Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 02 October 2014), October 1816 (18161030).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 30th October 1816.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice Hall, in the Old Bailey, ON WEDNESDAY the 30th of OCTOBER 1816, and following days; BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN HORT-HAND BY J. A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON: PRINTED AND PUBLISHED(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD Esq. Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir John Graham , bart one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Mr. Justice Dallas, one of the Judges of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis bart. Sir Richard Carr Glynn , bart. Sir John Perring . bart. Aldermen of the said City; Sir John Silvester , bart. Recorder of the said City: Sir Charles Flower bart. Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq: Aldermen of the said City, and Newman Knowlys esq. Common Serjeant of the said City. His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John William Norway ,

Samuel Burton ,

William Gilbert ,

James Bramwell ,

George Nightingale ,

William Price ,

Charles Shuttleworth .

John Gardiner ,

William Simms ,

John Thorn ,

Thomas Russell ,

Henry Webster .

First Middlesex Jury.

Edward Tuck ,

David Witten ,

William Goslin ,

William Evans ,

James Clark ,

William Halt ,

Peter Dickison ,

James Clarke ,

James Eastow ,

William Bigley ,

Robert Rose ,

John Willage .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Collins ,

Thomas Leachman ,

Thomas Goddins ,

John Archer ,

Ralph Wallock ,

William Beer ,

John Adlington ,

Thomas Warton ,

Daniel Hayward ,

William Carter ,

Richard Bates ,

Nathaniel Leath .

Third Middlesex Jury.

William Marshall ,

John Worster ,

Charles Davis ,

Henry Stephens ,

Thomas Boucher ,

John Simpson ,

Thomas Griffiths ,

Henry Tindale ,

Benjamin Webbe ,

James Saunder ,

Joseph Lidbetter ,

John Smith .

1098. ANDREW SAVAGE and BENJAMIN SAVAGE were indicted for feloniously disposing of and putting away divers false. forged notes, purporting to be the notes of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, for the payment of 1l. each, knowing the same to be forged, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

JOHN CHARLES . I was taken up upon a charge of having forged notes in my possession, on the 17th of August. After that, I was employed by Mr. Westwood, the clerk to the Solicitor of the Bank of England, to detect the prisoners in selling forged notes. By his desire, I introduced a person to the prisoners. Before I introduced that person, I had dealings with the prisoners respecting forged bank notes several times. I obtained some from them at the price ten shillings and sixpence of the prisoner, and the old sixpence was allowed to them. I paid them ten shillings and sixpence for a one-pound to ged Bank of England note; I understood that they had the sixpence for themselves for their trouble. Between the time that I was apprehended and the time. I introduced a person by Mr. Westwood's desire, I dealt with them five times and get from the nineteen notes. I introduced Giffiths to them on the 29th of August, at the Crown and Cushion in London Wall , they were not there when we first went in, but they came to us; they came there by an appointment which they had made with me the say before. I had spoken of Giffithes before; that is, I had told them that I had a friend that would be glad it they would serve as well as myself. The prisoner Andrew Savage , asked me if that was the friend I spoke of; I told him, yes. He then asked me if I could he answerable for his conduct I asked him, did he think that I would bring him if I could not. He asked me how many I wanted; I told him I wanted four for myself, and two for my friend; then I gave him the money; I gave him two pounds two shillings myself, and I asked Richard Griffiths to give me his money, and he gave it to me, and I gave it to Andrew Savage ; I gave him the two pounds two shillings for my own four, and the one pound one shilling for Griffths' two. I took the money from Griffiths, and Griffiths said that will buy me two I don't doubt but that which Griffiths said to me, and I said to Griffiths, was loud enough for the prisoners to hear; we all sat together. When Andrew Savage had received the money, both prisoners went out together; they said, they should not be long; it was not exceeding three quarters of an hour before they returned; but how much less, I can't say.

Q. When they returned, did they bring any thing with them. and which of them - A. Yes, Andrew Savage gave me six forged one pound Bank of England notes. We came out of the public-house, and then we parted.

Q. What did you do with the notes you received - A. I put them into my right hand small clothes pocket; I delivered them to Mr. Westwood the next morning. I am most undoubtedly sure that the notes I delivered to Mr. Westwood were the same that I received from the prisoner Andrew Savage . I met the prisoners again on the 30th of August, at the Crown and Cushion, in London Wall; Griffiths was with me at that time, and two other persons were in company besides the Savages on that day. I agreed to purchase six for myself, and Griffiths agreed to purchase two for himself. I gave the money at the same rate as before.

Was any money-paid by any other persons at the same time - A. Yes, the other two also paid money for the purpose of buying forged notes. We paid the money to the prisoner Andrew Savage ; he counted it, and gave it to Benjamin, who took a white handkerchief out of his hat, and wrapped what I had given him, and what Griffiths had given him, and what the other two persons had given him, all in seperate parcels; he first put one in the middle of the handkerchief, then another, and wrapped them up in four separate rolls of the handkerchief; I think he kept it in his hand, and he carried it away with him; they went away together. I don't know particularly how long it was before they returned; but I know they were not an hour away.

Q. On that day did they bring any thing back with them - A. Nothing more than the money which I, Griffiths, and the other persons had given to them. Benjamin Savage said, there can be nothing done to night: we did not ask why; but we waited a little while longer, and drank together, and then came out; he returned the money to us all; as soon as we had been in the house a little together, Benjamin came out with me and Griffiths to the door, and told us if we wanted any more, to meet him on the next night at the Fountain in the Minories, between seven and eight; that would be the 31st of August. I communicated that to Mr. Westwood.

Q. Before you went to your appointment, did you meet any persons - A. Yes; I met with Griffiths, and was searched in the investigator's office in the Bank of England, by Mr. Foy, and his brother, in the presence of Mr.Christmas and Mr. Griffiths, and I was supplied with money for the purpose of purchasing notes to the amount of three pounds three shillings in silver, and Griffiths was supplied with one pound one shilling. I had only a few halfpence about me beside this money. I went with Griffiths in the afternoon to the sign of the Fountain in the Minories; we went first to the sign of the Grave Maurice with Mr. Christmas and Mr. Thomas Foy . Then we were followed by Mr. Christmas and Mr. Thomas Foy to the Fountain in the Minories; Christmas and Foy did not go in. Grithths and I went in, Foy and Christmas remaining out. When we went in, there was the prisoner, Andrew Savage , and another man; a little while after that, the prisoner Benjamin Savage came in, and sat down by Griffiths,and stopped there a little while, and then asked me how many I wanted; I told him six, and gave him the money; then I told Grffiths to give him his money, and he gave him the one pound note and the shilling.

Q. Was any thing said about the former evening - A. Yes; Benjamin said to me and Griffiths, it is a pity you did not stop a little longer last night, as Tom ran home and came back with them. I considered Tom to be the man who served them with them. Then they both went out. Andrew Savage came back first. In a very short time, Benjamin came in. Then Benjamin gave me my six and be gave Griffiths his two. When I had received them, I put them into my right hand waistcoat pocket; as soon as we came out of the house, I delivered mine to Richard Griffiths . Then we were all standing together, and Benjamin said to me, if you want any more, meet me at the White Swan to-morrow in Coleman-street, at twelve o'clock. I told Benjamin Savage if we wanted any more we would call; I did not expect we should, but if we did we should know where to find him. We then went to the first public-house, and there the five of us had something to drink, the two prisoners, Griffiths, I, and another person. After we parted with the prisoners, we went to the Grave Maurice in Whitechapel-road. We found there Mr. Thomas Foy and Mr. Charles Christmas . I had previously delivered my notes to Griffiths, and he delivered them to Mr. Foy. We next met the prisoners on the 22nd of September.

THE ATTORNEY GENERAL. My Lord, we are now coming to the subject of the present indictment.

Q. Now, before you went to this meeting, were you again searched - A. I was; I can't tell by whom but Mr. Christmas was present. I was furnished with a one-pound Bank of England note, and one-pound two in silver; Griffiths was furnished with a one-pound Bank of England note, and one shilling, and then we went to the Fountain in the Minories, as we had appointed on the Saturday night; as we had not come on the Sunday to Coleman-street. Accordingly Griffiths, and I went to the Fountain, at twelve o'clock at noon; I believe Mr. Christmas followed us, and if I am not mistaken, one of the Mr. Foys, but I am not certain which, if either. We went there at twelve o'clock and stopped there until about three minutes after one; then we went away from there; neither of the prisoners were there when we went, nor did either of them come while we stopped. We then went to the Old Rum Puncheon, in the Minories, commonly called the Gully Hole, in Rose and Crown-court; it is generally called so, but I believe it was the Rum Puncheon. When we went there. neither of the prisoners were there; but we stopped a little while, and then they both came in. When they came in, we told them where we had been, and one of them, but I can't say which but both were present, said, there could be nothing, done until about eight o'clock at night. A little after seven, I, Griffiths, Andrew Savage, and Benjamin Savage went close to the church at Aldgate, and we staid near the watchhouse, and the prisoner Andrew Savage asked me how many I wanted, and I told him four; and I gave him a genuine one pound Bank of England note and one pound two in silver, which was the money that I received. Then I saw Griffiths deliver him his one pound note and his shilling.

Q. To which - A. To Andrew. When Andrew received the money of us both, he said to Benjamin, then take them somewhere where you know, and he took us to the Coach and Horses in Northumberland-alley, Fenchurch-street. I can't say rightly how long we staid there, but I think it was an hour before Andrew returned, and when he returned he said, my darling boys, you are enjoying yourselves. Then he gave me my four notes, and I put them into my right hand waistcoat pocket. I then saw him give Griffiths two, but they were not separated, and there might be only one; there were two I believe. Griffiths put them into his left hand pantaloon pocket I believe. We stood there a little while together, and then we all four came out and another man with us. As soon as I got to the door, I gave my four notes to Richard Griffiths ; that was before I parted with the prisoners, but I believe they did not see me give them to Griffiths, but we were altogether. We then went to the top of Northumberland-alley, and went to a wine vaults nearly opposite, if not quite, to the India House.

RICHARD GRIFFITHS . I am a gun maker by business; that is what I was brought up to. I know the two prisoners at the bar very well. I was employed by Mr. Westwood the Solicitor for the Bank of England to go and buy forged notes of the two Savages, in company with John Charles . I first saw them on the 29th of August, at the sign of the Crown and Cushion in London Wall. When we went there the prisoners were not in the house at all, but we saw them in about a quarter of an hour after; there were two persons in company with them, one named Allcock, and another named Welch. We then sat down and called for some beer, and drank together.

Q. Were you made known to the prisoners at that time - A. Yes, I had been introduced to them by John Charles .

Q. Did anything pass between you two about the prisoners - A. Yes; Charles asked me to give him my money; that was in the hearing and presence of the prisoners; we were all in one box together. I gave him my money to give to Andrew Savage, to purchase two forged one pound Bank notes; I had one pound, and a shilling, which I had received of Mr. Westwood. A little after, both the Savages went out; on their return they sat down, and Andrew Savage spoke close to Charles's ear, so that I could not hear. I then saw Andrew Savage give Charles some paper.

Q. Did you afterwards see Charles give anything to Mr. Westwood - A. Yes; the next morning I saw Charles give Mr. Westwood six forged Bank of England notes. On the 30th, Charles and I were in company together most part of the day. In the morn-of that day. I had received one pound one from Mr. Westwood, and Charles in my presence received I believe three pounds three shillings in silver; three-shilling pieces, and eighteen-penny pieces; theywere all marked by Mr. Foy. In the evening of that day, I met the prisoner at the White Swan, in Long Alley, Moore Fields; I joined company with them there; I stayed there about an hour; John Charles and Andrew Savage went out there, leaving me and Benjamin together. In a short time afterwards Benjamin Savage told me he did not like the appearance of two men that came into the house while they were gone, so we left it, and went to the Crown and Cushion, in London Wall. When we got there, we found Andrew Savage , John Charles, and a person named Welch. We joined company with them, and went into the same box. Benjamin Savage there asked me how many I wanted; I told him two; I gave him a one pound Bank of England note and a shilling, which I had received from Mr. Westwood. Then I saw Charles give him three pounds three shillings in silver; three shilling pieces and eighteen penny pieces. Benjamin Savage then took off his hat, and took out a white handkerchief which he had in his hat, and wrapped the money up in the handkerchief in separate parcels; then he went away. In about a quarter of an hour he returned, and said,

"nothing could be done to night;" and I saw him give Charles his money back, and he gave me mine. Then we came to the door along with John Charles and Benjamin Savage.

Q. Did you make any appointment to meet again - A. Yes; Benjamin told us to meet him at the Fountain in the Minories, the next evening.

Q. Did you go to the Fountain - A. Yes; in company with John Charles . They were not there; they had not come in. We waited about an hour; then we went out and went to the Old Rum Puncheon in Rose and Crown Court. That had not been mentioned as a place of meeting; but Charles said he thought he could find them there.

Q. What day are you speaking of - A. Saturday.

Q. Did you go to this other public-house - A. Yes; we went to the Rum Poncheon; we did not find them there, but they came in, in a short time; both came in. They said nothing could be done until eight o'clock that evening.

Q. Did you hear either of the prisoners say any thing about not waiting the night before - A. No; I did not.

Q. Did you part that night - A. Yes; we went down to the Crown and Cushion first; that was at night, at about eight o'clock. We were with them there; we went thence to the Fountain.

Q. What took place at the Fountain - A. When we went in, Andrew Savage was sitting there.

Q. Where did you meet on the Saturday - A. At the Fountain.

Q. Nothing having been done on the Friday, you were to meet on the Saturday - A. Yes.

Q. Where did Charles go on the Saturday - A. To the Fountain.

Q. Were you to have met them - A. Yes; it was so agreed, so we went there on the Saturday at about half past seven o'clock.

Q. Before you went to the Fountain, had any money been given to Charles - A. Yes; I believe a one pound note, and one pound two shillings in silver.

Q. Had any money been given to you - A. Yes; one pound one shilling, Mr. Christmas gave it to me. I am not certain whether he gave the money to Charles.

Q. Where did you and Charles go to - A. To the Fountain, at about half past seven in the evening; and saw Andrew Savage there, and Welch. I had three or four shillings besides the money I had received from Mr. Christmas, to pay expences. Charles had a three shilling piece to pay his expences.

Q. Now you went there and saw Andrew Savage. Now what passed - A. A short time afterwards. Benjamin came in, and he said,

"it was a pity we did not stop ten minutes longer, as Tom ran home last night, and came back with some." Benjamin then sat down by me; he asked me how many I wanted; I told him two; and then John Charles told me to give him my money; I gave him the one pound note and a shilling, which I had received from Mr. Christmas. I saw Charles give him his money; I believe three pounds. Then Benjamin went out, and he was gone about half an hour. and then came back. He sat down with me; he gave me two one pound forged bank notes, and I saw him give Charles his. He gave him six; I put the notes which I had got from him into my left hand pantaloon pocket; and I saw Charles put his into his right hand waistcoat pocket. In a few minutes we all came out together. Benjamin Savage told us, if we wanted any more on the Sunday, to meet him at the White Swan public-house, in Colman-street, at twelve o'clock. Then we drank together; we went into Aldgate together, and into a public-house opposite Aldgate Church; soon after we parted; we had half a pint of gin at that house, and then parted. Charles and I came away together. Charles gave me six forged one pound notes. He gave them to me about five minutes after we came out of the Fountain; he had not been out of my sight from the time he received them, until he gave them to me. He had not been out of my sight from the time he left the Bank of England, until those notes were first in his possession. He had been searched before he went away; he was searched by Mr. Foy, in my presence. The six notes I received from Charles, I put into my right hand pantaloon pocket, and went then to the Grave Maurice, and met Mr. Foy and Mr. Christmas there, and gave the six notes I received from Charles, and my own two, to Mr. Thomas Foy . I marked those notes after I gave them to Mr. Foy, but before I lost sight of them.

Q. Now look at these two - A. Those are the two which I purchased.

Q. Now look at these six - A. I will; those are the six which I got from Charles. We were to meet again on the 2nd of September; we were to meet on the Monday at the Fountain; that was agreed if we did not meet on the Saturday; we were to meet at nine o'clock on the Monday morning at the Fountain; Charles and I went. I had a one pound note and a shilling, and three or four shilling in silver. I had that money from Mr. Christmas. Some money was given to Charles also, in my presence; I believe a one pound note and one pound two in silver; I saw he was searched first. We went from there to the Fountain; we got there between nine and ten o'clock;we did not see the prisoners; they did not come there again; I went from there to the Gulley Hole, more property called the Rum Puncheon with John Charles; they were not there when we went in, but they came in shortly afterwards. They then told us nothing could be done until eight o'clock. Then we stopped there with them all day; and then the two Savages, Charles, and I went to Aldgate, close to the church, where Andrew Savage asked me how many I wanted; I told him two; and I saw Charles give Andrew Savage some money. I gave him my money also; I gave him a one pound note and a shilling; the same I received from Mr. Christmas. Andrew Savage then told Benjamin, to take us to he knew where. He took us to the Coach and Horses, in Northumberland-alley. Fenchurch street ; we sat down together, and in about three quarters of an hour, Andrew Savage came in; he sat down, and gave me two forged Bank of England notes; at the time he gave me those, Benjamin was present; we were all together. He gave John Charles four notes; I put my two in my left hand pantaloon pocket as before; Charles put his into his right hand waistcoat pocket, and after we came out, Charles gave me the four pound notes; I put them into my right hand pantaloon pocket, away from the two I had. From the time Charles received those notes until the time he gave them to me, he was not out of my sight. We then went as far as the India House, and drank there together, opposite the India House. I left John Charles with the two Savages, and went to the Grave Maurice immediately from them, and gave my two notes, and Charles's four to Mr. Christmas. I kept them separate all the time; I had them, and marked them those I received from the elder Savage.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS I am Investigator of bank notes. I have seen Griffiths and Charles in company. Charles and Griffiths came to our office, Charles was searched there, and was Griffiths so as to ascertain that he had no bank notes about him. He was supplied with money there to the amount of three pounds three shillings; I gave that money to Foy, who had previously marked it; he gave Charles three pounds three shillings, and Griffiths one pound one shilling I am not confounding two different periods. After they had got this, they went to the Fountain in the Minories followed by me and Thomas Foy. We kept at a distance to avoid being observe to be of the party. They both went in we remained in the street some time, we were there for about an hour or more, and they did not come. We returned to the office but did not see any thing of them; about ten o'clock I saw Griffiths; he delivered to me the notes which he had purchased; he marked them before I took them they are all foegeries. On the 2nd I was to watch were Charles and Griffiths went to. On the 31st, I followed them to the Fountain in the Minories at some distance behind; this was about half past seven in the evening; I waited there for about ten minutes; Andrew Savage then came out from the Fountain. He went across the Minories, and went to the Coach and Horses public house, in Northumberland-alley; I followed him; I waited under the archway for about ten minutes whilst he was in the public house; he came out accompanied by a man, a stranger to me; he came out, and went into Jury-street, and under the East India company wall, they were met by Benjamin Savage; they all three stopped together a few minutes, and then they went to the Bunch of Grapes.

Q. What did they appear to be doing before that A. They appeared to be exchanging something from one another; then they went all three to the Bunch of Grapes; Benjamin Savage gave this strange man some money.

Q. Is he the person that you now know by the name of Tom - A. yes.

THOMAS FOY . Corroborated the testimony of the last witness.

ANDREW SAVAGE GUILTY , DEATH aged 42.

BENJAMIN SAVAGE GUILTY , DEATH aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1099. THOMAS CANE was indicted for a like offence .

JOHN CHARLES . I was employed by the Bank to detect the prisoner. I met him on the 5th of September, but not to purchase any of him. I also met him on the Tuesday, and I met him on the next Thursday; the first of these times, I met him in Moorfields; he and his wife were together; he promised to meet me again that night in Cloth-fair, and I went, but could not find him. On the Sunday morning I met him at the Two Bells in White Chapel. On the 19th, I met him in the Tower at Artillery lane; and on the 12th, I was to have met him there but I met him as I was coming out.

Q. did you make any appointment to meet him any day after the Thursday-A. yes, I made an appointment to meet him at night o'clock on the sunday which was the 15th, at the George near White Chaple Church . I communicated that appointment to Mr. Christmas and to Mr. Foy; I was searched before I went there by Mr. John Foy and Charles Jefferies; Mr. John Foy gave me eight one pound good notes, and two pounds in silver, and Mr. Christmas gave me a shilling to spend. Charles Jefferies and Mr. Cox followed me. Both went into the house after I got into the house; I found the prisoner there sitting with two women, one of whom I believe to be his wife. We asked each other how we did first, then the box where we sat was full of company pretty well, for Mr. Cox sat in the same box, and I believe there were two other persons. The first question he asked me, after we had asked each other how we did was whether my friend was handy, that is near at hand, I said yes, he was at no great distance; because he said I have brought you forty; I had had a conversation with him before about a friend. After he had said this, I said I was not prepared for forty then, as I thought proper not to bring my friend with me; I said I would take twenty to night and twenty in the morning; and I asked him if that would do, and he said it would. Now you give me thing meaning the money; I gave him two pound in silver, and eight one pound notes. He said I should have one out of every score; he said it collectively but I perfectly understood that he meant one forged note in every twenty. Then we all cameout of the house together; I mean the prisoner and I and the two women.

Q. did you see anything as you come out of the house - A. yes; I saw him stop to speak to his wife at the door, and said to me go a little higher up to the Church, and wait for me half a minute. I did not see anything while he was speaking to his wife, I was to go towards the church; I went about a dozen yards; he came up to me near the church; he then gave me a roll of paper, and said here is a nice little cartridge for you; I put it in my pocket; we then went on together; we went down Bricklane . the prisoner said," I have brought some of them things as I was talking to you about," and then he produced a three shilling token, and asked me to ring it, and I rang it in my hand. Then we went to a cookshop window to look at the impression, to see if it was not a very good one; then he gave me an eighteenpenny piece, and I looked at that also. I gingled them as we were going along, and it rolled upon the pavement; then we went on into Union-street, and there we were taking together, and then Mr. Christmas came up to me and took hold of me, and Mr. Foy and Mr. Jefferson took hold of the prisoner. They took us to a wine vaults in Shoreditch, and Mr. Foy searched the prisoner.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . On the 15th I saw Charles in the morning; he was searched in the afternoon. John and Thomas Foy , Charles Jeffereys , Mr. Cox, and myself were present when he was searched; he had only a few halfpence, about him. He had seven pounds in Dark notes, and three pounds in Silver given him, and I gave him a shilling to spend. Being furnished with this money, he went from the house where he was searched, (the Gray Maurice ) and was followed by Mr. Cox, Jeffreys, Foy, and myself. This was about eight o'clock in the evening; I did not see them go into a public-house as there were people, but we went opposite the George public-house in Whitechapel Road. John Foy waited with me, and Thomas Foy was close by. We were there about half an hour when the prisoner came out; two women were also with him. At the door he stopped, and gave something to a woman, who I understood was his wife; he then went on; Charles was just before, and he joined him; Charles came out with him; but had gone on a few paces. The prisoner joined company with Charles by the wall of Whitechapel Church; I did not see what became of the woman; Jefferey's was following the prisoner, and Charles and John Foy, and myself were close behind. They crossed over into Brick-lane together, talking all the time. They stopped at the window of a cookshop in Brick-lane, and I saw the prisoner give Charles something at the window. They then went on, and as they crossed to the wall of Spital Fields Church, they both stooped down and sounded something. I heard that; they then proceeded down Church-street, towards Bishopsgate; they stopped at nearly the end of-street, to speak together. Foy and myself crossed immediately; the prisoner was taken into custody by Foy and Jeffrey's, and I took Charles. We then went to a house in Bishopsgate-street, near Norton Falgate. They were taken in, and the prisoner was searched. He was first asked by Foy, who, and what he was, and what he was doing with Charles; he denied all knowledge of him, and said he never saw him before. There were found on his person, a small pocket book, twelve shillings and sixpence in silver, and a small key. In fact, there were three keys; one was of a street door; Foy then searched Charles, and on searching him, he found this roll of paper in his pocket, and I saw it found on him. Charles was asked where he got them from; and he said from the prisoner. He was asked for what purpose, and he said he had bought them. Foy again asked the prisoner two or three several times, where he lived; who he was; what he was; and what he had been doing with Charles. He refused to give any account of himself whatever, and still persisted in denying all knowledge of Charles. Upon Charles saying that the prisoner gave them to him, I saw the notes taken from Charles; I marked them; they are all forgeries, and I have the same observations to make with respect to them, that I made with respect to the others.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. I searched Charles; I searched him in such a manner as to be certain that he had no roll of paper about him; I heard the account of these witnesses, and that is correct as far as came within my observation. During all the time I was following Charles; there was not a possibility of receiving from any person this roll of paper. I produce a pocket book. On Charles I found a paper, which on opening, contained twenty forged notes; they were on a small roll, and tied up in the paper. I asked him where he got it, and he said, "from that man," pointing to the prisoner. I asked him for what purpose, and he said he bought them. The prisoner did not then say any thing to it; but I asked him where he got them from; and he said he knew nothing about them; I asked him what he knew of this man, meaning Charles; and he said he never saw him before. I said, you must know him; and he said, "no, he did not, for he had never spoken to him in his life. I said, that can't be, for you were speaking to him when I took you into custody, this moment. He said," he was not." I said, what is your name, and where do you live. He said, "he should not give an account of himself." I said, you must; that my name was Foy, and that I was a police officer, and he was suspected to be a seller of forged notes, and if he did not say who he was, I should state that in my evidence against him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1100. ANN WOODMAN was indicted for the like offence .

JOHN CHARLES . I was taken up on suspicion of having forged bank notes in my possession. I was taken up twice, The last time on the 23rd of September. I believe I was discharged. After that, I was employed under the solicitor for the Bank of England, to detect the prisoner at the bar. I was employed by Mr. Westwood to detect as many as I knew. I met the prisoner at the bar, in companywith other persons, on the 15th of September. I met her at the sign of the George public house, near Whitechapel church.

Q. do you happen to know whether that person had been taken up - A. I certainly knew that he had been taken up.

Q. had you any conversation with her on that day about forged notes - A. I believe I had.

Q. what was it - A. I am not certain; it was not particular. I did not make any appointment with her she made an appointment with me; she told me if she heard any news she would call on me on the Thursday; if not, on the Friday morning. She did not come. I did not see her afterwards until a person with whom I then lived gave me some information; and in consequence of a message that was left for me, I met her again on the twenty second of September, that was on a Sunday; I believe, at the Pewter Platter in White Lion street, Nortonfalgate, that was on Sunday the twenty second.

Q. was any appointment then made to meet on the following day - A. yes; I was to meet her at nine o'clock the next evening the twenty third; she told me that we were to meet at the Three Tunns; I told her I did not know the Three Tuns she described the way to me; she said if you come up to the top of the street by the Jews chappel, and turn to your right hand, the first public house you come to is the Three Tunns she described to me the place where we were to meet; that was the place I was to meet her at

Q. what were you to meet for - A. I had told her on the twenty second, that I wanted twenty; she answerd that I was to tell her exactly how many I wanted, and she would not bring any more with her than I could take. I told her that I could not be-sure I could take more or not; but I would engage to take twenty.

Q. When you talked of taking twenty, what were you speaking of - A. I was meaning forged notes; we were two well acpuainted with that commodity to mistake each other; we generally talked of them as the thing, or screens, or queer thing. The Three Tunns was the place that I went to, but I found that the house that was the first was on my right, and I went on to White Chapel.

Q. Did you communicate the appointment you had made to any one - A. Yes, to Mr. Christmas, and the peace officers. In consequence of that, I was searched on the Monday, the 23rd, by Mr. John Foy, first, and I believe Mr. Charles Jeffries , afterwards; I had nothing more about me than a few halfpence; two shillings were given me by Mr. Christmas to spend and seven genuine one pound Bank of England notes and three pound in silver, making to the amount of ten pound together; the price I was to give was ten pound for them, that money would purchase twenty. Then I went to the Seven stars in Brick-lane.

Q. Did any of the person who had attended the search go with you - A. Yes; Jefferies went part of the way in company with me; when we got near the place, he drew a little behind, and let me go in first the other followed me I believe at a distance. When I went into the house, I called for a pint of beer; the prisoner came in afterwards; it might be within half an hour, or a little more; she asked me how I did; I said the same to her. Then she made an apology for making the mistake in saying it was the Three Tuns, as she afterwards found out it was the Seven Stars; after that, she asked me to walk a little way; I said most certainly, and we came out to the door; she stopped at the door half a minute, or near, I dare say; there was nothing passed there in particular. We walked from there up Brick-lane; there was no other in company with us two. We walked to the corner of Old Montague-street; in our walk there, we made an appointment to meet on Thursday; the 23rd was a Monday. When we got to the corner of Old Montague-street, we made a stop, but for what, I can't say, it was for nothing in particular. We then went down Old Montague-street , and came and stopped a little past the Cock and Key on the opposite side of the way. When we stopped, she said, is the thing all ready; I said yes; I then gave her seven one-pound Bank of England notes; this was in the street near the Cock and Key. I gave her the notes, and three pounds in silver, the same which I received from Mr. Foy. When she received the money, she said, you devil, why did you not wrap the silver up in the notes; I believe the most part of the silver was in tokens; I then gave her the silver, and she said, she would not be a minute before she returned; she went away; she was not longer than five minutes away, before she returned. When she came back, she gave me the roll of paper, and said, on Thursday night remember. I then put the bundle, or roll, which I suspected to be forged notes into my pocket. She was then going to bid me good night, and I called her then by her name, Mrs. Lawrence; that was the name by which I knew her; I said, won't you go and have something to drink before we part. We went into a public-house, the sign of the Cock and Key; we staid there no longer than while the landlord served us two glasses of gin; I paid for them, and received the change out of a shilling. We did not go above a dozen steps, before we were apprehended; it was before we had got out of the court where the Cock and Key is situated. I made a sign to the officers, to shew them that the dealing had taken place; I dare say I gave them words. Then we were apprehended, both I and the prisoner; that was the third time I was apprehended; I was only apprehended once on a real charge against myself. The officers took me and the prisoner into a house; Christmas and Jefferies took the prisoners; Jefferies also put his arm into my arm, and I made no resistance. They then took us to a house; the prisoner called out murder and robbery, and for assistance when she was apprehended. We were then taken to No. 8, King's Arms Court, kept by a person named Wilson. When we got into the house, Mr. Christmas searched the prisoner. Jefferies also searched her; they did not find anything particular on her; they found some shillings I believe. Mr. Christmas and Jefferies were standing by when I was searched; a roll of paper was found on me, Mr. Christmas took charge of them; he took it out of my pocket, that was the same Ireceived from the prisoner most certainly. Mr. Christmas asked me where I got them from? I said from the prisoner; that was in her presence; I don't know that she made any observation upon it. I belive she was asked what she was doing with me.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am inspector of Bank of England notes. I know the prisoner, and the last witness, Charles. Charles under an authority from me acted under my directions; he was authorised to deal with the prisoner at the bar if possible. I first saw the prisoner on the 15th of September; John and Thomas Foy , two officers, were with me. I saw her at the George public-house, in Whitechapel-road; there were four persons coming out of the house together; the prisoner, and another woman, the prisoner Cann, and the last witness; Cann is the man who was convicted on Saturday. When I say I saw them together, I mean they were conversing together, and spoke to each other as they passed.

Q. What became of them - A. Foy and I followed Cann and Charles, and we apprehended Cann at that time. The prisoner went away at that time.

Q. Did you see the prisoner and Charles together on any subsequent day - A. Yes, on the 18th, the Wednesday following; John Foy was with me; I saw him in Moorfields; I saw the prisoner, Charles, and another person together in Moorfields. At the time they were walking together in Moorfields, I passed them three times; they appeared acquainted, and in conversation together quite familiar. They then went into Broker's-row, opposite the Crown and Cushion London-wall, I followed them, they still continued in company together, and conversing together, and they were conversing together more than ten minutes. I still continued to watch and observe them. They were together half an hour, or better; during the whole of that time, they appeared to be intimate and familiar together. Previous to the 23rd of September, I saw Charles; he made a communication to me. In consequence of that, Charles was searched; I saw him searched, it was at his lodgings; Thomas Foy and Jefferies were present; Jefferies is also an officer; he was thoroughly searched; first by John Foy, and afterwards by Jefferies; he had then a few halfpence on him.

Q. I will ask you was it possible that he could have about him any roll of forged bank notes - A. It was impossible for him to have any thing about him without its being known. I then gave him two shillings to spend; John Foy gave him seven one-pound notes and three pounds in silver.

Q. For what purpose was that given him - A. To purchase twenty forged one-pound notes. We then proceeded to the house where the appointment had been made, the Seven Stars, in Brick-lane; the witness Charles and Jefferies went together; I followed, and the two Foys with me. Charles and Jefferies went in there; I waited close at the door, and the two Foys were near to the place where I was. I waited there for about a quarter of an hour, or rather more, when the prisoner came in company with two men to the door.

Q. What time was this - A. This was after nine o'clock at night. I looked into the public-house; but I could not observe the parties. The man who went in with the prisoner came out in a few minutes afterwards; he came out, and came down Brick-lane. About ten minutes afterwards, the prisoner and Charles came out together; they just stopped at the door, and then went in; Jefferies came out immediately after them. The prisoner and Charles passed me. I heard the prisoner say to Charles, no, my dear, indeed I have not heard of him. They crossed the road, and went on. I was on the opposite side to them all the way. That street won't admit of more than two carriages abreast. They went to Old Montague-street, and Jefferies was following me close behind. They stopped there about a minute, and then went along Old Montague-street; Jefferies and I followed them; we were within three or four yards of them all the way through that street. and they stopped nearly opposite to the Cock and Key public-house, just beyond. The prisoner then left Charles, and went into King's Arms-court, just opposite. I went up to Charles, and spoke to him. I went a short distance, and she came back after a minute or so. Then they crossed over, and went into the Cock and Key; I saw them talking together in the passage of that house. They then came out, and were about parting; I then went over to Charles, and asked him if he had made a purchase, and he said yes. Then the prisoner was endeavouring to get away, when I went up to her; she was going away; she did not apprehend anything at that time as I know of. I went up to her, and took her into custody; I laid hold of her hand; Jefferys at the same time laid hold of Charles. The prisoner called out thieves! and murder! I did not treat her with any violence, only by holding her hand; she called that out several times, and several persons in the court opened their doors; and the prisoner said these men want to rob and murder me. I made a request of one of the persons, and in short, we want into No. 8, Mr. Wilson's, and the prisoner was searched there, and on her were found, fourteen shillings and sixpence in silver, and a small key. I asked her her name, but she refused to give her name; Charles at the same time was present; Jefferies at the same time had hold of him; she refused giving any name or saying where she lived. I then searched Charles; I found in his left hand small clothes pocket twenty one-pound forged notes, they were rolled up in a roll; they were not tied, but were rolled tight up, and there was just a small bit of thread twisted round them I then asked the prisoner her name, a second time; she said her name was Woodman. I also asked her where she lived, and she said, she would not say, as it might disgrace her family. Upon finding these notes on Charles, I asked him where he got them; he said, from that person, pointing to the prisoner. I asked him for what purpose. She denied all knowledge of him; she said she never saw him before; she said she did not know who he was, nor what he was. I asked him for what purpose he had them from her; he said, he bought them from her, and gave her ten pounds for them; in fact, he said, I gave ten pounds for them to that person; she made no reply.

Q. Now I would ask you from the time at which you saw Charles at his lodgings, was there a possibility of his receiving the notes from any other person than the prisoner - A. No, he was not out of my sight, only while he was in the Seven Stars.

Q. From the time of their coming out, until the woman was apprehended, was there any possibility of his receiving them from any one else - A. No. I marked those notes that I took from Charles; I marked them that evening. I look at them; they are all forged, in the paper, and in the hand-writing; and they are forged in every respect; they import to be the signatures of the different persons who are signing clerks; but they are not the hand-writing of those persons; they are all of one stamp.

CHARLES JEFFERIES . I am an officer of the police. I have heard the account given by Mr. Christmas; that account is correct in all its parts.

JOHN FOY . I attended the search of Charles.

Q. Was it possible for him to receive any notes or money from any person between his own lodging and the Seven Stars - A. It was not. After he came out again, I followed him to the corner of Old Montague-street; during the time I watched them, he could not have had any communication with any other person except the prisoner. I was not present when they were apprehended; I lost them for a short time, but got to them again in Whitechapel-road, and the prisoner was then in custody. I searched the prisoner; I told the prisoner she was charged with having sold forged notes. I asked her her name; she said her name was Woodman. So I asked her who the man was she had been drinking with, and she said he was a man she had known about twelve months, and had occasionally called to see her. I asked her whether she met him by appointment or accident that evening, and she said by accident. I asked her how long it was since she had seen him before that evening; and she said some weeks, more than a month. I had seen them in company together on the 18th, in Moorfields. I asked her where she lived, and she would not tell. I had seen her on the 15th and 18th in company with Charles. I had furnished him with ten pounds, seven pounds in notes and three pounds in silver.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1101. CHARLES HAMLET was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a five-pound Bank of England note, the property of Charles Hay Cameron , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES HAY CAMERON . On the 19th of September, I missed a five-pound note; I was then lodging at the New Exchange coffee-house , kept by a person named Price, I had received sixty pounds from my bankers, Sir. Peter Pole and Co.; I received it in three ten-pound notes, four five-pound notes, and the rest in one-pound notes; I put them into a box of my own and locked it, and I am quite sure I did not myself unlock it between the 13th and 19th; I know the prisoner, he was my servent. I moved on the 19th from the coffee-house, and I missed this note after I moved on that day. I went to my chambers in the Temple, and immediately on getting there, I opened my box, and found that one five-pound note was gone. I went on the same day to the coffee-house, to inquire; Mr. Price the master of it made inquiries among his servant s; and one of the servants gave him some information. In consequence of that he gave me some information, and I requested him to go to a certain place and get something; the ship at Charing Cross. He got the note and brought it to me; I took it to my bankers, and I asked him the number of the five-pound notes they had given me, and I found this note was one of them.

JOHN HILL . I keep the Ship, in Charing Cross; I know the prisoner, and have seen him there several times, I remember giving him change of a five-pound note; that was on the 18th or 19th of September. I look at this note, there is 13th 9th upon it. I had no other five-pound note at that time. I am certain this is it.

MR. PARSONS. I am clerk in the house of Pole and Co.; they are bankers. I remember Mr. Camerons receiving some money from me; one of the partners came to me with Mr. Cameron's check, and I paid it; it was for sixty pounds, and drawn by C. H. Cameron; I paid it in three tens, four fives, and ten ones; I took the numbers of the fives, and one of those numbers correspond with the number of the note produced, No. 12413, dated March 13th; I think there can be no doubt that this is one of the five-pound notes paid in payment of Mr. Cameron's check. I took nothing more than the number and date of the note.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite clear of what my master accuses me of. The time I was paid off, I had eleven pounds given me for wages, and I brought eight pounds to London; some was notes and some was silver.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1102. JOHN AGGUS was indicted for a rape .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1103. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Gray , and for feloniously stealing therein, two boots, value 30s. his property .

THOMAS GRAY . On the 7th of October , I was at home between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; my shop door does not open into the street; there is a side door that enters into the shop. I was sitting at breakfast in such a position that I could see the shop door; it was shut, I am sure, and latched. I saw the prisoner enter, I saw him make a scramble at the boots and shoes in the window; he entered by the door. Those goods were bespoke made boots. My son was sitting in the same direction, and said something, and I immediately pursued. I followed him myself; I saw him, and my son said there is a man stealing boots. I saw him take the boots; he went out with them; I pursued him immediately after; I lost sight of him in the pursuit for about aquarter of a minute in my going out of the door; when I regained sight of him, the boots were dropt in the street; they might be not more than ten or a dozen yards from the shop. I looked at them; I picked up one immediately, and my son another; they were mine, and in my shop that day. I know them by the number and name that is within them; together they are worth considerably more than thirty shillings; I should have lost two pairs of boots in point of value; it would render both pairs useless. I now look at the prisoner, and I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM GRAY . I am the son of the last witness. I was with him on the morning in question. I saw a man go through the door; that man was the prisoner; I have no doubt of his being the man. I saw him go out with two boots; I pursued him myself immediately; he dropped them in the street upon my calling stop thief; he was stopt, and I came up. He dropped the boots before that. I am certain I saw him take them, and drop them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along the Strand, and I came past the gentleman's house, and there was a man came out of the door almost violently enough to knock me down, and dropped something, and a young chap was coming after me, and I was running after the man, and I was stopped, so he said, I was the man, and I said, I hope you will forgive me, because I am not the man, and you are wrong.

GUILTY , DEATH aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1104. ALEXANDER AITKIN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Charles Skinner , at about the hour of nine in the night of the 23rd of October , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, a shoe, value 3s. his property .

CHARLES SKINNER . On the night of the 23rd of October, I was standing in my shop, it was about a quarter before nine; I had a light in my shop. I was alarmed by a sudden breaking of my windows; two pairs were broken of my shop window. I went to the door; I saw the prisoner at the bar, I have not the least doubt of his being the man, running across the street; I pursued him; I did not observe him first; I secured him with the assistance of another person, who was in the neighbourhood. After securing him, I brought him back to the shop; while in the shop, a person brought a shoe in, which he picked up in the street; his name is Meridith, and he asked me if it was my property; I said it was. We then, it being near the hour of nine, detained him in the shop until the watch came; then I delivered him up to the watchman. I am sure the panes were not broken before. At the time I took the prisoner, his hands were bleeding very much I believe both of them, but one I am positive of. There was no mark of blood about the window; there is a mark of blood on the shoe.

CHARLES JEFFERIES . I was before the magistrates, and this shoe was delivered to me by Mr. Hicks.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. On the night in question, I had been with a young man from the country, and I was quite inebriated.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1105. EDWARD TURNER was indicted for the wilful murder of John Curtis .

JOHN CURTIS , SEN. I am the father of the young man that lost his life.

RICHARD COOMBE . I was present at the field of battle, on the 22nd of October, at Moulsey Hurst . There was no stage erected; they fought on the ground; there were a great many spectators on the ground. They fought an hour and twenty minutes; each had his seconds to see fair play. I saw the whole of the fight; it ended in Curtis's being quite exhausted. He lay on the ground; in the conclusion of the fight, he was thrown; in that throwing there was nothing that was unfair. Curtis would have continued fighting longer, had it not been for his seconds, who brought him away.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner take any unfair advantage - A. No; I observed very much like forbearance towards the latter end of the fight on his part. When Curtis was very much beaten, about ten minutes before the conclusion of the fight the prisoner for bore very much. While Curtis was lying on the ropes, the prisoner several times could have struck him violent blows, but he held up his hands, and left him as he was; he held up his hands to the public, to see that he would not take any advantage.

Q. Was there any thing in Turner's conduct, which marked a cruelty of temper - A. By no means, very much the reverse; I was present when Curtis was taken off the field; he was carried to the Red Lion, at Hampton. I was with him until he died. I knew the man by sight very well; I was not present when the doctor was there. I found him in bed when I went over. I omitted telling one thing; that in the third round, before the battle finished, having a knowledge of Curtis; I went to him, and begged of him to leave off fighting. He told me there was nothing the matter with him, and he could win the fight then. The men that were seconding him, took him in their arms and carried him between the ropes, and set him on his legs; he then ran into the ring again and began fighting. His seconds had meant that he should not fight any longer; but he got under the ropes again, and would fight again, and then it ended in three rounds afterwards.

MR. GRIFFIN. I am a surgeon, of Hampton. I was called into the Red Lion, at Hampton, to see this young man, between seven and eight in the evening, of the 22nd of October. I did see him; he was in bed when I came; I examined his body; his head was very much swollen, so that you could scarcely distinguish a feature; there were several bruizes on his body; but none that I should conceive would be mortal. I attended him for about twenty minutes. Upon my first seeing him, I apprehended serious danger; he was perfectly in a state of insensibility; he had not the power of speech, nor the act of swallowing. I learn that he died about four hours after Isaw him; I was not present when he died. I recommended that he should have some leeches; but without much hope. I certainly thought he would die. I did not open his body; I was not surprised at his death; I conceived his death arose from the bruizes undoubtedly.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentleman of the jury, deeply impressed with the great peril to which I am exposed, under the present heavy charge against me, and with the great difficulty I necessarily experience in substantiating my innocence. Owing to the great danger to which the most computent witnesses of the transaction would be exposed, were they to be examined. I must request your most serious attention to such facts as I shall be enabled to lay before you, by which I trust not only my natural disposition will appear, but that, on this occasion of the present sad catastrophe imputed to me, I was goaded into a consent to fight the deceased,[ who was a prize fighter] and with the greatest reluctance I entered the ring, after having been assaulted and abused with the most unremitting virulence; and when I did so, as soon as I ascertained my superiority over my antagonist, I forbore on very many occasions to avail myself of such advantages as presented themselves, and with the greatest reluctance I continued the combat, until the unfortunate event which I must ever deplore and lament, and which has placed me in my awful situation; and I must beg to state that my pursuits in life are honest, and my aversion to prize fighting great, never having before fought a pitched battle, nor should I on this occasion, but from the great aggrivation, which it will be proved I received. I assure your Lordship, and the Gentlemen of the jury, that I am wholly innocent of any intention to seriously injure the deceased, and that there never existed in my mind the smallest particle of malice towards him; I trust my character for humanity and forbearance on this accasion, will have its due weight.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of Man-slaughter .

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1106. JOHN CARTER, alias WOOD , and ROBERT CHURCH were indicted for feloniously assauting William Marsh , in the King's highway, on the 5th of October , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a silver watch, value 2l. his property .

WILLIAM MARSH . I was passing through George street, Grosvenor-square , about half past ten, on the night of the 5th of October, I was walking along; I was met by six or more of them; they were between boys and men; they knocked me down; they snatched my watch out of my pocket, and I catched it in my hand as I turned myself over. In getting up, I got it by the chain. One said to another,"b-gg-r your bl-dy eyes an't you got the thimble." I went to get hold of Career, and I still kept the watch in my possession. He got away, and then they all dismissed; they all ran away, I knew Carter before; I kept possession of the watch it was got, out of my fob, and I caught it as it was passing. I could not catch hold of him. I called the watch; I knew no others of the party; I never lost sight of Church hardly. I lost sight of him just for a moment, going round the corner; but that was all. I followed him up directly; it was just at the corner of Oxford-street where I lost sight of him; I kept running after him; I am sure he was the same I had seen before. I lost sight of him; but not for half a minute. He had run altogether about two hundred yards. He could not run above ten yards while out of my sight. He was running alone. They all separated themselves different ways. He was going alone. He stopped at a pump, and knocked the crown of his hat in, to drink, and then I and the watchman took him. Carter was also taken that night.

JOHN NASH . I know nothing of this, only that Marsh called to me to take this man into custody. I did not see any thing of these men surrounding him. I came up directly, and took Church into custody. He was standing by the pump, and Marsh gave me charge of him. Marsh said he was one the persons. I never heard him say, what the prisoner Church has represented. I called another watchman to my assistance.

WILLIAM GREGORY . I am a watchman. When I came up, he desired me to take hold of Church. He charged him with knocking him down, and catching the watch out of his pocket.

WILLIAM KERR . I was constable of the night. I remember these two lads being brought into the watchhouse. I had them in my custody from Saturday, until Monday morning.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Carter's Defence. I was coming down Oxford-street. We had been to the play, and I met a parcel of girls, and they shoved up against me, and I was taken into custody. I never saw the prosecutor to my knowledge before.

Church's Defence. I was a servant out of employ, and I had been for a place, and the gentleman asked me where I lived, and I told him; and he told me to call in about three days, and I went to know whether the character would answer, and he told me it would; and I said I would come on the Monday morning, but he said Monday night would do; and I then went and bought a two-penny loaf, and then I went up to the pump, and was going to drink, and the prosecutor and the watchman came up, and the prosecutor seized hold of me, and asked me if I was not in George-street, and I said no; and then he said take him, to the watchman, and I said I would let him know what right he had to be pulling me about; and with that he caught hold of me again and then two watchmen came up, and then the two watchmen and I went to the watchhouse; I had nothing to care for, for I will take an oath, I was not in George-street.

CHURCH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

CARTER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1107. JOHN ROUTLEGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , a pieceof floor-cloth, value 8l. the property of John Hare , privately in his shop .

THOMAS BUTLER . I know the prisoner at the bar. On the 27th of September, I saw him in Bond-street ; I saw him go into Mr. Hare's shop, and take the floor-cloth, and put it on his shoulder; it was between six and seven o'clock in the evening; it was quite light. Then he came out of the shop with it. There was a person in the shop writing at a desk; that person could not have seen the prisoner come in, because his back was turned. When he came out, he fell down wiht it, by the weight of it; it was a very large roll. He was in the act of taking it up again; in the mean time, I went into the shop to acquaint the person of it; he came out, and we took the prisoner into custody; he was taken to Mary-le-bone watchhouse, and the cloth was taken away at the same time.

EDWARD JONAS . I was in Bond street on the 27th of September, As I was coming up Bond-street, I saw the prisoner at the bar with his hand upon the oil-cloth; it stood on the curb-stone. With that the prisoner went into the shop of Mr. Hare; the old gentleman who had been writing took him in. with the assistance of the last witness. With that I picked up the oil-cloth, and took it into the shop.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1108. LYDIA PAGET and WILLIAM PERRY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Jane Preston , in the King's highway, on the 4th of October , for putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, a shawl, value 1l. her property .

JANE PRESTON . On the evening in question, I had been to Covent Garden Theatre; I was returning in company with Mrs. Hill. In the narrow part of Rathbone-place , I was suddenly without any provocation knocked down by the prisoner Paget, with her fist; she struck me on the face; while I was on the ground, I was severely kicked and bruised; I was stunned by the blow I received on my face; she took the shawl from my shoulders as I lay; I had it round my shoulders very close, and she pulled it to get it away; she did get it away at last. I was raised from the ground by the witness Mrs. Hill, with the assistance of Jonas Parr .

ANN HILL . I was with Miss Preston, on this night coming from the Play with her. We were returning by Rathbone-place, and met three females; the prisoner was the inside one; the prisoner came suddenly and shoved Miss Preston down, and knocked her down; she had no instrument in her hand; it was with her fist. She then seized her shawl, and with the force of pulling it from her shoulder, she fell back herself. When she got up she went a little distance, and gave it to another person; I don't know who that person was; she was in my sight. I called the watch; the watchman was nearly at my elbow sooner than I expected, and when the prisoner came back, she used abusive language, and asked did I think she had got the property. The watchman came up, and he took her. I saw a young man of the name of Parr; be crossed the road of Rathboneplace; he came to my assistance. I know nothing of the lad that is there.

JONAS PARR . I am not acquainted with Paget; I am not acquainted with the boy Perry either. I remember being on the 4th of October in Rathboneplace; I remember Miss Preston calling out for the watch; I think she did, but I am not certain; I heard some noise and out-cry. I saw Paget attempt to take the shawl from: Miss Preston. I saw the begining of it; I was on the opposite side of the way. I saw Lydia Paget strike her on the face, which knocked her down, and as I afterwards discovered. gave her a black eye. They both fell, and I picked the lady up. When Paget was up. I told her to go away, and she said as how she would not, for she would have her b-y life. She took the shawl, and went to the corner, and gave it to William Perry . She went about four doors down; he put it into his bosom, and went across the road, across Soho-square. I saw Perry at the time Paget gave this blow and knocked Miss Preston down; he was then standing still; there were other women in the concern beside Paget; there were two other women; they did not appear to take any part in the assault; they stood until the shawl was taken; they went away directly. I don't know either of them. I was in a public-house at first having a drop of beer to myself; I work at labouring work. whatever I can get to do. I did not know the ladies before.

Paget's Defence. I was very much in liquor; I had been drinking with Jonas Parr , and he gave me the shawl, and shoved the lady down, and took her shawl off her neck, and gave it to the other lad Perry, who ran away with it.

Miss Hill. Re-examined. The boy Parr crossed the road from the other side to assist us.

-. I am the constable of the night. When Parr gave us information of Perry, we kept him all night, and we went in search of Perry the next morning, and found he had been taken for a misdemeanor the same morning. Parr swore to him.

PAGET, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

PERRY, GUILTY - DEATH, aged 15.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1109. DAVID HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of September , a heiffer, value 10l. the property of John Walkden .

JOHN WALKDEN . I collect beast to drive them to London . On the 22nd of September, I had driven some up; I came with them myself; there were from thirty to fifty. I marked them on the Sunday. I gave them to William Nicholls . the Smithfield drover; I gave them all into his charge; he was to bring them into market to sell them. I went there the next morning, and missed this heiffer.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am a Smithfield drover. I received some beast on the 22nd of September, I received thirty-three from the last witness; they were not all marked the same way; but all had got H; there was a pole heiffer with B on the off rump and H on the off tutt. I brought thirty-three to Smithfield on the Sunday night, at about ten o'clock;I missed one; it was the pole heiffer marked with the B; that was one of those which on Sunday, I had received from the prosecutor. I know something of the prisoner. In consequence of missing this, I searched all day on Monday, to no effect. I heard of it the next morning; I was at Smithfield, and a man said, he had found one, and found the man that was along with it. This person told me where she was, at a butcher's shop, in Westminster, named Stent. I went there; there I found the hide of the heiffer I had lost; it was marked, and the same colour. The prisoner was not there. Upon this, I went to the office at Queen-square, and I made an affidavit that that was the hide of the heiffer I lost.

JOSEPH HURST . On the 21st of September last, I met the prisoner; he asked me if I thought that my master would consent for him to kill some beasts at my master's slaughter-house; I told him I did not know, but he had better go and ask him; he said he would. I remember a beast being brought; the prisoner brought a heiffer; I observed the mark on it H B; I helped him to tie it up in the slaughter-house, and we locked the doors, and went away. In about two hours after, I went, and saw the prisoner at work on it by himself.

(Hide produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I am charged with stealing a heiffer out of Smithfield-market, and I trust I shall be able to prove my innocence. I met a butcher that I knew perfectly well, and he asked me if I had any thing to do, and I was telling him that I had not, and he asked me if I could kill a heiffer for him, and I told him I could not give him a positive answer then, but I would go to Mr. Stent and ask him if he would let me kill it in his slaughter-house, and I met the young man, and asked him, and he told me that it was half-a-crown for killing it there; and I went to the butcher, and told him that I had seen Mr. Stent's young man, and he said it was half-a-crown for killing it there; he said very well, that would do, and he gave me a glass of liquor; he told me he had twenty-five altogether, and I should have the killing of them all. He then left me, and I went to Mr. Stent, and he told me I might go to his place, and kill it directly, then Mr. Stent's boy came, and helped me to drive her in, and tie her up in the slaughter-house, and then I came back and killed her, and when I came to take her to market, I was taken into custody.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1110. JOHN WESTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a silver watch, chain and seals, value 40s. and upwards, the property of Elizabeth Harris , in the dwelling-house of William Balfour .

ELIZABETH HARRIS . I was servant in Mr. Balfour's family. I am not now. I now live at No. 13, George-street, Foley Place. On Tuesday evening last, I left Mr. Balfour's; I had only lived there six weeks. Mr. Balfour lives at No. 26, Wilpole-street ; I know the prisoner at the bar; I remember his coming to Mr. Balfour's house; he first came with the stewart of the West-Indiaman. I saw him twice after that. At one time he slept in the house; on the the 18th of October. Mr. Greenfield had told me that he was his brother; the way he came to sleep there was; that he had a long way to go home, and he should be glad of a bed. He slept in the attic story; I slept in the next room; I put my watch under my head when I went to bed. I rose the next morning, at half past seven o'clock; I looked at my watch to see what time it was, and I put it back under the bolster. The prisoner had no opportunity of seeing it there. The watch was concealed under the bolster, but the seal, key, and ribbon were not; any person coming into the room might see them; then I got up, I went down stairs, and I did not see the prisoner until a quarter past eight o'clock. when I was sweeping the drawing-room stairs. He said he thought it was very late; he went out of the house without his hat, and I went up stairs afterwards, is consequence of the manner in which he went out. I went up stairs in search of my watch, and it was gone. I am sure I had seen it at half past seven o'clock. The prisoner had not been in my room to my knowledge.

- BROWN. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell. I took the prisoner into custody; I found on him the duplicate of a watch, pawned for one pound ten shillings, and I found a purse with five pounds six shillings in money in it.

GEORGE GILES . I am shopman to Mr. Dunbar, a pawnbroker, in Skinner-street, Sommer's Town. On the 19th of October, I received a silver watch in pledge from the prisoner, and a gold seal; they were pawned for one pound ten shillings.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Mr. Balfour's on the day in the indictment, and I knocked at the gate, and I said I wished to see Richard, the black servant, and the other servant said he had gone out at the front door, and I asked him how he did; and he introduced me into the kitchen, and I asked him what o'clock it was, and he took out his watch and gave it me, and said "look, and you will see;" and he went and left me with the watch in my hand; and he came again in about half an hour; and in a short time this young woman came and sat down to supper, and they pressed me to stay and take a bed, and she said it must be aired, and we went up stairs, and she said about a quarter of an hour with me. In the morning I rose, and I thought it was between ten and eleven o'clock; it was so light, and I saw this watch, and I took it, and she told me to go down stairs and get my hat, and not finding it, I went through the kitchen, the way I came.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1111. RICHARD CASEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Black , about the hour of eight o'clock in the night, of the 24th of September , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, a watch, chain, and seal, value 30s. and upwards, his property .

MARY BLACK . My husband's name is John. Ilive at No. 23, Cow Cross-street, by Smithfield . We keep a baker's shop ; at the back of that baker's shop, I have a parlour. About eight o'clock at night, on the 24th of September, I was at home. I went up stairs; I think it was rather past eight o'clock. There was a light in the shop; I had lit a large lamp for about three hours at that time, and I lighted it as soon as it was dark. It was quite dark at the time I am speaking of. Before I went up stairs, I had shut the shop door myself; I had shut it upon the latch; it leads into the street. Before I went up stairs, I left my watch in the little parlour; it had a gold chain; it was hanging on one side of the waistcoat. It hung in a corner where any one who came into the shop could see it. When I came down stairs, I wanted to look what it was o'clock, and I missed my watch; I am quite sure it had been hanging in the place where it had usually hung, when I went up stairs. I let nobody in the shop. There was nobody in the parlour but myself. I pereceived that my watch was gone. I looked at the door, but could see nobody. I found it standing half open. I was quite sure it was on the latch before I went up stairs. I thought the least of its being open. I remember perfectly well it was so. I did not miss my watch until after I had perceived the door was open. I am quite clear I had shut it myself. I sent to one of the Hatton Garden officers that evening. I did not see my watch until the morning following; I then saw the watch, chain, and seal, all together.

PETER MUNN . Between three and four o'clock, on the morning of the 25th, before day-break, I went into a house in Newgate Market. I found the prisoner at the bar, and two others, in that house. They had been drinking, but were not drinking then. I knew them all three to be suspicious characters. I knew them all. I took hold of the prisoner, and asked him if he had any thing about him; he said, "no, he had nothing." I had not heard at that time of Mrs. Black having been robbed. Upon his saying he had nothing, I began to search him. I found nothing, either in his hat or pockets; but when I came to search him rather close, I found the watch, chain, and seal on him, in his breeches, close to his knee, in his pantaloons. He would neither give an account of it, nor the maker's name, nor the number of it. I asked him where he got it; he said, "he met a strange man in Long-lane, who gave it him, and he did not know the man, and should not know him again. I took him into custody, and the others also. They were discharged. I have had the watch ever since. I am perfectly clear that is the watch which was taken from the prisoner at the bar.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Fleet-market, I saw a young man running very quick, and he threw the watch at me, and said, "here Jack," and I shewed it to some people.

GUILTY - DEATH . aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1112. WILLIAM MANSFIELD & JOHN CLARKE were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Davison , about the hour of ten in the forenoon of the 6th of October no person in the said dwelling-house then being, and felniously stealing therein, a salt spoon, value 3s. and a tea spoon, value 4s. his property ; and MARY AUCKLAND was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

MARY REETS . I live with Mr. Davison, as servant; he lives at No. 7, in the Kingsland-road in the parish of St. John of Hackney . I have lived with him five months as his servant; he lives by himself; he is a merchant . About ten o'clock in the morning named in the indictment, I went out for about five minutes, on my return I opened the gate the prisoner came up the area steps, and offered me bundle of wood; I saw one of our spoons in his hand I called to someone, and he ran a way, and some young man went after him; he had been in the habit of coming to the house with wood; we had some from him on Friday and Saturday before; I shut the door before I went out; I found it wide open on my return. I saw the prisoner come up the area steps. On examing the things I missed a silver salt spoon and tea spoon. That was all.

- RUTHERFORD. I am headbourough of Hackney parish, I received charge of Clark, and I saw Mansfield in Crooked Billet-gardens, between ten and eleven, and took him, and searched Mansfield's lodgings.

MANSFIELD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

CLARKE, NOT GUILTY .

AUCKLAND, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1113. WILLIAM SEAWOOD and JOHN LATHAM were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Brooks , in the King's Highway, for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, his property .

WILLIAM BROOKS . I am cellar-man to Mr. Beamer, a wine merchant, in Middle-row Holborn. On the 28th of September last, I had occasion to go to Hertford for my master; I returned by the Hertford coach in the evening to the Saracen's Head, Snow Hill, about ten minutes before eight. I walked all on the near side of Holborn Hill until I came near Gray's-inn-lane, and as I was crossing the other side of the way, I was seized with one hand by laying hold of this umbrella; it was about eight within a minute or two, one way or the other; a hand laid hold of this umbrella. The person tried to wrest it out of my hand. When he could not do that very easily, I turned round and he seized my coat, still holding the umbrella; immediately then I was seized on the other side by some one else hold the other arm; then a third one came and took my watch out of my pocket, which third one is one of the prisoners at the bar I saw the man's hand and the face of that man. I was held on each side. I immediately made a hue and cry; the person then ran. The man who took the watch was one of the prisoner's and the right hand man was the other; but I could not swear to the third man. I knew two of men who fled and I represented them before ever I saw them afterwards. John Latham the tall one held me, and the other robbed me. I should have got the tall one taken thatnight bad not eight or ten men come and stopped me in my progress; and there were two coaches began to gallop down as fast ever they could, and dround the noise. These other eight or ten came, pretending to render me assistence; and the men who were about me pursued for some time, and I believe them to have been accomplices; we did not overtake the prisoners. If I had a doubt in my mind of the prisoners person, as I am an advocate for liberty, I should be sorry to take away the liberty of any of his Majesty's subjects, and I am sorry to say that I have no doubt. I naturally went to my master the next day, and he advised me to go to Bow-street. In consequence of that I sent my son to Bow-street early on Monday morning to state the circumstances of the case; and an officer came to me on my master's premises; he took me to several houses; I went into two or three, and did not see them; at last he took me into the Castle, I think, in Tothill-street, Gray's-inn-lane. The first person I saw was Latham; I saw the other prisoner some time after; I pointed each of them out to the officer, and they were taken in charge to Bow-street.

Prisoner Latham. Had I these cloths on - A. No; he had a large, darkish loose coat on.

Prisoner Seawood. Am I now in the same dress as I was on the Saturday that you describe I was robbing of you - A. No he is not.

JEREMIAH MAIDMENT . I am an officer. On the Monday morning the prosecutor's son came to me, and in consequence of that, I went down to him at his master's premises. I asked him if he would know the persons who robbed him if he saw them again; he said he would. I told him I would take him to different houses which character's of that sort used. I took him to two or three. He looked about the tap rooms of several of them, and did not see any one he knew; at last I took him to the Castle in Tothill street, little Gray's-inn-lane; I did not tell him what sort of a house it was before he went in; but pointing to Latham he said that is one that seized my umbrella. Then he looked over the settle to another part of the tap-room, and pointed out Seawood. I asked him if there was any one else he knew; and he said, no. I asked him if he was positive those were the people, and he said, yes. I took them into custody, and searched them, and there was nothing about them. They made no resistance, any father then saying that they knew nothing of it.

Latham's Defence. On the Saturday evening about eight o'clock, I was in the Castle, I went into the Castle about half past six, and I saw William Seawood lying intoxicated on a seat, and in about half an hour he fell off the seal, and I stopped there until nine o'clock, and then a young fellow of the name of George Hutt said he was going to supper, and I went with him as far as Portpool-lane, and then I went to my sister; there I supped with her, and returned back between nine and ten, and there I saw William Seawood in the same state; and the landlord came in; and said I think this man has had a good sleep, and we will move him up.

Seawood Defence I went into the Castle about six o'clock, and I asked for something to drink; and I laid my head on the tap-room table, and there I laid untill between ten and eleven.

WILLIAM ELINGTON . On Saturday the 28th of September, between five and six o'clock in the evening, Seawood came into the Castle public-house, quite drunk; he went and sat down by the fire, and then lay down. He had not laid there long before he rolled off on the floor. I picked him up and replaced him on the seat again; he then fell off the second time, and crawled and the bench. There he lay until nine o'clock, at which time I left him. I am a waiter at this house; I left him lying under the bench at nine o'clock. The prisoner Latham came in between six and seven, and remained there until about a quarter to nine, at which time he went out. There were near twelve people in this place. I was obliged to run in and out at different times, and I can't exactly say the number that was there. I don't know what time Latham returned; I don't notice; I was out until the house was cleared; I went out at about nine o'clock to my sisters. I had leave to go out; there was a person in that house under the sheriff; when I returned at a little after eleven they were all in bed.

GEORGE HUNT . I am an optician's turner. On Saturday evening, the 28th of September. I went to the Castle public-house, in Tothill-street, to have a pint of beer, at about half past six, or a quarter to seven o'clock. I had a pint of beer; I saw the two prisoners in the room; the prisoner Seawood was on the floor under the bench, apparently drunk; he appeared to be so, for I spoke to him and he could not answer; I saw Latham in the room; I staid there until about a quarter before nine, and I went out with Latham. I went to Embling's sheep-head shop, in Leather-lane. There were about six or seven persons in the room; there might be about ten in the. house alltogether. I left Latham at the end of Portpool-lane, and I went back to the Castle, with my sheeps'-head, to eat it; I was not above a quarter of an hour gone alltogether; about half past ten o'clock, the prisoner Latham came in again.

RICHARD HATTON . I am a hatter. On the Saturday evening, which was the day before Michaelmas day, at about twenty minutes, or half past seven I went into the Castle, in Tothill-street, I called for a pint of porter and a pipe of tobacco; I sat down on the bench, and the shorter prisoner lay underneath on the floor. The tall prisoner, Latham, sat in a box along with two men, on the left hand side as I went in. I staid there until about twenty minutes before ten; the shorter prisoner never attempted, nor ever moved whatever that I know of; Latham went out I think about twenty minutes, or half an hour before nine o'clock, I staid until twenty minutes before ten o'clock, and I saw no more of them that night.

William Brooks . Re-examined. I again look at the prisoners. I had plenty of light at the time of the robbery from the moon, and the gas lights, and I can swear to them.

LATHAM, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

SEAWOOD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1114. ROBERT MEYRICK was indicted for a fraud on the Stamp Office .

WILLIAM HENNELL CLEMENT . I am the Proprietor of the Observer Sunday Newspaper. The prisoner was in my employment. On the 22nd of September this Newspaper was brought to me, by a deputation of the pressmen.

GEORGE GOODYERE . I am deputy publisher of the Observer Newspaper. The prisoner's office was to count out the papers. I myself take the blank paper to the Stamp Office to be stamped. I paid the duty then; the next day I sent the prisoner for them. I believe he brought me back the same numbers, but we don't count them. I then deliver them out to him in quantities to be wetted, and he finishes wetting on the Saturday morning. It is then put up in a cupboard in the press-room, and he locks that cupboard himself. Then when the pressmen begin to print, the two first come to me for the key. The printing goes on with great velocity. The first and last page are first printed at one press, then the third page is printed at another press, and the last page is kept open for the latest intelligence. The prisoner is then employed to count the paper out at the presses, and bring them down to me. Then it is delivered to the different Newsmen who come for it, and I count them out to see that the number agrees with the number that was brought from the Stamp Office. When the paper comes from the Stamp Office it would be smooth, it would not have the appearance of being folded up in a pocket. When it is so counted it is distributed among the Newsmen, The prisoner used sometimes to take out newspapers for Mr. Clements on account of the Office. He would get sixpence for them each when selling them for Mr. Clements, and they would be retailed afterwards at sevenpence, and the penny would be the profit of the retailer. It was not known that he sold papers on his own account; it was not his duty. He had to go a particular round, which was from the Observer Office, along the Strand to Charing Cross: Drury-lane was not in his ward. He lived in Drury-lane.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am one of the pressmen of the Observer newspaper. On the 22nd of September I observed that this sheet had a stamp inlaid. The regular course is for the stamp to be printed on the paper itself. That occasioned in me some suspicion that all was not right. The manner in which we conduct our business is, after the outside sheets are composed, the printers go to the closet where the paper is deposited, and take the stamped paper out as they want it. It is made up into parcels of 250, that is, a sheet is turned down after every 250, which projects. They are delivered to Meyrick, who takes them away when they are finished. He counts them into quires, and delivers them to the publisher. The customers take them away by quires. The pressman has no check against the person who wets. He might put two or three more into every 250. The printer goes printing on as he finds the paper, and does not count. The fly boys have also access to the place where the paper is deposited. I believe it has been the practice to repair sheets at our office when a sheet is spoiled, by taking the stamp from the spoiled sheet and putting it on another sheet.

Q. But you could not pick up any stamp in the Observer printing room, except an Observer stamp. For instance, you could not pick up a Morning Chronicle stamp? - A. No, not unless it was brought in with some refreshment.

Q. The stamp on the paper you hold in your hand is not an Observer stamp? - A. No; it has been used before, and there is the tyye of another newspaper on it.

JOHN BENSON . I am one of the pressmen of the Observer newspaper. This witness corroborated the testimony of the last.

- AYLESWORTH. I am a pressman belonging to the Observer. I asked the prisoner to whom the pasted stamped newspapers belonged? to which he made no reply.

GEORGE WYNNE . I am in the office of the Solicitor for the Stamp Office. I saw the prisoner. We had before applied to Bow-street, and procured a warrant for his apprehension. He came to the Stamp Office and surrendered himself voluntarily. I then shewed him the newspapers with the stamps pasted on them. I asked him how he came to have done it? He told me that he certainly did do it, but not with any fraudulent intention. I asked him what he meant by fraudulent intention? for it appeared that one stamp had been torn from a Morning Chronicle, and another from some other paper; consequently the revenue must be defrauded of the duty in those two papers. He said he could explain it in no other way, than that he had received a certain number of stamped sheets from the deputy publisher to wet down for the printers, and after those sheets were printed he was responsible to the deputy publisher for a like number. That in the course of printing off the newspaper a number of copies would be spoilt, and in that case he was required to tear off the stamp, and paste it in an unstamped sheet: and knowing that he was responsible to the deputy publisher for the number of sheets he had before received from him, he would look on the floor of the printing office for stamps which had been torn off spoiled sheets by the pressmen, which he would pick up and paste on unstamped sheets, and the stamps in question must have been stamps which he had so found on the floor, but he could not tell how they came there.

Mr. LAMBERT, printer of the Morning Chronicle, proved that the transposed stamps had been on a sheet on which the Morning Chronicle of the 21st of September was printed.

WILLIAM CAPPEL , Esq. I am Secretary to the Board of Stamps. I look at the stamp which has been transposed. It is a genuine stamp for the Morning Chronicle for fourpence; but there is no appearance of discount marked on it, therefore that would not be applicable to a paper. selling at seven-pence, and to which there is 20 per cent. discount allowed.

JOHN ALDIS . I keep the Duke of Wellington public-house in Drury-lane. The prisoner lodged with me, and used to supply me with the Observernewspaper on a Sunday, and I used to allow him for it out of his rent.

Prisoner's Defence. Whatever I have done I have done in the office, and never did any thing for myself.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1115. JOHN CLAY was indicted for putting his hand into the pocket of George Anthony Good , on the 27th of September , with intent the goods and chattels in the said pocket then being feloniously to steal .

GEORGE ANTHONY GOOD . On the day in the indictment I saw the prisoner at the bar, at the crossing of Bow church-yard . I felt something at my pocket. I turned round immediately, and saw the prisoner in the act of drawing my pocket handkerchief from my pocket. I said, "you rascal, you have attempted to pick my pocket." I did not apprehend him then; but I followed him down Little St. Thomas Apostle's. There I knew the residence of a constable. At that constable's door I apprehended him and gave him in charge. He had not thoroughly taken the handkerchief out.

JAMES GIBBS . I apprehended the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1116. MARY LACY was indicted for uttering a false, forged, and counterfeit sixpence .

She pleaded GUILTY .

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1117. HENRY MONK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , two sacks, value 4s. the property of John Piggott .

THOMAS PARRY . I stopped the prisoner with these sacks on the 26th of October, about twenty minutes before seven. He had four, and two were claimed by Mr. Bennett, of Russel-street, Convent Garden. Mr. Piggott claims the other two.

JOHN PIGGOTT . I am a Salesman , I look at these two sacks. I have no doubt they have been mine; but I have an immense quantity which I lend to my customers: but I have no idea where these were stolen from.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1118. WILLIAM LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , a piece of silk, value 171 the property of James Vernell , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES VERNELL . I live in Fore-street, in the Old Artillery Ground . I only know a preceding fact to the robbery, which is, that at the latter end of August, or beginning of September last, the prisoner came into my shop, and enquired for a person of the name of Brown. I told him I had no such person in my employ. That is all I know.

JOHN BARCLAY . I know the person of the man at the bar. On the 10th of September last he came into Mr. Vernell's warehouse, and asked me if Mr. Vernell was at home. I told him he was not. There was a piece of Mazarene sarsnet and a piece of drab lustring on the counter. They were within his reach. He told me to look into the back warehouse, and look for the name of Brown. I went into the back warehouse, and just turned over a leaf or two of the weaver's book, and came back again. I am sure it was the name of Brown he made use of. I then returned to the front warehouse again. The prisoner was still there. I told him I could find no such name. He said yes, he was sure there was, and I must go and look again. I went again, for I thought it was of consequence. He appeared respectably dressed. I was not gone the second time more than ten minutes at farthest. I could see no such name. I then returned, and the prisoner was gone. The lustring was there still, but the sarsnet gone. There were sixty-seven yards of it. I ran out of doors directly, but could not see the prisoner. I am quite sure he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, all the defence I have got to make is to say that I am as innocent as a new born baby.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1119. WILLIAM LEE was again indicted for a like offence .

JAMES ALLAN . I am in the employ of Mr. John Weaver . He is a silk manufacturer , and lives in Chapel Yard, Christchurch, Middlesex . The prisoner came into my master's warehouse, and enquired for a strange name, and asked me if we manufactured figured sarsnets. I told him, no, that we only manufactured plain goods. He then asked to see a piece. I put a piece on the counter before him, and he asked what was the net price of it, as he was going into the country, and he would pay money for it. I went to the desk to see what was the net price; that was about three yards from me; and he walked over to the press where the goods were kept. That was opposite the counter, and he remarked what long lengths they were; and he said he had got a friend waiting at the door, and he would go and ask him to come up. He then left the warehouse, but did not return. I was not alarmed. It was four or five minutes before I suspected any thing. We had only one piece of sarsnet in the house. I do not know when I had seen it before, but I know I did not sell it. I did not look for that, as there was only one piece, and I did not miss any of the others. I did not miss that plain piece until two or three days afterwards. I cannot swear it was taken that day. I have never seen it again.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1120. JAMES LUKE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jonathan Tatnell , about the hour of nine in the night of the 31st of August , and for burglariously stealing therein fourteen pairs of breeches, value 5l. two round frocks, value 15s. and one pair of trowsers, value 4s. his property .

ELIZABETH TATNETL . On the 31st of Augustlast my husband went out at eight o'clock in the evening. I shut the house and shop at half past eight. I had then lighted candles: it was dark. I fastened the shop by locking it once. After that I went into the kitchen at the back of the house. I had not been there above three or four minutes, before my attention was called to the shop again. A noise I heard in the passage drew my attention. When I went into the shop I perceived the door to be open. I am sure I had effectually locked it. I missed the articles in the indictment. Upon that I raised an alarm, and caused a pursuit to be made.

STEPHEN LEE . I am a horse patrole belonging to Bow-street. Upon an alarm given at Colnbrook , I went in pursuit of some supposed offenders. I was informed of the robbery, and overtook the prisoner about two miles and a half from Colnbrook, in the road from Colnbrook to Hounslow towards London. He had the property in question embraced in his arms, uncovered. I asked him how he came by it, and told him I suspected he was the person who committed the depredation. He made no kind of reply. I brought him back to Longford; that is fifteen miles from London. Mr. Tatnell was present, and identified his property. The prisoner did not give any account how he came by the property then. Before the magistrate, he said he found it about a mile and a half from Colnbrook. There was a Mr. Edwards with the prisoner when I took him.

ROBERT EDWARDS . I am a lieutenant in the navy. On the evening of the 31st of August I overtook the prisoner on the other side of Colnbrook turnpike. I since know that it was about two hundred yards from Tatnell's house. It was between eight and nine o'clock: it was quite dark; the lamps were lighted on the coaches. He had a bundle with him. I asked him where he was going, and he said to London. He said he had been to Egham races, hawking clothes about. I could not particularly see what it was he had; and I did not know, till he himself told me, that it was clothes. While he was with me, he did not find nor pick up any property.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the property just by a gate where that gentleman met me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1121. JOHN WILLIAMS, alias WINTER , was indicted for burglariously and sacrilegiously breaking open the parish church at Heston , on the 25th of September , and stealing therein two quarto prayer-books, value 4l. and an octavo prayer book, value 10s. the property of the Right Hon. George Villiers , Earl of Jersey.

CHARLES WHEATLEY . I am Sexton of the parish church of Heston. Lord Jersey has a pew in that church. It was the custom of his family to leave their prayer-books in that church. There were two quarto ledger prayer-books and an octavo prayer-book in their pew. I saw the church safe on the 24th of September at a funeral. Every thing was then safe, as far as I could see. I had seen every thing safe on the Sunday. I took it for granted every thing was safe on the Tuesday. It was my custom to keep the parish pall in the church. After that I was not in the church from the Tuesday until the Friday. I went out a little way, and when I came home I found that there was a hue, and cry. I went to it on the 25th, Friday, about four o'clock in the afternoon. I found it locked as I had left it. When I got inside, I missed the three prayer-books from the Earl of Jersey's pew. I searched the church carefully over, and I found two books belonging to the communion table were moved out of a cupboard into which I always put them. I have seen the pall since, and have got it now. Whoever it was that stole these things got in by breaking a window, which made space enough for a person to get in. It was about seven feet from the ground, but there was a tomb close, on which he must have got. I saw the pall afterwards on Saturday afternoon. My little girl brought it. Heston is about fourteen miles from here, and twelve from Golden Square.

- On the 25th of September the prisoner came and offered a quarto prayer-book to pledge. He asked five shillings for it: that was not near its value. I should suppose it was worth from 25s. to 30s. I asked him where he got it from? He said it was his own. I asked him where he bought it? He said he did not buy it, but he had it given him by a gentleman for cleaning his boots and shoes, instead of wages. I told him I thought that was not a very probable thing; so I went and acquainted Mr. Harrison. The prisoner was still in the shop. I went and informed Mr. Harrison, my master. Having conferred with him, he came and questioned the prisoner himself. I heard what passed between them. He asked him where he lodged, or where the gentleman lived that had given him the book? He could not tell us He said he could not tell; he was out of town, and he did not know him. Mr. Harrison then asked him where the gentleman lodged? He told us he did not know, that he believed somewhere in Whitechapel; to which Mr. Harrison said, that would not do; he must take him before a magistrate, and he must give an account where he got the book from. Mr. Harrison said he would take him, and therefore it was needless to make any resistance. He went along with Mr. Harrison. They had not got a long way, before I had occasion to go up stairs, and I was under the necessary of going through the passage where the prisoner had stood, and I stumbled over something. I took it up, and found it to be a bag, and it contained two other prayer-books; one exactly like the one he had offered to pledge. a quarto, and the other a large sized octavo. I immediately took the books I found in the bag to Maryborough-street to Mr. Harrison. The books were examined, and the prisoner was remanded for a further examination. The books have continued in my possession ever since.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1122. FREDERICK CONSTABLE was indicted for feloniously assaulting James John Sheath in the King's highway, on the 18th of October , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will a watch, value 20s. his property .

JAMES JOHN SHEATH . On the 18th of October last this man watched me in the Strand. He was looking at a play-bill. Two of them together went a-head of me, and followed me into Castle-court , where I live with my father. When I got into the court this man, seizing me by the collar, took the watch out of my pocket. The other man tried to pacify me, and put his hand on my shoulder; but I pursued this man, and cried stop thief, and halloed murder, and ran after the prisoner, and never lost sight of him. He was taken before a quarter of an hour had elapsed. I am sure I never lost sight of him, and I have not the least doubt but the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. ADOLPHUS. This was about nine o'clock. I saw this man and another looking at a play-bill at a small butter shop, the other side Bedford-street. They might be able to see the seal and key hanging below my waistcoat. This was a very little way from Castle-street. The prisoner went up the court before me, and waited to see if I came up the court. As I passed him I thought his attention was fixed on me. I thought he was eying me, and I tucked my ribbon up. No one spoke to me when he robbed me. I turned the corner of the court nearly at the same time that he did, and did not lose sight of him. He dodged about the coaches in Bedford-street. I had sight of him all the time, and he ran into St. Paul's churchyard, where he was secured.

- On the night in question I heard the cry, and I pursued round and saw the prisoner running up Bedford-street. He was going along Chandos-street, and I immediately stood before him, and then he turned back and went up Bedford-street, and I followed him. He dodged about among the coaches, and he knocked me down. I got up again and pursued him, and he ran into the church-yard. There I followed him. There he struck me and knocked me down again, but I secured him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1123. JOHN HOBBES was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Dealy in the King's highway, on the 25th of October , and taking from his person a one pound note, three three shilling pieces, and a shilling, his property .

WILLIAM DEALY . I sold the prisoner a black mare for 30s. He said he had not money enough to pay for it, and asked me if I would go home with him? and I did. He took some things to pledge to pay the money. He paid me a one pound note, three three shilling pieces, and a shilling. He then asked me if I would go home to supper with him. As I was going past Mr. Rose's brick field, I found him trying to pick my pocket of my pocketbook. I tried to get it back from him, and he knocked me down against the bank, and then he took what silver I had in my pocket besides, two three shilling pieces, and a piece of paper and some halfpence, which Mr. Hatfield has got now.

WILLIAM HATFIELD . I apprehended the prisoner. I found this piece of paper on him, which the prosecutor told me was in his pocket with the silver at the time he was knocked down. I found nothing else on him. The prosecutor only told me of the money he had lost before, and did not tell me of the paper until he saw it.

Prisoner's Defence. That paper was given me by a gentleman.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1124. RICHARD KELLEY and CHARLES PRESCOTT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , three yards of cloth, value 1l. 19s. the property of Thomas Thwaites , privately in his shop .

JOHN THWAITES . On the morning in question I was in our back shop, which looks into the front shop. I went into the shop, and there was a man dressed in a sailor's jacket, whom I since understand was Daniel Kelley . He came forward putting out a one pound note, and asked me if I would suit him with a pair of small clothes. Suspecting his character, I told him I could not. After he went out I missed the cloth, and I went after him, I went as far as Charles-street, Drury-lane, and could see nothing of him. In about a quarter of an hour after that I thought I would not give it up, but I went again, and I saw Daniel Kelley and the two prisoners after him coming up Charles-street. Kelley, the prisoner at the bar, had a bundle tied up in a handkerchief. I turned round in order to follow him, and Daniel turned under Short's Gardens gateway. I was running, and I was perceived by the prisoner, Richard Kelley , who looked round, and immediately turned out of my sight. I waited, and soon after saw all three. I pursued them as close as I could, and Richard Kelley appeared to have something under his coat, and was running very fast down Short's Gardens. I pursued him, crying stop thief, and he was stopped. In Short's Gardens I afterwards found the bundle which contained the cloth in question. Daniel Kelley, who had been in the shop, got clear off. Prescott was afterwards apprehended. I did not see the two prisoners about the door.

Both NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1125. WILLIAM JAMES FARMER was indicted for feloniously and fraudulently cutting, tearing, and getting off of a certain piece of paper a certain stamp, whereby it was denoted that a certain duty, to wit, the sum of twopence, had been paid in respect of the said stamped paper, commonly called a twopenny receipt stamp, with intent to use the same on another piece of paper to be used as a receipt stamp, whereon a similar duty as aforesaid would become payable, with intent to defraud our Sovereign Lord the King .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1126. THOMAS REILLY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of October , a pocket handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Edward Devenham , from his person .

EDWARD DEVENHAM . On the 30th of October, I was endeavouring to get into the Justice-room at the Mansion-House ; there was a very great crowd of people there, and I could not get in. In the entrance of the door, during the time I was there. I missed my handkerchief from my pocket. I am quite sure I had it before I went into the Mansion House; I turned round, and charged the prisoner with taking it from my pocket; he was at that time close by me; I laid hold of his coat, and pulled it open, and there I saw my handkerchief.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1127. WILLIAM BRUCK and RICHARD HAMMOND were indicted for stealing, a watch, value 1l. 5s.

No prosecutor appeared .

NOT GUILTY.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1128. ELIZABETH FRICKER , WILLIAM KELLY , and JAMES HITCHIN , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Ashworth , about the hour of eleven in the night of the 28th of July , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, one silver bread basket value 20l one silver tea-pot, value 4l. one silver tea-pot stand, value 2l. one silver milk-pot gilt inside, value 40s. seven silver forks, value 4l. six other silver forks, value 3l. foursilver desertspoons, value 40s. ten silver table-spoons, value 5l. seven silver tea-spoons, value 3l. one silver sugar ladle, value 20s. two silver sauce ladies, value 40s. one silver soup ladle, value 50s. six silver knives, value 3l. two silver salt spoons gilt inside, value 10s. one silver fish sauce stand value 10l. one silver cruet stand, value 20l. one glass mustard cruet mounted with silver, value 10s. one glass vinegar cruet, value 2s. four glass sauce cruet, value 10s. one silver liquor stand, value 10l. two silver gravy spoons, value 50s. one silver butter knife, value 10s. one silver marrow spoon, value 10s. one silver waiter, value 30l. one silver snuffer stand, value 20l. one pair of snuffers, value 10s, one pair of silver candlesticks, value 15l. two silver butter boats with covers, value 40l. one silver pint mug, value 4l. one gold watch, value 80l. one gold chain, value 15l. four gold seals, 4l. one gold key, value 1l. one silver saucepan, value 15l. two silver gilt buttle stands, value 15l. three table cloths, value 3l. six yards of linen cloth, value 6s. a silver egg stand, value 5l. a silver salt cellar, value 10s. a metal inkstand, value 5s. and a table cloth cover, value 3s. the property of the said Ann Ashworth . AND PETER KELLY was indicted for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

ANN ASHWORTH . I kept a house in Berner-street, in the parish of Mary-le-bone . Fricker was a servant of mine; I had another female servant; her name is Hannah Holloway ; she was the cook; I had no other servant; the 28th of July, was a Sunday. I went to bed before eleven o'clock on the night of that day. Before I went to bed, I had an opportunity of being positively certain that the windows of the parlour and the street door were fastened; but I am not positive as to any other parts of the house. I got up the next morning before six; I first went to my dressing room, and thence to the drawing room; I remained in the drawing room about ten minutes and thence went into the dressing room again. Then the cook Holloway came to me, at about ten minutes before seven. In consequence of something that passed between us, I went down to the kitchen; I found one of the kitchen windows open; we found some papers strewed about the kitchen; my writing-desk that had been in the parlour the day before, was on the ground, and broken open; the papers out of the desk were scattered about. I saw that the street door was open; the bolt was drawn, so as to prevent the door from shutting to. I saw a wine bottle behind the door, and an empty tumbler; there was a little wine in the bottle; but nothing else that I discovered. There was another bottle behind the parlour door, with a candle in it; that candle had certainly been burnt; I could ascertain that it was one that had been in one of my candlesticks; it was not a common kitchen candle, but had been in one of the candlesticks that were stolen. I discovered the sidebord locks broken, and the papers and things that were in the sid board were scattered about. I kept some plate in that sideboard; I had kept it locked when I went to bed. There was a silver bread basket there; the greater part of the plate in the indictment was there. The value altogether was about four hundred pounds; it cost a great deal more. It was on the Saturday before that the prisoner Fricker applied to me to clean the plate; she came to me for a silver waiter; it was a very large one. She asked for that particularly; it had never been cleaned by her before; it was in my bed-room. She had been in my service nearly three months. I had never asked her to clean it, not intimated to her that I wished it to be cleaned. She asked me for it three times, and at lenght I was induced to give it to her. I don't recollect that I expected company, or that there was any reason for her getting it. She also asked for two gilt silver spoons which belonged in the egg stand, and that would make the egg stand comple. They were kept in the drawer with the other plate in the parlour. The waiter might be worth twenty pounds, I believe it cost thirty. When I went up stairs to bed on the Sunday night, the prisoner Fricker came into my room; I used a gilt silver candlestick to go to bed with. She came and took that candlestick up; I asked her what she wanted that candlestick for, and she put it down again, and went out of the room, She brought me a letter, and a few minutes after, she wanted to go out, and I told her I could not spare her, and she said she must go out, and she would, for it was of consequence, she did go out. Her clothes were in the kitchen at that time packed up; it was afterwards discovered to be so. I have a neighbour named King. In consequence of something which he said to me, I looked for my green pelisse, and it was not in the place where it was left.

HANNAH HOLLOWAY. I am cook to the prosecutrix in July last; Elizabeth Fricker was a servant to her. Fricker was not at home all Sunday. the 28th of July; she went out at half past seven in the evening; she said she wanted to go, but I did not observe the moment that she went; until she returned about ten; when she came back, I was in the parlour. In about five minutes my mistress called her up into the parlour; my mistress gave her a pelisse; she was to have taken it up stairs to my mistress's bed room. She returned into the kitchen. I asked her to go to bed; she looked at the clock, and said, it was very soon. I left her; I did not go into my room; I went into the parlour. At this time, Mrs. Ashworth had just gone up. There was no work left behind to be done. I heard a noise like raking out cinders; but I had raked out the fire before. I went down, and asked her what she was doing it for, she said she had no particular reason for doing it. I asked her to come to bed, but she did not; she sat down. I said she had better not, sit down, but come to bed; which she did not do. I went up stairs, and left her below. I went into my mistress's bed room. I was attending my mistress there when the prisoner came up; she had a candle in a flat candlestick; but went down for a save-all; she spoke to my mistress and me as she was going down; she said, she had forgotten it. My mistress and I went down stairs into the parlour. Pricker went down stairs for it, and returned with it is a moment; she said, she had got it; when she returned, I was in the passage, on the ground floor, with my mistress. At the time I am now speaking of, the street door was fast. I had fastened it.

Q. Had you before this seen that the windows and doors were fast - A. One window I am positive of, the one that was close against the kitchen door; but I am not certain of the window that was found open. The door behind opens into a little yard at the back of the house; that was never fastened; but I am sure it was shut; there are railings at the back of it. Nobody could get in at that back door, without tearing up the railings, and the railings were quite safe. I am positive that the windows were shut; but I am not positive that they were fastened. I did not leave any candle in the kitchen table when I went up stairs. The candles that Mrs. Ashworth used in her sitting room, were snuffed out, and left on the parlour table; I am quite sure they were both mould candles, and they were in silver candlesticks. After I had met Fricker on the stair-case, my mistress went up stairs; I followed her, and Fricker followed last, all going up to bed. Fricker slept in the same room with me, but not the same bed. When I got into the bed room, Fricker went into my mistress's hed room; she joined me in a minute or two; she was not with me long before she left me saying she had left her book below; I told her she had not, for that she had left it in her mistress's dressing room; she said she was positive she had, left it on the kitchen table. I had not seen the book in my mistress's dressing room, but I had seen it in Fricker's hand as she was coming up stairs and went into my mistress's dressing room, therefore I told her so. She did not remain below above four or five minutes, not longer than was necessary in fetch the book as I thought at the moment; when she returned with the book, she looked the door, and came in and undressed herself, and got into bed, and read a little of the book, and then asked me to put the candle out; I did so. She had never before taken up a book to read. I did not wake, myself, in the morning, but she waked me; that was unusual; I got up, and looked at the clock, I discovered it was a little after six; she said to me when she called me that it was time to get up. I told her I was rather surprised at her calling me, for it was not usual for her to get up until nine o'clock; I don't remember that she made any answer. she got up at the same time; but I went down first. My usual hour of getting up was seven. She got up once, when I first came to live there early to work; but on this morning. I know of no work she had to do. When I went down stairs, there was light enough to see without a candle, it was very light; I perceived a little light through the street door. I saw a empty bottle and runner in the passage. I did not look at the street door to see whether it was a-jar or not. I went straight into the kitchen; I saw the cupboard door open; that had been locked when I went to bed, I am positive. I saw my mistress's writing desk and tea caddy in the kitchen, and I saw at the papers were scattered about on the ground. I perceived that the kitchen front door was a little on the jar, unfastened and open; it could not be opened by any other way than from within by the appearance. One window was fast as I had left it, and the other window shutter was open; but the window itself was down; at that window there were usually flower pots standing; they appeared to be in the same stare that I left them in the day before, apparently nobody had distubred them. Any one to get in at the window from the out side, must have moved the flower pots, for the window is very high. I did not stay for any time in the kitchen, but returned to my mistress's bed room; at that time I did not know what to think. Fricker I had left in the bed-room; but going up, I met her coming down, looking very pale, my mistress went down before me, for I was very much alarmed. Afterwards I came down stairs. My mistress called me into the parlour, and shewed me how the things were broken. I found the sideboard broken open, and the house robbed, as my mistress has told you. I never knew of a candle being used in the neck of a bottle in my mistress's house. The prisoner Fricker went out on the Tuesday following; I had been out myself to the butcher's at about ten minutes before four; the butcher lived a little way down Oxford-street; my mistress's house is above Castle-street, near the Middlesex Hospital; therefore I would pass the corner of Castle-street in going to Oxford-street. When I returned, there was a tall man standing at the door, speaking to Elizabeth Fricker . I should know that man again; William Kelley is the man, the tall man; I am positive he isthe man. I did not hear any of their conversation. Upon my coming, they went out together. I did not know the man before. When Fricker went away, she did not say any thing to me, nor did I to her. She was gone near open an hour; when she returned. I asked her where she had been, as she knew that I wanted to get my mistress's dinner, and that my mistress wanted to go out. She said she had been out to vent her mind to that person who had called upon her. That was all she said. There had not been any quarrell between her and her mistress, or me, to give her occasion to vent her mind on any subject. I had no reason to expect that she was going to leave Mrs. Ashworth.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am an officer. On the 29th of July, I went to the house of the prosecutrix, in Berner's-street. I immediately inspected the house, to see in what manner it had been entered. I found the street - door had no key-hole on the outside; therefore the lock could not have been picked. There was no appearance of violence on the outside, nor in any other part. I observed the window next to the fire place, and observed one leaf of the shutter was a little open. My attention was called to that by the prisoner Fricker. On my going down she told me that that was the way they got in. I went with her to the outside of that window in the area; there were six flower pots standing on the window sill; they were all of different sizes, and they had all plants in them, reaching a good way up the window. Those plants reached above the window, nearly as far as the front part, and some days previous to this, there had been rain, and a crust was formed round the bottom of each pot, that enabled me to observe whether they had been removed. I am positive they had not been removed lately, and no person could have got in there; it would have taken a great deal of care to have replaced them exactly in the same situation, if they had been removed. I did this in the presence of Fricker, and acquainted her with my observation. She strongly insisted that they had got in at that window; she did not say any thing else at that time. I examined the front area over, and other parts, to examine where they had been forced; there are no steps in the area; if there he a step, it can not exceed a couple or three inches in height, as it is only the sill of the door. I found no force had been used at the area door. That door was lined with iron. and the shutters was lined with iron; there was no appearance of force at all; they could not have got in at the back area door, for there were iron rails over it. The hall door had been shut before I came. Afterwards I found a bottle and candle, and and so forth. I afterwards searched her box; she was present. At that time I did not look for plate. Subsequently I found a piece of flannel which I have here. After I had taken her into custody, I had some conversation with her. At the first time I stated my suspicion; but left her in the house. I took her into custody before I found the flannel on the Tuesday. After I had taken her into custody on the Tuesday afternoon. I asked her who the man was that she had been speaking to cued the corner. half or three quarters of an hour before. She searched very reluctant to tell me; I proceed her to tell me and said, surely she could have no objection to tell me who he was. She then said, "he was a tally man." She explained that to be a hawking linen draper, who takes part payment for goods at a time. She said, "she had owed him eight shillings up wards of twelve months, and he had found her out at her place by accident, and she went out to pay him." She said "his name was Finch, and she became acquainted with him when she was at Miss Clarkson's. at Kentish Town, a lady who kept a boarding school."She said,"she had not seen him for upwards of twelve months." There was nothing farther passed that I recollect. She said, "she was a widow, and that she had been so for seven or eight years." The name of Kelley was not spoken of at all. When Kelley was before the magistrate, and the box was opened there, he claimed some leather which was in it.

THOMAS HILL . I live near the house of the proseutrix; I knew the tall Kelley; he lodged at my house at the time the offence was committed. He had not at that time given up his lodging. He first came to me on the 25th of July, four days previous. He did not sleep at home on Sunday the 28th; he lodged in the second floor, the top room. I have another lodger in the home. He and the prisoner slept in the same apartment. I did not see she prisoner at my house with Kelley on the Saturday. I never saw her to my knowledge until she was taken up.

DAVID LATHBURY . I lodged at Mr. Hill's, No. 3, Newman Mews in July last. I look at the prisoner, William Kelley , and know him. He came to lodge three on the 25th of July, he slept there; he did not sleep there on the night of the 28th; I know that, because I was at home late, and I saw the door fastened, and he did not come in after that. I did not see him the next morning. I saw him some days afterwards; but had not any conversation with him. I heard he had been to a fair. I asked him, and he said he had been in the country; but he did not say any thing more that I recollect. He always slept at home before that Sunday, as long as he lodged there. I did not see him between the day that I talked with him, and the day I saw him before the justice. I look at the female prisoner; I saw her on the Saturday, I have no doubt whatever. I saw her come to the door of the place when Kelley lodged, and she asked for Mr. Kelley. He was not at home. She came again about the middle of the day, but I did not see her.

THOMAS WEBBE . I keep the Crown public-house, - street Bloomsbury. Early in the morning of the 29th of July, I recollect two men coming to my house at a little before seven o'clock a they had a bundle with them. They rushed into a box opposite to the bar; one was a tall man; and the other was a short man; I believe William Kelley to be the tall man. To the best of my knowledge he is the man; he seemed to be in ill health. The short man I don't remember; I had not the same opportunity of observing him. They came together in a coach, and wept away in that coach. The coachman came in, and they gave him a glass of gin, and then theyloaded the luggage in the coach again. It was a bundle of some size, but I don't know what it was wrapt in. It was cloth, but I don't know the colour.

BENJAMIN COOKE . I live at No. 4, Brill Place, Sommer's Town; that may be about twenty yards from the Brill public-house. The old man, Peter Kelley lodged at my house; he came about May last, continued to lodge there until the 7th of September. when he was taken up. On the morning of the 29th of July, I was at breakfast, when three men came into the house. I did not speak; but my wife did. She asked who they were; I believe old Kelley was one of the three; the other Kelley was another; when my wife asked who they were, one of the two strangers said they belonged to Mr. Kelley. The short man came first, then William Kelley, and then Peter. It was between nine and ten o'clock. The short man had a bundle wrapt up careleesly in a green baize, a cloth with a yellow border. They all went up into the front room, on the first floor; the room in which old Kelley lodged. In a short time Peter Kelley came down, and said,"one of them is my son, the tall one in boots." He told me that his son had just come from the country, and he had a parcel sent by the Litchfield stage; end he said, "he was going to fetch a sheet of writing paper to write a letter into the country.

SARAH COOKE . I remember the morning my husband speaks of these men coming to his house. Peter Kelly was one. I now look at the bar; William Kelley is the second, and the other man, Hitchen, is the man who carried the bundle. Young Kelley had a horsewhip in his hand, and a green silk umbralla; she was dressed in jockey boots. As they they came in I started up from the table, and asked them whom they wanted, and they said, "they belonged to Mr. Kelley; Old Kelley followed last. In about two minutes old Kelley and Hitchen came down. Old Kelley told me that one was his son, and had just come out of the country. Young Kelley remained up stairs for about a quarter of an hour, and then went out in shoes. Young Kelley called again on Tuesday, at about half past six o'clock with Hitchen. He went away and came again, and asked if the old man was returned. They came again and supped with old Kelley and a friend. Young Kelley stopped and slept with his father. Hitchen went away about half past ten. Old Kelley went to see his friend home, and then returned. It was the lady who was to be his wife; a person of the name of Hansell. On Wednesday morning William Kelley got up at about ten o'clock, and washed himself and went away. He came again on the Thursday, at about half past six o'clock, as near as I can tell, and asked if the old gentleman was at home; I told him no, and he asked me to send for him, and I did so. Soon after he came down and asked me for a light, and I gave him one, and it appeared to me that he had been using sealing wax, and he had a cord to cord a box, and I went up and saw that box; It was a red box; I had painted it red for old Kelley in the latter end of May, I asked the younger Keley if his father was going to lend him that box, and he said, "yes," and said, "he must have it back again next week." I said, yes, when it was all knocked to pieces, he would have it back again.

(Box produced.)

That is the box, I saw them put it into a hackney coach.

SOPHIA UNDERWOOD . I live at No. 16, Johnson street, Sommers Town; that is a good bit from Brill place. I know old Mr. Kelley. I have known him almost these seven years. I remember his coming to our house; but I don't know whether it was in the month of August, or not; it was in the summer, some weeks before he was taken up. He called just at dusk, he called to ask whether he might leave a box there; and I said yes. He put the box into the shop; my husband is a carpenter. Old Kelley called in two or three days afterwards, and he said he moved the box because he was moving to Mrs. Stansell's by degrees. He was there several times afterwards, but did not say any more about the box. It might remain a week or a fortnight. I don't remember his coming with a basket. He fetched the box away on an evening, but I don't know how he took it away.

THOMAS UNDERWOOD . I am the husband of last witness. I know old Kelley. I have done work for him now and then. I understood he came to leave a box while I was not at home; he came afterwards, and told me he had left a box, and hoped it would not be in my way. We moved it out of the back parlour where we were working, up into the two pair of stairs front room; he was going to move it by himself, and I said Mr. Kelly, I will lend you a hand; it was a box similar to the one new produced. He and I moved it up together; it might be half or three quarters of a hundred weight. I remember his coming there with a basket in his hand, and said he wanted some tools out of the box; by which I understood that there were tools in the box.

WILLIAM BIRD . In the month of August last, I saw old Kelley in the street with a large box similar to the one produced, within three or four doors of Underwood's house. I was at work at Mr. Underwood's one evening when he came in and asked me if Mr. Underwood was within. At another time I saw him come down stairs with a rush basket, and I understood he had been up to get tools out of the box; it was when he came down that he had the basket.

HANNAH COMPTON . Peter Kelley came to my house on the 29th of August; he came with a wheelbarrow, with his trunk in it. He stopped at the door, and, "how do you do, Mrs. Compton; will you be so good as to let me leave this trunk at your house." I said, I have not room for it, unless you put it into the potatoe binn. He said, "that would do. It belongs to a young man who has left his situation, and it has got his clothes in it. He said it might be a day or two first, but when he got a situation he would move it again. That trunk remained there nine days, I think until the 12th of September; on that day a woman came who made an application for the trunk. In consequence of suspicion, I went to Malborough street office, and themagistrates sent an officer to my house, he took the trunk to the office, and I saw it broken open at the office; it was then in the same state as it was when it was first left. I did not put any thing into it. When it was opened, there was a good deal of plate and other things in it. I did not see any clothes in it.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. In consequence of the last witness having made an application at our office, I went and got a trunk; this is it, and I have had it in my custody ever since. We broke it open at our office, and on opening it, we found four silver desert spoons, ten table spoons, four tea-spoons, one butter-knife, one marrow spoon, one pair of steel snuffers, a silver salt seller, a cut glass mustard pot, three damask tablecloths, six yards of new towelling, a metal brass mounted travelling ink-stand, a piece of green baize, a table cover with a yellow border; these are all worth considerably more than twenty pounds.

WILLIAM MAGUIRE . The younger Kelley lodged with me; I let him one room; he came on the 29th of January, and remained until the 24th of July. The woman at the bar, Fricker, came to lodge with him as his wife; they lived there together as man and wife, for about a couple of months; then she got a place in Berner's-street. While she was in place there, she came twice to see him. I heard of the robbery in Berner's-street about a week after West-end Fair. I remember the prisoner Fricker was taken up and was in prison. I remember the prisoner Kelley coming for me; he called on me once, and as I was at home, I received him. The second time I was out. The third time a lad called for me, and when I saw him on these several occasions, he made inquiries how I did, and whether any one had been for him. I remember asking him why he did not come to my house; he said he had reasons for it; he sent for me, and I went to him several times; once Mr. Hitchen came for me. I went to the place where Kelley was five or six times when be sent messages to me. On one of these occasions, he desired me to go to Marlborough-street; he said he expected Fricker to be brought up to the office, and I was to observe whether she came for examination from the House of Correction. During the latter part of the time that he lodged with me with Fricker, they appeared very miserably poor, with scarcely any thing to cover their nakedness. When I saw him in August and September, before he was taken up, he appeared comfortable, with a newish kind of a hat, a goodish coat and breeches, with new stockings, and he had a watch. I remember seeing him ahd Hitchin together when he desired me to go for an attorney for him in Hatton Garden; I refused.

JOHN KING . I live in Berner's-street, exactly opposite to Mrs. Ashworth's house. I remember the circumstance of her house being robbed. On the Tuesday, I was in my shop, and saw a person standing at the corner of Castle-street and Berner-street, apparently looking up to the second floor of Mrs. Ashworth's house in Berner-street; I should suppose it was then about four o'clock in the afternoon. He watched her house I should suppose for the space of one or two minutes. I saw Mrs. Athworth's servant maid almost immediately come out of the house, and come to the corner to him; it was the prisoner Fricker. It appeared when they met together, by the motion of her right hand to his left, that something passed from one to the other; I did not see the colour of that something; they went a little way down Castle-street, and immediately returned, crossed over the way towards No. 10, and went down Bernersstreet. Knowing the robbery had been committed, I beckoned to Mrs. Ashworth, who was immediately opposite with the window open, and pointed to the prisoners. In consequence of what I observed, I desired my son to watch the man; I believe I did as far as Oxford-street; I observed him; he was a tall man with long dark whiskers, a dark black beard, apparently of two days standing. I thought I had seen that man before, frequently taking up a position, and always such that his eyes was ben on Mrs. Ashwoith's house. I have seen him in that position from perhaps an how to an hour and a half, or two hours. I look at the hat; the younger Kelley resembles that man, but I could not swear to him.

ALFRED KING . I am the son of the last witness. On the 30th of July, my father called my attention to a man in the street; but not until I had seen that man there before; I had seen that man there before; I had seen him about half past one or two o'clock that day standing there. I first saw him about ten, and his eyes were fixed on Mrs. Ashworth's house. About ten minutes before my father called my attention to him. I saw him Fricker came out, and gave him something like green silk, which she had concealed under her apron, and when Kelley took it, he put it under his coat; I saw them go down to the corner of Newman-mews, in conversation, and in a few minutes they parted. Young Kelley I speak positively to.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Fricker's Defence. I am thoroughly innocent of the charge laid against me.

William Kelley 's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I feel much concerned to see that so much of the valuable time of the Court has been taken up on this occasion; but if the Court had allowed me before my trial, I could have saved your Lordship all that trouble; but I could not suffer any one to be hurt, if I could say or do any thing of importance. I have therefore submited myself to take my trial, to do the other prisoners that justice which they have a right to require at my hands. I shall therefore coniess to your Lorship that I am the only guilty person; and whatever the other prisoners have done, they have been induced so to do from my mis-representation of the case. Consider what must my feelings be in bringing the grey hairs of my aged father, who spared no parts or expence to render me a respectable member of society, to this ignominious and disgraceful situation. With respect to Hitchin, the consequence of his conviction would be still more unfortunate than to me; for an aged father and an invalided sister who look up to him for support,would he deprived of that support. With respect to Elizabeth Fricker , I can't conceive that any proof has been adduced to affect her. I am undoubtedly bound to confess the innocence of them all; and if it would be any satisfaction to the Court, I would confess the manner in which the robbery was committed. With respect to my own innocence, I would not have broken and entered the house; but I am an accessary certainly, and have led all the other prisoners to what they have done; and all of them are innocent, so help me God. If I was going to die this moment, certainly I am guilty.

Peter Kelley 's Defence. I am innocent; I know nothing of the contents of the trunk.

William Kelley , in continuance. -My Lord, would it have any effect if I were to state the manner in which the robbery was committed?

COURT. You can state what you please with respect to yourself; but I must tell you that whatever you state with respect to the other prisoners can have no other effect.

William Kelley , in continuance. I have only to say my Lord, that the house was entered by a boy; without the knowledge of any of the prisoners. Certainly I know myself to be guilty, and I should be a vile rogue indeed worse than what I am if I were not to say that the other prisoners are innocent.

WILLIAM KELLEY , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

FRICKER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

HITCHIN, NOT GUILTY .

PETER KELLEY , GUILTY , aged 64.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1129. JAMES DUNPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , twenty pounds weight of lead, value 3s. the property of Mary Luffnell , deceased.

THOMAS PALMER . I live with Mr. Morgan, No. 30, Percy-street. On the morning of the 26th of September, I saw that the kitchen roof of the house in question was stript of the lead. We got into the house, and in the passage found the very piece of lead which was cut from the roof, and which fitted to it, which we marked; the last witness, the constable, and I were altogether. The copper and fixtures were all gone. We watched, expecting the person who cut the lead would call for it; and on the 28th, in the morning, about six o'clock, we saw the prisoner at the bar on the roof of the kitchen, and we took him into custody with the lead in question; then we took him to the watchhouse.

HENRY HOWARD , and WILLIAM SHEPHERD . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

(Property produced and sworn to.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1130. CHARLES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Cotton , in the King's highway, on the 4th of October , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a watch, value 2l. three gold seals, value 3l. and two gold keys, value 10s. his property .

THOMAS COTTER . On Sunday night, the 4th of October last, I was followed by three or four men about twelve o'clock at night; they wanted to fall out with me, and I rather felt my watch just as it was going; I was not quite sober. I fell down, and I cried robbery. I saw the watch advertised about three days after. I understood that man got clear off.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1131. MARGARET FISHER , was indicted for stealing, a pair of silver spectacles, and other articles, value 40s. and upwards, the property of John Weiss , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN WEISS . The prisoner was a servant of mine. On the 9th of August, she staid away in the evening, and we had a great suspicion of her. In consequence of that, we went to the watchhouse to get an officer. She came the next morning at six o'clock for her thing. I told her to come between eight and nine, and she should have them. She did not come until the evening. I then sent for a constable, and had her things searched, and the articles in the indictment were found among them; there were pen knives, scissors, and different kinds of cutlery, which were my property; altogether there were things to the amount of ten or fifteen pounds; but I can't say that they were all taken at once.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1132. RAPHAEL JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a pocket-book, value 1s. and 31l. in Bank of England notes, the pro- of Luke Crosbie , from his person ,

LUKE CROSBIE . On the 11th of the present month, I was coming from the Jerusalem coffee-house with a correspondent, and I had the notes in question in my pocket-book in my pocket. I felt something like a pull at my pocket, and on immediately turning round, I missed my pocket-book, and saw the prisoner running away. I immediately pursued him, and when he was stopped the pocket book was found on him under his coat.

JAMES FULLER . I was upon Cornhill , and saw the prisoner's arm at the prosecutor pocket. The prisoner immediately ran off. Mr. Crosbie complained of having lost his property. He was taken before I could come up.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1133. JOHN MILLER, alias WHITE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Spicer , in the King's highway, on the 25th of September , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, two hundred ounces weight of silver, value 40l. the pro Joseph Clementson .

THOMAS SPICER . I am fifteen years of age. When this happened I was in the employ of Mr. JosephClementson, who is a silver caster . He works for different persons, and for Mr. Bateman. At about a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, of the 25th of September, I set out from my master's house, in Basket-alley, Angel-street, St. Mantin's Le Grand, with two hundred ounces weight of silver, to take to Mr. Bateman's. I took it to Mr. Bateman's, at No. 108, Bunhill Row. Mr. Bateman wished it to be taken back to my master's house, as there were two gentlemen with an order for it. I took it back towards my master's house, and in the middle of Monkwell-street , the prisoner at the bar, came and put his hands before my face. I had seen him before he came up; I saw him at the top of the Alley where Mr. Bateman lived. I am sure he is the man; he took the bag out of my hand. I struggled to keep possession of it; he got it out of my possession at last. I was struggling with him full five minutes. The prisoner had his hands over my face. It was at last taken away from me by another man. The prisoner threw me down and then walked away. I raised an alarm; I could not tell in what direction the other man went. I cried stop that man. he is a thief, and the prisoner was stopped in Noble-street. I am quite sure he is the man.

JOHN CLINTON . I am a fruiterer. I live in Noble-street. On hearing the cry, I stepped out of my own door, and saw the prisoner running. I saw no one else running but him, and the lad. I made up to him as he ran, and caught him by the right arm. He instantly fell, and whether it was from me, or whether he slipped. I don't know. Then the lad came up. I said, are you sure this is the man, and he said, "yes, I will swear to him." The boy did not say he had lost any thing. He said,"take him to my master's; that is the man." We took him to Mr. Clementson's. The boy said he held him round his eyes and mouth, and he could not see, nor call out. He said then that the bag of silver had been taken from him. The prisoner did not say the least.

JOSEPH CLEMENTSON . I am master of that boy, the first witness; I sent him with two hundred ounces weight of silver to Mr. Bateman; it was worth forty eight pounds and upwards.

WILLIAM BATEMAN . I live in Bunhill Row. I sent some silver to the last witness's to be melted. The boy Spicer, brought it to me. It was about seven o'clock when he brought it to me. I afterwards sent him back with the same silver.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from Thames-street, where I work, going to Aldersgate-street, I heard this boy sing out stop thief, and I ran after the people that were running, and got before them, and missed the man all of a sudden, and I ran up a street, the name of which. I do not rightly know, and I was stopped by that man. That is all I know.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1134. JOHN KNIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a bag containing two pounds weight of pepper, value 5s. the property of Thomas Pritchard .

WILLIAM BEDFORD . On the 8th of October last, in consequence of suspicion, I watched the prisoner who was also in his service. I went to the pepper tub and laid the pepper bowl, and put a small piece of stick over it, which if moved I should know. I then went to an apartment, from which I could see the prisoner. I saw him take a bag and go to the pepper tub, and fill it with pepper. I then came from the place where, I was, and called him from the warehouse. After that, I charged him with it, and he strongly denied it. Mr. Thomas Pritchard said he saw him throw it away. The prisoner made some excuse, and said, he merely took it for some pickling, or for his friends. We took it up, and it weighed two pounds and upwards.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1135. HANNAH CRAWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , half a bushel of coals, value 9d. the property of John Littlewood and John Stephenson .

JOHN LITTLEWOOD . I am a coal merchant . The prisoner is what they call a mud raker . On the 16th of September, I was on our wharf, and saw the prisoner's hand going up frequently into one of the barges and taking the coals, which she put into a bag or apron, which was tied round her. We could not stop her then, as she was up to her middle in the mud and water; but we took her when she came on shore.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined one month , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1136. DANIEL CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , from the person of Peter M'Donald , a pocket handkerchief, value 2s. his property .

PETER M'DONALD . On the 24th of September last, I was coming along Bishopsgate-street, and opposite the London Tavern I felt something at my pocket. I turned round, but could see nobody. At the corner of Cornhill , I felt my other pocket attacked by a person whom I had not seen before. I I put my hand to my pocket, and turned on my heel, but my handkerchief was disposed of. The prisoner was within a foot of me. I could have no doubt, but that he was the person, as there was no one near. I accused him, and he instantly drew the handkerchief from his side pocket, and begged that I would not prosecute him, as he was a poor man. I however resisted his entreaties, and he then abused me, and declared that I was one of Vaughan's gang. To avoid his escape, I threw up his heels, and held him on the pavement, and kept him until an officer came.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1137. GEORGE NEDON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , a handkerchief, value 4s. the property of Henry Burtenshaw .

HENRY BURTENSHAW . I live in Newgate-street , and am a jeweller . There was a mob looking at a fire plug which had sprung, and I went to keep the window clear. I was returning in again, when the constable brought this man up to me, and asked me if I had lost any thing. I found I had lost my handkerchief and he produced it to me.

HENRY HONEY . I am a constable. In the evening of the 1st of October, there was a great mob essembled at the end of Newgate-street, looking at one of the pipes which was burst. I saw the prisoner commit the act, and I apprehended him.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 57.

Transported for Life .

London Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1138. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for stealing. on the 25th of September , a till, value 1s. four bank tokens, value 12s. two other bank tokens, value 3s. and nine shillings and tenpence three farthings in monies numbered , the property of Thomas Hobson .

THOMAS HOBSON . On Wednesday evening the 25th of September, I was sitting in my parlour behind my shop, and the prisoner at the bar came in and went round the counter and pulled the till out. He must have seen me. I was coming out, and just as he got to the door, he have it down. When it was down, he took the money out and ran off, I went after him, and caught him just order the window. I did not know him before. I brought him him back into the shop, and sent for the watch. I I delivered him and the money to the watchman.

GUILTY aged 12.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1139. WILLIAM GOODING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a copper, value 10s. the property of some person or persons unknown, and fixt to a building .

EDWARD WEIGHT . I live at Chelsea . On the morning of the day in the indictment, I was called by my servant at a little after five o'clock, and he told me that he thought there were thieves in the next house, which at that time was not inhabited. In consequence of that I got up, and caught the prisoner coming out with the copper in question on a porter's knot on his shoulders. He said, "he was sent for it by a man in the next street," and wanted to go, but I did not choose to let him. I gave him in charge of a constable. We saw where the copper had been taken from.

ANN - I am the servant of the last witness. On the morning in question, I saw two men go into the house next door, which was uninhabited, and as I suspected, I went and called my master.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1140. JAMES GREGORY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , the carcase of a of a pig, value 1l. 6s. 10d. the property of Thomas Grimmett .

THOMAS GRIMMETT . I bought the carcase of a pig, forty-six pounds weight, last Friday morning, at about half past six o'clock, and left it in my cart on Ludgate Hill . In about half an hour afterwards I heard it had been stolen, and in consequnce of information, I went to the pastrycook's shop on Ludgate Hill, where I saw it.

JAMES SNOW . I saw the prisoner take this carcase from the cart of the prosecutor at about seven o'clock on the morning in question. I shewed Grummett the pig, and he claimed it.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined three months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1141. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering an outhouse belonging to the dwelling house of William Blake , and for stealing therein, six geese, the property of George Blake .

JAMES BLAKE . I live with my father. Between twelve and one o'clock in the morning of the 4th of October , we were alarmed by the geese making a noise in this shed. I immediately called my brother William, and we went down stairs, and saw the prisoner getting through the roof of the shed. He had taken off about six tiles, and had cut the laths. We secured him as soon as he came off the tiles. I then unlocked the door, and there these six geese laid dead on the ground, just killed and all bleeding. We immediately got a constable and had him taken into custody.

JAMES WYNNE . I received charge of the prisoner and the property. I took from him a knife which was bloody. I asked him whether it was that with which he killed the geese, and he told me yes.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined six months , and whipped at Hendon .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1142. WILLIAM ASHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a gold watch, value 10l. two gold sea's, value 2l. a gold key, value 5s. a metal key, value 2d. and other articles , the property of Edward Ogilvie ; And ELEANOR HENRICKSON and FRANCIS DINON were indicted as receivers of parts and parcels of the said property, they well knowing it to have been stolen .

EDWARD OGILVIE . On the night of the 18th of October, I slept in my cabin on board my ship, in the Thames, off Iron Gate wharf ; the Barten layed on one side, and the Providence on the other. I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock, leaving my watch and two silk handkerchiefs laying on the table. I awakened in the morning about half past six, and immediately missed my watch. I was told a man had been on board my ship. About nine o'clock I went on shore myself, and saw a person in custody, and saw my watch and one of the silk handkerchiefs and one gold seal, which I knew to be my property.

JOHN GEORGE . I am a pawnbroker. On the 19thof October, I received information about eight o'clock in the morning, that a gold watch had been stolen; and about two hours afterwards, the prisoner Henrickson offered a gold watch to me to pawn for three pounds. I asked her whose it was? and she said, her sister's. I secured her immediately, and took her towards the Thames Police office. Going down Old Gravel-lane, she turned up a court, expressing a wish to change her shoes before she went to the office. I kept the watch by me all the time. She went into a house, and I followed her. She went into a room on the ground floor, and I staid outside the door. Through the crevice between the door and the door post, I saw her take something from her pocket, and hide it under the bed clothes. She then came out, and said as she could not find the shoes, she must go as she was. When I got to the office, I informed the officers of what I had seen, and I accompanied them back, and shewed them the house.

JOHN GOTTY . I am a police officer. I looked under the pillow, and found a gold seal. When I came back, I asked Henrickson what she had been hiding under the pillow? and she told me a seal belonging to the watch. The prisoner Ashton was then in custody, and while he and Henrickson were under examination, he said that Francis Dickson the little black man had pawned the other, seal and the golden key at Mr. Mount's, the pawnbrokers; the captain of the ship was with us, and he requested Mr. Mount to shew the key and seals that were pledged with him, and he did so. Ashton was merely charged on suspicion at first.

JAMES EVANS . On the 19th of the present moath, I went in company with the last witness and Mr. George to this court, in Old Gravel-lane. While they were searching the place below, I went up into the attick, and there I found the prisoner Ashton, concealed in a closet. I took him into custody, and round his neck I found this silk handkerchief, which is claimed by the prosecutor. I immediately asked him if he had sent the watch to pledge by a women? and he said, he had. I then took him to the office. Henrickson was there before us, and I asked Ashton whether that was the woman he had sent to pledge the watch? and he said, it was. I asked him where he got it? and he said, he found it on the Dock-hill, wrapt up in some paper. I afterwards apprehended the prisoner Dickson in the same room that I had apprehended Ashton in.

THOMAS WATSON . I am in the employment of Mr. Mount, the pawnbroker. On Saturday morning, the 19th of October, the prisoner Dickson pledged a gold seal and a broken key with me.

ASHTON, GUILTY , aged 18.

HENRICKSON, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

DICKSON, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1143. MARGARET GOVEAR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , six pairs of stockings, value 3s. and other articles , the property of Thomas Sherman .

MARY SUERMAN . The prisoner lodged with me about three months. I missed a great many things, and in conseqence, suspected her. I gave her notice to quit me on the 4th of October; on which day, she went into my kitchen and stripped the lines of the clothes. A lodger of mine came and informed me.

SARAH CLARKE . I lodged with Mrs. Sherman. On the 4th of October, about twelve o'clock, I heard her kitchen door unlocked, and I looked over the well stair case, and saw the prisoner come out of the kitchen. I went down, and looked into the kitchen, and saw the lines stripped of all the clothes. I followed her, and asked her where the clothes were; but she would give me no answer, and shut the side door. Then she went back to a room which was not inhabited, and in that room the clothes were found.

JOHN LOVETT . I am a constable, and found the property in this back room. The prisoner was close to the collar door, which is adjoining the room where I found these clothes.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge laid against me.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1144. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , forty-eight pounds weight of pork; value 1l. 10s. the property of William Thomas .

WILLIAM THOMAS . On Saturday morning last, about eight o'clock, my employer gave me a pig to carry home to his house. I put it into a butcher's cart, that the butcher might convey it home, and leave it as he passed the door.

THOMAS CUITTY . I saw a man take a side of pork from the cart in Warwick-lane , about twenty minutes after eight, and put it into another cart. I told the young man who is the next witness, that he was stealing it.

CHRISTOPHER DUCER . I saw the prisoner with a side of pork on his back, and he threw it into another cart.

William Thomas . They shewed me the side of pork which was removed by the prisoner, and I knew it to be mine. I found where the prisoner was in the public-house, and I got an officer, and apprehended him.

HENRY HONEY . I took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six months , and fined 1s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1145. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing a pair of sheets, value 6s. the property of Bowany Cabellow .

BOWANY CABELLOW . I lost these things yesterday between one and two o'clock. A neighbour called up to me, and asked me if I had sent a woman out with a bundle. In consequence of what she said, I pursued the prisoner, and brought her back.I found the things on her.

JOSEPH BLACK , Yesterday about two o'clock, I heard a noise of Mrs. Cabellow's appartment being broken open. I went to see what was the matter, and I stopped the prisoner with these things.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1146. WILLIAM RUSSEL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , three water ewers, value 12s. 6d. the property of Smithson Milner and John Morris .

WILLIAM SMART . On Thursday, the 26th of September, about half past six o'clock in the evening, I was at the back of the warehouse, and hearing a noise at the door, I went out, but could see nothing. I turned up Botolph-lane, and saw the prisoner at the bar with the goods in question on his head; I said to him, my friend, you must come back, you are wanted. In the mean time I sent for an officer.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1147. CHARLES BILLINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, a pocket handkerchief, value 1s. the property of James Bailey , from his person .

JAMES BAILEY . On Sunday night last, between eight and nine o'clock, I was standing at the door of Newgate when there was a crowd, and I heard some prisoners had broken out. The prisoner was on the left hand side of me. and a young man who was on my right hand, told me that he was picking my pocket. I felt something in my pocket, and I immediately turned round, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand, and I immediately collared him, and he dropped it. The young man picked it up, and I said as we were so near Newgate, we might as well go in at once; and we did, and I delivered the prisoner to Mr. Hodson.

-HODSON. I am a city officer, and received charge of the prisoner and the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined six months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1148. JAMES FLANNAGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , three pounds and half weight of wire, value 3s. the property of James Chaplain , the elder, and James Chaplain , the younger.

JAMES CHAPLAIN , THE YOUNGER. On the 19th of October, between two and three o'clock, a man called at my warehouse, and asked me if I had any suspicion of any of my men robbing me; I told him no. He then told me that my porter was in the custody of Harrison, the city officer. Soon after, Harrison brought the prisoner to Cateaton-street, and produced the wire in question, which was our property.

JOHN DAY . I had some private intimation given to me, in consequence of which, I gave it to Harrison, the City officer.

ANTHONY HARRISON . In consequence of private information I received from the last witness, I watched a notorious receiving house, and I saw the prisoner come down Whitecross-street, and go into it. I followed him, and took him into custody, and on searching him, found the wire in question on him.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1149. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for embezzlement .

CHARLES WING . I am a baker . The prisoner was in my employment, and was intrusted to receive money on my account. On the 19th of August, the prisoner accounted to me for forty shillings in copper which he had received from Mrs. Susannah Green, but no more.

MRS. SUSANNAH GREEN . On the 19th of August last, I paid the prisoner two pounds twelve shillings on account of his master. I gave him two pounds in copper, ten shillings, and four sixpences. He gave me this receipt.

(Receipt put in and read.)

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . I took charge of the prisoner. He told me he had at different times embezzled between five and six pounds, and had lost it gambling.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1150. REID COUZENS and GEORGE SLATTER were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , two horses collars, value 8s. the property of Samuel Holloway .

SAMUEL HOLLOWAY . All I know is that the collars in question are my property.

JOHN WILKES . I work for one of the clerks at Mr. Elliott's, the brewer. On Tuesday, the 24th of September, the two prisoners came into the stable, and laid hold of two old horse collars; but they said, let us take two better than these, and so they took the two in question. I did not know whether they worked there or not.

JAMES GILLMORE . I apprehended the prisoners.

MARY ANN GARVA . I bought these horses collars from the prisoners on the 24th of September.

COUZENS, GUILTY , aged 57.

SLATTER, GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1151. CHRISTOPHER JOHN COLMAN was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Bartholomew Mannix .

DANIEL HAYES . I knew Mannix, the deceased; he lived at No. 20, Monmouth-street , in the cellar, a cellar which opens to the street, and where they retail second hand shoes; he was a sawyer ; the prisoner was his son-in-law, by his mother' first marriage. On the Sunday morning, I was there when he came home; I was down in the cellar. When he came in, his wife and the prisoner were at home at the place. On Sunday night, the 14th of September, he went to an Irishman's wake; he was an Irishman. He staid there until about three or four o'clock in the morning; he was in liquor when he returned. I did not go home with him. He went out the next morning at about seven or eight o'clock; I was there. Then he went out with a man who invited him to drink. He came back about eleven o'clock in liquor; his wife was selling a pair of shoes at the door; the man said one was larger than the other; her son, the prisoner, was then down in the cellar. Upon these words, the deceased man was coming into the kitchen, and he said, he knew very well what business was going on. He and his wife had some words about the money; it is supposed that it was the prisoner's wages he wanted. I supposed they were speaking to the money that was due to the prisoner. The prisoner's mother told the deceased, that he always wanted the handling of her sons wages. Then they had some words about it, and she went up stairs, and the deceased man followed her up stairs, as if in anger; he had nothing in his hand. I went after him, and brought him back again. The deceased man then said that he had a great mind to give it to the prisoner. The young man tried to defend myself, and then they both grappled together, and I could not tell which caught hold first. A little time after, in the bustle, the young man fell down against the wall. Then the deceased man went up stairs again to his wife. Then the young man came up. I should have said that the knife dropped from the prisoner's hand; he picked it up, and followed him. The knife had fallen on to the working board. He followed him up stairs, and said, he would stick him through if he touched his mother. The deceased had not said any thing about that before he went up. I remained in the cellar. A little time after that. I heard the deceased man cry out for to take the knife. This was a very short time after the prisoner left the cellar. Then he came down in a very short time with his hand covered with blood. I asked him if he had stuck Manaix he made a kind of a groan, and his mother came down. Then the prisoner's mother bid me go for a doctor; and I went to the top of the cellar stairs, and saw the deceased man carrying down towards St. Giles's. I went in the next morning to the Hospital to see him.

ANDREW TASSIE . On the Sunday morning, at about eleven o'clock, I heard a bustle, and I opened the middle door from the shop. When I went up stairs, I found the deceased's wife standing there. I asked her what was the matter, and she said, she ran there for fear of her husband's beating her. The moment I spoke to her, up came Mannix; he spoke to her very pleasently, and I advised her to come down. At that moment that I was speaking, the prisoner came up with a knife in his hand; he made a rush at the deceased, and presently there was a cry, and the blood begun to run about, and the cries alarmed the people. At any time I did not see any blows pass from any one. I must have seen it if such a thing took place. There was no blows whilst I was on the stair case. I tried to get the knife from the prisoner, and I could not, but at last by persuasion he threw it over the balusters.

MR. CHARLES ALEXANDER PARSONS . I am a surgeon, and attend the Middlesex Hospital. I remember a person of the name of Manaix being brought there on Sunday, the 15th of September. There were two wounds on the fore part of the arm. I did what was necessary for his safety; one wound was about two inches; it had wounded the main artery of the arm. There were two wounds. The other was comparatively slight; he lived exactly a month. The larger wound was certainly the primary cause of his death; mortification ensued; but the man was labouring under a constitutional disease of the lungs at the same time.

Q. Do you ascribe his death to the wound or to the disease - A. That is rather a difficult question to answer. He had that disease previous to the wound, and there was a great deal of inflamation on the lungs after the death. If the wound had not been given, I should have ascribed his death to the lungs; but the wound having mortified, he had two causes of death. There was a bleeding at the arm at the time he died, which most probably proceeded from the aggravation of his coughing. I think his death was hastened by the inflamation of the lungs; probably that occasioned the mortification.

GUILTY , aged 17,

Of Manslaughter.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baroa Graham.

1152. JOSEPH RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying John Disman .

JAMES SAMUEL . The boy , the deceased, had been up in the loft to take some work to the vice-men. When he came down, he stood talking at my side with another boy. The prisoner told him to go on his own side, and mind his business; the boy made answer that he should not. The man gave the boy a shove, and the boy said if he did that again, he would kick his shins. The man told the boy if he would not hold his tongue, he would bring a chissel rod, and give him a good hiding. The boy repeated again that he would kick his shine. The prisoner had a spring-mander, which he threw at him in the heat of passion; it struck him on the forehead, and the prisoner went and pulled it out of his head; he exclaimed Oh God! what have I done; and he tore the hair of his head in handfuls, and the blood and froth came out at his mouth. He immediately took the boy in his arms, and took him to a coach.

MR. MANN. I was in 1809 house surgeon to St. George's Hospital. The boy was brought to the Hospital, and I saw a small wound on his forehead; but from the account which I received, fatal consequences were to be expected; it had perporated the scull, gone a considerable way into the brain.

Prisoner's Defence. As soon as this unfortunate affair had happened, which was in 1809, I went andcave myself up to the boy's father, and a constable. The father said, I know he would sooner hurt himself then my son, and I went off down into the country immediately.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Of Manslaughter.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1153. PRISCILLA KIRK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Scales , about the hour of nine in the night of the 12th of October , with intent to steal and for feloniously stealing therein, a gown, value 10s. a shawl, value 8s. and other articles of wearing apparel, the property of the said George Scales .

ELIZABETH SCALES . About nine o'clock on the night of the 12th of October, I went to get a pot of beer; my husband went with me. When I came into the passage, I saw a strange woman come out at the door with my candle in her hand; she said I have got your candle. I said who are you, and what do you do with my candle, what have you been in my room for; she said she wanted me, and was sent by a person who lived opposite. I asked her who, and she said she did not know the name; but she said if I would let her go down stairs, she would fetch the woman, but I said no, I fear you have robbed me. I called to the lodgers to open the door on the same floor; I asked them if they knew the prisoner, and they said no. I called out stop her, she has robbed me. Then she said, no I have nothing; see, I have nothing in my hands. With that they looked about her clothes, and found under her apron an apron of mine, wet, which I had just washed; it had hung on the back of a chair, presently we found the remainder of the things thrown carelessly down, but within the door.

GUILTY , aged 46,

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

1154. BARNETT BARNETT was indicted for stealing, four cut glass fruit dishes, six cut glass liquor bottles, and several other articles of cut glass, value 5l. the property of William Naylor .

WILLIAM NAYLOR . I ate on the evening of the 11th of September, or early the next morning, I lost these things; they were in an unfinished state.

- COHEN. I was coming along the street; the prisoner at the bar asked me if I knew any one that dealt in glass; I am the person that he left in the cart for a short time; I told him I knew of several being in the trade myself, and accordingly I took him to Mr. Lyon's house, and that is all I have to say.

- BRIGGS. On the 18th of September, a jew glass cutter came to me, and asked me if I wanted a job; I told him I did, and he said he would recommend me one. Accordingly he left me Mr. Lyons's address in the shop. I went, and was shewn the articles by Mrs. Lyons. I afterwards heard that Mr. Naylor's shop had been robbed, and I sent him word.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. On the 25th of September, Bring and another person applied at Guildball for a search warrant to search Lyons's place. I found some difficulty in procuring a warrant. and so I went with them, and I sent Briggs in to bargain with Lyons about the glasses. I went in in a moment or two, and found him shewing the two large trifle dishes to Biggs. I then told Lyons I would take him into custody, unless he gave some satisfactory account of them. He then shewed me all the rest, and said he got them from Barnett Barnett.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1155. JOSEPH CHURCHILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , a wooden box, value 2s. twenty four brass candlesticks, and twenty four brass cocks, value 8l. the property of George Woolford .

GEORGE WOOLFORD . I am the Blackwall and Limehouse carrier . I lost my property on the 10th of october last, in Gracechurch-street . My nephew, Thomas Holford , will state how it was stolen.

THOMAS HOLFORD . On the 10th of October, I left my cart at the end of Salbot-court, in Gracechurch-street; it was at about seven o'clock in the evening. I went to the White-lion booking office to see if there were any parcels for Blackwall, where we look every day, and there were two boxes; one containing the articles in question. I bought it out first, and when I was coming with the other, I saw the prisoner take this one from the cart. I immediately ran after him, and collared him; he threw the box of his shoulders, and struggled with me, and knocked me down. I ran after him again, as far as East-cheap, and then I saw another man run and pick the box up, and I took it to the cart again. I did not pursue the prisoner myself after that.

- MORGAN. I pursued the prisoner crying stop thief, and he was stopt, and I secured him.

GUILTY . aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1156. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , four silk handkerchiefs value 1l. 5s. the property of William Wilson .

THOMAS YOUNG . On the 18th of September, the prisoner came in, and he asked me to look at some pocket hankerchiefs. I asked him silk or cotten, and he said silk, I took a bundle out of the window, and put them before him. He then asked me if I had any with a white spot. I turned round to look in the window, and a piece out of that description. A gentleman came in to buy some articles, and he made a full stop, and accused the prisoner of taking a piece of handkerchief. The prisoner seemed very much confused, and denied it, and tried to be seated, and turned his pockets out. I also contradicted the gentleman; however we unbuttoned the flap of the prisoner's small clothes, and pulled the said handkerchiefs out. He begged very hard to be let go, but I told him I could do nothing of the kind. I was persuaded that he was an odd hand by the wayhe did it. In the mean time, the gentleman who detected him, prevailed on Mrs. Wilson to let him go.

GUILTY aged 21.

1157. JOHN THOMAS was again indicted for a like offence .

GUILTY aged 21.

Transported for Seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1158. SUSAN GROGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of October , two silver spoons value 6s. the property of George Crosby .

GEORGE CROSBY . On Thursday the 3rd of October, a pawnbroker waited on me with a copy of the crest which I knew was on them.

JAMES BASSET . I am apprentice to Mr. Harrison; his shop is at No. 12, Beech street, Golden Square. I don't know the prisoner at the bar; but on the 3rd of October, a woman named Mary Mumply , came to pledge these spoons. I asked her where she got them, and in consequence of the account she gave me. I went to Mr. Crosby; he saw the spoons and claimed them.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1159. JAMES ENWRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a bonnet, and other articles, value 11s. 6d. the property of Eleanor Gorzeman .

WILLIAM DEANE . On the day in the indictment, I was standing in Mount-street, and a boy pointed the prisoner out to me, as having been down an area in South Audley-street . I took him with a bundle on him, containing the property in question.

JACOB BIRD . I saw the prisoner go down the area where the prosecutrix lives, and I saw him come up again with a bundle, and I told Mr. Deane.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1160. JOHN RIPTIN was indicted for a fraud .

THOMAS CARR , ESQ. I am solicitor to the Excise. In consequence of some prosecution against Thomas Cooper , he presented a petition to the Board of Excise; he presented two, one offering fifty pounds to stay the proceedings and costs. The Board accepted the proposal. Afterwards he presented another petition, requesting the Board to remit the whole. Upon that, I submitted to the Board that Mr. Fitchew should report relative to the statement of facts made in the petition. Finally the Board remitted the proceedings against Cooper altogether.(The petitions were here read.) I do not know the defendant; he had no situation under the Excise. He was never authorized to apply to Cooper for any money to make any compromise.

JOHN FITCHEW . In consequence of directions I received, I called on Cooper to levy fifty pounds, and forty three pounds cost; that was in the beginning of November, 1815; his family was in a most distressed state, and his children very ill; they were in such a state, that I did nothing then but reported. I recommended him to petition. I know that he afterwards did petition. I was not made acquainted with the stay of proceedings. I saw Riptin the defendant some time after that; he asked me at several times whether Cooper's money was not paid; I did not give him any direct answers for once or twice; at last I told him it never would be paid, and I told him that I had a petition to report on, and I believed that the Board from distress, would remit it altogether. The defendant said that he believed that Cooper could pay as well as any of the rest if he was pressed for the money. He seemed distressed that the money was not recovered. I afterwards saw him in the course of June, 1816. The first time I saw the defendant was in the House of Correction in Cold Bath Fields. He gave the information against Cooper.

THOMAS COOPER . In consequence of having some Exchequer Proceedings against me, I presented the first petition. Mr. Fitchew waited on me, demanded a sum of fifty pound and cost, which together would make a sum of ninety four pounds; I was unable to pay, and in consequence of Mr. Fitchew's advice, I presented a second petition. As far as I knew, I never received any answer from the Board. Riptin called several times after the second petition, I have known him five or six years. When he called on me, he said he came from the officers of the Excise, I understand, said he, that you have petitioned the Board, and you have sent a certificate, but I can assure you that it is going on against you, and it will make it still greater expence; now I have it in my power to settle it for you, for about twenty five pounds. I told him he might as well ask me for twenty five drops of blood from my heart. I told him I had not got the money. In consequence of his calling several times, he was paid, twelve pounds by my wife for setting the business. He said that there was not a shilling of it for him, and he said, I ought to make some compliment for himself. I agreed that he should have a little gin, rum, and brandy, as a compliment for his trouble, and I asked him for a receipt for the money; but he said that the Excise never gave receipts; but he told me I might rest assured that it was all perfectly right, and that I would never be called on for a shilling. After that he sent a person for the spirits, and got them.

SARAH COOPER. Corroborated the account of the last witness.

GUILTY aged 53.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1161. DAVID DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , a gown, value 5s. the property of Robert Holding ; and SARAH DAVIS was indicted for receiving it, knowing it to be stolen .

ELIZABETH HOLDING . I am the wife of Robert Holding . On the 21st of September, the prisoner David Davis came into my shop on a pretence of selling a child's frock, and after he was gone out of the shop, I missed the gown in question. I saw it again on the 23rd of October, at a pawnbroker's overWestminster Bridge. I went after David Davis , who was with two other boys, and they ran away, and I lost sight of him. I went to his mother's house, and after knocking twice, she opened the door. I asked her if her son was at home, and she said, no, he had been out all day. I told her I had lost a gown, and she said she did not see anything of it. When I met David Davis , I had him taken into custody.

SARAH SCHOFIELD . On the 21st of September, about half past five o'clock in the afternoon, I was sitting at work, and I saw two boys shuffle a gown from the prosecutors door; I lost sight of Davis who had come into the shop. Young Merryman was one of the boys.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1162. JOHN WILSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Shillito , in the night of the 27th of March , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, bank notes and cash to the amount of 160l. his property .

MRS. SHILLITO. On the night of the 27th of March, our house was broken open, and robbed of gold silver and notes to the amount of one hundred and sixty pounds; these were two fifteen pounds notes. When I got up the next morning, I found my rush light put out by breath as it appeared, and I missed my pockets, which contained the property in question. On my going down stairs, I found my pockets on the counter emptied.

CHARLES MANNINGTON GRUBB . I am a gentleman's servant out of place. In the month of March last, I paid a fifteen pound note to Mrs. Shillito; I had put my name on it.

ALEXANDER MACKBETH . I received that fifteen pound note on the 11th of September, from Mary Cramp .

MARY CRAMP . I live in Clare-market, and paid that note to Mr. Mackbeth. I received a fifteen pound note from John Wilson , the prisoner, in March last; he is my cousin.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1163. SAMUEL LEE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Burt , widow , about the hour of nine in the night of the 23rd of October , and for burglariously stealing therein, seven sheets, value 14s. five napkins, value 2s. 6d. three petticoats, value 6s. three shifts, value 6s. pair of stockings, value 1s. and an apron, value 6d. her property .

JANE BURT . My house was broken open about nine o'clock, on the 23rd of October, forced open with a crow, and the things mentioned in the indictment were stolen. I had been away from my house about ten days or a fortnight, and in the interim it had been robbed of property to the amount of about sixty pounds.

THOMAS MILLNER . On the night in question, I saw the prisoner on Mrs. Burt's garden wall, and another man preceded him with a bundle under his arm, they got off that wall, which was about four feet from the ground, and they went along a piece of ground belonging to the East India Dock Company, to some paling, about eight feet high. I never lost sight of them until they got to the paling; then the prisoner struggled up the pales; then I approached the prisoner, and stopped him, and said hallo, what have you got here; then the other man came up, and as he opened his coat, I saw the but end of a pistol, and I said you villian. if you draw another inch, I will cut you down with my cutlass. I immediately called out for assistance, but could get none. The other man made a run, and I took the prisoner to our night officer. When I examined the house, the brick work was cut away from the front door; there was a glass door inside, and there were two squares of glass cut away from the wood work, and the locks were wrenched back.

WILLIAM BOWER . I am an officer of the East India Docks. When I came from the docks between four and five in the evening of the 23rd of October, I heard that the door of Mrs. Burt's house was broken open. I got into the house, and I found three or four bricks cut out of the wall, by which means a crow had been put in, and the door forced open; on a round table there were four glasses, each full of wine, with a newspaper to each glass. There were two large trunks which had been gutted, and were cut all down to the bottom. In fact the place was intirely plundered.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1164. CHARLOTTE MORGAN was indicted for- stealing a quantity of lace, value 40s. and upwards, the property of Euphemia Middleton , in her dwelling house .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1165. WILLIAM PLAYER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , a watch, value 3l. the property of Samuel Tuck , in the dwelling house of Charles Tuck .

SAMUEL TUCK . I live in Tottenham , in the house of Charles Tuck . I left my watch on the mantleshelf in the front room, on the day in the indictment; when I saw the watch again, the prisoner was in custody.

JAMES CATLING . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to me by a young man who works for Mr. Tuck.

CHARLES TUCK put in a written account as follows, "I am dumb, I am a cordwainer, but I here state the case in my own hand writing, to be the truth and nothing but the truth. I saw the door opened and saw a stranger in the parlour. I had the presence of mind to look for the watch that was hung up, and I saw it was gone; I took hold of the man who had come in, and he dropped it behind him.

(The witness was here asked when, and where, this took place, and he wrote, "the robbery was committed on the 24th of September, at Tottenham, in the County of Middlesex," On beingasked who the person was that dropped the watch, he pointed to the prisoner.)

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY aged 15.

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1166. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , a hat, value 5s. 6d. the property of Henry Moses .

HENRY MOSES . On the day in the indictment, the prisoner came to my shop, about half past nine in the morning, and offered a pair of stockings for sale; I would not buy them. In about twenty minutes, or half an hour afterwards, I was attending to my books, and hearing a noise on the threshold of the door, and looking round, I saw the prisoner reach in and snatch away the hat in question. I immediately pursued him, and he threw himself down in the middle of the road, and would not come back. I got an officer and took him into custody.

NATHAN NATHAN . I received charge of the prisoner and the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1167. CHARLES HENRY was indicted for stealing, a piece of linen, value 2l. on the 10th of October , the property of John Andrews , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL JONES . I am servant to Mr. Andrews. He is a linen draper and hosier, and lives at No. 4, Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital . My master only rents the shop there. On the 10th of October, about half past eight in the evening, we heard a noise at the window. I immediately went to the door, and perceived a piece of Irish linen missing from the window. The glass had been broken about a month; any person putting in a hand through that broken glass, might reach the linen in question. I immediately went to the watchhouse, where I saw the prisoner in custody, and the linen.

JAMES STAPLETON . I saw the prisoner coming up Newman Passage, from Newman-street, towards Rathbone Place; he had a piece of Irish linen under his arm, and I immediately stopped him; it was about half past eight o'clock.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1168. WILLIAM EDWARDS and JOHN BARRETT were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , seven pounds, fifteen shillings, and sixpence in silver, a guinea, and two silk handkerchiefs, value 4s. the property of Thomas Edwards , in his dwelling house .

THOMAS EDWARDS . On the 13th of October, I was obliged to attend the funeral of my wife's mother. I left my home in the care of my children I returned about a quarter before six o'clock, to see that the children were put to bed. My door was locked and I could not get in. After I got in, I found the hasp wrenched off, and the property in question gone. The prisoner Edwards is my brother, and I saw him again last Monday week. I told him what I had lost, and I insisted on his telling me where the key was; and he said I must take hold of the other.

THOMAS EDWARDS , JUN. I went to the funeral with my father, and he sent me home in the evening, and somebody blew my light out when I got in. It was a tall man.

THOMAS VAN . I took both the prisoners. I understood the money was lost in guineas, and I said to the prisoner Edwards what have you done with the guineas, he said, he does not know what he has lost, for it was in silver. I said what have you done with it, and he said why, we shared it equally. He said this without either threat or promis held out to him.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1169. JOHN TATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , a pair of shoes, value 6s. the property of George Futter privately in his shop .

SARAH FUTTER . I was sitting at brekafast behind the the shop on the morning in question, and I saw a hand reach something off the cutting board in the shop. I immediately jumped up, and missed the shoes in question from the cutting board.

JOHN THOMPSON . I was going up Seymourplace; I stood at the corner, and saw two boys come up dorset street . The prisoner was one, and I saw him reach into the shop, and take the shoes, and I followed him as far as Manchester-street, where I stopped him with the shoes in his possession, and brought him back.

THOMAS STEPHENS . I received charge of the prisoner and the property.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined Three Months and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1170. WILLIAM JAMES and JOHN WHITE were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , a brass cock, value 12s. the property of Joseph Coles privately in his shop .

FRANCIS FAGAN . I was passing through Saffron Hill , on the 19th of October, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the two prisoners standing opposite a broker 's shop; I saw the prisoner White take a pair of sugar tongs off a table, upon which I went to Hatton Garden to get some more assistance. I got Wainwright, the officer, to come with me. We secured them, and on searching them, found on James the brass cock in question, which Mrs. Coles afterwards owned.

WILLIAM WAINWRIGHT . Coroborated the account of the last witness.

JAMES GUILTY , aged 21.

WHITE GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Third Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

1171. JOSEPH NETTLEFORD and JAMES RAM were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October , a great coat, value 4s. the property of Henry Jones , in the dwelling house of the Reverend Evans John Jones .

JOHN CURTIS . I am a constable. On the 2nd of October, I saw one of these prisoners beckon to the other, who was with a donkey in the road; he went up to him, and received something from him, and then went back to the donkey, and drove it away. In consequence of this, I watched them, and saw them go up to Mr. Jones's house; Ram opened the iron gate, and then stepped back, and got the lock so that it might not make any noise he went to the right hand window, and raised the sash he then went to the left hand window, said do you want any apples, I believe there was some one there, and he immediately went gently back to the right hand window. He broke three of the laths out of the blind, and opened the blinds. He then looked in all about that parlour, and then but his body across the cill of the window, and reached the coat out. I immediately pursued them, and when he saw me running, he returned back, and threw the coat upon the iron railings. I caught Nettleford, but the other prisoner got away then; but I took him on the 26th of October.

NETTLEFORD GUILTY , aged 18.

RAM GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months and fined 1s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1172. GEORGE LEE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , a silver watch, a waistcoat, and a neck handkerchief, value 30s. the property of John Gould .

JOHN GOULD . I live at Chelsea . Those things were stolen out of my room. I got up on the morning of the day in the Indictment about twenty minutes before six, leaving the property in question up stairs. The prisoner was also in bed up stairs. My watch was left under my pillow, and the clothes were in the closet. The prisoner came down about a quarter before seven, and drank his potter, and went out. I missed my property when I went up stairs, and I did not see the prisoner again until he was taken into custody.

WILLIAM SMITHIES . I am a constable. In consequence of information I received, I took the prisoner into custody, and found the ticket for the handkerchief in his possession. He stated that he had sold the watch to a Jew in Swallow-street for fourteen shillings; he could not identify the Jew, but pointed out the house.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1173. JAMES BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a tea-tray, value 15s. the property of Aaron Cohen and Joseph Phillips , privately in their shop .

MRS. COHEN. On the 11th of October, a little after eleven in the morning, a gentleman came and asked me if I had lost a tea-tray; I then looked round the shop, and missed the tea-tray in question.

JAMES BAKER . I stopped the prisoner with the tray in question, on the day in the indictment, a little after eleven; I took him to the house of the prosecutors, and Mrs. Cohen stated that it was her property.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1174. SARAH ROLFE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , a pair of trowsers, value 5s. a pair of pantaloons, value 5s. the property of Michael Levi .

MICHAEL LEVI . I lost these things in the evening of the day in the indictment, about half past eight. I mentioned it to my neighbours the next morning, and towards the evening Thompson came and gave me some information.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am a pawnbroker, and took in a pair of trowsers and a pair of pantaloons from the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1175. ANN PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , a table cloth, value 17s. the property of John Watchom .

JOHN WATCHOM . On the 28th of October, in the afternoon, the prisoner with another woman came into the shop to purchase some muslin. In consequence of the prisoners' suspicious conduct in the shop, I sent one of my young men after her, and I saw her throw this table cloth in question down upon the flags.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1176. MARY SKIVERTON and ANN COHEN were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Fidder , in the King's highway, on the 6th of September , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a five pound note, a one pound note, twelve shillings in silver monies numbered, a clasp knife, value 6d. and a hat, value 2s. his property .

JOHN FIDDER . Coming along Whitechapel , on the 6th of September, by Angel Alley, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, my hat was suddenly knocked off, and thrown up the Alley, I went to pick my hat up, when I was knocked down, and stunned; my head was cut with some kind of weapon, and I was taken in a senseless state to the London Hospital, where two pieces of bone were taken from my head. While I was down, I was robbed of the property mentioned in the indictment. I saw nobody near me.

JOHN SEABROOK . I keep a gin shop in White-chapel. Between eight and nine o'clock one morningin September last, the prisoner Skiverton paid a five pounk note to me; she is a girl of the town. She gave me the name of Mary Williams , which I wrote on it.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1177. JOHN TAYLOR and WILLIAM JUDD were indicted for stealing, a quantity of books, a pair of gloves, and several other articles , the property of John Aird .

DONALD AIRD . The things in the indictment belonging to the young gentleman were stolen from our premises early in the morning of the 28th of September, or late the night previous.

JOHN GARVA . In the morning of the 28th of September, the prisoners were brought to the watchhouse, charged with robbing a gentleman's garden. The things we found in their possession led to the discovery of the present robbery, and after that some of the books were brought to me by the mother of Judd.

JOHN GUNNE . The prisoner Judd sent me with the book to his father's house on 28th of September, he told me to tell his father that they were what were given to him I gave them to his mother.

JOHN SWANSBURN . In the morning of the 28th of September, I saw three lads behind a hay stack belonging to Mr. Brown, which is about between two and three hundred yards from Mr. Aird's school. I could not get up to them, as they ran away; but on going up to the hay-stack, I found the young gentlemen's boxes, a slate, and bag, and other things.

TAYLOR, GUILTY, aged 14.

JUDD, GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1178. ROBERT EDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , a handkerchief, value 2s. and various other articles of wearing apparel, value 9s. the property of Ann Bailey , from her person .

ANN BAILEY . On the 12th of October, at about nine o'clock at night, I happened to be in Holborn The prisoner at the bar came behind me and the wall, and snatched the bundle from me, and ran away. The young man who was with me ran after him, and he and the bundle were secured.

JAMES WING . I was in company with the last witness. I ran after the prisoner, and caught hold of him, and he dropped the bundle.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1179. DAVID CABELLOW and THOMAS JONES were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Sandle , about the hour of six in the forenoon of the 21st of September , (Elizabeth, his wife being therein.) and for feloniously stealing, a gown, waistcoat, tea caddy, and other articles, his property .

JOHN SANDLE . On the 21st of September, I got up at about half past five in the morning, and came out and locked the door after me. I opened the window shutters, and put the key in at the window. I left my wife and family in the house. I then shut the window down, and shut the shutters to, and went to my employ.

ELIZABETH SANDLE . It was on the 21st of September that I was left in bed. I heard my husband go out. I heard some one open the window and take the key, and I called and said, is that you John, and no one answered. This was a lower room, and I was in the one pair, and they could hear what I said below stairs. I thought it had been my husband come back for something. They shut the windows and the shutters again as they had found it, and then they unlocked the door, and came in. The bundle of clothes was wrapped up ready for ironing; all the things except the gown and waistcoat, which were hanging up. The other things were wetted down ready for ironing, and wrapped up in a tablecloth. Hearing a neighbour answer, I thought it was not my husband; I then got out of bed, and come on to the stairs, and saw a man go out of doors; I saw his back; he had a bundle, with a tea caddy under his arm. He ran down the court, and I ran out of doors and called out I was robbed, naked as I was; a neighbour followed him down George-street, in his shirt, to the court where he was taken.

THOMAS FIELD . As I was going to work on the morning in question just before six. I saw one of prisoners with a bundle; that was the one who is on the right of David Cabellow; the other prisoner was walking with him; there was a person running after them I understood. I heard from him what was the matter; he told me one of the neighbours had lost his property. I told him where I saw the two prisoners go in; they had gone up an alley.

JOHN BLOCK . I heard her cry out, and she told me she had been robbed; I then got up undressed, and ran after him. I did not have any sight of the prisoner. I ran as far as George-street, and had no sight of them all the way. I met Vield, and he asked me what was the matter. He pointed out to me where they were gone; they were gone up the alley; I went up the alley; but could see no one at all. I came down again, and stopped at the end; I had not stopped there above two minutes before Jones, the shorter of the prisoners, came down, and asked me what was the matter; he went away out of the court entirely; I let him pass. I am certain he is the man. I did not know him before. I took such notice of him as to be able to swear to him.

- HART, I am a constable. I went into this court, in George-street, and seeing a man named Solomons at the door of one of the houses, I took him into custody. He was coming out and I met him at the door. I took him back into the room, and saw the property lying about the room, some on one table, and some on another. The property seemed laid out, as if for shew. Then Mr. Bar went up stairs and brought the prisoner Cabellow down, and he said, the property and Solomon was taken to the watchhouse together.

JOHN BARR corroborated what the last witness said.

SOLOMON SOLOMONS . Some things were found; but they were not in my house. Where I was taken, was a door off from my house. On the morning in question, I was called up by the prisoner Jones, and was taken to his room where he lived. There is an empty house between that and mine. When I came there, Jones was not there, but Cabellow was there. Then he asked me to buy some linen and things that were on the table. I attend sales, as well as buy clothes, and I told him I would not buy any thing of the kind, and I went out. Then I was taken into custody by Mr. Hart, the constable. The prisoner, Cabellow, had gone up stairs.

CABELLOW, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

JONES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1180. RICHARD DAVIDGE was indicted for stealing, a silver tea pot, value 6l. the property of Dr. Reece , in his dwelling house .

ANN MORGAN . The prisoner came in the morning about half past eight, and gently rang at the bell. He told me he was employed to measure the drain. I lit him down stairs. He pulled a rule out of his pocket and measured the area. He likewise measured a part of the kitchen. He told me he should come on the morrow to repair it. He asked me if there were any water closets up stairs. I told him we had a drain in the back area, and I shewed it to him. He asked me if I would take a pail of water into the back area, and throw it down the sink. He told me he thought I was called up stairs. I replied I should not go up until the bell was rung. In about a minute the bell did ring, and I went up stairs with my master's coffee. I left the prisoner in the kitchen. When I came down again, he was gone. I never mistrusted the man in the least, until a neighbour came and said, "have you not had a man been to measure the drain," and I said yes. Then she asked me, "was he sent for," and I said, I suppose he was, and she said, "had you not better enquire, for he has been to my house also; and our's was in full repair, and I knew he was wrong," and said she, "I don't like the person of the man, and I sent the servant to see where he went, and the servant saw him in your area, measuring your area." I then went up to my mistress and told her what this lady said. I went down again, and missed the tea pot which had been in the kitchen whilst the prisoner had been in the kitchen. No other person had been in, and we never found the tea pot, and I am sure he is the man.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1181. RICHARD DAVIDGE was again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , two spoons, value 30s. two silver forks, value 20s. and four silver tea spoons, value 29s. the property of the Rev. George Tuffield , in the dwelling house of Edward Butler , esq .

HANNAH BARRINGTON . On the 15th of June, Saturday morning, I heard a pull at the bell twice; went up to the door; I opened it, and two men stood there, and said they had come to measure the water pipes. I let them in, and they went down into the kitchen, and I let them into the scullery, and looked at the pipes round about, and in the lodger's servants' room, and in the back area. Then they went into the lodger's servants' room, and looked about there, and then they came into the kitchen and asked if we had got a back kitchen. I told them we had no back kitchen; but we had places which were locked up. So I told them I could not get at them until my master was up; I told them we had a parlour backwards up stairs, and one man took the rule out of the other's hand and went up stairs with me into the parlour, and measured the parlour twice across, and once along. Then the other went down stairs, and down to the kitchen. Then he came back again. I was in the parlour, and he came up to me again, and told me he would come back again in an hour's time, when my master was up. The first thing I missed when they went away, was one tea spoon that had been on the lodger's servants' dresser. I gave the alarm directly, and then on searching, we missed the other things. I am possitive the prisoner was one of the men.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1182. JOHN MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , twenty-three yards of silk, value 40s. and upwards, the property of Charles Erith , in his dwelling house .

ELIZABETH ERITH . I am the wife of the prosecutor. On the day in the indictment, the prisoner and another came to bring a pair of pantaloons to be dyed. The prisoner took the silk in question out of the window. I caught hold of him, and asked him what he wanted with the silk, and he immediately dropped it, and wanted to get away. My husband went round and picked up the silk, and an officer was sent for.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I received charge of the prisoner and the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY aged 39.

Of stealing to the amount of 39s. only .

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1183. RICHARD WILTSHIRE and WALTER TOWSER were indicted for stealing, two bags, value 2s. a quantity of fat, value 8s. the property of some person or persons unknown.

In this case, no witness appeared to bring home the guilt of the prisoners, they were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1184. WILLIAM WICKHURST was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , a pair of boots, value 21s. the property of Archibald Trail .

ARBHILALD TRAIL. I am a boot and shoe maker , and live in Oxford-street ; about half past one, on the day in the indictment, the prisoner and another lad were loitering about my shop, and at last the prisoner held open a basket, while his companion threw a pair of boots into it from the door. I pursued the prisoner, and seized him at the corner of Argyle-street, with the property in his possession.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Distress.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Three Months and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1185. FREDERICK BARKER and MARY HARVEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of October , a watch, value 4l. a seal, value 1l. and a key, value 3s. the property of William Chaffey .

WILLIAM CHAFFEY . I am a solicitor's clerk . On the 2nd of October, about half past nine at night, the prisoner Harvey spoke to me, and desired me to go home with her. I went with her to a house in Charles-street, Drury-lane . I only staid with her in the passage for a minute, and I pulled out my watch to see what o'clock it was, and she snatched it from my hands. I gave her nine shillings to give it me back again, and she did. I had scarcely placed it in my fob again, before the other prisoner came through the passage and snatched it out. I immediately pursued him, and he ran into a house of ill fame; afterwards he was taken by the watchman, but no watch found upon him.

BARKER, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Life .

HARVEY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1186. ROBERT JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , a watch, seal, and key, value 2l. 10s. the property of James Turner , from his person .

JAMES TURNER . On the 21st of October, I lost my seal; soon after five in the afternoon, I was walking down Drury-lane , and a short distance from the corner of Long Acre, I saw the prisoner, and several others. The prisoner staggered against me, and holding forward his left arm which came against my breast, and with his right hand he seized my watch chain, and ran off. I immediately pursued him, and just at he entrance of Parker's-lane, a person came violently in contact with me, and threw me down; I called stop thief loudly, and just as the prisoner passed Mr. Davy's, the wheelwright, he was stopped.

JOHN DAVY . I am a wheelwright. Seeing the prisoner running and hearing the cry of stop thief, I stopped him. Mr. Turner came up, and charged him with this offence, and another man came up and seized Mr. Turner, and shook him violently. I told that man if he did not go about his business I would take him into custody also. We took the prisoner into a public-house, and searched him, but nothing was found on him. GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1187. WILLIAM RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , a looking-glass, value 5s. the property of George Chawcraft .

JOHN BROWNE . On the 6th of October, about five o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner, with this looking glass.

Prisoner's Defence. I went up a court for a necessary occasion, and as I was buttoning up. I saw the looking glass standing in the court, and I had just taken it up when I met Mr. Brown.

The prisoner received a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1188. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, two jackets, and a coat, value 30s. the property of John Francis .

SARAH GOODWIN . In consequence of some information which I received on the 2nd of October , I went into the shop, and saw a chest moved from under some shelves behind a counter; looking behind the chest, I saw the prisoner concealed, with the property in question, which had been moved from the situation where it had been before.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1189. JAMES JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a great coat, value 7s. the property of Jeremiah Henry Mills .

JOSEPH BROWN . On the evening of the day in the indictment, the prisoner and another man rushed into the shop, and took my master's coat. I immediately took the prisoner by the collar, when his companion struck me, and knocked me down. They then threw the coat into the kennel, and both of them ran away. I immediately pursued the prisoner, and when I got into George-street, I found that he was searched, and in the custody of Mr. D'Arcy.

GEORGE D'ARCY . I stopped the prisoner, seeing him running and hearing the cry of stop thief.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1190. JAMES FIRMIDGE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , three street lamp glasses, value 9s. the property of Thomas Simms Couldery .

HENRY HOWARD . I am a constable. On the morning of the 28th of September, about half past five, in consequence of information I received from William Shepherd , I followed the prisoner, and stopped him in Newman-street, with the three lamp glasses in question in a basket. I asked him where he got them; he gave me no answer to that question, but said he hoped I would shew him mercy, for he was sure to be transported.

THOMAS SIMMS COULDERY . I am the contractorfor the lamps in that part of the town, and these are my property.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1191. WILLIAM PINK was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of October , a sieve, two watering-pots, and other articles, value 20s. the property of Benjamin Perroff Webbe .

BENJAMIN PERROFF WEBBE . I am a nursery gardener , living in the Commercial-road . The prisoner was in my employment, and in consequence of missing several articles, I got a search warrant and two officers, and we searched his premises, and found the property in question concealed there.

JOHN GRIFFITHS and MOSES FORTUNE , searched the premises.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined two years , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1192. BENJAMIN GOLDSMITH was indicted for perjury .

THE Evidence adduced did not prove that the defendant made use of the several sentences alleged in the indictment to be false, nor the substance thereof, which was decided to be necessary in the case of the "King against Jones, Ist Peake, 38." The"King against Dowling, Ist Peak, 170," and "the King against Leese, 2nd Campbell, 134.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1193. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, a coat, a pair of breeches, and a handkerchief, value 20s. the property of John Highland .

JOHN HIGHLAND . I found the prisoner in my master's hay-loft, at Enfield Highway . He took these things out of my box, which he broke open.

WILLIAM SMITH . I went to the last witness master's to mend the harness, and I saw the prisoner standing at the door with a bundle, he attempted to run away, and I stopped him, and he had the property on him. He made his escape for a time, and swam across the mote, and I chased him round with a knife, and at last we caught him.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined one month , and whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1194. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , seventy-two yards of calico, value 3l. 12s. the property of John Rout .

JOHN ARCHER . I am in the employment of Mr. Rout. These things were stolen from the door on the day in the indictment, but I don't know how. I saw them at Lambeth-street police office the day following.

JAMES INGHAM . I am a grocer and draper; I saw the prisoner on the day in the indictment, take the goods in question from the prosecutor's door. I pursued him, crying stop thief; and I never lost sight of him until he was knocked down and stopt.

WILLIAM LYON . I received charge of the prisoner and the property.

EDWARD EDWARDS . I picked up part of the property and pursued the prisoner.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined two years , and whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1195. SUSANNAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of September , a half-tester bed furniture, and a child's frock, value 3s. 3d. the property of Thomas Sander .

ISABELLA SANDER . I missed these things on the 30th of September, and I saw them again on the 8th or 9th of October, hanging for sale at a broker's shop.

SUSAN MANSFIELD . I bought these things of the prisoner two days before the prosecutrix claimed them. The prisoner, said she lived with her father, No. 17, Bow-lane, Cheapside.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1196. JOHN GREGORY was indicted for stealing on the 16th of October , several brushes, value 5s. and upwards , the property of William Thompson .

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I live in Gray's-inn-lane . The prisoner was in my service, and I suspected him of robbing me for a long time. I missed the brushes, and that made me watch him. On the night in question, after he had shut up the shop, he was going out when I stopped him, and brought him back, and found the brushes on him; I sent for a constable and had him taken into custody.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1197. JOHN GAINES and PETER JACKSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , four geese and seven fowls, value 30s. the property of Abraham Slade .

ABRAHAM SLADE . I am a farmer , and live at Hendon . I lost this property from my poultry house in my yard; Gain's was a workman of mine; Upton the patrole shewed me my property.

JOHN UPTON . I took the two prisoners into custody, with the property on them, quite warm.

GAINES, GUILTY , aged 46.

JACKSON, GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined six months , and whipped one hundred yards at Hendon .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1198. JOHN MORTIMER was indicted for embezzlement .

SAMUEL KEENE . I am a butcher , residing at Hounslow . The prisoner was in my service for about three years, and in the month of October last.

SYBELLA SPARK . I am a married woman. I reside at Hounslow. I dealt with Mr. Keene, about September last I paid the prisoner on his account, two pounds five shillings and six-pence.

SAMUEL KEENE . The prisoner never accounted to me for the money.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1199. CHARLOTTE DEXTER was indicted for stealing, two pairs of plated salt sellers, and two cruets , the goods of William Potter .

WILLIAM POTTER . I am a silversmith . The prisoner at the bar, was in my service, and I found these things at the pawnbrokers.

WILLIAM NEVE . I produce the property in question. I took it in from Sarah Dexter, and advanced eight shillings on it.

SARAH DEXTER . The prisoner gave me these things to pledge for her, and I did pledge them at Mr. Neve's.

NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1200. ELIZABETH YORK was indicted for stealing, seventeen yards of ribbon, value 30s. the property of William Townsend .

HENRY TOWNSEND . The prisoner came into the shop to purchase some ribbon, and she purchased two or three odd yards. I saw her with her apron over a drawer, take the ribbon in question; and I led her into the counting house, where I took it from her, and she could not deny it.

JOHN TOWNSEND . I am the brother of the prosecutor, and I saw the ribbon taken from the prisoner.

GUILTY .

Fined 1s. and Discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1201. NEHEMIAH MORRISON and JOHN TAYLOR were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , a watch, value 5l. a piece of ribbon, value 1d. and a key, value 3s. the property of John Jobson , from his person .

JOHN JOBSON . On the 19th of October, about half past twelve o'clock at night, I was at the corner of Cleveland-street and Rowland-street, Fitzroy-square ; a girl of the town accosted me, and asked me how I did! I said pretty well, and I were about leaving her, when twelve or fourteen young men came down Russel-place and surrounded us. The prisoners and two others attacked me, and immediately my watch was snatched from my fob; but I caught it in my right hand; and collared the third man. They bit me a violent blow on the face, and after that, they dispersed. The two prisoners were afterwards apprehended according to the description I gave. I could swear to their persons. I took Taylor myself, and delivered him to the hands of the watchman. I saw the other secured about ten minutes afterwards. The watchman took him.

MORRISON, GUILTY , aged 18.

TAYLOR, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1202. WILLIAM RICKETTS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , one silver spoon, value 10s. the property of William Pinley .

CHARLOTTE -. I am servant to the prosecutor. The prisoner came into his house on the morning of the day in the indictment, for the purpose of sweeping the chimnies. These spoons were on the stairs. After the prisoner had gone away, we missed one of the spoons. We went in quest of a person named Sherbut, where we were informed that the prisoner had lived; but he was not home. As we were returning from his house, I met a little chimney sweep boy, and had some information from him. When the prisoner was taken, about half past three in the afternoon; I saw him take the spoon out of a place where he had hidden it. That spoon was my masters.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1203. THOMAS TERRY was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , nine books, value 10s. the property of Nathaniel Evans .

NATHANIEL EVANS . I delivered these books to the prisoner, locked up in a box, to carry to one Sarah Ann Cox; and I found that he had sold five of them to Mr. Roberts.

ROBERT ROBERTS . I am a cheesemonger. The prisoner sold me these books as waste paper.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1204. WILLIAM STEPNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of October , a veil, value 7s. the property of Frances Nichols , from her person .

FRANCES NICHOLS . I was going home. Crossing into Westmoreland Place , and I heard some one walking slowly behind me. I turned round and saw it was the prisoner. We came opposite a butcher's shop, and I had a better view of him. After two or three attempts he snatched my veil off and ran away. He was stopped, and when I saw him I knew him to be the man, I never lost sight of him, only when the crowd surrounded him.

JOSEPH - I received charge of the prisoner and the property. On searching him I found a shilling, a small key, and a pocket comb on him; that was all.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1205. WILLIAM WANT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , a sheet, a quilt, and other articles, value 4s. 6d. the property of Ann Price , widow.

ANN PRICE . On the day in the indictment, Iwent out to a neighbours to borrow an umbrella, leaving my door open. When I returned, I missed the property.

JOHN THOMPSON . On the 7th of October, I saw the prisoner come running up with a bundle in his hand, and there was a cry of stop thief after him. I told the prisoner to stop, and he said if I stopped him he would knock me down. I told him I would see about that, and immediately seized him by the neck. I brought him down Fleet street, to the Pit's Head in the Old Bailey, where I delivered him into the custody of Turnpenny, the day patrole.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1206. WILLIAM TYSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of October , a Bank of England note for the payment of ten-pound , the property of Thomas Williams .

THOMAS WILLIAMS . On the 23rd of October, upon opening my book case, I found that it had been broken open, and that the note in question had been taken out of a tea-caddy, which was inside the book case. I went to the Bank of England, and stopped payment of the note. In consequence of something my wife said, a suspicion arose with respect to the prisoner. In consequence of which, I sent for an officer, and took the prisoner into custody. The prisoner then acknowledged he had taken the note, and said the old boy had persuaded him to do it. He said he would take us to where he had changed it, and he did so, and the man immediately said that he changed it.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1207. BENJAMIN WRIGHT and ROBERT TURNER were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of September , five saws, a smoothing plain, a small drawer, and several other tools, value 2l. 10s. 2d. the property of William Harrison and Richard Alfred Wells .

WILLIAM HARRISON . On the 5th of September last. I was working at Mr. Hanbury's, in Coverly's Fields, Mile-end New Town . We left work at six o'clock on the evening of the day in the indictment, and the next morning the chest was broken open, and the property in question taken from it. We found some of the tiles removed from the roof; and by that means the thieves had got in.

(Property sworn to.)

WRIGHT, GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

TURNER, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1208. JOHN STOBIE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , a sheet, value 10s. the property of William Bowman .

WILLIAM BOWMAN . The prisoner slept in my house one night; the next morning he came down, and called for a pint of beer. I sent the girl up to see if all was right, and she missed the sheet. I came down to the prisoner, and I got a drum major to take charge of him, and while we were searching him, he pulled the sheet out.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1209. JAMES REED was indicted for stealing, six ends of printed cotton , the property of William Neville , the elder, and William Neville , the younger.

JAMES BOWES . I am a servant of the prosecutors, and live at No. 10, Mile-end-road . The goods in question were piled seven feet high outside the prosecutor's door, on the day mentioned in the indictment. In consequence of information, I went to the door, and missed the property, and saw the prisoner running away; I stopped him about an hundred yards from my master's house, and found the property on him.

THOMAS HOLE . I saw the prisoner take the property in question from off a stool at the door.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined two years , and whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1210. JOHN PEARSON , WILLIAM DEACON , and MARY SMITH , were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , forty pounds weight of fat, eight rabbits, and a bag, value 14s. 6d. the property of William Heffill .

WILLIAM HEFFILL . I saw the prisoners lurking about the premises, and I went down to Mr. Telfords to fetch a sheep, and when I came back I found the place broken open, and the rabbits stolen. I went down by Stroud-green, and found them there in a potatoe field, there in custody.

DEACON, GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined one year , and whipped one hundred yards at Crouch End .

PEARSON, NOT GUILTY .

SMITH, NOT GUILTY .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1210. THOMAS KENT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of October , a rule, a pair of compasses, and other tools, value 40s. the property of Richard Bleakley .

RICHARD BLEAKLEY . I am a carpenter . I left these tools at an empty house where I was at work, in Green-street, New-road, Whitechapel, while I went to dinner. When I returned, I saw the prisoner and my tools in custody.

JOHN WILSON . I stopped the prisoner with the property.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1211. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , a shawl, value 4l. the property of Harriett Henley .

HARRIETT HENLEY . The prisoner snatched my shawl, and ran down the Court. When I saw himat the watchhouse I knew him. I never got my shawl back again.

MARY ANN HEARNEY. I saw the prisoner snatch the shawl from the shoulders of the prosecutrix.

GEORGE PERRY . I took the prisoner into custody in consequence of the description I received from Harriett Henley; I had known him before.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1212. ANN GRAY and ANDREW FULLER were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , one pound thirteen shillings, the property of Thomas Connelly , from his person .

THOMAS CONNELLY . I went home with the female prisoner on the night of the day in the indictment. I staid at her lodgings until four o'clock in the morning, when I was awakened by the patrole, and missed the prisoner, and my property. I afterwards saw both prisoners and my pocket-book at the watchhouse.

JAMES SIMMONDS . I am a patrole. On the morning in question, about four o'clock, I saw the two prisoners together, and heard the prisoner Gray say to Fuller that she had made a good thing of it, and she told him to count something, and at the same time gave him money. I took them both into custody, and found the pocket-book on Gray.

GRAY, GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

FULLER, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1213. ALFRED JOY and GEORGE KAY were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , eight books, value 20s. the property of Thomas Keys .

THOMAS KEYS . I lost these books from off my counter.

ANN HOUDLEY . The prisoner Joy came to offer these books to me to sell; he had a boy with him, but it was not the other prisoner. I stopped the books.

GEORGE BARNWELL . I was sent for these books to the house of the last witness by the prisoner Kay.

JOY, GUILTY , aged 10.

Confined six months , and whipped .

KAY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1214. CHARLES JORDAN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , eight pounds weight of mutton, value 3s. the property of John Liquorish .

JOHN LIQUORISH . I am a butcher . I did not see the prisoner take this mutton, but he was pointed out to me as having taken it, and I followed him, and he dropped it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it from real distress.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1215. HENRY BUTLER was indicted for stealing, twenty yards of flannel, value 20s. the property of James Chapman .

JAMES CHAPMAN . I saw the prisoner make a snatch at my door, and take the flannel in question from the door. Before I got up to him, my neighbour's servant got him and the flannel.

JOSEPH EVANS . I seized the prisoner with the property.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1216. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of a certain person unknown .

THOMAS THOMPSON . On the day in the indictment, I saw the prisoner following a gentleman. I saw him take the handkerchief from the gentleman's pocket, and I took him, and found the handkerchief in his bosom.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1217. JOHN BENTLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , two sheets, and a quilt, value 9s. the property of Thomas Jackson .

SARAH JACKSON . The prisoner was a lodger of our's; he went away without giving us any notice, and we broke open the door, and missed the property in question.

HENRY PEACHY . I am a pawnbroker, and took in this property from the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1218. JOHN BAMFORD was indicted for stealing, a duck, value 3s. the property of Philip Fuller .

SARAH FULLER . I lost this duck on the day in the indictment, from a pond behind the house. I went to Holloway, where I saw the prisoner with the duck dead.

LOUISA PICKA . The prisoner said the duck was his.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1219. ELIZABETH BUNTING was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , three gowns and a mantle, value 10s. the property of Martha Thwaites Arnett .

MARTHA THWAITES ARNETT . The prisoner lived servant with me. She absented herself from my house on the morning that she took the things, which was the 14th of September. One of the gowns was pledged, and the other was at the house of one of her friends. The mantle was on her when she was taken.

JANE STEPHENS . I knew Miss Arnett. I met the prisoner in the street, and seeing the mantle on her, I asked her to walk with me back to Miss Arnett's, and as we were going along, she said she had pledged one of the gowns. She said she had left another at a friends. I did not hold out anypromise or threat to induce her to go back. She said she would go.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Judgment Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1220. HARRIET THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , one bank note, value 10l. the property of John Carter .

JOHN CARTER . I am a sailor . I went home with the prisoner on the night of the day in the indictment. I asked her in the morning to go and get me some beer. When she was gone out, I searched, and missed my pocket book. When she returned, I got up and put my clothes on, and went and told the landlord, and he said I was a wicked man to say I had lost any thing in his house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1221. THOMAS SUTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October , six pounds weight of candles, value 4s. 3d. and fifteen shillings and three pence in money, the property of Thomas Page , from the person of James Day .

THOMAS PAGE . On Saturday evening, the 26th of October, about seven o'clock, a lad called on me and ordered six pounds weight of candles, to be sent to No. 3, Oxendon-street , with change for a pound note. I sent the witness, James Day , and he returned without money.

JAMES DAY . I was sent with this property. I took them to No. 3, Oxendon-street, when the prisoner came up and said, are you going to our house. I answered that I was going to No. 3. He said,"you cannot get in; the door is locked; here is the note." putting a piece of soft paper into my hand. I then gave him the change, and he then ran away as fast as possible. He did not take the candles. When I saw him run away, I opened the paper, and found it was not a note. I immediately hallooed out stop thief, and ran after him, a gentleman caught him.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1222. ROBERT COGWELL was indicted for stealing, two pinnafores and a pair of boots, value 5s. the property of Nathaniel Sykes , from the persons of Thomas Sykes , and Nathaniel Sykes , juns.

NATHANIEL SYKES . JUN. I am almost seven years old. I went to meet daddy coming from dinner with my little brother. The prisoner asked us to go and see him swim a ship. He took us over to a pond, called the Little Ocean, and took off my pinnafore, and my brother's pinnafore and boots.

JOSEPH HIBBERS . I produce two pinnafores and a pair of boots, pledged by the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1223. MARGARET THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of October , a petticoat, value 2s. 6d. the property of Hannah Cohen .

HANNAH COHEN . On the day in the indictment the prisoner took the petticoat from my shop.

GUILTY .

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1224. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of September , two silver tea-spoons, an apron, and several other articles , the property of Thomas Ashwin .

THOMAS ASHWIN . The prisoner was in my service, and absconded from me. I discovered the two spoons at Mr. Dunbar's, in Somers Town.

WILLIAM THISTLETON . I found an apron, a pair of stockings, and a silk handkerchief on the prisoner.

ANN DUNEAR . I produce two spoons, which were taken in pledge from the prisoner at the bar.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1225. PETER JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , a shirt, value 5s. the property of John Christal .

JOHN CHRISTAL . The prisoner was in my tap-room on the day in the indictment for about a quarter of an hour. When he left the tap-room, he stole a shirt out of the parlour.

FRANCIS COBLER . The prisoner sold this shirt to me.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1226. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , a waistcoat, and other articles, value 15s. the property of Henry Griffiths .

HENRY GRIFFITHS . On the day in the indictment, we missed the things. We found the duplicates on her when she was apprehended.

JAMES HOWELL . The prisoner pledged the waistcoat at our house.

JAMES BARROWS . The prisoner pledged a cloth and a waistcoat at our house.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1227. JEREMIAH DESMOND was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , a hat, value 5s the property of William Ayres .

MICHAEL CANNON . On the 12th of October, between five and six o'clock, I received information that a hat was taken from the door. Between six and seven in the evening, Mr. Barnet came to me, and told me he had bought the hat.

MOSES BARNETT . The prisoner wanted to sell this hat to me, and I stopped him.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1228. JOHN BOSTON was indicted for stealing, a time piece, value 80s. the property of Vincent Walker .

MARY THOMPSON . On the day in the indictment, the prisoner came to our house to sell apples. I missed the time piece immediately after he was gone, and ran after him. I ran after him for about three quarters of a mile, and at last he was stopped.

THOMAS TALBOT . I stopped the prisoner. He told us if we would go with him to Shoreditch, we should get the article back.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1229. MATHEW WHITFIELD and BENJAMIN WHITFIELD were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , a male ass, value 20s. the property of Thomas Henley .

THOMAS HENLEY . I lost my ass out of my stable, in the night between the 1st and 2nd of November. I found it about seven o'clock in the morning, at about a hundred yards from the stable, stabbed in several places, and with its throat cut.

THOMAS ASHLEY . I heard Mathew Whitfield say that Henley should not come flashing his donkey, he would make a flash of it; as soon as night appeared, he would flash the truth. What these words meant, I do not know.

MATHEW WHITFIELD, GUILTY , aged 28.

BENJAMIN WHITFIELD , GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined three months , and whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1230. WILLIAM ANDERSON was indicted for stealing, a pair of boots, and a shirt, value 38s. the property of William Eastman .

WILLIAM EASTMAN . I lost this property, but never saw the prisoner in possession of it.

MICHAEL GOLDSMITH . I stopped the prisoner with the property, and took him into custody.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1231. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 28s. the property of Joseph Pearson .

JOSEPH PEARSON . I am a linen-draper . This cotton was stolen from my door. The prisoner was seen to run with this property, and was stopped.

JAMES GRAY . I heard the cry of stop thief, and seeing the prisoner running, I pursued him, and stopped him, and he threw this cotton down.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Whipped and discharged.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1232. BENJAMIN JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of November , two spoons, and a work bag, value 2s. 6d. the property of Emma Fry , widow , and four pounds weight of beef, value 2s. the property of James Buckland .

EMMA FRY . The prisoner stole my property off the rails at the back of Mr. Buckland's house, and took his property out of the safe. He was stopped with it on him on the premises.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined two years , and fined 1s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1233. JOHN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of November , two sacks, value 8s. and two hundred weight of biscuits, value 18s. the property of James Ledsham .

JOHN WAY . I saw the prisoner in my master's premises, where the biscuits were kept; he had got over the fence, and unfastened the door where they were kept. When he saw me he dropped a bag, and jumped over the fence and ran away. I pursued him, and secured him. I found two sacks of biscuits entirely taken away.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1234. ROBERT THAKERAY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , twelve tin plates, value 4s. the property of Thomas Joyce .

THOMAS JOYCE . The prisoner was in my service. In consequence of suspicion. I stopped him as he was going out on the day in the indictment, and on searching him, I took from him the property in question.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1235. WILLIAM TOWNSEND was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of October , a shawl, value 2s. the property of Maria Trimnel ; a shawl, value 12s. the property of Sarah Cox ; and a towel, value 1s. the property of Richard Simmons .

WILLIAM WALKER . On the day in the indictment, in consequence of the suspicious conduct of the prisoner, and two other persons who were with him, I pursued them, and at last secured the prisoner, who had in his possession the several articles named in the indictment belonging to the several persons whose names are stated.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1236. THOMAS DANIELS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , four 1l. notes, and goods and chattels, value 16s. the property of Mary Batchelor , from her person .

MARY BATCHELOR . On the day in the indictment, I went into the Kettle Drum. When I came out of the public-house to go home, the prisoner followed me, and took my umbrella from me, and then knocked me down, and took my bundle from my hand. I followed him as well as I could, and he was stopped near the Dock-wall.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Life ,

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1237. GEORGE SWANN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of October , a chair, value 10s. the property of William Henry Wilson , from the person of Charles Bond .

CHARLES BOND . My mistress delivered me a chair to deliver to my master; and going along the prisoner took it from my head, and told me to go back.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one year , and whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1238. PETER SEBALLAS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a lace veil, value 20s. the property of Ellen Scaley , from her person .

ELLEN SCALY . On the 18th of October, about half past eight in the evening, I was in Wellclose-square , and as I was coming along the prisoner snatched the veil from my bonnet, and ran away. I called out stop thief, and he was secured. I had lost sight of him.

ELIZA FATURN . I was walking with the last witness when the prisoner came up, and snatched the veil off her head. I am quite sure he is the man.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined two months , and whipped .

Third Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1239. JOHN MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , a watch, chain, and seals, value 3l. 10s. the property of Andrew Doyle , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Johnson .

ANDREW DOYLE . The prisoner and I slept in the same room together; and in the morning of the day in the indictment, I missed my watch from my bed side.

THOMAS EDWARDS . I apprehended the prisoner with the property on him.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

1240. JOHN SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Chasen , about the hour of ten in the night of the 25th of October , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, two silver salts, a silver mustard spoon, a gold ring, and other goods and chattels, together with two pounds four shillings in silver, the property of the said Samuel Chasen .

MRS. CHASEN. On the 24th of October last, at about a quarter past ten at night, I sent my servant girl into my bed room; as soon as she unlocked my bed room door, she saw two drawers open, and likewise one of the front windows open, and the shutters, which at nine o'clock had been shut; I had seen them shut at nine o'clock. She immediately came down, and told me that my drawers were open. I was still in the bar, and I heard some one jump from the bed room window into the street; I should think that is a height of nineteen feet. I ran up stairs, and saw the drawers as the girl told me, and likewise the window. The property in the indictment was missing. The drawers had been opened apparently by a chissel. I had seen all the articles that very afternoon about four o'clock.

- FLETCHER. On the night of the 24th of October, about twenty minutes after ten, I was walking along Russel-street, Bloomsbury , and heard a noise; I saw a man coming out at the window; he jumped into the street; I followed him, and pursued him up and down very many streets crying stop thief, and a young man stopped him at the corner of Castle-street.

JOHN HEARN . I remember the prisoner being brought to the watchhouse on the 24th of October;

Mr. Roberts desired that I would go and search the prisoner, and I did so, and found on him a pair of silver salts, a box with phosphorous, two pieces of small wax candle about the length of my middle finger, a small chisel, and one pound thirteen shillings in bank tokens. The prisoner several times attempted to put his hand to his pocket where the pistol was. I afterwards saw the pistol, and it had two balls in it, and was loaded to within half an inch of the muzzle; the hammer however was down, so that the powder had fallen out of the pan.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.

1241. SAMUEL BAILEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Hales , about the hour of seven in the afternoon of the 23rd of April, 1816 , and stealing therein, a silk handkerchief, value 3s. two necklaces, value 1l. one brooch, value 18s. two pair of ear-rings, value 17s. two tablecloths, 3l. three sheets, value 1l. 10s. five pillow cases, value 10s. one pelisse, value 7s. two gowns, value 10s. three frocks, value 3s. two shirts, value 5s. four aprons, value 4s. two petticoats, value 2s. six towels, value 6s. and a pair of stockings, value 12s. his property .

RICHARD HALES . I keep the Bridgwater Arms, Bridgwater Gardens . On the 23rd of April last, between seven and eight in the evening, several people were in the house drinking; my wife was in the house; the prisoner Bailey was in the parlour drinking with several others. I was in the skittle ground at the back part of the house. I had occasion to come through the house, through the room where they were sitting. Bailey was not there then. I heard one of them, whose name is Morgan, say, we are in a bloody mess now; three or four of the others immediately rose up, and said, let us stall him off as he comes down stairs. Then there was something the matter on my stairs. I opened the stair foot door, and three or four steps up, was the prisoner Bailey coming down; I immediately seized him, and called to my wife to bring a light; I then perceived that he had a silk handkerchief of mine in his hand, which he threw over his shoulder behind him. I then brought him down stairs, and wanted to see if he had any other property about him; but his companions that were in the parlour came about me, and I was afraid they wanted to rescue him. I then took him into the bar; his companions went round to the front of the bar, and one named Thatcher said to me Hales, let the man go, for he is drunk. I said I would not let him go, for I found him with my property about him. He then turned round to the others, and said damn my eyes, if you are all of one mind be shall not be taken. Then they came round to the other door, and Thatcher dragged my wife away from me. She was at that time asking me to let the prisoner go. for fear of our lives. I immediately bolted the door upon them. It is a double door; the top part bolts, and the bottom part has a lock to it. They then took the shutters which they found outside, and battered the door all to pieces, and beat me away from the doortill they got hold of the prisoner by the collar, and they dragged him over the door which runs into a passage that goes down by the side of the house. I never saw him again until about a month ago. I am sure he is the man. We found part of the goods named in the indictment missing, and other things proved.

VIRTUE HALES . On the 23d of April, two strange men came into the house. They went into the perlour, and called for some liquor; I took them in some ale and some gin which they had ordered. When I went into the room, the prisoner Bailey was sitting on the child's small chair. I requested him to get up, and he abused me very much. They paid me for the liquor, and I went into the bar. There were in company with the prisoner, five men, whom we have had tried here. I went into the bar again and shut the door. Bailey came into the tap room and was very abusive there. Some wished me to go and speak to him, as he wanted to fight several in the tap room. I tried to persuade him to leave the place, and spoke to one of his companions to take him away. They did not regard what I said, and immediately left me and went to the parlour. I went into the bar, and served some gin to a woman at the bar, and the prisoner came into the bar and asked me if he should draw the liquor for me, and pretended to be in liquor himself. He came up very close to me, and I told him I was capable of drawing my own liquor. He grasped up some halfpence at the time he was talking to me. I gave him a push away, and he let drop some of the halfpence, but kept some in his hand, and said, thank God he had some halfpence to pay for some pipes of tobacco, I told him he was for no good. Several of them then came bustling round, all calling for liquor at the same time, and whether the prisoner went up stairs then or not, I can't say, but soon after I saw him on the stairs with my husband. He held a silk handkerchief in his hand, which I said, I could swear to was mine. He threw it over his shoulder, upon the second stair above him. I said, how he got it I could not tell, for I had the keys of my bed room where it had been in my pocket. The padlock key, and an inside key; my husband desired me to go up stairs to see if all was safe. I went and found the bed room door open. The child's silver coral laid at the door, and had been broken to pieces. The bed clothes were tied up, and the window was open, and I ran down stairs and exclaimed I was ruined. When I got down stairs, my husband had got the prisoner at the bar. I desired him to let him go, for I thought we should be murdered, for they beset us. Thatcher immediately dragged me away from him, and said I could swear to my property, and they would do for me. I resisted very much, and they beat me until my senses left me, and when I came too, I found myself in the parlour. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. On the 24th of September last, I was going through the Strand and saw the prisoner. I had seen the advertisement for his apprehension, and I asked him what the piece of work was about in Bridgewater Gardens. He said, he hoped that I would not trouble him for it. I told him I should do my duty, and take him into custody, I did so, and going to the office, he begged very much for me to let him go, saying he would go on board of ship directly, and leave the country. I proceeded with him to Bow-street office.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

1242. SARAH CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of October , a silver tea urn, value 20l. and other articles, the property of Ann Williams , in her dwelling house . And WILLIAM WOOLAMS was indicted for hiring and commanding the said Carter to do and commit the felony aforesaid .

MRS. WILLIAMS. I live at No. 46, Wellbeck-street, in the parish of Many-le-bone ; I am a widow . The prisoner Carter lived with me several different times as my servant ; she last quitted my service about three months ago, but I can't say exactly. She was reprehended from coming to my house after she had so quitted my service. I lost several articles. On the Friday I lost a silver tea urn, some silver knives and forks, and tea spoons; I don't know the number, as the servant had the care of the plate. This shawl which I have on was also stolen. The urn was worth twenty pounds. On the day on which these things were lost I had seen some of them, for they had been in my room.

MARY GRACE WALSH . I was housemaid to Mrs. Williams, but I did not live there at the time the prisoner went away; I came after she had quitted the service. In the course of Friday, the 4th of October, I had seen the different articles of plate mentioned in the indictment safe in the house. I had them under my care, there was a silver tea-urn, nine silver spoons, five silver knives and forks, one silver sauce ladle, one pair of silver candlesticks, a pair of sheets, a large India shawl, and an old silk shawl. I had seen these things after three o'clock, and at my mistress's dinner hour; she generally dined about five o'clock, but dined later that day. I think I saw them between six and seven o'clock; they were in a closet in my mistress's bed room on the second floor. I missed them from that closet, but not before the watchman came in, which was near eight o'clock, Before the watchman came in, I gave an alarm; I went up stairs for some china, and as I opened my mistress bed room door, I heard the back bed room which had been locked, open unlatch. I went into the bed room as far as the door that parts the two rooms, and saw a large black leather trunk removed. I came down stairs, and asked my fellow servant if she had moved it; she told me she had not. Then we went up stairs to look again, and I went close up to the door, and saw it a bit opened. Upon going down stairs again, I told my mistress I was certain there was somebody in the house, and I told her she had better have a watchman in, and accordingly we had, and he went up stairs to the garrets, and we could not see that there was any one in those two that were occupied. Thewe came down stairs, and went to the door where the prisoner had come out of, which was the back two pair bed room; the two Miss Hughes's, two young ladies who were on a visit at my mistress' slept there; we did not see any one there, and I looked into my mistress's bed room, and nobody was there, and I looked into the closet, and the first thing I missed was the tea-urn. I sent my fellow servant down, and on going into the room again, I missed the other things. Upon this, more watchmen were brought in, and every part of the house was searched, except one garret, which was not occupied; then a Marlborough-street officer and a Bow-street officer came; they searched all over the house, except my mistress's room, and my mistress objected to her room being searched again. On the Saturday I suspected all day that there was some person in the house, for on Saturday night when I went to bed, I heard a snoring over my head, and on the Sunday morning I and my fellow servant came down stairs, and opened the house, and Hannah Fyford , and her brother-in-law, and sister were waiting to come in. I told them we had been robbed, and at that time the prisoner came down stairs, and was going out at the door, when John Holley seeing her come out at the door, he was on the advance to speak to her, when she turned back again into the house; she went up stairs. I saw her when she was taken into the back garret; Mr. Stone, the constable took her. The property was all tied up in a bundle with her.

-STONE. On the 6th of October, I was sent for at about one o'clock. I went up and apprehended the prisoner. I found her in the cupboard. I have heard the account given by the last witness. As far as I am concerned, her account is true.

DEBORAH - I saw the other prisoner on the day the robbery was commited opposite Mrs. Williams's. I saw both prisoners speak together, at about eleven o'clock in the morning. Sarah Carter went to the area gate, and was let in by one of the servants. The other prisoner went up Bullstrode-street.

JOHN M'DANIEL . I was once in the service of Mrs. Williams, The prisoner Carter, was a fellow servant of mine. About May last I attended Mrs. Williams, to a party, and on my coming home, the prisoner Woolams and two other young men were sitting very comfortable on the sofa, and the prisoner asked why we did not knock the old lady on the head, and another said no, we had better choak her, and take her property from her. The other two young men went away, and Woolams stopped in the house. When we went for Mistress, to bring her home she lant her carriage to bring another family home, and she came home with another family. As soon as we went down into the kitchen, Woolams's hat was on the table, and the prisoner Carter took it up. and took it into the pantry.

Woolams's Defence. She got up, and left me on the Friday morning, and I saw nothing of her until I saw her in custody. I went to the office and gave myself up.

- Stone. He did give himself up voluntarily.

CARTER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

WOOLAMS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Dallas.