and privileges of the trade." - Farnsworth said, "How is the money to be made up? I think there are 250 or 300, more or less." - Smith proposed that those present who were in work should subscribe, and said, "For my part, I will give 2 s. 6 d." Farnworth said he would give the same. I don't know whether he said 2 s. 6 d. or 3 s. The room was crowded. Two or three men at the further end said, "You, Mr. Smith, I want to know what you rum coopers are going to do, whether you intend to strike or not." Smith said "I beg you will not have so much to say about the rum coopers, we shall do as we like; we are not going to satisfy you whether we strike or not. I know who you are, thought I cannot get near you; you are a wrangle some fellow, and have always bred a great deal of disturbance." I returned to work on the day her Majesty was buried. I usually worked at No. 4, but I went to No. 10. I met with no difficulty in returning to work.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Farnsworth was in the chair? - A. Yes: he was entirely spokesman, and the whole body seemed to be led by him.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did Farnsworth hold forth? - A. Yes; and he said it was requisite that the coopers should gain their ends, which was impossible, unless the run coopers struck as well as them. Smith (pointing to him), begged one or two to hold their tongues about the rum coopers, as they would do as they thought proper; and I think he said they had drawn up a petition, and presented it to the Dock Company, and would not strike, but wait the issue of the Company's answer. Farnsworth held forth with great violence.

Q. If you were called on as a conscientious man to say who was the most violent, who would you say? - A. I have seen Farnsworth very busy at many meetings, and think him the most violent man in the company. I only saw Smith at one meeting. Farnsworth was always the most violent, and there is no doubt but all the men were led by him. I returned to work before the rest, and went to several meetings afterwards, but they would not admit me, as they said I was a spy. Farnsworth certainly urged several men to stand out; he begged of me to suffer death sooner than return.

JOHN WARD . I am a cooper and worked in the sugar quay. I was occasionally employed by the company. I attended the first meeting after the strike; I saw Smith there soon after the business commenced; he assured the men present, that 3 s. a day would be allowed during their absence from the West India Docks: one Richards objected to it; but Smith assured the meeting that 3 s. a day would be allowed. I did not hear how the money was to be got. I received some money at the Three Lords, Minories; the first payment was 7 s. the second 2 s. and I received 4 s. afterwards from a man named Munn. I was one of those who struck. There were a great many at the meeting.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Who was chairman? - A. Farnsworth, he opened the business and conducted it.

THOMAS MUNN . I was one of the extra coopers. I attended a meeting at the Green Dragon, Stepney, on the 8th; it was attended by a great many. I saw none of the defendants there. I attended another at the Ben Johnson next day, nobody in particular was in the chair; but Farnsworth generally held forth. None of the Defendants were there to my knowledge. The meeting was concerning the infringement of time made by the Company; that was their grievance; they absented themselves on that account; we met there every day till it was settled. I have seen Hall and Smith there. I received money at the Angel to pay 42 men, belonging to my warehouse, No. 4, at 7 s. each; there were 30 or 40 people there. I saw Hall in the room, also Forman and Smith. The money was ready told out on the table with my number to it; I always received the money when the company paid us, and so I received this. I attended to receive it in consequence of a note; Farnsworth I believe told us to go there, and there would be money for us. I received a second sum the following Saturday, at the same place; Smith was there, and I think Forman.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODERICK. Q. Were you intimate with any of the men? - A. Yes: many had wives and large families.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Farnsworth was generally spokesman? - A. Yes. I have known Smith 5 or 6 years. I never heard his character subject to the slightest reproach; no man could work more industriously. He was on the rum side; the rum men did not strike.

COURT. Q. Then the rum men had nothing to do with it? - A. No: the men had 5 s. a day.

Q. Then instead of having 30 s. they only had 7 s. a week? A. Yes; and the next week was only 4 s. I afterwards received 2 s. for there were 13 days absence altogether.

JOSEPH PURDIE . I am permanent foreman cooper in the West India Docks. On the Sunday after the strike, Adams sent me to meet the Bristol coach, six coopers came. I was to suffer them to remain in town if they thought proper, and to convey them to the Docks on the next morning. I appointed to meet them on Tower-hill on Monday morning, but they did not come. I went towards the Plough, in Smithfield, where I had left them, and met them in Cheapside, Hall was with them. I told them they were behind their time; they said they had seen some of the trade, and did not intend to go to work. I don't know whether Hall heard them, he was in front, and had a man on each side; he walked on. I remonstrated with them, and finding them straggling towards the east, I was fearful of losing them all, so I moved on with them, and got only two of them to the Docks - there appeared about eighteen altogether.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am clerk in the West India Docks. I went to Bristol and engaged twenty-eight coopers, and paid them their expenses to town, and sent them off by different stages.

THOMAS PLUMBLEY . I am an extra cooper in the Docks; Thompson hired me at Bristol at the Hole-in-the-Wall, where the coopers sometimes meet. I saw the defendant Forman there on the 18th, after Thompson had come down to hire men. He said in the presence of about forty coopers, that none of the men on the rum quay had struck, for when they received their week's money it went to support the club till such time as the Company submitted.

Q. What had you to do with the coopers striking? - A. I went to see some of the coopers off, and saw nineteen go off, and had spoken to Thompson about going myself. I saw two men by the Post-office, who had partly agreed to go, and what they said led me to the Hole-in-the-Wall. Forman came in afterwards, and one of these men said he was sent down by the society of coopers to prevent their coming up, and that all the coopers on the rum quay were at work. I saw him afterwards on the Bristol quay, with John Thomas , a Bristol cooper, but had no conversation with him. I I came to London on Sunday.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Did Thompson engage you? - A. Yes. The Company never accused me of taking any thing.

JOHN WHITE . I am a cooper; I am extra man at the Docks. Mr. Thompson engaged me at Bristol in August; the cooper meet at the Hole-in-the-Wall, after I was engaged I saw Forman talking to the other men about the strike in the West India Docks.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. The cooper's trade requires an apprenticeship? - A. Yes, seven years. I have 3 s. 6 d. a day at Bristol, and work from six to six.

JOSEPH GARIN . I was a cooper of Liverpool. I was engaged to come to the West India Docks. I came to Ladlane by coach, and met Hall and Hicks there; they asked if we were from Liverpool. There were ten of us in one coach and three in another. We said we did come from Liverpool. They told us to come with them. They took us to the Angel in the Minories, into a large room, and said there was a regular strike among the coopers, and they hoped we would not go to work till they saw further into it. They gave us something to eat and drink; there was nobody but ourselves in the room; they found us at the Peacock, in Whitechapel; we all lodged there two nights. I don't know who paid our expences, we did not. After being there two days we went to Mr. Adams's office, told him what had passed. Five of us went to work on Wednesday and four afterwards.

COURT. Q. Were you paid any money? - A. Only our expenses.

WILLIAM BULL . I am a cooper. I worked for Mr. Osborn of Whitechapel. Hawkins worked there with me. In August, I went from master's yard, with orders to go and work at the Docks; we were stopped on the road; I don't know who the persons were. I afterwards attended at Lambeth Street with Hawkins.

WILLIAM MURTENS . I am a cooper in the West India Docks. Smith was a rum cooper. During the time of the strike, he told me there was to be a meeting at the Shipwrights' Arms. I went to the second meeting; Smith was there, and was proposed by the general class there to be speaker. He said it was requisite to know what the rum coopers intended to do, whether they intended to strike, or what way to proceed, as it was time to come to some decision; but for his part, he would recommend the rum coopers not to strike, and that there might he means taken, such as supporting the men, and sending in an humble petition to the board. Some were for striking and some were not, and the permanent men would have nothing to do with it. They decided, that there should be a collection made of 3 s. each man, to support the men on the sugar side; the resolution was carried. I opposed it, and was roughly treated, and told I was afraid of losing my situation. Davenport also opposed it. Smith recommended the rum coopers not to go over to the sugar quay till they had a satisfactory answer to the petition, which was not then written.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Smith's advice was to petition? - A. Yes: each man was to pay 3 s.; a number of men had large families, who were distressed.

Q. The subscription was to keep them and their families from starving? - A. Yes. I told Mr. Longman that Smith advised the men not to strike.

MR. WALFORD. Q. When did you tell Mr. Longman that? - A. After the strike.

COURT. Q. You are asked if they had large families; they might have had work in the Docks if they liked? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a permanent rum cooper in the Docks. I remember the sugar coopers striking. I was never at any meeting. Smith asked me for money for the coopers who were standing out, about a week after the strike; I said, I thought the permanent coopers had nothing to do in it, and gave him none; he said it was a general thing throughout the Dock that all the coopers were to pay to it: I said I would have nothing to do with it. We were applied to, to assist on the sugar quay.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Would you believe Parish if he swore that Smith worked over his time during the strike? - A. I believe he did two nights on the rum quay: I have known him a long time, and never heard any thing against him.

Q. Were you ever suspended? - A. I am now suspended on suspicion of being concerned with a man detected in taking rum.

CHARLES PETERKIN . I am a cooper at the Docks. At the time of the strike, Smith told me there was a disturbance among the coopers on the sugar side. He called a meeting of the rum coopers at the Shipwrights' Arms; he was there. He and Cook demanded 2 s. 6 d. each from us to support the sugar coopers. The resolution was carried; I paid my 2 s. 6 d.

Q. Do you remember when it was proposed to the rum coopers to work on the sugar quay? - A. Yes; Smith was there. A letter was read from the Directors stating, that if we went and worked on the sugar side we should have 7 s. 6 d. a day. Several of them murmured, and said, No, no. Mr. Sturts, who read the order, said, "Not one man." Smith said, "No, not half a man."

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. There was a great murmur before he spoke? - A. Yes; the proposal was not to quit our side, but to work the over hours on the sugar side. Smith has been seven or eight years in the service, and bears a good character. I was only off work one day, that was a month or six weeks ago; it was on account of this strike. I was sent down to Captain Parish.

MR. WALFORD. Q. Is it the practice with the coopers to work with other coopers when they leave in the afternoon? A. Yes, I have done it myself, but now work is slack.

EDWARD RODDEN . I am an extra cooper in the Docks on the sugar side. I saw Hall at the Ben Johnson during the strike, and heard him say, if twenty or thirty of the men went to his baker's he would give them a quartern loaf a-piece if they were hungry. He told me himself in the Commercial-road that he sent the Bristol coopers back again.

JOHN FARROW . I am a cooper, in the service of Barclay and Co.

Q. In August last, was any information given you to collect from Barclay's men? - A. Yes: (looks at a book); I collected 2 l. 12 s. 6 d. I paid it myself on the 13th of August, at the Angel, Minories, to a person who sat there; Hucks signed the book as a receipt for the money. I afterwards attended a meeting to audit the accounts at the Angel; (looks at a paper), this is the account; I copied it from a paper which was handed round at the meeting.

[This account was here read. It was a statement of cash received from different persons amounting to 177 l. 1 s. and of expenses amounting to 69 l. 10 s.]

Q. Did you make any other collection? - A. Yes; and paid it at the Rose and Ram, Southwark, to one Hall (not the defendant), for coopers out of work.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Do you know Farnsworth? - A. By sight; I saw him at the Angel. I attended no meeting till after they returned to work. Farnsworth sat next to me when the accounts were audited, and took a very active part. Smith came in at the close of the business. If a cooper is any thing of a hand he can earn 7 s. a day; and if a good one, from 9 s. to 10 s.

- LONGMAN, ESQ. I am Secretary to the West Docks. I remember a petition being brought in on the 20th of August, it was laid before the Court on the 21st of August. After that, I went down to the Docks, and saw Smith, it was between the 21st and 23th of August. Smith was sent merely to ascertain whether the petition was to be considered as coming from the permanent rum coopers as well as the extra, or from extra coopers only: he avowed it to be the petition of both permanent and extra. The Directors desired that two of the permanent men should be sent for, I believe the officers of the department selected Smith.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. You were desired to ascertain from whom it came - A. Yes; Smith was discharged three or four days before this indictment was found.

The Petition was here read for an advance from 5 s. to 6 s. a day.

MR. PARISH. The petition was brought down to me. I was desired to enquire if it was from the extra men or both, and to select two to meet the directors. Smith and another man were deputed by the permanent men.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Did the rum coopers strike - A. No; I heard they were wavering. The rum quay is the most important branch.

MESSRS. CURWOOD, ADOLPHUS, BRODRICK, and PHILLIPS addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendants.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

NINTH DAY, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1821.

93. ANN JENKINS and MARY QUINION were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , twenty-six yards of linen, value 38 s., the goods of John Dorset Poole , privately in his shop .

JOHN DORSET POOLE . I am a linen-draper , and live in Shoreditch . On the 1st of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came to the shop together. I served them with some calico; they were about half an hour in the shop, and left together. We suspected, but did not stop them. I followed them soon after, but did not overtake them, and on returning, I missed a piece of Irish linen. I found them in custody with it.

MATTHEW COOK . I am shopman to Messrs. Bonner and Rees, who live about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Poole. The prisoners came in about half-past three o'clock, and in consequence of suspicion I pursued them, and said I wanted an explanation about a piece of Irish cloth. I stopped Jenkins, she denied having any thing. I found a piece of cloth concealed between her back and the wall, she was leaning against it. Quinion had walked away but I secured her. Jenkins said Quinion had bought it and given it to her. Poole claimed it. Quinion said it was hers, and she had bought it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

QUINION'S Defence. I was distressed.

JENKINS'S Defence. I did nothing.

JENKINS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

QUINION - GUILTY . Aged 50.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

94. ABRAHAM MYERS and ROBERT DAY were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , one wrapper,value 1 s.; twenty-eight pieces of calico, value 22 l., and four hearth rugs, value 4 l. , the goods of Thomas Holloway .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to Thomas Carrison .

THOMAS HOLLOWAY , I live at Romford, Essex. I had bought twenty-eight pieces of calico and two hearth rugs of Messrs. Clark and Boyd, in town, and directed them to be sent by Carrison's waggon, from the Saracen's Head, inn, Aldgate. They were packed in two parcels - one I received, the other I did not; but found it at the office in about a week, and knew them. I had put a private mark on them when I bought them.

THOMAS CARRISON . I belong to the waggon . These two parcels were in my waggon, they were safe when I was in Whitechaple, at the Rabbits, public-house, about six miles from town. I never missed them till I got to Romford.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. In what part did you put them - A. At the bottom of the waggon, nothing was on the top of them. I was at the Rabbits, public-house, at a quarter before seven o'clock.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a watchman. On the 27th of October, about two o'clock in the morning, I was in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel, and saw a hackney chariot come down Gulstone-street, from Whitechapel, driving very slow, as the road was bad, I looked at it as it passed me, and could see nobody in it. I followed it down Bell-lane, it turned up a short street out of Bell-lane, and stopped at the third door, the coachman was then off his box, and the coach door opened, I cannot say by whom. I had seen Myers following the coach down the street, about forty yards behind. Day is the coachman. When it stopped, I saw them one on each side the coach door, I went up and collared Myers - he begged of me to stash it, which means say nothing about it, he offered me 2 l. to let the property go into the house. Day was present, I said neither 2 l. nor 20 l. would do. I sprung my rattle, another person then came out of the house. I found nobody was coming to my assistance. Myers still pressed me to let it go into the house, and I should have a share in the swag. I said it was of no use, he must go with me, and ordered the coachman to back, which he did. I told him to turn his horses heads and follow me, which he did. I took him up Bell-lane and Winfield-street, and gave my partner charge of Day and the coach. I had Myers by the collar all the time.

Cross-examined. Q. They both went quietly to the watch-house - A. They did. Myers was not in the coach - he had not stopped half a minute. The person who came out of the house walked off directly.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. The coachman took no part in the business - A. No; he followed me down the street when I told him, without being held. The property was all loose in the coach.

THOMAS BOLTON . I am servant to Messrs. Clark, Boyd, and Co. Mr. Holloway bought the things, I delivered them to the Saracen's Head Inn.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MYERS'S Defence. The watchman swears false.

DAY'S Defence. I was not off my box all the the time.

MYERS - GUILTY . Aged 21.

DAY - GUILTY . Aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

95. MARY BAYLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , two napkins, value 5 s.; two yards of muslin, value 1 s.; seven towels, value 5 s.; five yards of net lace, value 2 s., and one apron, value 6 d. , the goods of John White .

MRS. MARY WHITE . I am the wife of John White , of Southampton-row . The prisoner lived six months with me as servant . On the 2d of November, in consequence of suspicion, I told her I should search her box, she did not object - I did not search it. Mr. White came home, and he told her he would search it. She then said she should be made to open it before she did. A constable was sent for, who broke it open, and found the articles stated in the indictment in it.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did Page sleep with her - A. Yes. The prisoner's box was locked.

ALEXANDER GILLMOR . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's box, and found the property in it.

ELIZABETH PAGE . I am servant to the prosecutrix. After I had been there some time, the prisoner told me she had a piece of lace and some patch-work, that she took it from her mistress when she first came, and told me not to tell. After that she told me she took other pieces of lace from her mistress. I did not tell.

Cross-examined. Q. When was this - A. A month after I came. I saw the things found in her box.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

96. MARY BRETT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one cornelian cross, value 15 s.; and one gold ring, value 15 s. ; the property of Benjamin Hesse .

BENJAMIN HESSE . I am a cabinet-maker , and live in Green Man's-row, Bethnal-green. I left these things in a box, at my brothers; I afterwards went, and found it broken open, and the things gone.

WILLIAM HESSE . My brother left a box-glass with me, the latter end of July. I am a schoolmaster, and live in the Hackney-road ; the prisoner, occasionally, came to assist in the house ; the box was in the parlour, it was locked, and my brother had the key; they were missed about the middle of November; I had discharged the prisoner about a week before; I did not know the contents of the box.

ELIZA HESSE . I am the wife of the prosecutor, I went to the prisoner on a Monday, and asked if she had the things; she said she had pawned them. I had told her she had better confess; she took me to the pawnbroker, where I redeemed my gold ring. I found the other ring in pawn. I have not found the cross.

WILLIAM PORTER . I am apprentice to Mr. Hyam , a pawnbroker, in Bishopsgate-street; the prisoner broughtthe prosecutrix to me, they took away a mourning ring, pawned for 4 s., in the name of Ann Robinson .

CHARLES JONES . I am servant to Mr. Mitchell of Hackney-road; a ring was pawned with us in the name of Ann Brett , by the prisoner, for 1 s. 6 d.; she came with Mrs. Hesse to redeem it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Hesse promised not to hurt me, and said she would take the money by instalments, at 6 d. a-week. I paid the first 6 d.

GUILTY . Aged 50.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

97. JAMES LONG was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , five pieces of paper-hangings, containing twelve yards each, value 22 s, ; the goods of William Cox , and Thomas Cox ; and JOHN RIDOUT for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen .

MESSRS. ALLEY and ADOLPHUS conducted the Prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM COX . I am a paper-hanging manufacturer , and live in Plough-yard, Whitcross-street ; Thomas Cox is my partner; Long was nearly seven years in our employ as porter ; he was never authorised to sell, or take away any of our paper; we had several times missed paper to a small amount. In consequence of an anonymous letter, we employed Clinton and Sergeant to watch our premises; and in in consequence of a message which Sergeant sent me, I went to the Lion and Lamb, public-house, Golden-lane, and there saw Ridout; it was about a hundred and thirty yards from our premises. Ridout and his wife were present when we searched the house, and found a paper parcel under the counter in the bar; it contained five pieces of paper-hangings, of rather a common sort, worth 22 s.; I knew it to be our property. We had sent none of it out by Long that day; it is a pattern which only ourselves make. The officer said Long had just brought it in; Ridout said nothing; the officer asked if he was the landlord; of the house; he said, Yes; we went up stairs and found a man named Wayman in bed; I found four pieces of paper-hangings, and some other paper and canvas of ours; and the house was all papered with our paper; about seventeen pieces, and two hundred and four yards of border were hung in all. We had sold him none.

Cross examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Was this on the morning of the 13th - A. It was; Wayman's name was over the door. Persons in the tap-room could see what passed at the counter; it is one room, with the bar across it.

Cross examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Had you a managing clerk who sold papers when you were out - A. Not for three months before.

MR. ALLEY. Q. He could not have delivered the paper to Long - A. No; we had a clerk who was ill at the time; I was on the premises this morning; he had no business to carry it out without asking me.

GEORGE DUGDALE . I travel for the prosecutors, we have large quantities of paper, five hundred pieces might be taken without our knowledge. In consequence of a letter, I went to Long, in Newgate; I said, "You have sent a letter to the prosecutors;" he said Yes; I said "The letter is only an acknowledgment of your guilt, you do not explain any thing I wish to ask you a question." I asked if he had not stolen five hundred pieces; he said, he thought not quite so much; he thought he had not taken more than three hundred pieces, which might be worth 40 l. or 50 l.

JOHN CLINTON . I am a city officer, I was applied to watch the proceedings of Long, I began to watch on the 5th or 6th, I saw him go from his masters' to the Lion and Lamb public-house, he dined there with Ridout, and his wife and Wayman; I saw him go in there and dine on the 8th also. On the 7th, I saw him carry something there, which he brought out of his masters' house, when he got there he put it under the counter, in the presence of Ridout and his wife, and left it there. On the 12th, I saw him go again, he brought something from his masters, house, and left it with Mrs. Ridout, in Ridout's presence. He took it through the door-way, into the private part of the house. On the 13th, I was on the watch, and at a quarter before nine o'clock, I saw Long come out of his masters' house, he looked up and down the street, to see if he was watched; I was out of sight; he then returned into his masters' house, and came out in a minute or two with a bundle of paper under his arm; I and Sergeant followed close behind him, into the Lion and Lamb public-house; he put the paper on the counter, to Ridout, who put it on a shelf under the counter; Long then went out of the house. I called for a glass of beer, and sat down opposite the counter; waited while Sergeant, the officer went for Mr. Cox, the paper remained under the counter. Ellis and Sergeant came in with a search warrant. When Mr. Cox came, I opened the wicket, and went behind the counter; no person was there but Ridout. I asked him, if he was the landlord; he said Yes; I put my hand to the parcel, and asked who it belonged to; he said, he did not know. I asked if it was his; he said No; his wife came into the bar; Ridout said to her, "Do you know who this parcel belongs to - "she said, No; I said, It was nonsense denying it, for I had seen him receive it. I gave it to Sergeants, and told him to go into the parlour with the prosecutor, to see if it was his property; they were a short time there, and Ridout left the bar as if to go up stairs. I said the officer had better go up with him, they went, and I said below with the prisoner. I went into the back yard, and saw a colour-pot full of colouring; I said "I believe that is something like the colour-pot which Long brought here the other morning." Ridout's wife said, in his hearing, she believed it was, Long brought it on the 9th, and she had put some red lead in to colour the white, it had been white lead. Ridout said, "That is my property, I bought it and paid for it." Long lived at the corner of Addle-hill and Thames-street.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. Addle-hill is a long way from the prosecutors - A. Yes; Long did not go there to meals, as a journeyman would.

Q. Do not you know it is the custom for publicans to take care of parcels - A. I do not know, it was concealed under the counter. The house is a resort for all the common women.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGAST. Q. Were you near to Long - A. Yes; I am sure he was carrying paper.

JAMES ELLIS . I am an officer. On the 13th of November,about nine o'clock, Mr. Cox and I went to the house. I asked Ridout if he was landlord; he said, "Yes," I told him I had a warrant to search for paper and other property, belonging to Mr. Cox; and asked if there was such property in the house; he said there was nothing of the kind. We went up stairs, and found in a cupboard in a front room, four pieces of paper hanging, a quantity of remnants, and two or three pieces of canvas. I found Wayman in bed, and in his room, in the drawer, was a piece of canvas, his clothes were covered over with it. I found in all, thirty-seven yards of canvas.

Cross examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. You and Clinton accompanied Mr. Cox - A. Yes; Q. All the visitors go through the bar to the parlour - A. I do not know; I cannot say whether the parlour is used for guests.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LONG'S Defence. Neither Ridout, or Wayman, knew but what I bought them of my master.

RIDOUT's Defence. Whatever Long has brought to our house he has taken away again; it was always in brown paper, I never knew the contents.

JOHN CROSS . I am one of the firm of the Golden-lane brewery, I supply the Lion and Lamb public-house; I have been there frequently; Wayman is the master; Ridout acted as his servant; it is not a brewer's house.

Q. You do not know whether Ridout is a partner - A. No.

LONG - GUILTY . Aged 40.

RIDOUT - GUILTY . Aged 38.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

98, JAMES LONG was again indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , thirty-seven yards of hessing, value 1 l.; two pieces of paper-hanging, value 6 s., and one colour pan, value 3 d. , the goods of William Cox , and Thomas Cox ; and JOSEPH WAYMAN and the said JOHN RIDOUT were indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

MR. COX. In consequence of information, I went to the Lion and Lamb, public-house, on the 13th of November; Ellis had a search warrant; Ridout and his wife were in the bar, his wife said to him, "You are a ruined man, I wished you to have nothing to do with Long," I and Ellis went up stairs, and in the front room on the first floor. I saw Wayman in bed, we told him we suspected he had some of my property there, he said we might search - Ellis found a parcel containing four pieces of paper, and a large quantity of remnants, in Wayman's room, and some hessing; we went up stairs, and found a large quantity of hessing there, it was all put together, and brought down stairs, there was thirty-seven yards of hessing. On Wayman's seeing we had got the hessing, he said "We have bought these of Long, and gave him 4 d. a yard for it;" Ridout's wife said, "No, we gave 5 d. a yard for it," she said she had bought it, and paid for it, and it was entered in the book; they had no bill of parcels of it. The lowest price we pay for it, is from 8 1/2 d., to 10 1/2 d., a yard to sell again.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. The house was papered - A. Yes. Wayman's room was newly papered with my paper, it was perfect paper - the remnants were pieces which were cut off; the hessing is not used in papering, it is for packing. Wayman produced a bill for papering the rooms, and said Long sold it them.

Cross-examined by MR. PLATT. Q. When he said they bought it, Ridout's wife was present - A. Yes; I cannot say whether Ridout was present then.

MR. AOLPHUS. Q. Did Wayman say who Long was - A. No. The whole pieces of paper were in Wayman's room.

MR. DUGDALE. Repeated his evidence as on the former trial.

JOHN CLINTON . I was employed by Messrs. Cox, to watch the proceedings of Long. On the 7th of November, a little after six o'clock in the evening, I saw Long come out of his master's house with an iron pan, and a large bundle, which he took to Golden-lane, it was very heavy, and in canvas - I followed him into the Lion and Lamb, public-house, he opened the wicket of the bar, and put the bundle down behind the counter, and sat himself down; he took his apron, and wiped his hands as if they were dirty; Mrs Ridout gave him a glass of rum and water, and two or three more glasses, before he left the bar; Wayman came into the bar in his shirt sleeves, Long nodded to him, and he (Wayman) immediately stooped down, and picked up the parcel, and carried it out of the bar; he put his foot behind him and shut the door after him - in about half an hour after, Wayman came out of the house with a two gallon stone bottle on his shoulder, and went up Golden-lane. I staid there till a quarter past nine o'clock, when Long left. When he came from behind the bar, he called for a glass of rum to keep the cold out. On the 13th I went there again, and kept below till Mr. Cox came down, and said in Ridouts presence, that he was afraid Wayman would get away, I went up, and found him leaning with his arm on the pillow; I said, "I am astonished you should lay there, we cannot leave without you," he said, "I know that gentleman perfectly well, it is Mr. Cox, and I know his brother, they are respectable gentleman living close by here." Mr. Cox said, "These are officers, and must do their duty." I found a paint pot below, containing white lead, with red lead added to it - I asked Mrs. Ridout if it was not the pot Long brought that morning, she said Long brought it on the 9th, Ridout immediately said, "No that is mine, I bought it, and paid for it." I went and apprehended Long.

Cross-examined by MR. BOLLAND. Q. All this property could not be in that bundle - A. No; it was the colouring tied up in hessing. Mrs. Ridout swept away the dirt which came through it.

JAMES ELLIS . On the 13th of November, I went to the house; and went into the room where Wayman was in bed, and in the cupboard of one of the front rooms, I found two pieces of hessing, four pieces of paper-hanging, and a quantity of remnants. While he was dressing, he opened a drawer in which was another piece of hessing, I asked where he got it, he said he had had it sometime, and bought it of Long for 4 d., a yard; he afterwards admitted that he knew Long to be Mr. Cox's porter. On his coming down stairs all the articles were shewn to him, and he was brought away - I told Mrs. Ridout in his presence, that he said he gave 4 d., a yard for it, she said, "No, we gave5 d.," she then said to her husband, "I advised you to have nothing to do with Long, you are a ruined man".

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Wayman put in a long written defence, stating, that Ridout had the care of his business, and it was usual for customers to leave parhels to be taken care of; that Longs parcels were always in wrappers, and he never knew the contents. and that Long offered to paper the house, stating that his master allowed him a profit on it.

JURY to MR. COX. Q. Were the rooms papered with the same pattern as the four pieces - A. No; the remnants might be the same pattern.

LONG - GUILTY . Aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

RIDOUT - GUILTY . Aged 27.

WAYMAN - GUILTY . Aged 38.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

99. MARY RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , six shoes, value 15 s. , the goods of James Clough .

JAMES CLOUGH . I am a shoemaker , and live at Shadwell . On the 9th of November I missed several shoes. At Ashbridge's I found six shoes. I know nothing of the prisoner.

JAMES CAMPER . I am servant to Mr. Ashbridge. of Broad-street, Ratcliffe. While I was at dinner, six shoes were pawned, I did not see who by; and the next time the prisoner came, I accused her with pawning them, and produced them, saying, I suspected they were stolen, being odd ones. She said, a man, who was gone to sea, gave them to her. Clough claimed them.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pawned them for a man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

100. JOHN MARTIN and JOSEPH ROSS were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , 40 lbs. of bacon, value 15 s.; one knife, value 3 s., and one steel, value 2 s. , the goods of John Mousley .

JOHN MOUSLEY . I am a cheesemonger , and live in Archer-street, Chesea-common . On the 9th of November, between six and seven o'clock, in the evening, I went down stairs for five minutes, and Townsend came and asked, if I had lost any thing; I then missed the bacon, and I and him went each different ways, and on returning, I found he had taken the prisoners. It was safe a few minutes before.

JOHN TOWNSEND . I am a grocer, and live in Archer-street. A little girl told me, three boys were lurking about the prosecutor's door; I looked, and in a few minutes, one boy left the other, and went behind some bricks, then returned, and went into Mousley's shop, and came out with the bacon. The prisoners were two of the boys, I do not know which of three, went in, I went and told the prosecutor, and he missed the bacon; they were then at the end of the house; I am certain they were all three together, he went after the man who took the bacon. I took the prisoners coming across a market gardeners ground, they run as hard as they could.

MARTIN'S Defence. We were at play when he took us.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

101. JOHN MURRELL was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , one pound of ginger, value 15 d., and four ounces of sugar, value 3 d. , the goods of Abel Garraway .

ABEL GARRAWAY . I am a grocer , and live in Clark's-place, Islington . On the 4th of October, at noon, I had packed some of ginger, and put it on the desk by the counter, and on coming from the back premises into the shop, I found the prisoner in the custody of Birdseye, who produced it to me; and in about an hour, he brought the prisoner again, and produced another parcel of sugar, what laid on the desk, but I had not missed it.

WILLIAM BIRDSEYE . I am a constable. I was passing the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner and another lurking about; I saw the prisoner go in and take the parcel from the counter, and put it in his hat, and come away. I went up, took his hat off, and found the parcel in it. I took him to the watch-house, and upon searching him, I found the other parcel in his pocket.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them off the ground, supposing them to have fallen from the counter; the man came in and collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Confined One Month , and Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

102. WILLIAM MALIN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , one sheet, value 8 s.; the goods of Ann Richards , in a lodging-room .

ANN RICHARDS . I am a widow , and live in Queen-street, Seven Dials . I let the prisoner a bed, at 2 s. 6 d., a week, about the 14th of September; he left next day, without paying, at eleven o'clock, in the morning, and took the sheet with him. I saw him go out, but did not see him have any thing.

SAMUEL COLLINS . I am a constable. I was sent for and took the prisoner in custody, he said he took the sheet, pawned it on Snow-hill, and tore the duplicate up. I could not find it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

103. ANN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 3 s. 6 d., in monies numbered, the pro-property of John Webster , from his person .

JOHN WEBSTER . I have lost an arm, and get my living by selling pies in the street . On the 14th of November, I was going down Kingsland-road , and had got nearly as far as the Basing-house, public-house, the prisoner was on the other side of the way, and appeared to be intoxicated. She called to me, and came a-cross the road, and asked me for a two-penny mutton pie. I gave it her, and she gave me a penny, saying, she would give no more, she turned her back, and I followed her to the Spread Eagle, she appeared so much in liquor, that she fell on my shoulder, with one arm a-cross my shoulder; I tried to push her from me, but could not get her away. She soon after run fromme, down a court, by the side of a house, I heard money jingle as she went along; I found my pocket turned inside out, I lost 3 s. 6 d. I called after her, but she was out of my sight. I waited at the end of the court till past twelve o'clock, when the watchman came, he went and searched all the houses, he could not find her. Next morning I told Smith, and he apprehended her, I am sure she is the woman. I did not suspect any thing till I heard the money jingle in her hand.

GEORGE SMITH . I am an officer. On the 15th of November, about ten o'clock, Webster called on me, he described the prisoner to me; I said it was Ann Jackson . I went down the court after her; she put her head out of a window, to know if she was wanted, I said she was. The prosecutor said she was the woman, and I took her.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw him in my life, till they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

104. ROBERT JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , 30 lbs. of lead, value 5 s. , the goods of William Bound .

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a labourer. I was looking out of window, on the 28th of October, between ten and eleven o'clock, in the morning, and saw the prisoner, looking out at the garden door of Mr. Bound's house. I thought he had no business there. I saw another standing behind the water-closet, he came to him, and both went into the house, In two minutes, they both came to the door, the other man got on the area wall, and the prisoner handed the lead up to him, (it was an unfinished house,) he was going into the next house with it, but on seeing me, he threw it into the area of the next house; I took him.

WILLIAM JORDAN . I was sent for, and found the prisoner on the premises, with a screw-driver and hammer, and the lead, in a kettle.

WILLIAM HOOK . I am servant to Mr. Bound. I know the lead to be his property, The houses are Spafields .

Prisoner's Defence. The house leads into the field, like a thoroughfare, I was on the grass when they took me.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

105. JOHN HAYDON was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of November , the sum of 10 s. 9 1/2 d., in monies numbered, the property of James Cansick , from his person .

JAMES CANSICK . I am a journeyman cooper . On Saturday evening, the 3rd of November, about eleven o'clock, I went into the Wellington, public-house, Cannon-street, and had a pint of beer, the prisoner came before me, and called me his father, and said, would I have some liquor, or beer, I said, "No;" I asked him to drink with me, I paid one shilling, and received nine-pence change for it. I went home, and he walked with me, arm in arm, and kept me in conversation. Another man walked about six yards before me, and at the top of the street, the other man made a full stop, the prisoner immediately put his hand to my pocket, and ran off. I felt, and found he had turned it inside out; I pursued him, calling Stop thief! The office stopped him. I know him to be the man, he ran very quick, and I kept close to him all the way. I lost 10 s 9 1/2 d. from my pocket.

JOHN LAMBOLL . I heard the cry of Stop thief! about twelve o'clock, at night, I ran out of the watch-house, and caught him by the arm; I found 10 s. 9 1/2 d., on him. He said he had that money, from Mr. Teddy, a tobacconist, I went there, and he did not know him.

Prisoner. Q. I said I worked for Mr. Jordan, of Fore-street - A. He said so afterwards.

WILLIAM SUMMERS . I was at the watch-house, and heard the cry of Stop thief! When the prisoner was searched, I found 10 s. 9 1/2 d. on him and 6 d. was found concealed in the lining of his coat, he acknowledged putting it there himself. The publican came, and said he was the man who was with the prosecutor, the prosecutor was rather intoxicated, but perfectly correct.

JAMES CANSICK . All my money was in shillings, and so is this.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard the alarm, and they took me. The prosecutor was very drunk, and did not know what he lost.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

106. JOHN DRISCOLL was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one bonnet, value 4 s., and one comb, value 1 s. the goods of John Green , from the person of Ann Green .

ANN GREEN . I am the wife of John Green. On the 5th of November, I had been to Somer's-town, to see a sister who was dangerously ill; I was at the door of No. 11. Bow's-yard, Bolton-street, Long-acre , where my mother lived, at half-past twelve o'clock at night. I knocked at the door several times, but could not get in; being very tired I sat down on the step, and fell asleep, and was awoke by a man untying the handkerchief off my neck. I found my bonnet taken off. It was the prisoner, the watchman took him immediately.

WILLIAM PRICE . Between twelve and one o'clock in the morning of the 5th of November, I walked round Middle-row, and saw the prosecutrix sitting on a step, and the prisoner standing half bent over her, undoing the handkerchief on her neck - I seized him and asked what he was doing; he said the woman was tipsy, and he was trying to get her home. She jumped up and screamed out that her bonnet was gone. He said he knew nothing of it. I said I shall take you to the watch-house, if you do not tell me; he then said it is at No. 43, George-street. I took him there, and found two women sitting at the fire. He asked them where the bonnet was which he threw into the house; the women said, "On the table," and gave it me. I took him to the watch-house, and found the comb out of her hair in his waistcoat pocket. She was perfectly sober.

THOMAS HARRINGTON . My fellow-watchman called me to his assistance. He brought the bonnet from George-street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I drank with her and gave her 4 s. 6 d., to go home with me. She would not go when we got out of the public-house.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Six Months and Whipped ,

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

107. SAMUEL CHIPP was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one handkerchief, value 2 s., the goods of Joseph Hudgell , from his person .

JOSEPH HUDGELL . I am servant to Mr. Collins. On the 14th of November, I was walking in Glasshouse-street . Griffiths came up and asked if I had lost any thing; I felt, and missed my handkerchief, which he produced.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I belong to the Humane Society. I saw the prosecutor walking along; the prisoner and two others were together, one of them took the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and gave it to the prisoner. I went and told him to follow me, and I pursued and took the prisoner; and as he ran he took the handkerchief out of his hat, and threw it down an area, it lodged on the rails, I picked it up and secured him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw it.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

108. ANN CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th November , 2 l. 8 s., in monies numbered, the property of John Dowd , from his person .

JOHN DOWD . I am a labourer . On the 14th of November, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I was in Rosemary-lane, I met the prisoner and went home with her, to Blue Anchor-yard . I undressed myself and went to bed, in about three minutes, and then she demanded her money, 2 s. I told her to hand my waistcoat to me, she laid hold of it and ran down stairs with it; there were two sovereigns, two half-crowns, and three shillings in it. I stopped in the room till morning, thinking she might return; and in the morning I went to look for her. I came back in twenty minutes, and found the door locked. I went out again and met her in the street, and asked for my money; she said, "Don't bother me about your money." I said "I will have you taken up;" she said, "Come down to the room and I will make the money good." She then said, "Go into the public-house, and I will bring it to you." I refused, and had her secured.

SAPPIO ROBINSON . I am a constable. I took her in custody between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, and found 8 s. 2 d. on her, and a bundle of new clothes in her hand, which I suppose cost about 20 s., she was quite tipsy.

The prisoner, in her defence, denied robbing him, and stated that he was very much intoxicated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

109. SARAH STEVENS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , one watch, value 50 s.; one seal, value 1 l.; two keys, value 1 s., and one watch ribbon, value 1 d., the goods of Alexander Grant , from his person .

ALEXANDER GRANT . I am a glazier , and live in Saville-row, Burlington-gardens. About twelve o'clock at night, I was in Piccadilly , the prisoner accosted me and asked for something to drink. I thought I knew her, but did not. She said she was very much in distress, I said she might have a glass of beer or spirits if she liked; she went into a liquor-shop, and had some. I threw down the money for it and walked out; she followed me, and said she would not let me go unless I gave her something. I could not get rid of her, she caught hold of my arm pulled me across the street and kept me there, I could not get from her, I tried to push her away, and gave her 1 s. to go; she caught hold of me again, and in an instant ran away. I missed my watch, which was safe just before. I pursued her to the corner of Titchborne-street, and she came out of a liquor shop - I charged her with having my watch - she was taken, and it was found at her feet, as she was going to the watch-house, in the quadrant of the new street - I had not been there before. She was drunk - I do not think she knew what she did.

Q. And so you gave her liquor to make her more so - A. I did not know she was drunk till after she came out of the shop. I think she shammed drunkenness.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. I was going my rounds, and saw the prosecutor, who charged the prisoner with having his watch. In taking her to the watch-house she hit me several times with her right hand. I put my hand down, she then threw the watch from her left hand, and it fell at my feet.

THOMAS GOOK . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house for stealing the watch, and said he ought to have given her more money.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

110. CAROLINE BUTTERWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , six yards of cambric, value 30 s.; one scarf, value 30 s.; and one shawl, value 5 s., the goods of William Bennett , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am a linen-draper , and live in Bridge-street . On the 9th of November, between ten and eleven o'clock in the day, the prisoner came to look at some goods, representing herself to be the wife of Mr. Matson, the Greenwich coachman; and they were to be laid by till the evening, when her husband would call and pay; she looked out the goods and then expressed a wish to see the Lord Mayor's procession pass, and I said I would accommodate her. She went away, and came in about an hour - I shewed her up stairs. In a short time she came down and looked out more goods and had them laid by with the others, and bought a cloak, for which she paid 8 s., and put it on. She went away between two and three o'clock - she was never alone in the shop. Soon after she was gone, I wanted to shew a lady an article which I missed. I then looked over the goods and missed a piece of cambric and a shawl. I concluded I should see no more of her, but in the evening, between five and six o'clock, she alighted from one of the Greenwich stages, and said Matson was coming in half anhour for the things. I shut the door and charged her with stealing the cambric and shawl; she positively denied it, and said a good deal about the disgrace, and said Matson would make good any loss I supposed I had sustained; she called him her husband. I gave her in charge and found she was not Mrs. Matson. Davenport brought me my shawl, and a piece of cambric which was not mine. I have not found my cambric.

WILLIAM DAVENPORT . I found her at the shop, charged with taking a shawl and piece of cambric, she denied any knowledge of it. I found a sovereign on her, she represented herself as Mr. Matson's wife. At length she said if I would go with her I should have the shawl. I went to her lodging with her, the Crown and Anchor, public-house, King-street, Westminster. She spoke to the landlady, who fetched down a piece of cambric and a shawl.

MARY HURST . I keep the Crown and Anchor, public-house. The prisoner lodged with me till the 9th of November; she said her husband was a serjeant at Dublin, and her name was Butterworth. On the 9th of November she went out about ten o'clock in the morning, and returned about two with some goods; she took the cambric and two shawls out of the handkerchief, and asked me to let her measure the cambric, for she thought her sister had stolen some, and thought she had worn the shawl; she left them with me.

(Shawl produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 32.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

111. ELIZA JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , one watch, value 2 l.; two seals, value 1 l.; one brooch, value 10 s.; and 29 s.; in monies, numbered, the property of John Henry Bennett from his person ; and THOMAS PALMER , was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

JOHN HENRY BENNETT . I am a journeyman bricklayer , and live in Midway-street. About four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at Marquis of Granby public-house, in the Almonry; the prisoner came in and drank with me, and took me to the house of Alexander Legg , No. 3, Almonry ; we went up stairs, and I consented to stop all night. She went down stairs, and brought up the landlady, who demanded 2 s., which I gave her, I bolted the door, and awoke about one o'clock, she was gone, and my watch and money also; I called the people of the house up, the landlady produced the watch and brooch. I called a watchman and gave her in charge. We found her in bed, at No. 17, Peter-street. I charged her with robbing me; she denied seeing the money, but did not deny taking the watch. The same money as I thought I lost, was found on Palmer, who was in bed with her. I cannot swear it was mine. I had been drinking pretty freely.

BENJAMIN TIMBRELL . I am a watchman; Legg was brought to the watch-house - I went to Peter-street, and found the prisoners in bed together on the teaster of the bed. I found a half-crown, and in Palmer's pocket a crown, a sovereign, and 1 s. 6 d.

ALEXANDER LEGG . I keep the house. About an hour after they came in, a person came and asked for Jackson, from the Marquis of Granby, public-house, about a glass of rum and water; my wife called her down, she came with a watch, and brooch in her hand, which she gave to my wife, and said,

"The man is in liquor, take care of them, while I go and settle for a glass of rum and water." He made a noise about two o'clock, I took them up to him, and told him that she left them with me as he was drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

112. SARAH TAYLOR was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , one shirt, value 10 s. , the goods of Mary West .

MARY WEST . I am a single woman , and live in Kentish-town , the prisoner worked for me; I discharged her on the 21st of October, in consequence of suspicion. I missed the shirt, and found it in pawn.

WILLIAM TUCK . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Tottenham-court-road. On the 22d of October, I received a shirt in pawn, of the prisoner, in the name of Everitt.

CHARLES READ . I apprehended her, she said she pawned a shirt, but it was her daughters.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 42.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

113. SARAH NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , three blankets, value 9 s.; two pillows, value 6 s.; one bolster, value 10 s.; one sheet, value 2 s.; one looking-glass, value 5 s., and one set of fire irons, value 6 s., the goods of Thomas Clements , in a lodging-room .

The prosecutor did not appear NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

114. THOMAS WINDERBANK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , two loaves of bread, value 18 d., and 1 lb. of cheese, value 8 d. , the goods of Charles Baldwin .

CHARLES BALDWIN . My wife keeps a chandler's shop . On the 21st of November, the prisoner came and ordered two quartern loaves, and two pound of cheese, to be sent to Mr. Risely, and said they would be paid for on delivery - I sent my son with them, and watched him, suspecting something; I saw the prisoner standing at Mr. Risely's door, my son gave them to him, and left them; he immediately went away, and I secured him, and took him to Mr. Risely's; the servant said they had ordered none. He said distress drove him to it.

JAMES BALDWIN . My father sent me with the things to Mr. Risely's, Ray-street. I delivered them to the prisoner at the door, and came away.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 24.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

115. THOMAS PERKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , one sack, value 1 s., and two horse-cloths, value 3 s. , the goods of James Tweed .

RICHARD HESTER . I am servant to James Tweed , a cabinet maker . On the 20th of November, I was driving a load of mahogany from the West India Docks; I stopped the waggon at a gate, in Rosemary-lane , about half-past six o'clock, and while I was gone for the key, two cloths and a sack were taken from the box - I went in pursuit, and found the prisoner standing in the lane about three hundred yards off, he had nothing - I fetched Hamilton, who said he was the man, and I took him; I have not found the things.

JANE HAMILTON . I live in Derby-street. On the 20th of November, the waggon stood at the gate - I saw the prisoner go before the horses, then he went by the side, and took something out of the box, I could not tell what it was. I am sure he is the man, he has a wooden leg.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Confined Six Months .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

116. JAMES NEWTON and SAMUEL SCHOFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , three pair of stockings, value 3 s. , the goods of William Wood , Richard Ellis , and John Thayers .

RICHARD ELLIS . I am a hosier and glover , and live in Oxford-street . My partner are William Wood and John Thayer . On Wednesday, the 28th of November; a person came to the shop and gave me information. I went to the door and found the prisoners on the step; it was about ten o'clock at night. They went away on seeing me, but came back in about twenty minutes, and a person came in to sell flints and steels. While I was trying to get him away, the prisoner, Schofield, ran on the step of the door, and took three pair of stockings; both were in company - he saw me and dropped them on the pavement. I ran and took him, the other was taken directly.

THOMAS GOULD . About five minutes before ten o'clock on the 28th of November, I saw the prisoners standing at the prosecutor's door, Schofield went on the step, put his arm through the rails; the other saw me and gave him a nudge, they went away - I informed the prosecutors, and went down in the kitchen to watch them, and saw Mr. Ellis run out, and take Schofield. Newton dropped the stocking on the pavement.

THOMAS GOOK . The prisoner were brought to the watch-house, with a knife, which was found in the room they had been put in.

SCHOFIELD - GUILTY . Aged 12.

NEWTON - GUILTY . Aged 12.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

117. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of November , twenty-four dozen of curtain rings, value 5 s. , the goods of William French .

JOHN STEPHENSON . I am servant to William French , an ironmonger , of St. John's-street . On the 26th of November, the prisoner came for a half-penny worth of tacks; as he went away, I missed two parcels of cuain rings, from the counter - I followed, and stopped him; the officer found them in his coat pocket.

JAMES METCALF . The account of the last witness is correct.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 61.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

118. JOHN LYNCH was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , three boots, value 24 s. , the goods of John Reeve , and John Reeve , Jun .

JOHN REEVE , SEN. I am a boot and shoe maker ; and live in High Holborn . On the 31st of October, about six o'clock, as I sat in the kitchen, I heard a noise in the shop, went up, my man and two beadles brought the prisoner into the shop, and produced two boots, Robinson gave me a third boot, they were mine, and were safe five minutes before, he denied the charge, and tried to run out of the shop.

EDWARD BARKER . I am servant to Mr. Reeve. I was in the shop, and heard a skirmishing by the door, and saw a person picking up some boots off some boxes, and run out of the shop with them in his arms, round King-street. I gave an alarm, and some gentlemen stopped him, and as I brought him back, I saw two boots, about thirty or forty yards from where we took him, in the way he run, another was found - I cannot swear he was the man I saw running out, as I only saw his back, only one man was running.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . I was passing along Holborn, there was a cry of Stop thief! I saw a person running fast. I cannot say it was the prisoner; I picked up a boot.

JOHN KENDRICK . I am a beadle, and heard the alarm, several were running, and the prisoner was stopped. I let go of him in the shop, he immediately made a spring to get out. We found some of Reeves's shop tickets in his breeches pocket.

RICHARD SMITH . I found them on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN REEVE . These tickets were attached to five boots, which I lost five minutes before, which have not been found. I asked him where he got the tickets - he would not answer.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a man go from the shop, he threw some papers away, which I picked up, and followed him; this will explain how I got the tickets.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

119. ANN GODMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , two salt-spoons, value 5 s.; one cream ladle, value 3 s.; one caddy ladle, value 18 d.; one tablecloth, value 5 s., and one frock, value 3 s. , the goods of Thomas Huxtable .

THOMAS HUXTABLE . I live in Elder-street, Norton-falgate , and am a weaver . The prisoner was in my house six weeks, as nurse . In consequence of suspicion I discharged her. On the 24th of November, I missed the articles stated in the indictment, and charged her with it, she denied it. I went to her lodging in consequence of information, and she gave me a number of duplicates. I found onefor a frock with the name of Mills on it, I left it on her table, and never saw it afterwards. I gave her in charge.

RICHARD BURRELL . I am a pawnbroker and live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 16th of November the prisoner pawned a cream ladle and salt-spoon, in the name of Eliza Evans .

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 43.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin Esq.

120. HENRY BLACKSHALL was indicted for stealing, on the 2d December , one hat, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of James Crockwell , from the person of Charles Crockwell .

CHARLES CROCKWELL . My father lives in Mason-court, Shoreditch. On Sunday, the 2d of December, about half-past four o'clock, I was near Shoreditch , on my way home, the prisoner came up and knocked my hat off, then took it up and ran off with it. There was several of them at play. I knew the prisoner before, but never spoke to him or his companions. They gave the hat to each other, and kept kicking it about; the prisoner took it up and ran away with it on his head. I told my father. I saw it next day at the office.

JAMES CROCKWELL . I am a beadle. The prisoner's mother lives at Bethnal-green. My son lost his hat. I know no more.

GEORGE COLE . I was coming home from church; a little boy was coming along, Bradshall came behind him and knocked his hat off, I went to pick it up and the prisoner knocked me down, they kicked it about, and the prisoner ran away with it.

THOMAS WALTERS . On the Sunday there was an Odd Fellow's funeral at the church, the prisoner was in the yard, I drove him out. I went next morning and asked what he had done with the hat he stole. He said he stole no hat; that he had on his head was his own. Upon taking it off I found it was the prosecutor's, but the hatband and seal that was in it were taken out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A parcel of boys were hitting one another I trod on something in the road, and picked the hat up.

GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

TENTH DAY, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1821.

121. THOMAS MASH and JOHN COOK were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , one snuff box, value 1 l., and one pocket-book, value 1 s., the goods of Sir Charles Dance Knt. , from his person .

SIR CHARLES DANCE . I am a Major and Lieutenant-Colonel in the 2nd Regiment of Life Guards . On the 3d of November, I was at Drury-lane Theatre, and after the play was calling my carriage, nearly opposite the end of Bow-street - the theatre was quite over. I felt somebody catching my arm. Burton asked if I had lost any thing, I felt, and said, Yes, my snuff box and pocket-book from my coat pocket. I knew they were safe a few minutes before. I have never found them. The prisoner were then in custody. I had a lady (my cousin) on my left arm.

JOHN BURTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. I was on duty at the corner of Bow-street, and saw the prisoner in company together at the end of Bow-street, standing together. Sir Charles stood there. The first I saw was Cook, who laid hold of Sir Charles's coat tail and lifted it up, and appeared taking something out, I seized them both. Mash stood a little behind. A third person got away directly among the coaches, whom I took to be in their company. Sir Charles missed his property. Nobody was between them and Sir Charles.

Cross-examined by MR. PERCY. Q. You did not see them take any thing - A. Not to be certain, they appeared taking something.

MASH'S Defence. I happened unfortunately to be going by when Burton took me.

COOK'S Defence. There were forty people on the spot.

COOK - GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Life .

MASH - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

122. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing on the 27th of November , one bed tick, value 3 s. ; the goods of Timothy Donovan .

TIMOTHY DONOVAN . I live at No. 2, Church-street, Bloomsbury ; On the 27th of November, I was sitting in the front parlour, and heard the prisoner come down, gently, and go out with a large bundle under his coat; I called to him to stop, he immediately ran, I pursued, crying Stop thief! I saw him stopped with it under his coat; it was the bed tick which he had taken from the two pair of stairs room. He was quite a stranger.

WALTER CAMPBELL . I am a beadle, I saw him run with the tick, and took him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the passage.

GUILTY . Aged 30.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

123. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one pair of shoes, value 5 s. ; the goods of Margaret Britain , widow .

MARGARET BRITAIN . I am a widow, and live in Little Turnstile . On the 12th of November, I heard a noise, and saw the prisoner with my shoes under his coat; I called out, Stop thief! and pursued him; he stopped, and the shoes were found under his coat. They hung at the door.

JAMES ASHTON . I heard the cry of Stop thief! I pursued the prisoner, and took him with the shoes under his coat.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. A boy threw them down, and I picked them up.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin. Esq.

124. DAVID MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , 16 lbs. of flour, value 3 s. ; the property of William Cochran .

WILLIAM COCHRAN . I am a baker ; the prisoner was in my employ, I had flour in my warehouse; he lodged in the house. On the 12th of November, about half past six o'clock, I let him out. I found him in custody, at the Thames police, with the flour; he had nothing when I let him out. My house is at the side of a court, he could put any thing out of the window into the court, and then go round, and take it. I had given him notice to leave me on Saturday.

JOHN SHIELDS . I belong to the Thames Police. On Monday, the 12th of November, about half past six o'clock; I apprehended the prisoner with 16 lbs. of flour, in a bag, tied round with a silk handkerchief, about three hundred yards from his master's house; I asked him how he came by it; he said he had stolen it from Mr. Cochran; he said he was going to leave him on Saturday, and thought he should want some flour.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you tell him you was an officer - A. Yes; he was not drunk; he asked me to take him to his master.

Prisoner's Defence. It is false.

GUILTY Aged 22.

Confined One Month .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

125 THOMAS TROUT was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of November , one counterpane, value 20 s. ; the goods of Ann Bagley , widow .

ANN BAGLEY . I am a widow, and live in Peter-street, Westminster ; the counterpane was in the two-pair back room; I saw it safe on Sunday, and on Monday, the 4th of November, about day light, I missed it. I saw it on the Thursday following, when the prisoner was in custody. I had seen the prisoner going up and down stairs to his relations in the house. I had been down stairs on the Sunday evening, for half an hour, leaving the door open.

JAMER PORTER . I am a watchman. On Monday morning, about one o'clock, I took the prisoner in charge, with the counterpane tied in a handkerchief, in Mead's-court. I asked what he had got; he said a dirty shirt, which he was going to take to his lodgings in Berwick-street; he was carrying it a different direction; he could not tell the number, nor the landlord's name. I found no shirt in the bundle.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

WILLIAM HAMMOND WEBB . The prisoner was brought to the watch-house; and said, John M'Cormack gave him the counterpane, and he was taking it to his lodgings, in Dyott-street; he afterwards said he lodged in Husband-street.

Prisoner's Defence. She borrowed 5 s. on the counterpane, she gave it to a man to carry home for her, which he did. She was very much in liquor; I was in the next room, we had five or six pots of beer, and two pints of gin, then went to a house with her and had five or six more, she was brought home drunk and had seven or eight pots; after that she gave me the counterpane to get two pots of porter and some gin on it.

The prisoner called three witnesses to prove his account, they stated that the prosecutrix was drunk, but none of them her give him the property.

GUILTY . Aged 40.

Confined One Year and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

126. SAMUEL DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , seven spoons, value 36 s., the goods of Catharine Cowan , from her person ; and HENRY BURY , THOMAS TURNER , and CHARLOTTE DUGGETT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, well knowing them to be stolen .

CATHARINE COWAN . I am a widow , and keep a lodging-house , in Duke-street, Portland-place . On the 25th of October last, a boy brought a letter for the servant, saying, it was from her brother. She asked him down in the kitchen, while she wrote an answer, she went up stairs to get something to give him. I went to the cupboard for the spoons afterwards, and missed them, this was about nine o'clock, I had seen them afe about three o'clock. I did not see the boy myself.

MARY GARNELL . I am servant to Mrs. Cowan. On the 25th of October, a boy brought me a letter, I think it was Davis, he said he brought it from my brother, I opened it, and thought it was from him. I asked him down in the kitchen, while I wrote an answer. I left him alone there, while I went to get him 1 s., for his trouble, this was be-between six and seven o'clock. at night; I came down, and gave him the 1 s., and the letter, he was alone about two minutes. I let him out, nobody else came until my mistress missed the spoons, I had put them in the cupboard at three o'clock. Nobody was in the kitchen from three o'clock, until that time.

JAMES BRADLEY CHAMBERLAIN . I am a servant to Mr. Wise, a pawnbroker, in Broad-street, Bloomsbury. On the morning of the 26th of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, Catharine Duggett offered me five silver tea-poons, for 12 s., I offered her 9 s. She left the shop with them, not then thinking it enough, and in a very short time returned with two table spoons. I suspected she had stolen them, she wanted 22 s., on the table spoons, and said they were her mother's, who lived at No. 4, or 5, Charles-street, Drury-lane; I asked her name, and she hesitated, and said her mother's name was Charles. I sent a boy for an officer, she wanted to go with him, I told her she must stop. When the officer came, she said, a man who slept with her the night before, dressed like a baker, gave them to her; she did not bring the tea-spoons back, she said she offered them to another pawnbroker, who had offered the same money.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. When she brought the tea-spoons, did she not say the person who sent her, desired her not to take less - A. No; I am confident she never said so.

JAMES BAKER . I am an officer. I was sent for to Wise's, and asked the prisoner where she got the spoons, she said they were her mother's, and that she lived at No. 14, Charles-street, Drury-lane. I found six duplicates, and 7 s., or 8 s., on her, I left her then, and went to Brook-street, for Ellis. We went to No. 4, and asked if Charlotte Duggett lived there? they said No; nor her mother either, but they believed she lived at Somer's-town. We returned to Wise's,she then said the spoons were given her by a man, dressed like a baker, at No. 4, Charles-street, on the first floor, we went there, and in consequence of information, went on the second floor, and found Turner and Bury, and asked if they knew Charlotte Duggett , they said yes, but she was not at home. I searched Bury, and found the duplicate of a handkerchief on him; I found a hat in the cupboard, with the name of Davis in it, they said it belonged to a young man who came there sometimes; we took them to the office with the hat.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. Was Turner dressed like a baker - A. Either a baker, or stable man. The house is a very infamous one.

JAMES ELLIS . I went to Charles-street, with Baker, and found Duggatt's mother did not live there, we went to Wise's; Duggett said the person she had them from was on the two pair of stairs; she had before said it was a one pair, I went there, and found Turner, Bury, and a woman named Todd, I searched Turner, and found two duplicates in his pocket, one for a watch, pawned in the name of John Davis ; the other, a suit of clothes, for 20 s., in the same name, he said the property was his, and he got Davis pawn them; and when the hat was found, he said it belonged to the same person; we took them to the office. I fetched Duggett from Mr. Wise's, when I took her into the room, I asked her if either of them were the men, she said No; she did not know them. I had previously asked if she knew the baker's name, she said "No;" and turned round, and Bury took the advantage of that and ran to her. I suspected them, and then the said young man's name was Davis, who gave her the spoons to pawn. After they had been examined, the prisoner, Davis, came to the office, to ask about a hat, which had been brought away, with the name of Davis, made it, I said I could not part with it, but shewed it to him, he said it was his. I went with him to No. 4, Charles-street, and found Todd there, I took her and him into custody.

HANNAH TODD , I live at No. 4, Charles-street, I know all the prisoners. On the Saturday night I was out, and came home about eleven o'clock, I heard nothing of the spoons till Friday morning, when one of the young men asked Duggett if he would pledge five tea-spoons, I do not know which it was, but they were all there, she said she did not like. One of them again asked her to pawn them for 30 s., she took them, and returned, saying, the pawnbroker would not let her have so much; one of them sent her with two table-spoons to pawn for 1 l. I cannot say who gave them to her. Duggett lived on the first floor, with Bury; I live on the second floor, with Davis. Turner was a stranger, he only came the night before.

Q. You are sworn to speak the truth. Whom did you tell the Magistates gave her the spoons - A. I saw Davis have them.

Cross-examined by MR. CURWOOD. Q. You are an unfortunate girl - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you not entice Duggett to the house - A. No; she was there about three weeks.

MARY GARNELL . I saw Davis in custody on the Friday week after. I believe him to be the man.

DAVIS'S Defence. I was told my hat was gone, and went to Bow-street for it; if I was guilty I should not go after my hat.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

DUGGETT - GUILTY . Aged 21.

Judgment Respited .

BURY - NOT GUILTY .

TURNER - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

127. MARY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , one pair of shoes, value 4 s. , the goods of William Brown .

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a ladies shoemaker and live in Oxford-street . On the 1st of November, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop and asked for a pair of walking shoes. I shewed her several pairs of shoes and boots, but said she did not very well like them. She then pitched on a pair of cork-soled boots; and as she tried them on, she laid them on two stools, and while I was getting the boots out of the window, she got up with her hands behind her, and appeared all of a tremble; I thought she was in a fit. She sat down again, got up, and stood against the window, and said she should like to see the cork boots; I handed them to her. As her hands were behind her, I suspected her; she sat down and asked the price of them; I said 7 s. 6 d., she paid for them, I wrapped them up and she went out. I followed, and told her I thought she had a pair too many, she was ready to fall down. I gave her to a person to hold till the officer came and took her.

Cross-examined by MR. BARRY. Q. She appeared to be ill in her mind - A. Yes, she was all of a tremble and fell backwards in the arms of a person.

DANIEL ANSTED . On Saturday, the 1st of November, between six and seven o'clock, the prosecutor came over to me in the watch-house - I went with him, and took the prisoner; I found a pair of boots, and a pair of shoes on her - she was very much agitated.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. He says it was Thursday; it was Friday.

GUILTY . Aged 56.

Fined One Shilling and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

128. GEORGE WARWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , nine books, value 10 s. , the goods of Joseph Howard .

JOSEPH HOWARD . I am a bookseller , and live in Gray's Inn-lane . On the 7th of November, about three o'clock the books were inside the door, on a stool - I saw the prisoner going out of the shop as I turned my back, I followed him, he ran but I overtook him in Baldwin's-gardens, and took the books from under his coat - he said he found them in the street.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. They laid on the curb.

GUILTY . Aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

129. JOHN SULLIVAN , ROBERT WRIGHT , and JAMES COLLINS , were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of November , one handkerchief, value 6 s., the goods of a certain man unknown , from his person .

THOMAS GOOK . I am an officer. On the 3d of November, about noon, I was in the Strand , and saw the three prisoners in company, following different gentlemen up the Strand; they attempted two or three pockets, and by Somerset house, they turned back after two gentlemen, as one of their pockets appeared to stick out; the gentlemen had got considerably a-head of them, they all three ran to get up to them, and near Waterloo Bridge, Sullivan put his hand into a gentleman's pocket, and pulled out a handkerchief a little way, and a little lower down, he pulled it a little more; and near the True Briton, newspaper-office, a coach stood there, and he pulled it quite out, and gave it to Collins; Glassborough immediately ran round the coach, and collared Sullivan and Collins, and pulled the handkerchief out of Collin's bosom; I took Wright, and called to the gentleman, whom he had robbed, they immediately turned back; one felt and said he missed his handkerchief - I said he must come to Bow-street, he refused me his name, said he would meet me at Bow-street directly, but never came; Wright was in their company from first to last.

THOMAS GLASSBOROUGH . I was with Gook, and watched the prisoners to Temple-bar, they turned back after two gentlemen, by Wellington-street, Sullivan took the handkerchief a little way out of the gentleman's pocket, and a little further on, he took it further out, and at the corner of Beaufort's-buildings, they all closed on the gentlemen; Sullivan took the handkerchief from the pocket, and gave it to Collins, who immediately put it in his bosom; I took Collins and Sullivan, and took the handkerchief from Collin's bosom.

SULLIVANS'S Defence. I do not know this boy at all, the other boy and I were in the Strand, and did not know Collins had the handkerchief.

SULLIVAN - GUILTY . Aged 15.

WRIGHT - GUILTY . Aged 15.

COLLINS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

130. JOHN MOORE and WILLIAM TAYLOR were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , one handkerchief, value 3 s., the goods of Charles Packer , from his person .

CHARLES PACKER . On the 24th of November, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was walking along opposite Compton-street , a person asked if I had lost my handkerchief, on feeling, I found it was gone; I turned round, Taylor stood on the curb in the act of putting a handkerchief round his neck, he said, "I have not got your handkerchief, it was the other boy yonder." The officer secured Moore, with it in his pocket.

FRANCIS KEYS . On the 24th, I was in Compton-street with Cooper and Collins, and saw the two prisoners, and another in company - I heard one say to the other, "There is nothing in that pocket," they were then following a gentleman; I watched them up Great George-street, St. Giles's, into the second house, they came out in a minute and a half, and stood at the corner, the prosecutor came by; the one who has escaped, beckoned the other to come on, they all three followed him about three hundred yards - I saw the one who got away, take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and give it to Moore, who went across the street with it; I went after him, and saw him put it in his pocket; I took it from him, and secured him - the prosecutor came up and claimed it. Taylor was in company with him.

JOHN COOPER . I went with Keys and Collins, and saw the whole transaction; Taylor ran in Monmouth-street, I pursued and brought him back. The third boy was convicted last night of another offence.

TAYLOR'S Defence. I was going on an errand, and pointed them out.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MOORE - GUILTY . Aged 13.

Transported for Life .

TAYLOR - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

MARY HADDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of December , three spoons, value 1 l.; and two window curtains, value 2 s. ; the goods of John Charles Cuthbert .

JOHN CHARLES CUTHBERT . I keep the Goat public-house, in Pall-mall ; the prisoner came and offered herself to me as a servant , about six weeks ago, and brought me a very good written character, which turns out to be false; I engaged her, she lived about a month with me; in the course of that time, I lost a great deal of property; and, on the 29th of November, about half past nine o'clock at night, I laid four table-spoons on a chest of drawers, in my bed-room; I immediately after, sent her to make my bed; the spoons we missing next morning; I did not suspect her; this was on a Friday. On the Monday, following she had leave to go out for two hours, and never returned; she had previously conveyed away her box; About seven o'clock, on the Tuesday evening, she came very drunk, to demand her wages, and said she was going to follow the guards to Ireland, and had taken her place in the Paddington boat, paid her fare, and wanted her wages directly; I paid her, but she behaved so insolently, I got Pepper, the constable, to take her away. About an and a half afterwards, I was fetched to the watch-house, and found her there; the constable produced two duplicates of four spoons, pawned in the name of Cuthbert.

EDWARD PEPPER . I am a constable, I took her into custody I asked if she had pawned any spoons of Mr. Cuthbert's, she said No; I told her there was a witness; she said she had pawned one at the corner of Barrett's-buildings, Oxford-street; she then pulled out some duplicates, which were in a purse, and threw them on the table; and said, "Thank God, I have not got those duplicates about me." I then searched her; I saw her put her hand behind her with a handkerchief in it; I seized her hand, she resisted very much; and in the handkerchief, I found 17 s. 1 d., and the duplicate of a spoon, pawned for 9 s., at Mr. Stone's, in Oxford-street; she begged of me to destroy it; I said I would do my duty. I also foundon her another duplicate of a silver spoon, pawned for 9 s. at Mr. Temple's; I sent for Cuthbert, and examined her trunk in her presence, and found a salt spoon and two window curtains.

ANN PHIPPS . I know the prisoner; she came down to Paddington; she said she was going to Ireland, and sent me to her master's for her box; and as I went along Oxford-street, she went to the pawnbrokers at the corner of Russell-street, and pawned a spoon; I took her empty box to her master's, and brought a full one away, which Pepper examined.

JOHN HUGHES . I am an inspector of nuisances. On the 4th of September, Pepper and I were going our rounds; Cuthbert told me to take her away; she said she would go back, and break every window in his house, and we thought it fit to see her a good way from the house; she was disputing with Phipps about 2 s.; and Phipps said, "I know she can pay me, for I saw her pawn a spoon for 9 s." We went with her to her master's, where she left an empty box, and brought away a full one. We took her to the watch-house with it, and found two duplicates on her of the spoons.

JAMES CHARLES TATE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Oxford-street. The prisoner pawned the table-spoon for 9 s. in the name of Cuthbert. I asked her what name was on it, she said Cuthbert. I asked how she spelt it. She said she was no scholar, and that he grandmother gave it her. She gave her name Ann Cuthbert , King-street.

THOMAS TEMPLE . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Panton-street, Haymaket. I have a table-spoon, pawned by the prisoner for 9 s.

Prisoner's Defence. He said I should go away that night, and so I took him at his word. I sent my things home. The spoons were safe after I left. I went the next night for my money, this woman called me to the pawnbroker's and asked me pawn a spoon for her.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

132. JOSEPH RAVEN , CHARLES HANNINGTON , and GEORGE BADGER were indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , 163 lbs. of lead, value 1 l., the goods of Thomas Boyle , and affixed to a certain building of his .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to belong to John Hammond .

THOMAS BOYLE . I had an unoccupied house, Cranbourne-alley . On the 13th of November, about ten or eleven o'clock in the morning, I was there. I found a parcel of people on the first, second, or third floor, I cannot tell which, and the prisoners among them. The three prisoners were standing together in the loft, and when Raven saw me, he put his hands up to his face and cried bitterly. I think he was ashamed, as I knew him before. There was a ladder there which led to the roof; I told him I was astonished at his injuring me when I was a friend to him; he made no answer. I went on the roof and missed a quantity of lead which was fixed to the building. They were taken to the watch-house. I slept in the next house, and heard a rumbling noise in the course of that night.

JOHN HAMMOND . I am a publican . I hold a lease of the shop and parlour under this ware-house I went to get the key, and as soon as I got into the loft, which was about eleven o'clock in the day. I found the prisoners in the loft, a key was found under the water butt which opened the lock. I said "Gentlemen what do you want here?" I locked them in, and called a constable. About 160 lbs. of lead was ripped, and moved into the loft.

ROBERT BOWSER . I am a constable. I took the prisoners in custody in the house, and found some knives on the premises. As I was going to the watch-house with Raven, he wept very much. I said, "You have brought yourself into a pretty mess, how have you got into these premises," he said, they got in with a key, and that it was under the tub, I found it there. I took the lead from the loft, and found it fitted exactly.

DANIEL BOY . I assisted in taking them, and saw the lead had fitted.

RAVEN - GUILTY . Aged 19.

HANNINGTON - GUILTY . Aged 18.

BADGER - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

133. GEORGE DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , 3 s. 6 d., in monies numbered , the property of Ellis Jones .

ELLIS JONES . I am a grocer , and live in Brick-lane . The prisoner was my shopman . In consequence of suspicion, I marked 15 s. with the letter E, there was eight shillings, five sixpences, and two half-crowns, and put them in a till, with half-a-crown, not marked. I went away, leaving the prisoner behind the counter, and in about a half an hour after, I went behind the counter, turned the money out, and found 3 s. 6 d., of the marked money gone - an officer came and searched him, and found seven shillings and sixpence on him, one shilling and sixpence of it was marked, and I knew it to be mine, he said he had part of it from his father, and part he received from me.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer. I was sent for between ten and eleven o'clock, and found one shilling and sixpence in his waistcoat pocket, which the prosecutor claimed, and in his coat pocket six shillings.

ELLIS JONES . It is the money I marked.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and, Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

134. JOHN HUTCHINS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , one gown value 10 s., and one book, value 1 s. , the goods of John Congreve .

WILLIAM DUNCAN . On the 14th of November, about three o'clock, I saw a cart unloading next to my house, the prisoner was in it unloading it - I was at the window; he put his hand into a bundle, took out two or three things, looked at them, and put them in again; this excited my suspicion; he then opened a drawer in a chest, while the man and boy were assisting in getting the things in. As he opened the drawer, he took out a book, looked at it, and put it in again, he then took a ball of string, and putit in again, he took out the book again; and concealed it under the straw in the cart - I continued to watch him, he took out another drawer, and overhauled that; took out a gown, as I thought, held it up, and stuffed it into his bosom, and buttoned his coat over it. I gave them information.

BENJAMIN SHINGLEFORD . John Congreve is my brother-in-law. I was receiving the goods from the prisoner, Mr. Duncan gave me information - I jumped into the cart, and saw the prisoner's coat bulky, I kept my eye on him, the people kept looking at him, which I supposed made him think himself suspected; I saw him unbutton his coat, the gown was under it, he dropped it as if he wished to conceal it; and then said, "Here is a gown laying here." I said, "Yes, and it was under your coat just this minute," he asked what good it would do him, to conceal it under his coat; I said just as much as any other thief - I charged him with having a book, he denied it; I sent for an officer, he jumped out of the cart, took the book out of his bosom, and threw it up to me, and said,

"There is your book." He was carman to Mr. Barlow of Islington.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the gown in the cart, I picked it up, and gave it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

135. GEORGE BRINDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , 5 lbs. of salmon, value 6 s. , the goods of Clement Bassano .

CLEMENT BASSANO . I am a fishmonger , and live in Cranbourne-street . On the 30th of October, Bidgood brought the prisoner into the shop with a piece of salmon, which was mine, I lost such a piece.

WILLIAM BIDGOOD . I live in Castle-street. I was passing the prosecutor's shop, and saw the prisoner cut the salmon down from the door post, and ran away - I pursued and caught him without losing sight of him, with it in his hand; I took him back.

GUILTY . Aged 18.

Whipped and Discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

136. THOMAS PRATT was indicted for stealing, 40 lbs. of silk , the goods of Rupert Kirk , John Kirk , and Charles Kirk .

JOHN KIRK . The executors of Ann Kirk , have a share in the profits of my business.

COURT. This indictment is not good. NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

137. WILLIAM WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of November , one pair of chaise reins, value 6 s.; thirteen live tame fowls, price 26 s., and six live tame ducks, price 12 s. , the property of John Tillot .

JOHN TILLOT . I live at Brook Green-lane, Hammersmith . On the 25th of November, I was awoke, and found the chaise-house broken open, it was secure at dusk - a hole was cut through the gates large enough to admit a man; I missed a pair of chaise reins, thirteen live fowls, two dead ones, and six ducks; an iron chisel was left behind. On the Wednesday following, I found the reins at Marlborough-street.

ROBERT DAINTY . I am a patrol on the Harrow-road. On the 26th of November, about six o'clock at night, I stopped the prisoner on that road by the five mile stone, and took him to the Green Man, public-house, and found a chisel and knife on him. He had left the fowls at the Green Man, public-house, the people are not here, the landlady's son said in his presence, that he left some fowls there in the course of that day - he brought out seven fowls tied in a pair of trowsers, and a pair of chaise reins; the prisoner did not deny leaving them then, but said they were his own, the fowls were dead and picked, and a bloody knife was found on him.

MR. TILLOT. The reins are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, and the parish would give me nothing better than dog's meat, I was turned out of the work-house and could get no relief.

GUILTY . Aged 60.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

138. JOHN ROWLEY was Indicted for stealing, on the 14th of November , seventeen pair of stockings, value 4 s.; and one sheet, value 3 s. , the goods of James Watt .

JAMES WATT . I live in Southampton-street, Pentonville . On the 9th of November, I lost these things out of a yard where they hung to dry, I saw them hanging there between nine and ten o'clock at night, and missed them next morning at seven o'clock with other things - I know nothing of the prisoner. Taylor brought them to me on the Tuesday morning following.

SAMUEL CAYGER . I am a watchman of Battle-bridge, the prisoner lives near me, in a house by himself. I do not exactly know the name of the street; in consequence of information, I went to his house on the Sunday morning, the door was only latched; I saw a sheet and seven pair of stockings laying at the foot of his bed; he lives three-quarters of a mile from the prosecutors; as I returned from the house, I met the prisoner, and said, "Rowley, I want you for the linen and ducks;" I had found some ducks there; he made no answer but went with me. I gave him to Coulson.

Cross-examined by MR. PHILLIPS. Q. Any one might open the door. - A. Yes. His brother who is now in the House of Correction, lodged with him.

WILLIAM COULTON . I went to the house, and found the property; the prisoner said he knew nothing about it; his brother is a bad boy, and took more stolen property to the house after the prisoner was taken, he has absconded.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

139. SAMUEL TURNER and THOMAS SENIOR , were indicted for stealing on the 10th of November , 47 lbs. of lead, value 5 s. the goods of Bently Burroughs , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

BENTLY BURROUGHS. I am a publican , and keep the Dundee Arms, in Bethnal-green . On the morning of the4th of November, at half-past seven o'clock, I missed this lead, which was safe, the night before, it was ripped from the front of the tap-room windows; next morning the officer shewed it to me; I saw it fitted to the place, it corresponded exactly.

JOHN TRIBE . I am a Bow-street patrol; on Sunday morning about five o'clock, I received information, and fell in with the prisoners, in Gloucester-street, Hackney-road; a little after six o'clock, coming in a direct line from Bethnal-green, in company together; Senior was carrying something heavy; Beris stopped him, it was lead; Turner walked off immediately, but I detained him. The lead fitted the prosecutor's premises.

JOHN BERIS . I am a patrol, I was with the last witness, his account is correct. Senior had 47 lbs. of lead in a basket; he said he went to get in mushrooms, and found it in Bow-fields.

TURNER'S Defence. I was two-hundred yards from the other.

SENIOR'S Defence. The lead is not his, I took it from the Shepherd public-house at Bow.

TURNER - GUILTY . Aged 21.

SENIOR - GUILTY . Aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

140. JOHN MURPHY , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , one snuff box, value 2 l. the goods of Lorenzo Parodi , from his person .

LORENZO PARODI . (Through an interpreter.) In July last I was at the Opera-house , and had a snuff box in my coat pocket, and used it on that evening; when I got home I missed it; I saw it again at the pawnbrokers; I did not see the prisoner near me.

HARRIET NEWTON . I live with my father, who keeps a chandlers' shop in Buckeringe-street, Bloomsbury; the prisoner lived in the neighbourhood; I pawned the snuff box at Wises, on the 26th of October, which I had bought of the prisoner three or four months before; I did not know it was gold, I gave him 5 s. for it; he came to me on a Sunday afternoon, and asked me to buy it, I said, I did not want such a thing; he came again on Monday, and asked me to have the goodness to buy it, and I bought it; he said he found it at the corner of James's-street.

Q. Did not you tell Wise that it belonged to a relation of yours, and you had recently redeemed it - A. Yes, I do not know why I came to say so. I told the truth when I was taken up.

S. B. CHAMBERLAIN . I am servant to Mr. Wise , the pawnbroker. The girl offered the box in pawn. She said the miniature on it, was her cousin or sister, I forget which, and it was painted by an artist named Sullivan; the childs' name was Patty; I detained her; she said she had redeemed it from Wadmore's, which I found was false.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

141. JOHN COSGROVE MOSLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November , one chest, value 3 s.; one handkerchief 1 s.; one bed, value 2 l.; three blankets, value 3 s.; two pillows, value 2 s.; five shirts, value 5 s.; three pair of trowsers, value 5 s.; five waistcoats, value 5 s.; two pair of drawers, value 2 s.; four pair of stockings, value 4 s.; one quadrant, value 12 s., and six books, value 3 s. , the goods of Mark Tomkins .

MARK TOMKINS . I am a mariner , on board the Union, which lay in the Surrey Canal . I left about six weeks before the 5th of November, leaving the prisoner, and my shirt and bedding on board, and went to Carrington-road. I told the boys belonging to the ship, that if an order came in my name, to give them up, but not otherwise. The prisoner was a mariner on board. On the 3d of November, I found they were gone. I found the prisoner with them on board a brig off the Tower. The clothes he had on, except his shirt, were mine; my bedding also was on board the same brig.

GEORGE SAVAGE . I am an apprentice on board the Union. The prisoner came on board the day before the goods were stolen, and dined with us. He left in the afternoon, I did not notice him take any thing - a waterman brought me an order for the prosecutor's chest, also his bedding, and I gave it him.

ANDREW KELLY . I am a waterman. At the latter end of October, the prisoner sent me over to the Surrey Canal to fetch his chest and hammock out of the ship Union. He gave me a written order, which I shewed to Savage, but did not leave it with him. They gave me the property, which I gave to him with the order at Bell Wharf.

THOMAS MUNDAY . On the 1st of November, the prisoner employed me to fetch the chest and hammock from No. 2, Love-lane. I brought it to Tower-stairs to him, and put them on board the Catharine with him.

JOHN MARRATT . I am an officer. I took him in charge with the clothes on his back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I sent the order for my own things as I had left a frock there.

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before W. Arabin, Esq.

142. CATHARINE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , 1 bed, value 1 l.; one pail, value 1 l.; one tea-kettle, value 6 d.; one tea-board, value 2 s.; the goods of James Russel , in a lodging room .

JAMES RUSSEL . I live in Tower-street - I let the prisoner a two pair furnished front room; she lodged with me four weeks; on the 27th of October, I heard she was in custody, I then broke her room open, and missed the articles stated in the indictment.

THOMAS BARTLETT . I am a patrole. On the 27th of October, I took the prisoner in Charles-street, with a broom in her hand - I watched her into Short's Gardens, where she offered it for sale, but they would not give her enough. She went into another house; I took her in charge. I found part of the property in Phillip's possession.

ELLEN PHILLIPS . I deal in bottles, and live in King-street, Soho; I bought a tea board, pail, and kettle, of the prisoner in October or November; Russel claimed them.

Prisoner's Defence. I took this woman two pillows;she gave me 6 s. for them, and told me to bring as many more as I could, and she would buy them.

GUILTY . Aged 20.

Confined One Year .

First Middlesex Jury, before Wm. Arabin , Esq.

143. WILLIAM FORD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , one coat, value 20 s.; one pair of breeches, value 5 s. ; the goods of Robert Weight .

ROBERT WEIGHT . I am servant to Mr. Stewart, of Sidmouth-street . On the 28th of November last, my box coat was on the coach, and a pair of breeches in the stable; the prisoner had assisted me in the stable ; I found the coat at his father's house next morning, and the breeches at Marlborough-street, a fortnight after; he never came to work again - I met him in the street, and charged him with stealing the things; he said he had, and had pawned them.

WILLIAM ENSER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Luck, a shoe maker, the prisoner came and asked my master if he would have the duplicate of a pair of breeches; my master sent me the same night (Saturday) to Lightfoot's, and I redeemed them, and pawned them there again.

ROBERT CASLAKE . I am servant to Mr. Lightfoot - I produced the breeches which the last witness redeemed and pawned.

SAMUEL HILL . I took the prisoner in charge; his mother gave me the coat.

GUILTY . Aged 17.

Whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Wm. Arabin , Esq.

ELEVENTH DAY, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17.

144. THOMAS HARVEY was indicted for a fraud .

MARGARET BOLTON . I live in Charles-street, Hatton-garden. I have known Felton four or five years; he is a printer. On the 1st of November in the morning he gave me twenty-five sovereigns to keep for him. I and Felton met the prisoner the day before; Felton was looking for a small house for me; Harvey said he would find him a house. An agreement was drawn up on the 1st of November for a house; he said he would not let it to his own brother without a deposit, and 2 l. deposit was given him at the White Bear, Barbican, where we had some refreshment. I went out, and on returning the prisoner stood at the door of the White Bear; we went into the parlour; Felton was not there; I asked where he was: the prisoner said he was not well, and was gone into the yard: and he had told Felton he had some cattle to pay for in the market, and it would save him going to Bethnall-green for it, and that Felton authorized him to come to me for what sum he wanted; I asked what sum: he said I might let him have two sovereigns: and then he said it was not enough, I might let him have another, which I gave him; he put them in his pocket. He then nudged my elbow, and told me not to tell Felton, and he would return them on Saturday; he then got up, and said he would see me and Felton in a day or two, for if he was not in the market at 3 o'clock he should be fined 10 l.

Prisoner. Q. When did you come to Bethnall-green to take a furnished house, and say you were Mrs. Felton? - A. I never said so. Only Wallis was present when I gave him the sovereigns; two gentlemen were there before. Felton took me to him, and told him to pay the money he had extorted from me; he said he would not, we might go and be d - d.

RICHARD FELTON . I am a printer and commercial agent. I saw the prisoner last at Rumford. On the 31st of October, Bolton and I were in search of a house; we went into an eating-house at Battle-bridge; the prisoner accidently looked in at the window, Bolton said "What does that ill-looking fellow want with us;" I said, I believed he was an honest man. I went to him and told him our business; he proposed to let me have a house at 25 l. a year, or 40 l. a year if furnished; we looked at it, and agreed to take it furnished. I gave him 2 l. deposit, and produced his receipt; he said nothing about security. We were to take possession on the 7th of November. Next morning Wallis and Bolton informed me of this, and said he had promised to return it on Saturday at ten o'clock; he did not come, and I went to his house, but could not find him; but I met him on Wednesday by appointment at the Black Bull, Smithfield. On the 7th he brought me a bill for 15 l. he said it was for a forfeit of 10 l. in not having the house ready, and 2 l. deposit. I asked what the other three was for, he would not explain, but I told him; he then said "Did Bolton tell you of that;" I said "Yes: and I will stick to you as tight as wax."

Q. On the 1st of November did he tell you he had some cattle to pay for at Smithfield, and ask you to advance him 3 l. - A. No: I never authorized him to ask Bolton for what he wanted, or any thing of the kind. She does not live with me. I have known her parents for years.

Prisoner. Q. Did you summons me? - A. Yes, for the deposit; not for the 3 l.

MARY ANN WALLIS . I was with Mrs. Bolton. Harvey came into the parlour and said Felton had authorized him to have what money he wanted from her, and he wanted 2 l. then he said another would do, for it would serve him going home, and save him 10 l. in the market; he nudged her elbows, told her not to tell Felton, and he would bring it her on Saturday morning.

Prisoner's Defence. They came and said if I returned them the 2 l. they would not prosecute me.

GUILTY . Aged 30

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Wm. Arabin , Esq.

145. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing on the 26th of October 500 lbs of lead, value 4 l. the goods of Thomas Pinnock and Thomas Howerth , and fixed to their dwelling house .

JONATHAN DOCKER . I am servant to Thomas Pinnock and Thomas Howerth . They have three houses in Dean-street, East Smithfield . I collect the rents as jointly due to them. On the 26th of October, I found the front and middle gutters of all three houses stripped of the lead, from four to six hundred weight was gone; it cost 15 l. to replace it. I found three pieces in the bottom room of the house; it was fresh cut. I got a warrant, and went with Miller to No. 1, Lemon street, Goodman's Fields, and there found seven or eight hundred weight of old lead in the back wash-house, among some straw, fresh cut; some pipe was among it; I lost no pipe. The edges of the lead we claim were bright, and cut into about a hundred pieces, and doubled up; two pieces of it corresponded with that left in the house. We could notfind the prisoner till the Thursday following. The name B. Smith, is over his door.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Did you go to his house before Friday? - A. I did not. We took his shop-man in custody. The thieves had broken the street door open, and cut a hole in the ceiling.

GEORGE EDWARD ATKINSON . I am a plumber. I got the lead from Miller, and fitted it to the houses; I fitted five or six pieces; they were cut irregularly, and corresponded.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I went to No. 1, Lemon-street, and found the lead. Atkinson fitted three pieces, which weighed about thirty pounds. I gave him three hundred weight.

THOMAS WENDSON . I am servant to the prisoner and Jackson; they live at No. 1, Lemon-street. The lead that was taken away, came on the 24th of October, about half-past eleven o'clock in the morning. It was brought in by Jackson's direction. The prisoner was absent at the time. It was bought of Mr. Mayers, of Wanstead, Essex: he came with it. The edges were fresh cut. I said nothing about it. We deal in old rags.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

146. THOMAS FLETCHER was indicted for stealing on the 10th of November , five pieces of timber, value 10 l. the goods of Thomas Brockelbank : and GEORGE DUNKLEY for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

MR. ALLEY conducted the Prosecution.

JOHN LEADER . I am rafter to Thomas Brockelbank ; his timber was rafted at Blackwall, near Foley House . All the cargo of the Seven Brothers ship had been rafted there for twelve months. It is marked S X B. on the side, and at the end we put B. K. On the 11th of November, about 10 o'clock, I missed five pieces, which had been secured in the usual way; the ropes were cut with a rope. I have seen it since, and know it.

ROBERT BULL . I am a waterman. On Saturday morning, the 10th of November, about half-past 8 o'clock, Fletcher employed me at Ratcliff-cross-stairs; he said he wanted me to fetch some timber from Blackwall. I rowed him by the Foley House, and stopped there an hour and a half, till the water floated the timber, he then shoved five pieces out; we rowed them up to Jessop's Wharf, and got there between two and three o'clock in the morning; he told me to call next morning on Jessop, who paid me.

JOHN GOTTY . I am a Thames police surveyor. On the 29th of November I went to Mr. Hand's premises, Dog-row, Bethnall-green. Dunkley is a lath render and wood-cutter, and said he rented the premises. I found four whole pieces of timber and three lengths, which appeared to have been cut from one piece, and marked S X B. and B K.; he said he bought them of Fletcher, and produced the bill and receipt. The prosecutor claimed it. Fletcher was in custody, and admitted selling it to him.

WILLIAM JESSOP . I am a publican, and have a wharf. On the 10th of November, in the afternoon, Fletcher came and asked me to pay the waterman for bringing the timber to my wharf, if it came: next morning I found it there, and paid the waterman. On Monday, Dunkley came to me and said he would buy it. Fletcher came soon after, and he paid him at the rate of 3 l. a load for it.

MR. BROCKELBANK. It was worth 3 l. 10 s. a load; four months credit.

FLETCHER - GUILTY . Aged 44.

DUNKLEY - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

147. THOMAS FLETCHER and RICHARD CIAS , were indicted for stealing on the 25th of November , seven pieces of timber, value 35 l. the goods of Joshua Dowson & William Dowson .

WILLIAM HENRY ATKINSON . I am clerk to Joshua Dowson and William Dowson , timber merchants , Bankside . On the night of the 24th of November, this timber was stolen from the wharf; it was made fast to a barge and some piles, and found it at the office.

WILLIAM SIGGINS . On Saturday afternoon, the 24th of November, I made this timber fast with three ropes, and next morning about 12 o'clock, I found two of the ropes cut, and seven pieces stolen. I found it on Monday at Jessop's Wharf; he said it belonged to Fletcher.

WILLIAM JESSOP . On the 25th of November, early in the morning, this timber came to the wharf, and on the 26th, Fletcher told me to deliver four pieces to one person, and two to another; he said nothing about the odd pieces; but before they were delivered he was apprehended.

Cross-examined by MR. PRENDERGRAST. Q. You did not see Cias with him? - A. He was paid 4 s. as the waterman. He brought me a note from Fletcher to pay him; that was under his fare; and he came on Monday for a piece of rope which was attached to the timber, as being his.

EDWARD HENRY HANDS . On the 25th November, Fletcher came and asked if I wanted to buy any timber, and asked me to go and see it; I said, no: as it was Sunday; but I would meet him at Jessop's at six in the morning. I did not go, and between seven and eight he came and knocked me up. I went, and agreed for four pieces at 2 l. 15 s. a load, and 2 s. wharfage.

THOMAS CARPENTER . The prisoner came to me on Sunday. I agreed to buy some timber of him.

FLETCHER - GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

CIAS - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

148. RICHARD FOREST , was indicted for stealing on the 12th of November , 6 shirts, value 10 s.; 1 shift, value 2 s.; 6 neckcloths, value 6 s.; 2 handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; and 2 petticoats, value 3 s. the goods of Robert Warder .

ROBERT WARDER . I am clerk at the Chelsea Hospital , and live in Queen-square, Chelsea . On the 10th of November, (Saturday night) I lost these things out of the wash-house.

BETTY WARDER . On Saturday, the 10th of November, I put this linen in a tub, wet, ready for the wash, and on Monday morning it was missed. Somebody had got over the wall: the wash-house was not locked. I also missed a table spoon. I afterwards found part of them at Queen-square.

EDWARD JOHN HANDLEY . I am an officer. On Monday morning the 12th of November, about 8 o'clock, I was informed the prisoner had gone into a dealer of marine stores' shop; I followed in the direction he had taken, and apprehended him in Charles-street, Westminster, and asked what was in his bundle: he said it belonged to his mother, and contained different things, but would give no account. I took himinto a public-house, and found it was wet linen, and found some more in his hat; he told the magistrate he picked it up in the park. I advertised it, and found the owner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I found it in the park.

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

149. CHARLES BROWN was indicted for stealing on the 9th of November , one sack, value 3 s., the goods of James Woodward ; and one shovel, value 1 s. , the goods of a certain person unknown.

DANIEL TALBOT . I am constable of Bow-street. On the 9th of November, about 12 o'clock at night, I met the prisoner at Cambden-town with this shovel and sack; I asked him where he got them. He swore he would neither tell me or any one else. I secured him.

Prisoner. Q. Did I not come over the way to you? - A. Yes. I had three men with me. He would not tell us his name, or where he lived - at the watch-house he said it was Brown, but refused to say where he lived.

JAMES WOODWARD . I am a mealman ; the sack is mine. I live at New Barn's mill, St. Alban's.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in Hampstead-road.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

150. JOHN DORAN was indicted for stealing on the 3d of November , the sum of 12 l. in monies numbered, the property of Eliza Hines , from her person .

ELIZA HINES . I sell tin ware . About the 3d of November, on Saturday night between eight and nine o'clock, I went to a public-house in Wingfield-street with my boy to have some beer; he asked for 2 s. of his wages. I pulled my purse out of my bosom to pay him. I had six sovereigns and six pounds in silver there. While I was at the bar I leant my hand down on my purse; the prisoner came and shoved me from the bar, took up my purse, and run away with it. I called stop thief - nobody would assist me; but the publican said he would get me 9 l. back by Monday; but he put me off till Wednesday, and then told me I should find the prisoner in Long-alley, but I could not. I am sure he is the man.

ANN M'GINNIS . I was at the Star public-house with Hines; I saw her take the purse from her bosom and give the boy 2 s. then put the purse down - the prisoner pushed her away and ran off with it.

MOSES FORTUNE . I am an officer. I was informed the prisoner was wanted, and on the 22d of November I met him in Wentworth-street, and told him he was wanted, but did not know what for. As we went along, he said he supposed it was for that Star business. I did not know any thing about it myself.

HENRY SERVICE . I am landlord of the Star, and have kept it six months. The prosecutrix was there with three women and her son. They had two glasses of rum, the prosecutrix said she would pay for it, and gave her son 2 s. He said that was not enough. She turned round to give him some more, and said her purse was gone.

Q. Was the prisoner there? - A. He was an hour before. She said, "Bill, you have my purse." He denied it. She then went into the tap-room and said she was robbed of 40 l. I ran to the office and brought three officers, and she told them so, she then reduced it to 12 l. I saw nobody run out.

ELIZA HINES . I never said I lost 40 l.

ANN M'GINNIS. I went to the Star next morning. Service gave the prosecutrix 2 l. and promised to make up 9 l. more if she would not go before a magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. She first told the magistrate she lost 40 l. I was remanded for a week; and she said if I gave her 5 l. she would not prosecute. I refused. She then said 2 l. I refused. She then said I was done.

GUILTY . Aged 39.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

151. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing on the 30th of October , two chairs, value 12 s. the goods of George Gray and William Hull .

CHARLES GREEN . I am a painter and glazier. On the 30th of October I was in Oxford-street, and saw the prisoner with another at an upholsterer's shop below Dean-street, looking at the door; they passed me and went up to the prosecutor's door. Two chairs stood in front of the shop, the prisoner took them and ran into Chapel-street. I followed and took them from him. I heard him tell the boy to watch while he went in the other shop.

HENRY GOFF . I was shopman to George Gray and William Hull , upholsterers , Oxford-street - the chairs stood outside the shop.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 22.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

152. JANE COLLINS was indicted for stealing on the 23d of August , two silver forks, value 30 s. , the goods of Barbara Nichol , widow .

BARBARA NICHOL . I live in Adam-street, Adelphi . The prisoner visited my housemaid unknown to me, and on the 15th of August these forks were stolen from the sideboard. I found another silver fork changed for a plated one.

WILLIAM HARNATT . I am servant to Mr. Ashman, a pawnbroker, who lives in the Strand. On the 23d of August the prisoner pawned two silver forks for 20 s., she said they were her own; she had been a customer, and appeared very respectable, and always pawned in the name of Mary Smith , Hunter-street.

ISAAC SAYER . I am an officer. I stopped the prisoner in the Strand; she said she was going home, and that she lived at the Golden-cross tap. I took her to Ashman's. He said she was the person who pawned the forks, which she did not deny; but said she received them from a strange woman in the street, and went to another pawnbrokers first, but they would only give her 16 s.

(Property produced and sworn to.).

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Moss's to pawn some clothes, and saw a respectable woman at the door. I went to Harris's and saw her there also; and when I came out, she asked me to pawn the spoons for a sovereign; theywould only give me 16 s., and I took them to Ashman's. I did not say they were my own.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

153. WILLIAM WOODNESS was indicted for stealing on the 3d of November , one chaise knee boot, value 2 l. , the goods of Charles Bray and Frederick Tatton .

FREDERICK TATTON . I am in partnership with Charles Bray ; we are coachmakers , and live in Little Queen-street . On the 3d of November I was up stairs at breakfast, and heard somebody below. I went down, could see nobody, and was going up again when I saw a chaise move. I stood on the stairs, and saw the prisoner stand up with the knee boot rolled up under his arm. He walked further into the shop and laid hold of a phaeton knee boot. I seized him; he asked me to let him go, and said he really did not cut it off, and that he was going to bring it to me - a knife was found on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to ask for work; a man went rather quick out of the shop. The knee boot laid on the ground; I folded it up, and went towards the stairs with it.

GUILTY - Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

154. HENRY TEW was indicted for embezzling one half crown, the property of Samuel Prestwidge , his employer .

SECOND COUNT for stealing a half crown.

MR. BRODRICK conducted the Prosecution.

SAMUEL PRESTWIDGE . I am a grocer , and live in Drury-lane . The prisoner lived shopman with me for a year and a half; it was his duty to receive money. On the 14th of November , about six o'clock, my wife and I went out, leaving him and Taylor in the shop. I returned about twelve, and in consequence of a communication from Taylor, I saw the prisoner in his presence, and desired him to produce his money from his pocket; he produced 25 s. Taylor selected and identified a half crown from among it. I said, "Tew, how much have you taken out of the till to-day?" He said, "I had 10 s. in the morning, and the other 15 s. I have taken from the till to-day."

JACOB TAYLOR . I am employed by the prosecutor. He left me with the prisoner. I marked three half crowns in Shaw's presence in the back parlour. Shaw took them away. I afterwards saw two of the same in the till, the other was missing, and found on the prisoner's person - this is it, (looking at one).

JOHN SHAW . I am a chemist. I saw the half crowns marked, and gave them to Brown, and followed him to Prestwidge's shop, where he bought some tea.

GEORGE BROWN . I am servant to Mr. Day. I received three half crowns and took them to Prestwidge's, and gave them to the prisoner for one pound of 7 s. tea.

JOHN LACKLAN . I am an officer. I produce the 15 s.

JACOB TAYLOR . Here is one half crown among them which I marked.

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

155. HUGH NORRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of November , fourteen yards of stuff, value 14 s. , the goods of Frederick King .

HENRY BOND . I am a patrol. On the 9th of November, about seven o'clock at night, I was in St. John-street , and saw the prisoner with two others lurking about King's shop for three quarters of an hour; at last the prisoner went to the door and snatched something off the pile inside. I ran across the way; he saw me and dropped it. I secured, and brought him back, picked it up. I am sure he is the boy.

PHILIP SWINGLER . I was with Bond opposite Mr. King's; saw the prisoner cross the road. Bond took him.

FREDERICK KING . The stuff is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw a parcel of boys playing, and a man after them with a stick in his hand; I run away.

GUILTY . Aged 13.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

156. JOHN LANE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of November , two sheets, value 5 s.; and one candlestick, value 6 d., the goods of John Gilbert , in a lodging room .

ESTHER GILBERT . I am the wife of John Gilbert . We live in John Street, St. George's in the East . I let the prisoner a furnished room seven or eight weeks ago, at 4 s. a week; he owed me about 1 l. I missed the sheets and candlestick, and sent for an officer and took him.

JOHN HERBERT . The prosecutrix fetched me. I found the prisoner in bed, and told him I was informed he had made away with the sheets, and asked for the tickets; he gave me the duplicates from his pockets.

JOSEPH CAMPBEL . I am a pawnbroker, and live at Shadwell. On the 17th and 30th October, he pawned a sheet for 3 s. each.

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Church-road. On the 30th October he pawned a candlestick for 4 d.

Property produced and sworn to.

The prisoner pleaded distress.

GUILTY . Aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

157. JAMES HOLMES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of November , nine pounds of bacon, value 2 s. , the goods of Richard Shail .

RICHARD SHAIL . I keep a chandler's shop in Arthur-street, St. George's in the East . On the 30th of November I was in my back parlour, the shop door was open; I heard a person come in, looked through the glass door and saw the prisoner take a piece of bacon out of the window and go out. He heard me following him, and dropped it on the pavement. I secured him on the other side of the way.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY - Aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

158. ELIZA BULLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of November , one bed, value 10 s.; three blankets, value 6 s.; one bolster, value 3 s.; one pillow, value 3 s.; two sheets, value 5 s.; one candlestick, value 1 s.; and a saucepan, value 1 s., the goods of Margaret Taylor , in a lodging-room, let to Robert Bullard .

MARGARET TAYLOR . I let the prisoner the lodgings.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

159. ELIZA BURN was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , three pounds of bacon, value 1 s. 6 d. , the goods of Charles Goodenough .

ROBERT HICKMAN . I am servant to Charles Goodenough , a cheesemonger , who lives in Cow-cross . On the 7th of November the prisoner came and asked for some scrapings of butter; I said I had none. I was serving two customers, and saw her take up a piece of bacon and put it under her apron. I stopped her as she was going out with it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I have two children.

GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

160. JAMES BOULTON was indicted for stealing on the 21st of November , three pounds of beef, value 1 s.; and three pounds of mutton, value 1 s. , the goods of James Bird .

JAMES BIRD . I am a butcher , and live in White-cross-street . On the 21st of November I was informed the prisoner was loitering about my shop; I set Bradford to watch. His daughter lived with me as a servant. I missed this meat; the cloth it was wrapped in is not mine.

THOMAS BRADFORD . I am street-keeper. I placed myself in a gin-shop to watch Bird's premises, and saw the prisoner go by twice; he then came back, looked into the shop, then went in, and came out with something in a cloth. I went over, laid hold of him, and asked what he had there. He said, "Beef and mutton, which my daughter gave me at Bird's." His daughter first of all came to the door and looked out for him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went by, my daughter said, "Here is some beef and mutton, which I have bought for my mother."

GUILTY . Aged 46.

Confined Six Months .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

161. THOMAS RHODES was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of November , one handkerchief, value 4 s., the goods of Henry Boucher , from his person .

HENRY BOUCHER . On the 21st of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in New-street, Covent-garden , in company with two friends, a boy came and walked before me, which made me walk slow; somebody behind said, they have taken that gentleman's pocket handkerchief. I then felt and missed it, and saw two or three boys running away. I followed them, crying Stop thief. They turned down St. Martin's-court into Cecil-court, and then I lost sight of them; but as I returned I met my friend with the prisoner; the handkerchief was found on him.

ST. ANDREW ST. JOHN . I was walking with the prosecutor who missed his handkerchief. I saw two boys running towards Cecil-court, they crossed over into St. Martin's-court, and about the middle of the court I saw the prisoner running before me; I caught him as he turned the corner. I told him he had been picking a gentleman's pocket and must come back. He said he did not pick the gentleman's pocket, he only picked it up. I said,

"Have you got it?" and he produced it from his hat.

THOMAS GOOK . I took him into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I saw two boys treading it under their feet and picked it up.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

162. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for stealing, on on the 18th of November , a hundred and fifty pounds of lead, value 30 s., the goods of John Chandler , and fixed to a building of his .

JOHN CHANDLER . I am a builder . On Sunday, the 18th of November, this lead was taken from my building in Cockspur-street ; it was nailed down, not soldered.

THOMAS FOY . I am a watchman of Cockspur-street. At three o'clock in the afternoon the prisoner came and borrowed a shovel and pick-axe of me; he worked at the next building to Chandler's; he returned it about four o'clock, and asked if I would have any thing to drink; we went and had a pot of beer; he went out while I was was drinking with my wife, and I suppose he thought I was going to remain at the public house, but in five minutes, as it was getting dark, I went to the back of the building, found a board taken down, and missed the lead from its place, and found it a few yards off. I went to the public house, he came over, and I saw sand on his shoes; I had seen footmarks on the sand by the board. In about an hour he returned to the premises, and took up the lead, lifted it on his shoulder, and I seized him.

(Property produced and sworn to).

Prisoner's Defence. He took me and showed me the lead.

GUILTY . Aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

163. JOHN TATE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , fifty pounds of lead, value 7 s., the goods of Joseph Fletcher , and fixed to his dwelling house .

JOSEPH FLETCHER . I am a baker . This lead was fixed over the dormer of my door, No. 12, Nassau-street . I was called up at six o'clock in the morning, and the watchman produced the lead.

JOSEPH MUNROE . I was calling six o'clock. I looked up, and missed the lead from Fletcher's door, and saw it there rolled up; something moved on the top of the door, I called out "Come down," and found the prisoner on the dormer, and took him to the watch-house.

GEORGE CULLUM . I am a watchman. Munroe called me. I found the prisoner on the dormer, and the lead rolled up.

JOSHUA IVORY . He was brought to the watch-house. I found a knife, chisel and rope on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

164. MARY SHORT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of November , 13 s. in monies numbered, the property of Wm. Stokes , from his person .

WILLIAM STOKES . I am a labourer . On the 25th of November, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I went to George-yard, Whitechapel , to get a bed. I live on Bow-common, the prisoner said she could get me a bed, and as soon as I entered the room she wanted eighteen pence to stop. I said I did not want her. I felt her hand about me, felt in my pocket and missed my money. I laid hold of her, two more came up and held me while she got away. I am sure she is the woman. They turned me out of doors. I waited outside, and heard her say she had got the *** thief's tea and money, and she would have a strong cup of tea in the morning. I fetched an officer. I lost some tea, but do not know what my money consisted of.

JOHN PARTERIDGE . I was fetched to the house, and demanded admission. I found six women in bed. He thought one was the woman, but not speaking positive I sent him away. In about an hour I saw the prisoner tipsy, tossing up with a man; it struck me by the bonnet she wore, that it was one I saw in the bed on the first floor, and I took her, and found two half-crowns, eleven-pence three farthings, two ounces of tea, and some mustard on her. She said a man gave it her, and that she bought the tea at the corner of Plough-street.

WILLIAM STOKES . I cannot swear either to the tea or the money. I had been very fresh.

Prisoner's Defence. He was drunk, I never touched him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

165. ISAAC LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of November , one coat, value 5 s. , the goods of Robert Buck .

ROBERT BUCK . I live at Stratford, and drive a cart ; I put my coat on the horse about six o'clock in the morning, at the King's arms public-house, Whitechapel , Tye came and said it was stolen. I stood with my back to the cart.

THOMAS TYE . I am a labourer; I was going to work and saw the prisoner take the coat off the horses back; I went and told Burke; we followed and took him without losing sight of him; he saw me following him and dropped it. Buck picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

166. JAMES HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of November , one hat, value 4 s. , the goods of Daniel Gardner .

THOMAS DANIEL GARDNER . My father is a hatter , and lives in Chiswell-street ; his name is Daniel; on the 2nd of November, about nine o'clock at night, Weeks brought the prisoner in with this hat, which was taken from about five feet inside the door.

THOMAS WESTWOOD . I am a hatter, and live in Beech-street. I saw the prisoner, and two others lurking about my door, I followed them to Chiswell-street, all three went together, and planted themselves by Gardiner's shop, the prisoner went in, and took a hat off a peg, then came out, whistled, and the other two came up, and all ran away together he gave the hat to the biggest boy, then came back to door, when I took him, but before that I took the hat from the boy.

THOMAS VANN . I was in Chiswell-street, and took him in charge.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I happened to look in at the window, and the gentleman collared me.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Confined Six Months and Whipped ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

167. JOHN COLBERT was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of November , 9 lbs. of sugar, value 8 s. , the goods of Peter Martineau the elder , Peter Martineau the younger , and David Martineau .

LUDOR KRUDOP . I am servant to Messrs. Martineau, they are sugar bakers in Whitechapel . The prisoner frequently came the house as carman . On the 8th of November, between twelve and one o'clock he came and asked where the cart was gone, and said he was going to meet it, he asked me to fetch him some beer, I was gone a few minutes, and saw him come from the lump room, towards the warehouse door, he appeared bulky; I followed and saw a loaf of sugar in his bosom - he begged to be let go. I got him back with difficulty.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

SAMUEL MILLER . I took him in charge, he said a man gave it him to carry.

GUILTY . Aged 14.

Whipped and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

168. JAMES MAHARS and MICHEAL LEANORD were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of November , one sheet, value 5 s. , the goods of William Lorance Rogers .

SARAH DAVIS . I am servant to William Lorance Rogers . The sheet hung on Northend common to dry - I saw it half an hour before it was taken.

MARY BATTLE . I live at Mr. Davis's, Northend; I hung the sheet on the furze close to the house, between twelve and one o'clock.

HENRY TOOLEY . I am a cow-keeper, and live at Hampstead; I had been on the common to take up some linen, and saw Mahars with a bundle under his arm; another person was with him; I cannot say whether it was Leonard. I went to them, and the one who was with him ran up a bank; I lost him, but stopped Mahars with the sheet tied up in a handkerchief, about a quarter of a mile from Davis's house; I said I suspected it was stolen, and asked where he got it; he made no answer.

JOHN BLACKHALL . I am a labourer. I took Leonard about a quarter of a mile off, and told him it was useless to resist. He denied it.

CHARLES READ . I am an officer. Leonard was given to me; I understood some napkins were lost, and asked him where they were. He said he knew nothing of them, he only took the sheet. I asked how his coat was torn, he said, with running away.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MAHAR'S Defence. I saw it laying there tied in a handkerchief.

LEONARD'S Defence. We saw it laying down.

MAHARS - GUILTY . Aged 16.

LEONARD - GUILTY . Aged 16.

Confined Three Months and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

169. JOSEPH WILLIAMS , THOMAS FLOOD , and HENRY BRYAND were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of November , 2 quires of emery paper, value 3 s. the goods of William Brown .

ROBERT DUKE . I am a broker, and live at Lambeth. On the 23rd of November, between seven and eight o'clock at night, I was in James-street, Covent-Garden ; I saw the three prisoners in company with another, coming from the Piazza towards Long-acre; they stopped at Brown's oil-shop a few minutes, and then Bryand went in and took two bundles of Emery paper out. I stopped Williams and Flood, and found the paper on Williams. Before I secured them they went along Hart-street together, and stood a few minutes, then ran up Phoenix-yard; I ran round and secured them in Hanover-street. Flood said he would have his regulars out of Williams. Bryand's father brought him to the office, on hearing he was wanted; I took them to Brown, who missed the paper; I know his name is Williams.

CHARLES WILLIAM GREEN . I am a painter, and live in Dean-street. Duke's account is correct; I helped to secure them.

WILLIAMS'S Defence. Two chaps dropped the paper; I picked it up, the same as any body else would; this boy ran up and cried out halves.

WILLIAMS GUILTY . Aged 14.

FLOOD GUILTY . Aged 14.

BRYAND GUILTY . Aged 10.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

170. THOMAS LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of November , a handkerchief, value 3 s.; the property of John Bursey , from his person .

JOHN BURSEY . I live in Goodge-street, and am a clerk in the Audit-office, Somerset-house . On the 20th of November I was in the Haymarket ; the officer said my handkerchief was gone; I missed it.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a constable; I saw Mr. Bursey crossing Russell-court with another gentleman; the prisoner and another followed him; there was four of them. I first saw them all in conversation, in St. Martin's-court, till Mr. Bursey passed them, when the prisoner and another followed him, and at the corner of Coventry-street and the Haymarket I saw the other one lift up the prosecutor's coat, take out a handkerchief, and give it to the prisoner. I ran across and told Mr. Bursey; they saw me, and both ran down the Haymarket and got away; I went with Keys to the corner of St. Martin's-court, and saw the prisoner and his companion, with some girls of the town; they went into Covent-garden, and I took the prisoner; he threw something away as he crossed the road; I have not found the handkerchief. I knew him before, and am certain of him.

FRANCIS KEYS , I was with Colton, and pursued the other, but lost him.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he believed I was the boy.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

171. THOMAS SAUNDERS , SUSAN ANDERSON , MAGNUS SODERBERG , and ELIZA SODERBERG , were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , one quadrant, value 2 l.; four jackets, value 1 l. 13 s.; five sheets, value 1 l.; four pillow-cases, value 6 s.; twenty-four waistcoats, value 2 l.; two handkerchiefs, value 2 s.; three pair of drawers, value 1 s.; twenty pair stockings, value 10 s.; twenty-two shirts, value 30 s.; five towels, value 3 s.; twenty-four pair of trowsers, value 30 s.; one cot, value 1 l.; two blankets, value 5 s.; one quilt, value 5 s.; one model of a ship, value 10 s.; one night cap, value, 6 d.; one tooth pick, value 2 s.; one canvas bag, value 6 s.; two pair of braces, value 6 d.; one book, value 3 s.; one mahogany case, value 3 s.; one case of instruments, value 10 s.; and one chest, value 10 s. ; the goods of Robert Manners .

TWO OTHER COUNTS, stating them to have been stolen by Thomas Saunders only, and charging the other prisoners with receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen.

MR. ADOLPHUS conducted the prosecution.

MR. ROBERT MANNERS . I am a midshipman in the East India Company's service. In July last, I returned from a voyage, and arrived at Gravesend the latter end of July. I had a cot and a chest, containing this property. I left the ship that evening, and ordered Saunders, who was my servant , not to part with the things till I sent for them. I did not go to the vessel again till the 25th of October, and found him and the things gone. I found him at Soderberg's house, in New Gravel-lane; it is a lodging house for sailors; Anderson was living there with him. I asked Saunders where my chest was; he said it was in the house, but I could not have it, for the master of the house was at Gravesend. I said if he would be there next day I would come for them; he said he would. I went next day, and he was out; I saw Ander- who said my chest was safe, in the room, but the master and mistress were out, and I could not have it. I met Saunders in Ratcliff highway; he said the person of the house was out, and had got the key; I took him to the office, and went with Morant to search the house, and found Anderson, and asked her for the key; she said she had not got it; but we insisted on having it; and, after a good deal of hesitation; she produced it from her pocket; she was in the front room, ground floor; the key opened the back room. I found my trunk there, the locks forced, and the articles stated in the indictment, gone, and a quantity of other things. My night-cap and tooth-pick were found in Anderson's pocket, with a parcel of duplicates.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. Was not Saunders servant to Mr. Moore - A. Yes; and my servant also.

When I went in October, all the crew were discharged. I had desired him to take care of them, while he was on board, and leave them there, they would be safe in the docks.

JOHN MURANT . I am a Thames police officer. I went with the prosecutor to Soderberg's house, and found Anderson there; she said Soderberg had the key, and was out, I insisted on having it, and she produced it; I opened the door, and found the chest broken open, and the things gone. I found a tooth-pick, and a night-cap on Anderson, with R. Manners at full length on it; also some duplicates. On the 29th, I apprehended Sodeberg and his wife at the office, where they came. In a cupboard, in the back parlour, I found a pair of sheets a pillow-case, nineteen waistcoats, three pair of drawers, ten pair and a half of hose, five pair of stockings, two shirts and a towel; and, on the front parlour floor, I found a pair of sheets, and two waistcoats, and four pair of stockings. I found a quantity of property at Mount's, the pawnbrokers, and four sheets at Kernall's. Anderson said she pawned part of them. I found the cot up stairs, between the sacking of a bed; and the blankets were in use on different beds.

THOMAS WALKER . I am servant to Mr. Mount, pawnbroker, Old Gravel-lane. On the 10th of September, Mrs. Soderberg pawned six pair of trowsers in the name of Sarah Hicks ; I always knew her by that name. On the 11th, she pawned five shirts, and three pair of trowsers; and on the 12th, four shirts; and on the 3rd of September, Anderson pawned four shirts and a quadrant, on the 13th, three jackets and four waistcoat. On the 14th, she also pawned six pair of trowsers, a coat, and nine pair of trowsers.

Cross-examined. Q. It is common for a landlady to pawn for her lodgers - A. I cannot say. Both she and Anderson were well known at my shop.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

MR. MANNERS. I gave Saunders the key of my chest for the Custom-house officer, and told him to take care of my things till I wrote or sent for them.

Saunders put in a written defence, complaining that the prosecutor never paid him any wages, and he was obliged to pawn the property till he could get his wages.

ELIZA SODERBERG 'S Defence. It is usual to pawn for lodgers if they want it done.

MR. MANNERS. I paid him money, and gave him clothes at China. No pay was due to him.

SAUNDERS - GUILTY . Aged 29.

Confined Three Months .

ANDERSON. - NOT GUILTY .

ELIZA SODERBERG . - NOT GUILTY .

MAGNUS SODERBERG - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

TWELFTH DAY, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1821.

172. THOMAS PATES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , two watches, value 50 s. , the goods of Henry Berry .

HENRY BERRY . I am a broker , and live in Paddington-buildings, Paddington . In the beginning of October, the prisoner called at my house, saying he was a watchmaker; and asked me if I had any thing to repair; he was a stranger. I gave him a clock to repair; he said he lived in Great James's-street, Lisson-green; he brought the clock back the same day. I gave him a time-piece, he brought that home the same day, or the day after, and I then gave him two watches; I do not think he asked for them, they were both silver, old, and worth 50 s.; he never returned them; I did not go to Lisson-green; I made inquiry after him, but could not find him. I saw one of my watches in pawn, about six weeks after, the other was produced by a pawnbroker at the office. I never gave him authority to pawn them. When I saw him in custody, I said, "I am sorry to see you in this situation;" he said, "He was very sorry too, and that great distress caused him to be there." His wife appeared at the office with a family.

Cross-examined by MR. BRODRICK. Q. What is the value of the two time pieces - A.1 l., the clock was worth 4 l., they were both returned.

Q. Did not he say he pawned them to relieve his necessity, but never intended to steal them - A. He said something of the kind; I paid him for the clock; we made an agreement for the watches and time-pieces together.

FREDERICK W. LAWRENCE . I am servant to Mr. Baker, a pawnbroker, of Upper George's-street; the prisoner pawned a watch on the 8th of October, in the name of John Wood , No 8, Upper Dane-court, for 15 s. I did not take it in, but I believe I have some recollection that he pawned it.

Cross-examined. Q. You do not know who delivered it - A. I have some recollection of seeing the prisoner there. I will not swear that he pawned it. I have a copy of the duplicate but not the original.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GEORGE GRIFFITH HOWELL . I am shopman to Edward Jenkins of Crawford-street, Montague-sqare. I took a watch in pawn on the 8th of October, of the prisoner; I am certain of him, he gave me the name of Wood, No. 6, Homer-street, a lodger.

Cross-examined. Q. How many shopman have you - A. Four; I am certain of his person.

HENRY ROBERT BUCKERIDGE . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 15th of November, at No. 27, Molyneux-street, Bryanston-street, he was in bed on the second floor; his wife gave me the duplicate of the watches out of a box. I enquired at Great James's-street, he did once lodge there.

MR. BRODRICK contended that it was clear that the prisoner had a special possession of the property, and that a subsequent taking could not be a felony, and cited 2 d. vol. East's Reports, chap. 16, sec. 109, p. 682 and 683; also, 1st. vol. Hawkins's Reports, chap. 33, sec. 2.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ, and called on him, he gave me them to repair; I took them home, and on the 6th of October, I had a letter to inform me a bill was unpaid, which I was arrested on; I pawned the property to take it up, but intended to redeem it.

NOT GUILTY .

173. THOMAS PATES was again indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , two watches, value 10 l. , the goods of William Perkins .

WILLIAM PERKINS . I am weaver , and live in the Curtain-road. I first knew the prisoner on the 12th of March,he told me he was a watch-maker, and would be obliged to me for employment; I said I was satisfied with my own watch-maker, but would give him a turn, this was on the 16th of April; and a few days after he came to my house, I gave him a watch to clean; he kept a very respectable looking shop at the time, in St. Swithin's-lane , with watches in it; mine was a silver watch, worth 4 l. or 5 l.; he brought it home in about a fortnight. I had promised him two more to clean; I paid him for the one and gave him the other two to clean; this was about the 12th of May, I never saw him again till he was in custody I had no suspicion for three months, but being in the neighbourhood one day, I saw the shop altered for another business, and him gone. I never gave him leave to pawn them; if I supposed he would have pawned them, he should not have had them; one was a gold repeater, worth twenty guineas, and the other was a gilt watch.

Cross-examined by MR. ALLEY. Q. Your acquaintance commenced by his rendering you a kindness - A. Yes, I gave him a turn out of gratitude, I do not know that they wanted repairing.

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH . I am a pawnbroker, and live in Crown-street, Finsbury. On 12th of May, a gold repeater was pawned for Mr. Clark, of Holloway-mount, by Thomas Pates for 6 l.; I do not recollect who pawned it; the duplicate produced is the one I gave the person; Mr. Perkins claimed it a fortnight ago.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

H. R. BRICKERIDGE . I did not find the duplicate on him, but received it from Mr. Richards, of Bridgewater-square; he said that the duplicate of Perkins' watch was at Richards's.

Mr. Alley rose the same objection as Mr. Brodrick.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Richards persuaded me to take a shop in the City; my friends promised me money to commence business, but did not fulfil that promise. I was obliged to have goods on credit, and sold them on credit; sea captains frequented the shop, I took their bills, which were dishonoured. I was arrested for 22 l. and pawned the watch to give the officers money to leave the house till the afternoon, when I should have the money. I could not redeem it, and next day had an execution in my house, I gave Richards the duplicates, hoping to redeem them, but never had it in my power.

The Jury found the prisoner GUILTY . Aged 27.

But that he did not intend to steal them at the time they were delivered to him. - This case was reserved for the consideration of the twelve Judges, on the point argued.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

174. KNIUD HANSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of November , one shirt, value 2 s. , the goods of Simon Simpson .

SIMON SIMPSON . I am a mariner , and live at Ratcliff cross . In July I went to sea, leaving this shirt in my chest, at Mrs. Lowry's - I returned in November, found my chest broken open, and several things gone.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I found the shirt locked up in the prisoner's chest, at Lowry's, he said he bought that and another at Sweden.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

175. MARY ANN DAVIS and HANNAH HOUTCHINGS were indicted for stealing, on the 7th December , twenty yards of poplin, value 3 l. the goods of Edward Evans , privately in his shop .

JOHN PEARSON . I am shopman to Edward Evans , linen draper , High-street, Clerkenwell . On the 7th of December, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I came in, and found the apprentice shewing the prisoners some stuffs; and while he went to the other counter, the poplin was taken; I saw it sticking out from under Houtchings' dress, and detained them; she delivered it up before the officer came, and asked Mr. Evans to let her off.

RICHARD GOULD . I am the apprentice. The prisoners came in together, and asked to see some plaid stuffs, which were in the window, they did not like them; I shewed them a purple poplin, they then asked for figured stuffs. I went to the end of the counter, leaving the poplin there, and as I returned, Davis held up the stuff before the other, as if she was looking at the pattern, and when she put it down I missed the poplin. After looking at a great many stuffs, and buying nothing, they were going out; but Mr. Evans stopped them, and said he missed a piece of poplin; they were willing to be searched. I went for an officer.

EDWARD EVANS . I came into the shop and was going to let the prisoners out, and request they would never come again, as they-never bought any thing; when the apprentice said he suspected them - I sent for an officer, but before that, Houchings gave me the poplin from under her arm.

DAVIS'S Defence. The things were too dear, we were going out, when they missed the poplin; Houchin picked it off the ground and gave it him.

HOUCHIN'S Defence. I have no more to say.

HOUCHIN - GUILTY . Aged 16.

DAVIS - GUILTY . Aged 19.

Confined One Year .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

176. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of November , one fixture (i.e.) one copper, value 5 s., belonging to Thomas Balme , and fixed to his dwelling-house .

THOMAS BALME . I am a tobacco pipe maker , and live at Mile-end . On the 28th of November, about seven o'clock in the morning, this copper was missed from the wash-house adjoining the dwelling-house, the key of the stable was missed at the same time.

JOHN HODGSON . I am a pipe maker. On the 28th of November, about seven o'clock in the morning, I went to work at Balme's I left the key in the stable door, and went up the shop, and in a quarter of an hour, I missed the key, looked round, and found the copper unfixed and gone. The stable joins the wash-house.

CHARLES BOLTON . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 21st of November, about twenty minutes past seven o'clock in the morning, I came out of my house in Dog-row,and saw the prisoner and another pass, the prisoner had the copper on his head; I thought he had not come honestly by it, and followed them five or six hundred yards, and got in front of them, the other man said, "What do you want." I said I am an officer, and suspect you have not come honestly by this copper - I wish to know where you got it from, and where are you going to take tt;" the other said to the prisoner, "Never mind any b - y officer, you follow me" - he walked off, I seized the prisoner with the copper, and gave him to a person to hold, and followed the other, and when I seized him, he threw a ripping chisel at me, and knocked me down, and ran off, I could not pursue any further; he was secured, and brought back to me; I found the key of the stable in his pocket, with some skeleton keys; I handcuffed them both together, and within one hundred yards of the watch-house, he slipped his hands out, and escaped. I was wounded in the head and temples with the chisel, and could not follow. My house is five minutes walk from the prosecutor's.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

CHARLES BOULTON . He said nothing of the kind.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going a long Whitechapel, and met a man, who asked me to carry the copper; the officer stopped me, I never resisted; the other man was brought back - I said "You employed me master, and you must clear me."

GUILTY . Aged. 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

177. GEORGE BURROWS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December , one shift, value 2 s. , the goods of Samuel Whitney .

SARAH WHITNEY . I am the wife of Saul Whitney , and live at Crouch end . On the 6th of December, I missed a shift, which hung in the garden by the back door; my child cried out, "Mother, a man has taken the shift off the line, and is putting it into his hat." I ran out, and saw somebody running up the road. The officer stopped the prisoner.

THOMAS IZARD . I am an officer. On the 6th of December, I was informed a shift was stolen, and on Crouch-end hill I caught hold of the prisoner, and asked where he was going, he said to Golden-lane; he had the shift tied round him like an apron, quite wet.

WILLIAM DAVENPORT . I was with Izard, and took the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. That man would swear the ball of St. Paul's was only five yards round. I have no witnesses, I want none.

GUILTY . Aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

178. THOMAS BELCHER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , fifteen wine glasses, value 15 s. , the goods of John Langdon .

JOHN CLARK . I am porter to John Langdon , an auctioneer , who lives in Piccadilly . On the 1st. of November, about six o'clock in the evening, we had a sale of wine; my business was to supply the Company with samples, and observing the glasses decrease, my suspicion fell on the prisoner, we stopped him as he went out; I took fourteen glasses from his pockets.

ROBERT WEAVINGS . I am a porter. I stopped the prisoner as he was going out, and found the glasses on him.

THOMAS GLASSBORO . I searched him and found another glass on him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

The prisoner pleaded extreme poverty.

GUILTY . Aged 65.

Fined One Shilling, and Discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

REX v. SMITH and MARSDEN. - On the second day of the Sessions, MR. JUSTICE BAYLEY delivered the decision on the above case. The prisoners were indicted for stealing 6696 lbs. of nux vomica, described in the indictment as the property of Joseph Marsh and others. - (Vide 8th Sess. - Thorp Mayor, page 430.)

The Judges took two points to consider, viz.. whether it could be considered a robbery, when William Marsden , the original proprietor, concurred in the exchange, and the prisoners were acting in concurrence with him; or, in other words, whether the owner of the goods, in acting with them, could be considered as stealing this property. Another question was, whether it could be considered as a robbery, when the intention was not so much to defraud Marsh and Co. as to cheat and defraud the King. Both questions have been carefully considered, and the majority of the Judges are of opinion, that this is a larceny, and that the prisoners are properly found guilty of stealing the property, describing it to be the property of Marsh and Co. A person may have a temporary and a special ownership in particular property; one man may be the general owner, and the other special owner for a particular purpose, and if the general owner steal from the special owner, the law considers it as a theft. In this case it is clear that Marsh and Co., for a special purpose, were temporary owners of the property, till it should reach the ship; they had great interest at stake, and were liable to the forfeiture of their bond, if it did not reach its destination; and any one stealing the property during that interval, would be liable to be indicted for stealing it, as their property, and it would be a robbery, though the general owner concurred in the robbery; they had no right to divest Marsh and Co. of the possession of the property at that time. This point is not entirely new, for the question whether the general owner of goods could be guilty of a theft by stealing them from the special owner, is laid down in Mr. Justice Foster's Reports, p. 123 and 124. That a man under some accusations may be guilty of larceny in stealing his property. Therefore the objection, that Wm. Marsden coneurred in the theft of the property, does not (on the authority just referred to) make it the less a theft; and it is not the less a theft, because the intent was not so much to cheat and defraud Marsh and Co., as to cheat and defraud the Crown. If the object was to steal, it is not the less theft, because the principal object was to effect some other fraudulent purpose. In this case, therefore, inasmuch as Marsh and Co. had the dominion over the goods from the time they were on board their lighter till they reached the ship, and as the prisoners, together with Wm. Marsden, the original owner, concurred in stealing it from the possession of Marsh and Co. against their will and knowledge, they took the property animo furandi, for in point of fact, they did steal it from Marsh and Co. and all the consequences of theft attach on it. This is the opinion of the majority of the Judges, and the reasons are from my own opinion of the subject. The Judges are of opinion that the prisoners are properly convicted, and sentence will be passed at the usual period."