Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 6.0, 30 August 2014), July 1816 (18160710).

Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th July 1816.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the King's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY, the 10th of JULY, 1816; and following days; BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY J. A. DOWLING, CLEMENT'S INN.

LONDON. PRINTED AND PUBLISHED,(BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) BY R. BUTTERS, No. 22, FETTER-LANE, FLEET-STREET

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY, FOR THE CITY OF LONDON

Before the Right Honourable MATTHEW WOOD, ESQ. Lord Mayor of the City of London. Sir James Allan Park, knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas. knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas. Sir John Silvester , bait. Recorder of the said City, Sir Watkin Lewis , knt. Mr. Alderman Combe; Sir James Shaw , bart. Mr. Alderman Thomas Smith ; Sir William Domville , bart. Mr. Alderman Goodbehere, Mr. Alderman Cox, Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common Serjeant of the said City. His Majesty's Justices of Over and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holder for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

George Lowcock ,

John Myers ,

James Peck ,

Charles Isleton ,

Daniel Pitt ,

Thomas Morrin ,

John Coventry ,

Robert Obbard ,

Edward Barnard ,

George Aubrey ,

Thomas Elden Jones ,

John Schofield .

First Middlesex Jury.

Runcid Kuk,

Benjamin Martin ,

John Manner ,

William Kear ,

Richard Jones ,

John Cruie

David Williams ,

Richard Joy ,

John Sanders ,

Andrew Wilson ,

John Davis ,

John Greville ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Ussender ,

Thomas Llewellvn ,

Edward Edwards ,

Joseph Tacey ,

James Graham

Esquire Dukes ,

James Hay ,

James Kemp ,

George Ilunikey ,

John Hawkins ,

Thomas Smith ,

James Powell .

678. JAMES MAHOFFEY , ELIZABETH MAHOFFEY , MARY MITCHELL , THE ELDER, and MARY MITCHELL , THE YOUNGER, were indicted for High Treason, in counterfeiting the Current Coin of this Realm, called a sixpence .

HENRY COLLIER . On the 3rd of July , I went with Squibb, another constable, to No.6, Bainbridge-street, St. Giles's . I went up three pairs of stairs into the left hand room; I saw the prisoner Mahoffey and his wife; we left the man with whom we had come, in the care of Fry, at the door. Squibb and I went into the house; Mahoffey and his wife were satting on the side of the bed; he was polishing a piece, of brass of the shape and size of a sixpence with his thumb and a stick. His wife was employed in rubbing something in a wet rag, which she threw under the bed, and which I afterwards picked up. I told them to stand up, for they were prisoners., I was tying them together, when the man threw his left hand up, and put something in his mouth; I immediately seized him by the throat, and he chuckled a little, and he threw up forty into my hand; they are all brass, in the shape of a sixpence; there is a mark of a little a on almost all of them; they were so when I took hold of them. I searched him; but there was nothing more on him. I then searched his wife, and found a quantity on he; they were in her pocket; there were also six finished in her pocket. All the pieces I found, finished, or unfinished, were marked with the letter a, which on all of them seemed to me made with the same punch. The finished ones were rolled up with paper between them; they were brighte when I found them, than they are now they now assume a greenish appearance. The bustle brought Squibbing with the other two prisoner, and I tied them all together, and searched the two Mitchells; on the elder Mitchell I found several the gutter; four of them had the letter a on them. I also found a tite; it appeared to a have been used for brass; also a pair of cissazes; they have been used for brass; the brass is on them where they have been cutting it. A small pair of plyers; they are brassy also. Also a small quantity of cream of letter, and a small quantity of salt. I don't know the use of these articles; a rubbing stick like the other, and a little drop of aquafortis in a bottle; two pieces of pumic stone, and a sheat of sand paper, unused. I also found some six pences, which fell behind young Mitchell; they appeared to fall from her; I picked them up near her. there were still a finished state, wraped up in paper, like the others; they have also the letter a. I told her, I have got them; but she made no answer.

Prisoner James Mahoffey . Q Dal you not see the stauding up when you came into the room.

Witness. No; he was sitting on the bed side.

Prisoner Mary Micky the elder. Q. What did you find in my pocket.

Wittness. As many as I said.

GEORGE SQUIRE . In the evening of the 3rd of July, John Michlilian was brought to me, charged with uttering false money. He shewed me the way to the house in Paibridge St. Gules's.Fry was with me; I syent to the house with him; I went up stairs, and into the right hand was first; the door was on the latch; I foand the two Bitchelds in that room; the elder was standing up well dressed, appatrnetly as it she was going lad hes bal or bonner on. The youngest was in the room, without that or bonnet, or check she was standing. When I entered the room they in confusion. I said, it is no use making any resistance, I have some information that you are soing something which is wrong and I beg you will give up to

JOHN M'MILLAN. I am a rope-maker by trade. I know the four prisoners at the bar, from a late acquaintance; the first time I saw them was at Diffield, in Yorkshire; that is about seven weeks since. From a short conversation then, I learned that he was a drover. I saw no more of them until about a fortnight after, when I saw them together in Hull; I then formed a public-house acquaintance with them; but nothing farther. I agreed to travel to London with them, and the man said, that I should not want any of the necessaries of life. Accordingly, I agreed to travel with them to London. We embarked at Hull, and came to Burton, where we stopped that night; I did not see any of them do any thing extraordinary until we got to Stamford; I there saw James Mahoffey employed with a file scouring and rubbing of brass under a hedge; it was a wet day. It was a thin sheet, which had been cut up, and rounded to the size of sixpences; nothing more passed until we got to Peterborough, which was at about five o'clock in the evening; James Mahoffey went to work, I saw him; I had a full opportunity of seeing him colour some of these pieces; he put colour out of a piece of paper, and it produced an effect to make it look like silver. We did not drive cattle on the way to London; it was on a Sunday when we arrived in London. We occupied a room in Mrs. O'Neill's; the four prisoners at the bar and I went to Mrs. O'Neill's, in Carrier-street, St. Giles's; we had a ledging there until Tuesday, consisting of two beds; that served the whole five. We remained there until Tuesday, and then we took the lodging for a week, on condition that I was to sleep below in another bed, and we were to pay seven shillings and sixpence a week; we continued there from Tuesday until the Monday following. During the time we were there, we lived together; they were then employed in the same service which absolutely I have sworn to; I saw them. I went to the cutler's to get the scissors sharpened for the same execution. On the Monday, I was down along with Mary Mitchell, the younger, at Greenwich, and circulated twelve. We afterwards went on Tuesday to M'Lawrence's, in Bainbridge-street; two rooms were taken there; the one on the right hand belonged to the two Mitchell's; the other to Mahoffey and me. The morning after I went to this house, Mahoffey after preparing seventeen sixpences, gave me a penny to procure a pennyworth of aquafortis; I went to a chemist's, and got it, without any qustions what it was to do; by his request, I gave it to Mary Mitch ell, the elder. I came to him in his room, and by his desire, I went to her in her room; I give it her. In about fifteen minutes after that, she came into the room in which I was, with that cup, and delivered it into Mahoffey's hand in his room; it had then some stuff in it, more than it has now. He immediately applied it to colour those seventeen pieces which he had prepared; he succeeded in that, and affected it. He then wrapped them up in paper, sundry with paper, and told me to go up Highgate-road, and buy any small article; but return him two pence out of each sixpence. On my return from that place, I was apprehended. I put them all off but five. The last words Mahoffey said to me were if I was apprehended, to swallow them, and they would injure me not; that was the same evening on which I was afterwards escorted to Bainbridge-street by three officers. Those five which I had not uttered, the gentleman of the name of Squibb got.

Prisoner James Mahoffey . Q. Were not these your goods, (pointing to the different ingredients and implements produced.)

Witness. No.

(Here a dispute arose between the witness and the prisoner, each accusing and criminating the other.)

JOHN M'LAWRENCE, merely proved the prisoners taking the lodging where they were found.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant solicitor to the mint. I have been so a considerable time, and am conversant with transactions of this nature; I have seen the various things produced to day; from my experience, I think they are complete to finish the counterfeit money of the description now produced; they are tools proper for making the pieces that have been produced, and they appear to have been appropriated to such a purpose. I look at two pieces of the parcel taken from Mrs. Mahoffey, and one from the parcel that dropt from Mary Mitchell the younger; they were made to resemble the coin called sixpence, as it is now currant in this Country. I saw them on the morning that the prisoners were taken up, and I think they were then likely to impose on a person using ordinary caution.

JOHN NICOLL. I am one of the moneyers of his Majesty's Mint. These pieces never came from the Mint; they are brass coloured; they could be brought to their present round state by merely clipping with a pair of scissors.

James Mahoffey's Defence. This is the first prison I was ever in, and I leave it all to the mercy of the Court.

Elizabeth Mahoffey 's Defence. Whatever was found in my house, was brought by that man, (pointing to M'Millan.

Mary Mitchell , the elder's Defence. I say it is that very man that brought the things into the room.

Mary Mitchell , the younger's Defence. I never saw an article of the kind, and more than that, I was out of town, and did not sleep in the place where they slept; and John M'Millan asked my mother to lend him a bottle, and he said it was to buy oil for his hair, and what he fetched in, I don't know.

JAMES MAHOFFEY, GUILTY - DEATH ,

aged 45.

ELIZABETH MAHOFFEY, GUILTY - DEATH ,

aged 43.

MARY MITCHELL the elder, GUILTY - DEATH ,

aged 50.

MARY MITCHELL, the younger, NOT

GUILTY.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

679. LYON LEVI was indicted for feloniously receiving a quantity of paper, knowing it to have been stolen .

BUT on account of the absence of two material witnesses, relations of the prisoner, who had been in vain sought after, the prosecutor was disenabled from supporting his charge, and the prisoner was of course found

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

680. MARGARET M'MANUS , WILLIAM MUL-VEY , and CATHERINE MULVEY , were indicted for High Treason, in counterfeiting the Current Coin of the Realm, called a shilling .

MARY HARBER . On the 6th of May last, I went to the lodging of the prisoners; Catherine Mulvey at that time was living at No.3, Shropshire-place, Tottenham-court-road . I found her at home; nobody was with her but a little girl; she was filing of copper of the size of a shilling; she was filing it round; her husband was not then present. William Mulvey came in in about half an hour, and went to work on the blanks in the same way. Margaret was not there that day. I had known all the prisoners at that time between five and six years. I went to their lodging again on the 11th of May, at the same place; they lodged in the parlour on the ground floor; William and Catherine Mulvey occupied it. I called on them by the direction of Mr. Burton, an officer, on the11th of May; when I got to the lodgings of Mulvey, I saw the three prisoners there then; that was about half past eight in the evening. I was sent there by Mr. Burton; he gave me two eighteen-penny tokens to purchase some of them. Margaret M'Manus was scouring something with salt; it was a mettal white when I first saw it, round, and in the shape of a shilling; she was rubbing it with salt; there was a great many of them all in a body, about forty in a cloth, and she was rubbing them all together; William Mulvey was doing nothing, only he went out for some cream of tarter; he staid about a quarter of an hour. Margaret M'Manns said, there was no cream of tarter in the house, and asked him if he would go and fetch any; he said, he would, and she gave him some halfpence; he went, and on his return, gave it to her, saying there was an ounce, and telling her to be careful of it. He then sat himself down, or laid himself against the bedstead, and did not do any thing else. Catherine was there; but she was doing nothing but aiding and assisting in getting warm water, and they were washed in it by Margaret, after they had been rubbed in salt and dried in a cloth; then they were put into a cloth, and rubbed with cream of tartar again; Margaret did that. Nothing else was done to them by either of the other prisoners. She then washed them again in warm water, and then dried them in a cloth again; from that she put them on a hot iron, and put some blacking on them while they lay, one by one on the iron. Then she rubbed them between her thumb and finger, and put them away. Then I had the first six that were finished, and gave her the two eighteenpenny-tokens; Margaret gave them to me. Catherine took the money for them. I then left them; I went to the officers in Tottenham-court-road, Mr. Burton and Mr. Craig: I went to the public-house where they were; I knew they were there, because I left them there. I gave the shillings to Burton. I went into Mulvey's lodgings with the officers; we knocked at the window, and the door was opened by William Mulvey , and the officers were by me at the time. William Mulvey gave Burton a blow on the breast, knowing him; then Mr. Burton said to Mr. Craig, take care of the prisoner; he called out to Craig to secure him, and he did so. I then made my way. I had no more money about me but the two eighteenpenny-pieces.

Prisoner Margaret. Q. Did you ever buy any of me, or know me to sell any?

Witness. No, never.

Q.How came you then not to pay me, as you say, I gave them to you?

Witness. I offered her the two eighteenpenny-pieces, and she said, she was busy, and told me to give them to the other. She was then finishing of them, blacking them on the iron.

Q. Who were in the room all the time?

Witness. My own sister, Ann Wilson , and her husband.

Examined by the COURT. They were present at the whole of this; they were there before me; they were doing nothing at all but standing in the room; they lived in Mary-le-bone.

Prisoner Catherine. Q.When you asked me for these things, did I not say, I had none, I had done with them; but her sister had plenty, and would let her have them?

Witness. No; you said, I should have them when they were finished.

Prisoner William. Q. Was I in doors when you came?

Witness. Yes.

Q.What doing?

Witness. I don't know whether you were sitting down, or leaning against the bed.

Re-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. I don't know where my sister is now; I have seen her down at the office when they had their hearings.

RICHARD BURTON . I am an officer of Marlborough street. I know the last witness. In consequence of information she gave me; I gave her directions to act under my authority. I furnished her in the morning of the 11th of May, with two eighteenpenny-pieces; before that, I searched her, and ascertained that she had no other money, neither good, nor bad. Craig was in company with me. Craig, she, and I, went towards Shropshire-place, Pancrass-street; I stopped at a public-house at the corner of the street; the woman went away; I sent her. I stood there better than half or three quarters of an hour before she returned; we then went to Mulvey's house; I then told Mrs. Mulvey I must see what she had about her; and she said, do you think I have got any bad money about me, with that, she took out of her pocket three eighteenpenny-pieces, a shilling, and three halfpence, and jinked them on the hearth stone, and said, you hear they are good. I then told her to give them to me. She did, and I found two of the eighteenpenny-pieces werethe two which I had given to the last witness to purchase these with. I then searched her pockets; but she had nothing else. I then searched the room; I found two papers of cream of tartar, and a quantity of blanks of the size of a shilling, in an unfinished state; four were the size of a shilling, and four the size of a sixpence; they were pinned up in one of the bottom corners of the window curtain I then searched the table-drawer, and found two files with brass in the teeth of them; I found a pair of scissors, but there is nothing on them. I also found a quantity of clippings of copper in a little bag; I found a bottle on the shelf, with nothing in it, and I found an old tea-pot, with a quantity of salt in it; and in the room, I found a quantity of rags, some wet and some dry; they are stained with something; I found a little tin pot in the cupboard, which had a strange smell; I found a small stamp with the letter A upon it. I found nothing else. Craig and I conveyed the woman to the watchhouse. I locked the door, and took the key in my pocket. Before I left the room, I saw a boy of the name of Rowley; he and his father went to the watchhouse. I locked the room door, and fastened the window. We returned in the course of a quarter of an hour, we found the room as I had left it. While we were there, I saw Rowley and his father; Rowley's father gave me twenty-nine counterfeits, and the boy gave me one. I afterwards saw Margaret M'Manus on the next evening, about ten o'clock; I saw her at the corner of East-street, Paddington-street, at the watering-house. I have applied this punch to several of the finished shilling, to some of those which I received from the last witness, the mark on them appears to be such as is made with this punch. I have applied the punch also to those given me by Rowley's father, and the mark is the same, and I believe it to be made by that punch.

Prisoner Margaret. Was I in the house when you first came, I came in for my bonnet?

Witness. I did not see her at first; but when I turned round, I saw her.

Examined by the COURT. I had marked the eighteenpenny-pieces with a small cross on their edges.

WILLAM CRAIG. I went with Burton to apprehend the prisoners; I went in company with the two last witnesses to the house in Shropsh re-place. The woman knocked at the window, and the man rushed out. I was behind, and could not see if a blow was given to Burton; Burton told me to secure him; I went after him, and as I was going down the court, I saw the window opened, and a quantity of things like shillings thrown out; I was busily ingaged with the man, whom I took, and was bringing back. I searched him, and found five three-shilling pieces, two shillings, and some halfpence. I took the man to Pancrass watchhouse. I then returned to the prisoners's lodging alone. I found these blanks in the table drawer, some not round. In a box at the other end of the room, I found a paper with seven pieces of mettal in it. In different parts of the room I picked up pieces of sand paper, more immediately near the fire place, which appeared to have been used for working mettal; I found also a pair of scissors, pinchers, and a hammer, which are all slightly discoloured with mettal.

WILLIAM ROWLEY . I am fourteen years of age, I live in Shropshire-place, with my father. I remember on Saturday, the 11th of May, hearing the cry of stop thief; I was in doors at first, and we went out in the street; I saw Mr. Craig and Mr. Mulvey wrestling. My father went along with them to the watchhouse. I then went into the court, and picked up twenty nine shillings; I picked them up about a yard and a half from Catherine Mulvey 's window. I then went home, and gave them to my father. I went afterwards to this house, and found one shilling on the stairs, three or four steps up.

THOMAS ROWLEY . I am the father of the last witness. I went out on this might, and saw what my son described. My son gave me twenty-nine shillings. I took them in my hand until I saw Mr. Burton, and delivered them to him in the watchhouse.

SARAH HUTCHINS . The prisoners William Mulvey and Catherine Mulvey lodged with me about three weeks before this happened; they lodged on the ground floor; they had a bolt under the lock inside; it was not put on by them.

THOMAS RICHARDS . I am apprentice to Mr. Adams, an apothecary, in Chorotte-street, Fitzroy-square. I have sold Catherine Mulvey aquafarts very frequently; I don't know how lately. That is the bottle she brought to have the aquafortis put in it.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant solicitor to the Mint. I am well acquainted with affairs of this kind. I have seen the various things produced; they are all necessary and useful to make these sorts of articles, resemble the current coin of the Realm called shillings in their present state. I compare the punch to thesepieces; the punch fits them. They might impose upon a person using ordinary discernment.

JOHN NICOLL . I am one of the moneyers of his Majesty's Mint. These pieces never issued from the Mint; they resemble the coin called a shilling it its present state.

Margaret M'Manus's Defence. I never gave Mrs. Harbour any thing in my life; I never gave her one, nor she never saw any with me. I saw her sister give her six, she asked her for them, and said, Poll, have you got any, and she said, yes, and gave her six, and then she offered me the money, and I would not take it.

Catherine Mulvey 's Defence. About six o'clock on this said Saturday evening, the prosecutrix came in and sat down; I don't think Mulvey was there. She asked me for some of these shillings, and asked me for six of them, and I told her, she knew I had none; and then her sister said, Poll, I have got plenty, and then she returned to me, and gave me two eighteenpenny pieces; and I said, what do you give the money to me for; and she said, if my husband knows I have got money, he will get it from me, and I don't like to take it home; and at that same time, I returned them on the table, and she said, she must not take it, as her husband was very scarce always in giving her money. Then the sister after that, knowing she owed me eight shillings, which I lent her to go and see her husband, who was on board the Hulks, contrived to give me the two eighteen-penny-tokens; and the moment: Mrs. Harbour saw me put the money in my pocket, she goes out, and fetches in the officers, they laid the plan of bringing these things into my appartment. I never took the money from her, but received it from her sister; she herself has been convicted, Mr. Powell knows, of uttering bad money, and does it stand to reason, that if Margaret sold these things to her, why not pay her the money.

Mr. Powell. Re-examined. Mrs. Harbour came to me voluntary, and without any imputation against her; I had no charge against her at all; she was acquitted once, as only being in company with her sister, who was uttering bad money,

MARGARET M'MANUS, GUILTY - DEATH ,

aged 26.

CATHERINE MULVEY , GUILTY - DEATH ,

aged 47.

WILLIAM MULVEY , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

681. ROBERT WAPLES was indicted for having in his custody and possession, a certain forged promissory note, purporting to be a promissory note of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, he well knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

682. ROBERT WAPLES was again indicted for forgery .

BUT no evidence being offered on this indictment, he was found

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

683. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , a pocket handkerchief, value 6s. the property of James M Andel , from his person .

JAMES M'ANDEL. On the 13th of June, which was the Anniversary Day, on which the charity children go to St. Paul's , I lost my handkerchief; it was about a quarter past three, and I was at the North-gate; there was a considerable crowd there; I felt my handkerchief in the act of being drawn from my pocket; I immediately put my hand to feel, and missed it. I turned round immediately, and seeing the prisoner fall back, I accused him of stealing it; an officer was in the crowd, who unbuttoned the prisoner's coat, and the handkerchief was in his breast pocket.

WILLIAM WORSTER . I am a constable, and took the prisoner into custody, and took the handkerchief from his possession.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing through St. Paul's Church-yard, and picked this handkerchief up, and the officer searched me, and found it on me.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

684. ABRAHAM MENDOZA was indicted for feloniously assaulting Joseph Wood , in the King's highway, on the 7th of April , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 15l. a chain, value 4l. two seals, value 30s. and a key, value 5s. his property.

JOSEPH WOOD . I am a linen-draper , and live at No. 17, Bishopsgate Within. I was robbed of my property at a little after ten in the evening of the day in the indictment, the 7th of April; I was going from Bishopsgate-street to Whitechapel, by Petticoat-lane ; I had been in company, and was in some degree the worse for liquor. As I was going up Petticoat-lane; a person rushed right across me; he ran against me; as I was endeavouring to defend myself, the person suddenly pulled my watch out of my fob, and ran off immedieately; he came from the opposite side of the way, and ran across me in a side direction. I had not observed him on the opposite side of the way; I have every reason to suppose he ran from a door against which he stood. The push was violent; I did not fall by it; it moved me from the position I was in; it moved me on one side. I immediately hallooed out to the watchman, and called stop thief. The watchman called stop thief; I did not at all perceive the countenance of the person who ran up to me in this way; the person who was running from me, I lost sight of. He was pursued, and taken within two or three minutes; I learned that he was taken, and that my watch was safe. I have had my watch ever since. The watch was delivered to me the next day by the officer; it is worth fifteen pounds. The person I found in custody was the prisoner; he was a stranger to me quite. I was quite sensible of what was going on.

RICHARD KINLEY . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner in the evening of the 7th of April; I saw the prosecutor that evening also. I did not see him before the complaint of being robbed; I first heard he was robbed, about ten minutes before eleven o'clock that night. I saw the prisoner cross upon Mr. Wood; he walked over to him; I was then about ten yards behind them, and expected there was something going forward. The prisoner was alone; I kept my eye on him. A scuffle ensued between the two parties; he caught hold of him, as I suppose. The prisoner, as I suppose, by the collar, and I saw his arm drawn, and I expected he had a watch at the same time; I did not see what it was. Mr. Wood cried thief, several times. Petticoat-lane is partly in the City, and partly in the County. That part were they were was in the County part. I proceeded after the prisoner; I saw his person many times before; I went after him when there was a call of stop thief; I lost sight of him for a short time, but caught it again; he was the only person who ran at the cry of stop thief. I laid hold of him in a turning which leads out of Petticoat lane into Gullstone-street. When I was about two yards behind him, I saw him stoop, and he put the watch down in the corner of a step of a door; it was a moon-light night, and when he had taken his hand from the place,I saw the watch glisson; I perceived it was a watch. I caught hold of him immediately; he asked me what was the matter, and I did not make him any reply, but secured him. I stooped down, and picked up the watch; it was the same watch which was afterwards returned to the prosecutor. I then brought him into Petticoat-lane, and took him to Aldgate watchhouse. The prosecutor came up in three or four minutes. I shewed the watch to the prosecutor, and he owned it to be his, as the watch he had been robbed of.

Joseph Wood. Re-examined. I was very much in liquor, I will allow; I have no knowledge of the man taking hold of my collar. I know there was something of a scuffle, and in that scuffle, I lost my watch.

Q. You admitted that you were the worse for liquor, but said that you knew what was going on. Now have you ever said, at any time, or in any place, that you were seized by the collar - A. No.

Q. Could you be so seized without knowing it at the time - A. It might have taken place without my remembering it; as to being collared, I don't recollect it.

CHARLES HAMBLETON. I am a watchman. Just before eleven o'clock, I was standing against the door; I observed Mr. Wood standing opposite me, with his chain and seals hanging showey out. There was a man stood along side of me; I don't know who he was; be seemed to take greatnotice of Mr. Wood, very much. I then saw Mr. Wood advance towards Whitechapel, on the right hand side. This man rushed into the Black Lion, and then the prisoner came out; the prisoner was not the man who stood by me; I knew him well before; I had seen him very often about the place, As soon as I saw him go forward, I called to Kinley, and said, that gentleman will lose his watch before he goes any farther. I had a light in my lanthorn, a candle was pretty fresh, and the moon shone pretty light. Kinley called me back, and said stop with your light, I will go forward. I did not go forwards enough to see what was done. I heard the cry of stop thief; he was not quite in my sight then; nor was Mr. Wood quite. I stopped momentarily, for I knew which direction they would take. I heard Kinley's rattle spring, and came up directly, and the next I saw of the prisoner was when he had hold of him. The prisoner came out of the Black Lion alone, and crossed the way alone.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent. There was a cry of stop thief, or something of that, and I was running with the others, and there was a man near where the property was found.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

684. JAMES HOY was indicted for a rape , and found

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

685. JAMES KINGSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , three seals, value 2l. 14s. and a key, value 6d. the property of William Hulm , from his person .

WILLIAM HULM. I lost my seals and key on the day in the indictment; they were fastened to my watch, which was in my pocket; the ribbon was cut in two with a pair of scissors, and the watch was left behind; it was about half past eleven in the morning; I was in Aldgate-street , and was looking at the fire, which had been there that morning. While I was in the crowd looking at the ruins, I felt my coat pulled very tight, and on looking down, saw my seals in one of this boy's hands, and the scissors in the other. He immediately threw them on the ground. and I held him fast while I picked them up; they were my seals; the ribbon had been cut. I handed the prisoner and the seals over to an officer.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

686. JOSEPH PERU was indicted for the wilful murder of Benjamin Twigg .

JOHN JOHN . I am a corporal in the 3rd Guards. On the evening of the day in the indictment, I went with some of my comrades to celebrate the Anniversary of the battle of Waterloo, to a house in St. Catherine's-lane ; the deceased, Benjamin Twigg, was with me; it was a little after then o'clock; there were a good many soldiers with us, there were twenty or more. While we were sitting in the house, the prisoner at the bar came in; we were in the tap-room at the time we fell out with the prisoner; he forced himself into our company, and we refused him. He wanted to get some beer to drink, and we refused him. We told him to be off, because we would not have any Foreigners among us. He did not go; he would not. He told us that he was an English man, and would not go away. We told him to be off, for we would have nothing to do with him. We ordered him out of the door. Upon that, he refused, and some of the soldiers turned him out; not in a manner to hurt him at all; I can't say Twigg was one; I can't say he was not. He did not say any thing to the prisoner. The prisoner did not come in again; it was ten minutes before I saw him again. Twigg went out; I followed him soon after, almost directly; I saw Twigg and the prisoner close together in the lane; I saw the deceased fall; before that, I did not see any thing done by him. I did not see him strike the prisoner, or any thing of that kind; I am not sure he did not strike him. I was within five yards of them. I saw the figures of two men in short; the soldier was not dressed in scarlet; I was near enough to see one lift his hand to the other, if he had done so; but I did not take any notice. I saw Twigg heel back; on seeing him fall, I jumped up the prisoner, and he made a blow at me. I discovered that the two persons I saw were Twigg and the prisoner. Twigg groaned out when he fell. When I came up, the prisoner struck me; he made a back handed blow at me, and I felled him with my left, and seized him with my right hand. The blow he made at me, cut me; it was such a cut as could not be done without some sharp instrument. I secured the prisoner, and therewas a man came up, and took him to the watchhouse. I did not say any thing to the prisoner, nor he to me. I went to the watchhouse; but did not go in. I did not see what became of Twigg, the deceased.

Prisoner, (by interpretation.) Q. Do you say I struck you?

Witness. Yes; he struck me in the street, after Twigg fell.

EDWARD WARREN . I am also a soldier in the Guards. I went to this house with some of my companions who were at Waterloo; the deceased was of the party; we went about half past nine; there was a good many. I did not see the prisoner there; I had seen him in the course of the day; he has lost one of his arm; it was about four o'clock in the afternoon that I saw him. He had a fork screwed to the stump of his arm, it screws into the top of the arm; I took that from him, because he was breaking the doors open with it, and abusing the people in the lane The deceased was not with me then. The prisoner was in liquor, but not drunk. About half past nine, I and my comrades were in the house. I recollect the deceased going out to buy some tobacco; I saw there was a row just opposite the White Lion soon after, and there I found Twigg laying there; I thought it was from liquor that made him lay there at first; he was twenty or thirty yards above the White Lion. He was laying down; he was wounded, as I discovered afterwards; I directly went up to him; he was laying with his face up, I believe; he was put on my back; he was not able to get up himself to go to any place, and I took him to the Guard-room at the Mint; that was about fifty yards, or more. He said something while he was on my back; but I could not tell what it was, I did not understand him. I laid him down when I brought him to the Guardroom; he continued there until the surgeon came; he was the same man the surgeon saw.

DAVID EVANS. I am a surgeon; I live in that neighbourhood. I was called in to examine the deceased, on the 20th, two days after the murder, it was before the Coroner. He was wounded a little below the navel; it is my opinion that, that wound was the occasion of his death. It appeared to be done with a sharp instrument; it was three inches deep; a portion of the omentum protruded through the lacerated integuments; it had reached the intestimes, but not to wound them.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am a police officer. I conveyed the prisoner from Aldgate watchhouse to the police office. As I went along, I had a conversation with him. I asked him where the knife was; (for I had searched him at the watchhouse, and found none.) he said, he had no knife. I asked him how he came to commit the murder; and he said, he did not commit it; that was directly after I asked him for his knife. He was taken, and examined before the magistrate. He was asked what he had to say; whatever he said, I believe the clerk did not put down. He said, he was drunk and mad, and did not know what he did. I got this knife from the landlord of the White Lion; it was exactly as it is now.

CHARLES PENRO . I am a waiter at the White Lion. I recollect the night on which this offence was committed; I am a Prussian. In consequence of something that had passed, I went about eleven o'clock at night to look for a knife, and some one went with me. I found this knife; I took a candle in my right hand to go and look for it; this is the knife I found; I found it between. thirty and forty yards from the public-house; it was shut when I found it; it was a dry night; there was a little blood on the blade.

Prisoner. Q.Perhaps he had it in his pocket?

Witness. I swear I found it, and never saw it before to my knowledge; I found it in the street.

JONATHAN MURRAY . I am a pawnbroker; I live in East Smithfield. I sold a knife to the prisoner on the 17th of June, similar to the one produced; with the name of Stelty on it. I believe it to be the name; I can't swear to it.

Prisoner. I bought a knife like that of him; but there are many like it.

JOHN MOODY . I was one of the party of the Waterloo men, on the night of the 18th. I saw the prisoner in the evening in the house, about half past six; the last time I saw him was a quarter past ten; I have reason to know, that at that time, he had a cutting instrument or knife in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was at the public-house, three soldiers fell upon me, beating me about the head, and when they took me to prison, all my head was swelled, and I had two black eyes. I lost all my money and my knife. I was at Greenwich; where I have been eight years, and I received twentyeight pounds to go home to my own Country; and they robbed me of all my money. I have no witness, for I was very much in liquor.

John John . Re-examined. I did not see any body beat the prisoner about the head. I saw him the whole time, until we turned him out, and I am sure nobody struck him on the head, or gave him these blows. I was near enough to see him the whole time.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 60.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

687. ESTHER WESSEN was indicted for the wilful murder of her male bastard child .

ANN BOOTLE . I am the wife of John Bootle; I live at No. 11, Well's-yard . I had occasion to go to the privy in the yard to throw some water down, on the Saturday before the Coroner's Inquest was holden; I observed part of a child's leg and thigh under the grating; it must have been put down the hole of the privy; the grating belongs to a drain which communicates with the privy. This was in the morning. When my husband came home, I informed him what I had seen; he went out; and brought in the body of the child; it was a male child. I observed that the navel-string was not tied as it usually is by medical men and nurses after delivery. The body was quite putrid, and must have been dead some time; how long, I could not judge. The people of the next adjoining house use this privy. John Partridge lives there. I had known the prisoner Esther Wessen , a short time; she had been living at Partridge's house for a few months; I did not know that she wa pregnant.

JOHN BOOTLE . In consequence of what my wife told me, I went to this grating, and took up the child; it was on the Saturday before the Inquest was holden. I saw no marks of violence on the child; I kept it.

ANN WESSEN. I am the mother of the prisoner. I was sent for to John Partridge 's; he is my son-in-law; I was sent for at about a quarter past five o'clock in the morning of Whit-Monday; I fellowed him as soon as I could. I found the prisoner in bed at his house, in John Partridge 's wife's bed. The prisoner appeared to be very poorly when I first went; she appeared to be very bad; but nothing as I thought dangerous. She complained of a pain in her bowels, Before that time, I had never been informed that she was pregnant. Upon her complaining of this pain, I went as soon as I thought the apothecary's shops were open, to get some castor oil, but the shops were not open. I did not at that time believe her to be in labour. I was gone about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour. I found her worse on my return; her sister was sitting on the bed by her, and I sit down by her also, and she seemed very much agitated, and in a great deal of pain. She took hold of my hand, and grased it, and her sister's, and she said, God will help me, and has helped me. Then she said, I am better, for it has come from me; and I said, what come from you, in the consternation I was in; she made answear and said, I don't know mother; but I believe a child. On that account, I looked to see what it was, and on turning down the bed clothes, found it was a male dead child; it appeared like a child that had gone its full time; there were marks of recent delivery on it, and in the bed. When my son-in-law came home, he was very much surprised, and said, what should we do with it; I had put it into a dry chamber-pot, which stood by. My son-in-law said, mother, what shall we do; we must get a box, and bury the child; that was first agreed upon. I said, I did not know what to do; the best way will be to hide the child, and nobody will know any thing about it, to hide the shame of the girl. I don't know whether he saw the body of the child; he did not say what way to hide it. It was taken into the yard; I took it from the room, and carried it to where it was found in the privy; I put it down the privy. As near as I can guess, it was near nine o'clock. My daughter was not told what was done with the child.

JOHN PARTRIDGE. My wife is not able to come out; she was brought to bed last Wednesday was a week. I got up just before five that morning; my wife told me to get up, and go call her mother, as she had heard Esther all night; I proposed to them, and told them, that the child ought to be buried in a proper manner; I told them that it would bring disgrace on my own family, and they might do what they liked with it, and throw it down the privy if they liked. I did not see the prisoner after it was born. My mother took it through to the privy while I was at breakfast. I never suspected what was the matter with the prisoner,

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

688. WILLIAM DODD ,and ANDREW BARTON were indicted for wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, cutting with a certain sharp instrument, on the 25th of March , a certain person unknown, with intent to kill and murder him .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

689. MARGARET WALSH was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , six yards of flannel, value 14s. the property of Frances Baker , privately in her shop .

FREDERICK CHARLES BAKER . I am the son of the prosecutrix; I live with her, at No. 2, Duke's-row, Pimlico ; my mother keeps a linen-draper's shop , she is a widow . On the 1st of June last, I was sitting facing a large looking-glass in the parlour at my dinner, and in that looking-glass I could see a great part of the shop. I happened to look into the glass, and saw a woman in the shop. I went to see what she wanted, and it proved to be the prisoner at the bar; she was about a foot and a half into the shop; she had her face towards me, not as if advancing farther; she stopped, and I asked her what she wanted; she asked the way to Westminster; no other person was in the shop at that time; I told her the way. She left me; I then turned round to go into the parlour again, and perceived a piece of flannel was missing off some wooden steps, which stood about three feet and a half within the shop, quite within. I had seen that flannel when I went into my dinner. On missing it, I went after the prisoner; I overtook her about four doors from our house; I took hold of her arm, and I thought I saw something under her clothes; she had no cloak, and I found this piece of flannel there. I got hold of her, and in leading her back, she said, don't push me, and I told her to deliver up the flannel, and she did so; she gave it me just before we got to our house. I have the flannel here; there are six yards; it cost above eighteen pence a yard; it would sell for a greater price.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the flannel, and there was another woman coming out at the door when I picked it up.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

690. EDWARD GURLING was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , a silver tea-pot, value 7l. the property of John Divett , esq. in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES SPOONER . I am groom to Mr. Divett; he lives at No. 9, Devonshire-place; that is in Marybone parish , between three and four o'clock on the day in the indictment, I was in the kitchen of my master's house, there were five more servants in the kitchen. I heard a noise in the passage, and went to see, and saw the shadow of some one going round the corner; I saw the shadow of something, and the person finding that I was coming on him quite, turned round, and met me; it was the prisoner; he could have got out the way he came in; he returned back, and asked me for some name; but what it was,I don't know. In the mean time, I saw the handle of the tea-pot under his coat; I saw the handle upwards. I pulled the coat on one side, and saw that the tea-pot was my master's property. I left the prisoner in the care of the other servants, and we never parted custody of him until we delivered him to the officer.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am an officer of Mary-bone parish. I took charge of the prisoner and the property. It was represented to me in the prisoner's presence that the tea-pot was found on him. I have had it ever since.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

691. WILLIAM NORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , a purse value 1d. and ten shillings in monies numbered, the property of Robert Wells , from his person .

ROBERT WELLS . I am a coster-monger . I lost my money on the 20th of June; I was drinking along with the prisoner at the Devonshire Arms, and I had a little drop in my head, and know nothing of the matter.

CATHERINE JOHNSON. I lodged at this house, the Devonshire Arms. I saw the prisoner coming out with a purse in his hand; he took the money out, and threw the purse down the cellar.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

692. JOHN WATTS and ALEXANDER ED-MONDS were indicted for feloniously assaulting SAMUEL BECKET . in the King's highway, on the 9th of June , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 30s. his property .

SAMUEL BECKET. On the 9th of June last, at about five o'clock, I was walking down Mile-end-road , with my watch in my fob, and returning back again, I met about a dozen men, who took me round the middle, and hustled me; they clasped me fast, and took the watch out of my pocket; it was a silver watch, and had a ribbon to it; they pulled my watch out of my pocket, and then walked away; they handed it from one to another. I staid, and looked at them a little time, and then they handed it to John Watts ; I don't know positively who the other men were; I believe the watch I saw in Watts's hands to be mine; I did not see the other prisoner about me, and I could not take notice of them all. While it was in Watts's hands, I took hold of him, and asked him to give me my watch; he said, it was not mine; but his own. He then walked-off, and I called stop thief; then I attempted to run after him, and there were some people came behind me, and shoved me down; they shoved me off, and I lost sight of him. I went farther up the road, as far as Globe-lane, and there stopped. I saw the prisoner Watts coming back by himself; when I saw him, I sang out to the watchman, and got him taken up.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a watchman of Mileend, Old Town. On the Sunday morning in question, I was on the road on my duty, and as I was walking down towards Globe-lane, I saw a concourse of penple assembled, when the prosecutor gave charge of Watts; he went quietly to the watchhouse.

CHARLES JAKES . I was constable of the night, and remember Watts being brought to me; he was brought by two watchmen; nothing was found on him.

MARY JAKES . I am the wife of the last witness. I live in Mile-end-road. On Sunday morning, the 9th of June, I got up between four and five o'clock; I went and threw my sash up, and threw the shutters back; I saw some persons on the same side of the way as my own house; there might be ten or a dozen men standing in the street; they had got the prosecutor between them, hustling him. I then saw John Watts come towards my house; he came from the others, and had a watch in his hand; that I saw; it was a silver watch; he had an apron before him, and seemed as if he was putting it into the apron; the other man, Edmonds, was with the others, endeavouring to keep the prosecutor back; he was on the outside of the party that was round the prosecutor; he was standing still, and looking towards Watts, said, push it, Jack. I am sure the prisoner Edmonds said so; I had a full opportunity of seeing him. I saw this out of my parlour window.

Cross examined by MR. BARRY. All the parties were totaliy strangers to me. My husband was constable of the night; he asked me if I could describe the person who got the watch; and I said, I could. I know there are such things as rewards. I have heard of such a thing, but not from my husband.

Samuel Becket . Re-called. I never saw that woman that I know off. I was two much frightened; I don't remember crying that morning, nor do I remember leaving against any rails.

THOMAS VANN. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner Edmonds, on the 17th of June, in consequence of information.

The prisoners in their Defence, both declared their innocence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

693. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , a saw, value 10s. the property of Thomas Walker .

THOMAS WALKER, the prosecutor, could not swear to his property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

694. SOLOMON BOWERMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , a gelding, value 10l. and a horse collar, value 2s. the property of Robert Roffey ; and a cart, value 6l. the property of John Bullen .

ROBERT ROFFEY . I live at Merton, in Surrey. I was possessed of a horse, which I lost on the morning of the 18th of June; I saw him before on the morning of the 17th of June. I missed him on the morning of the 18th, when I found my stable entered, and the staple wrenched out of the door, and the door broken open. I saw him again on theFriday at about eleven o'clock; I know nothing of the prisoner with respect to it. I had some harness stolen with my horse, but only found the collar. I saw the horse at Mr. Ing's; it is a horse now down here. I don't know the prisoner at all.

THOMAS WATSON . I was at work with this horse on the 17th of June; I went home with him about three o'clock. I saw him about nine o'clock on that day. The next morning, the man who looks after the team, went to the stable first; I went between five and six, and saw that it was broken open. I had locked it the over night, that I am sure of; I carried the key in doors, and hung it up as usual. I know the prisoner at the bar; I did not know him before the horse was lost. I did not go with my master to Mr. Ing's.

GEORGE HUGHES . Mr. Ing is my master, and my uncle; he is a cow-keeper. I and Mr. Ing were at the Grafton Head, the corner of the yard, on Wednesday morning, the 19th of June. The prisoner and another man came in, and the prisoner asked Mr. Ing if he had any place that he could put his horse in; he said, yes, and came out to the door, and he sent me down to take the horse in; I took him down the yard, and the prisoner went with me. The horse was in harness in a cart; I unharnessed him. and we took the collar off, and hung it up in the stable. The prisoner bid me give him a quartern of oats, which I did. After that, he asked me if I would go up and have any thing to drink, and I said, yes, I would, and I went up, and got something to drink, and the other man was there; they had a bowl of gin and milk; nobody paid for it. After this, the prisoner came down the yard again, and ordered me to give the horse another quartern of oats. I did not see the prisoner or the other man after that. I never saw the prisoner again until the next morning. My master went up to Mr. Roffey's, not this Mr. Roffey, his brother. The next morning the prisoner came to fetch the horse and cart away, and I was ordered, if he came, to get some body to help me to secure him. He said, he wanted the horse out directly, and while he was gone to a certain place, I sent for a constable; then I gave him into the hands of the constable. I was ordered directly to fetch the officers from Bow-street.

GEORGE SQUIBB. I am watchhouse-keeper, and apprehended the prisoner. I went up to him as he came out of the privy, and said, my friend, is this cart, and the horse belonging to it yours; and he said yes, it is. In consequence of that, I said, there is a very strong suspicion that it is not yours, and I must detain you; and I said Mr. Goodwin, you assist me to take this man to the watchhouse. In his left hand waistcoat pocket, I found this pistol, loaded; it is not loaded now; there was a ball in it, and powder; and there was ball and powder enough for another load or two.

George Hughes. I have been to look at the horse; it is now down at the door; that is the horse that the prisoner brought in the morning of the 19th; I have the collar in my hand.

Robert Roffey . I have been down to see the horse, it is mine; it is one that was lost from the stables on the morning of the 18th.

Prisoner's Defence. In the first place, the constable said that pistol was loaded, and it was not; neither are those two balls that are there, mine. Another thing, the ostler says that nobody brought the cart in but me; but the owner of the cart took it out himself. I am a total stranger. The first time I saw this cart was at Battle Bridge, on Tuesday, about the middle of the day; the man was offering it for sale, and I believe the person who was looking at it, would have bought it, only he said, he had another one making. Then after that, the owner went on with his cart. I went to the person who was about buying it, and the man said, if he could get it for fifteen or sixteen pounds, it would be a bargain. The next time I saw it was when the owner was coming from Cambden Town, coming from the New-road to Tottenham-court-road, and I said, hoy; have you sold your cart; and he said, no; and I said, stop, and I will buy it of you if we can agree; and he said, very well, wait a minute or two; and I waited a bit, and he returned again, and we agreed for fifteen pounds, and I paid thirteen pounds down, twelve pounds in notes, and one in silver, and I told him I would give him the rest if he would go up to my cousin's, and he said, very well, and we put the cart in, and then he came back again, and we waited, and then came another person, who lived handy there, and paid him some money, and I thought he well knew him, and he paid him down some money, three or four pounds; I understood that he kept an iron shop, and that he brought it from his own home. When he got to my cousin's, I asked him to take the rest of the money, and he asked me my name, and where I lived, and all that, and I said, I would come and meet him.

- KENTON. I am a sawyer; I live up by Lord's cricket-ground, near Paddington. I know the prisoner; all I know of him is seeing him along with his brother; I know him by sight.

Q. Did you see him any where on the morning of the 19th of June-A. I don't know the day of the month, but I saw him in Tottenham-court-road, Wednesday three weeks, yesterday, it was between six and seven o'clock in the morning, and in Tottenham-court-road. As I was crossing the top of Tottenham-court-road, I saw him looking round a cart; that cart had a horse to it; there was a tall stout man, and the prisoner, with that cart. I heard the prisoner say the cart was not worth so much money; it was fifteen pound that he said was two much; he said the cart was very much out of repair, and would never run long. The other made answer, that sold it, and said, it would run for three months longer with very little repair. Then they walked round it a little bit, and then walked of the road on to the pavement. The prisoner said I have not enough to pay you now, but I will pay you some now, and settle the rest with you in the morning, or something to that purpose. He said, you meet me here at this public-house to-morrow morning, at ten o'clock; there was a public-house not far off, he pointed towards it, and said, I will settle with you, and you will get a stamp for a receipt. I saw the prisonerpull his money out, it consisted of notes; he said, here is twelve pounds in paper, and here is one pound in silver. I saw the prisoner give that money to the man.

MARY GATES, I am a widow; I live in Thomas's-buildings, Somers Town, at the top of Phoenix-street. The prisoner at the bar has lodged with me; he took my lodging on the 1st of May, Wednesday. He lodged with me until he was taken up; he slept at home the night before he was taken up, and the night before that; he never slept out of his lodging since he has had it; he went to bed at about half past ten on the night of the 17th; he came in about seven, and continued at home from seven until he went to bed, and never went out of doors, and at half past ten he went to bed.

Q. Do you know whether he continued in the house until the next morning - A. I am certain of it.

Q. What time did he go out the next morning - A.About nine.

Robert Roffey . Re-examined. The place I live at, is between eighteen and twenty miles from Town.

George Hughes. The Grafton Head is twenty or thirty yards from the top of Tottenham-court-road. I saw a man named Read, a dealer in marine-stores, in the public-house. There was another man with the prisoner; it was between nine and ten in the morning when the prisoner came back; the other man never came back.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

695. MAURICE ROACHE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , a watch, value 50s. the property of George Spear , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE SPEAR. I live at 99, East Smithfield . On the evening of the 19th of June, at about half past eight, the prisoner was talking to a lodger of mine at the door, and asked to go into the parlour with him, as he had something particular to say; they went in; and after they had gone about a quarter of an hour, I missed my watch; it was most usually hung over the mantle piece in the parlour; but whether I left it there, or whether in the privy. I don't know. The lodger was a female lodger; she is a distant relation of my wife, and was out of place then; she is in service now. She went into the parlour with the prisoner, and came out first, leaving him. When the prisoner was apprehended, about half past eleven the same night, he acknowledged he had been in my parlour; but denied taking the watch. The outside-case of the watch was found in his waistcoat pocket; the other part in his other pocket.

JOHN LAWSON . I am a constable. The case was in his waistcoat pocket, and the other part in his fob.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the watch on the seat on the necessary, and I took it up to look at it, and being rather intoxicated, I let the case drop, and put it in one pocket, and the body of the watch in the other, with intent to give them to the owner of the house; but, being so drunk, I forgot it, and I quite forgot having it in my possession when I was sober. If I had taken it with any fraudulent intent, I had plenty of time to make away with it; but I forgot entirely that I had it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

696. WILLIAM ALGAR was indicted for stealing, a quantity of silk ribbons, value 800l. the property of William Clark and John Clark .

IN this case, the prosecutors could not swear to the property produced.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

697. RICHARD MINCING was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charles Robertson , in the King's highway, on the 12th of June , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a hat, value 3s. and seven shillings in silver monies numbered , the property of the said Charles Robertson .

CHARLES ROBERTSON. I am a tin-plate-worker . On Wednesday evening, the 12th of June, I was up late, I was drinking in the early part of the evening; I was some what in liquor; but was sensible of what I was doing. I went into a coffee-shop about two o'clock in the morning, in the neighbourhood of Clare-market; I had some coffee there; there was a good many people there; they were intirely strangers to me; there have been two of them to my house. The prisoner was in the coffee-shop. We went in together. He accested me first in the street; he had some sort of conversation with me, and seeing this place open, we went in to have some coffee, and we drank it together. I staid there a short time, half or quarter of an hour. I went first out; I had paid for the coffee for both. We sat next to each other. I remember when I paid for the coffee, I took out all my silver to see if I had a sixpence. I went out first; he followed me out, and made up to me almost directly; he came up to me, and gave me a blow on the front of my head, and knocked me against the wall, and thrust his hand into my pocket, and took every farthing in the world that I had, and did not leave me a halfpenny. He stupified me for a moment; but I directly called out, when he ran away; I told the watchman, and every one I met, what had happened. I went back to the coffee-shop, and told the people there; I described the man to them, and somebody in the shop gave me some information where I should be likely to find the prisoner; they asked me if I would go with them to Fleet-market, and they would find him; but I declined going, as I had no hat; and then they told me to stop where I was. While I was there, they went; and one of them then came back, and gave me some information; in consequence of which, I went with him, and saw the prisoner; he saw me, and escaped out of the market; I followed him into Holborn-hill, and there he got into a tobacco shop; I went over to him, and saw my hat on his head. I asked him what he was doing with my hat on his head, and he said, it was not mine; I said, it was. I also asked him where my money was that he took out of my pocket; and hesaid, he did not take any out of my pocket. He then shuffled out of the shop, and got away again, with the hat on his head; I ran after him, and overtook him; he ran through the cross courts, and I overtook him in Poppins's-court, Fleet-street; he fell down; when I overtook him; I took hold of his two wrists, and the hat fell off his head, and fell down, and he said, he had none of my property; he said, he would murder me if I did not let him go; and I told him, I was in a good case, and was not afraid of him; and he was in a bad one, and all I wanted, was my own. Some people went and fetched an officer, Mr. Cresswell, the street - keeper of Fleet-street. The hat was laying at the prisoner's feet when the officer came. This was about half past seven, or a little after. I had had some liquor; but I am perfectly sure that he is the person who struck me in the street.

ABRAHAM CRESSWELL . I was called to Poppin's-court, and found the prosecutor and the prisoner there. There was a hat laying about three feet from them, and the prosecutor had the prisoner by both wrists. The prosecutor told me what mark I should find in the hat before I took it up; he mentioned three or four particular marks, as if done with a bodkin; I took up the hat, and found those marks in it; I have kept it over since; it was in my own sight the whole time, close to myself; I observed the forehead of the prosecutor, the forehead and nose were very red, as if they had had a blow.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along to buy my goods, and going up Catherine-street, in the Strand, I found a hat laying in the road. I know no more about the man being robbed, than a child in its mother's womb.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

698. DENNIS ROERDON , THOMAS COLLETT , and JAMES QUINN , were indicted for High Treason .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a constable, and street - keeper of the Ward of Aldersgate. On the 20th of May, I was in company with Block and Pelliam, in Little Britain. Brock came to me in Aldersgate-street; when we three were in company, we went to Augel-alley, Moor-lane; this was between two and three o'clock; we went to a house which had no number. Petham led us to that house; we went up stairs first, and he could not find out the exact room; we then went away, and hid ourselves; and then he came and beckoned us, and we returned, we went up into the two pair, we went into a room where the three prisoners were. I secured them myself; they were setting on their bottoms; they were all three sitting in a row, colouring shillings; they had a piece of mettal rubbing it with white colour; that white colour was on their fingers; each was so employed. I secured the two tallest, and clapped the two handcuffs on them, and told them not to resist. I have got the three that they were colouring; they flung them down.

Q.Which is which - A. I don't know, I am sure that out of the number you now hold in your hand, three of them are what fell from the three men. The rest I picked off the boards; they were laying in front of them. Brock secured the third man. We afterwards searched the room. I found them laying before them, and by the side of them. Amongst them, there was a phial full of aquafortis, and here is one here which has had it in; aquafortis was in that phial. Here are nine uncoloured blanks, and eight shillings wrapped up in Roerdon's waistcoat pocket.

Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. I have seen the little man, Quinn, at the time of Mr. Duncan's new house being built; as for the other two, I don't know them. They said that a man had gone out with two shillings to buy them some dinner, and after we secured them, they wished us to stay to see if he would come back.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL. I am assistant to the solicitor of the Mint. I have looked over the articles, sand-paper, bason containing the mixture, the blanks, and the phial, which smells of aquafortis. There are materials sufficient to produce the colour of silver on these blanks. I look at the blanks in question; they are of a size to resemble the Current Coin of this realm, called shillings; all of them are the same.

COURT. Look at that parcel containing the three which are said to have dropped from the three prisoners, and tell me if they are finished - A.They had not been finished, as they have not been washed in water.

William Taylor . Re-examined. They look something yellowish.

Mr. Powell. Cross-examined by MR. ADOLPHUS. Putting them into the water takes off the action of the solution, which if it were not for the water, always turns them yellow, and the water takes away that discolouring quality.

Q. There is a metalic material imparted to the blanks, and that is confined by the aquafortis; but unless they are afterwards washed with water, they turn yellow - A.Certainly.

Q.Therefore the colour to continue, so as to be issued into the World, ought to be washed in water - A. Yes.

Re-examined by MR. REYNOLDS. The colouring gives it a silver colour; but to fix it, it requires water.

JOHN NICOLL. I am one of the moneyers of his Majesty's Mint. I look at the three which fell from the prisoners; they were never issued by the Mint.

Quinn's Defence. (By interpretation, for he spoke in Irish.) On the morning that I was taken, I left my house, I went to Cheapside Market, where all Irish labourers look for employment as bricklayer's labourers. When we went to the market, we remained there until seven o'clock, and there was a man came up to us, and asked us if we wanted any employment, and of course we said yes; and so we went with that man; he said, he could not send us to work until after nine. We went down to the lodging, and stopped until after nine. I had only a bit of dry bread for my breakfast. After that, the man told us to come to Cripplegate Church, and we waited for the man, and then he told us to go alongwith him, and he brought us up in the two pair in Angel-alley; we were there a few minutes before the man shewed us what employment he was going to give us; then he brought a piece of copper, and a large pair of scissors, and a file; he shewed us then what we were to do with these things. When we saw what colour he brought, we did not like to do it. The man said, he would give us our dinner that day; the man is now taken prisoner. I left some of these pieces on the floor. After the man was gone, the officers came in, and hand-cuffed us. I asked the constable to stop a few minutes to see if the man would return; but the man did not.

COLLETT, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

ROERDON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

QUINN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

699. CHARLES HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, a diamond ring, value 7l. and a gold mounted hair brooch, value 12s. the property of Sarah Moore , in the dwelling-house of the Rev. Harry Bristow Wilson .

SARAH MOORE . I am sister-in-law of the Rev. Harry Bristow Wilson. On the 22nd of May last, in consequence of my attention having been directed to the middle drawer of my sister's dressing-glass, in which the trinkets and jewellery that I seldom wore were deposited; I perceived it was shut; but the bolt stood up, and prevented it from going into its place; it had been opened by some violence. I missed several things from that dawer, and among others the diamond ring and brooch in question.

MRS. MARY ANN WILSON. I can speak positively to locking my sister's things up on the 8th of January.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I am an officer. In consequence of information, I went to Messrs. Dunn and Dalgairn's; I first saw one of the partuers; I asked which was Hawkins's desk, and on its being pointed out to me, it was unlocked; I opened it, and there I saw the brooch laying, and a pack of ivory trinkets. The gentleman found the duplicates, and gave them to me; that was when I came the first time.

THOMAS KIRK . I am a pawnbroker. I have known the prisoner about three years. In May, he came to my shop, with a ring. I look at the ring produced; I believe that to be the ring. He offered it me to pledge; he wanted to borrow ten pounds on it; on looking at the ring, I said, I thought it was a larger sum than I felt warranted in lending; and he took it way, saying, that a less sum would not answer his purpose.

JAMES BROOK . I live with Barber, a pawnbroker. I know the lad at the bar; I have known him three years and a half. He came to me on the evening of the 22nd of May, between seven and eight o'clock; he brought this ring, and said, he wanted ten pounds on it for his father; I told him that was more than it would do for, and I said, I would give him six pounds; he said, that would not do; but he would go and ask his father; I then saw him go to another pawnbrokers. In two days after, he came again; then he said, that would do; but I was not inclined to lend him so much, and I lent him five pounds, twelve shillings, and sixpence.

THE REV. HARRY BRISTOW WILSON. I know the drawer from which the jewellery in question was taken. I cannot speak positively to its state of safety previous to the loss. After this lad was taken up, I had a conversation with him. Messrs. Watson and Chappel sent for me, to inform me that the prisoner was then at their house. I went down there; I found the boy there. In his presence I said, that that ring and the other articles were stolen from my house, and that in consequence of the information given to me, I apprehended that a ring which he had offered at Messrs. Watson's, answered the description of the one that had been stolen. I asked him what he had done with that ring, and he said, he had returned it to his mother. I asked him where his parents lived, and who were his employers; he told me he was in the employ of Mr. Brown, at St. Mary's hill, and that his parents lived in Sloaue-street, Chelsea. Not wishing to cast any doubt on the prisoner's character with his employers, I abstained from going to St. Mary's Hill, and prefered going to Sloaue-street. The prisoner assented to his accompanying me and the pawnbroker's man in a coach to a house in Sloane-street, which on our arrival at it, by his direction, we found to be empty. I sat in the coach with the prisoner, while the pawnbroker's man went to a shop on the other side of the street, to make some inquiries. The result was that the house had been shut for three months. The person of the shop where the inquiry was made, sent his errand boy to ride on the coach-box to the landlord of the empty house, who resided at Brompton, whom I found at home. I asked him if any one could have occasionally slept at the empty house, and he said no one could have acces to it, because the key was in his own possesssion. Finding the boy had told me that falsehood, I determined to have him taken into custody; not knowing whether he should be given into the charge of an officer of the County or of the City, I went to Bow-street, and in consequence of the advice given me by the magistrate, I had the prisoner apprehended by a City officer, and he was taken to Giltspur-street Compter. In his way thither he retracted what he had said with respect to having the ring from his mother, and he said, he had it from one Singleton, who, he stated, lived at the house of Messrs. Finch and Co. in Skinner-street, Snow-hill. No person of the name of Singleton lived there. The prisoner was taken before the Alderman on the next Monday, and Singleton attended, and is here to day.

LEE SINGLETON. I live in Newington, with my father. I know the prisoner at the bar, and have known him about fifteen months; I have known him when my father was unfortunate, and in the King's Beach. I look at that ring; the prisoner never had it from me; nor did I ever see it before I saw it at Guildhall.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. Singleton gave me the ring, and I pledged it for him; I was not aware it was stolen.

-SQUIRE. I never saw Singleton but twice inmy life. I saw him in company with the prisoner about a week before Easter; they came together to my counting house where I was in Castle-court, Biching-lane; I was out when they came at first; they brought two rings; they were only guilt ones; they were cheap articles, and Singleton appeared as the proprietor of them. After that time, I did not see either of them until the 22nd of May, and then I saw the ring in Hawkins's possession. I had no dealing with Singleton.

PETER DALGAIRN ESQ . Give the prisoner a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

700. JOHN HARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June , a mare, value 50l. the property of James Poynor .

JAMES POYNOR . I am a farmer , living at Peckledon, in Leicestershire . On the 3rd of June last, which was Whit-Monday, I had a mare, which I had bought at Tilly, and had had two years. She was in my field that evening at nine o'clock. I had seen the prisoner close to the field that night at seven o'clock. The next morning the mare was missing, at about four o'clock. The next time I saw her was in Smithfield, and I knew her very well.

THOMAS WEBB. I am a dealer in horses. I was at Redbourne on Wednesday, the 5th of June; that is about four miles from St. Alban's; I saw the prisoner there, on the mare in question; I will swear to it; I saw him about half a mile on the other side of Redbourne, between Redbourne and Market-street; he was riding towards London; but turned up a lare, I believe on account of seeing me; that laue only leads into fields. I was on horseback myself; I hed no conversation with him; and I saw him again on this side of Barnet. The mare was very much fatigued; it might be two hours before I saw him the second time. The distance from Baruet to Redbourne is about fourteen miles. I had no conversation with him then; he kept on the road to London; he continued going towards London, and I passed him. I saw no more of him that day. I came to London. I was in Smithfield on the morning of Friday; I think soon after two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner on the mare; he had got her there for sale; he was riding her about for sale. I am sure the mare I saw him on at Smithfield, was the same I saw him with at Redburne and Barnet. I went and asked the price of her; he asked twenty guineas for her; twenty guineas in the state she was then, was a good price for her. She was very much cut up, and looked as if she had been hard ridden; I agreed to give him twelve pounds for her; and I took him to the toll-book to hare her booked; and I told him he must find a voucher before I could pay him for her, as I was not satisfied she was his property; he went and brought a voucher. He first told me his name was John Jameson , living at Knighton, in Leicestershire, or some such place. He weat for a voucher, and when he came back with one, he gave a different name, the name of John Hardy; a man came with him. He said, he lived at Grimley, near Market Halborough. I saw the mare was about three years old. I found him in various stories. At first he said, he had had it three years, and afterwards he said it was his uncle's. I left the mare at the Ram. Worrall was in the room, and I gave him charge of the prisoner, on account of his various stories. I don't know whether he saw me with the mare.

JOHN HAZEEWOOD WORRALL . I am an officer. I happened to see Mr. Webb and the prisoner at the bar at Smithfield-market. I did not see the marethen; she was taken to the Ram; but I went to the Ram the next morning, and saw her; Mr. Webb shewed me her.

Thomas Webb . Re-examined. The mare I shewed Mr. Worrall, was the mare I had from the prisoner.

John Hazelwood Worrall. I heard the conversation between the last witness and the prisoner; the prisoner told me his sister would confirm him in his story, and I went to Gardner-street. I afterwards saw Mr. Poynor; I gave the mare to Mr. Poynor; that was the same mare I saw at the Ram. The prisoner was first discharged, and then he came to the Ram, and insisted on having the mare, and I said, I would detain it, and risque the consequences, and I wrote down to his uncle, to whom he first said, it belonged, Dr. Thistleton, and I have the answer.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am guard to the Prince Regent coach from London to Leicester. I know Pecklington, it is a few miles from Leicester; it is between Hinkley and Leicester, it is about one hundred and seven miles from London; Redburne is twenty-six. I knew this mare; I knew it belonged to Mr. Poynor. I saw the prisoner in the Compter; I had no conversation with him, only he said to me I hope you will beg my pardon of Mr. Poynor not to prosecute me, and my friends and relatiors will pay all expences. He also asked Mr. Poynor's pardon when he saw him; Mr. Poynor had nothing at all to do with him. I saw the mare; it is the same mare.

THOMAS TEASDALE. I am a toll-collector in Smithfield-market. I made an entry of the sale of this mare. The prisoner described himself as John Jameson , of Knighton, in Leicestershire, and he called the mare a grey; I made an entry of the mare as a roan.

Prisoner's Defence. On Whit-Monday, I was at Hinckley-fair, and I went into the sign of the Ram about five o'clock, and I fell into conversation with a person about coming to London, and I said, if I could get a horse any where, I would go to London myself; and John Jameson said to me he had a horse to let; upon which, I asked him what he would let me have it for ten days or a fortnight for; he said four pounds, and I offered to give him three pounds down, and one pound when I returned. I staid there until about nine o'clock, and I agreed to this man to bring this horse to Southeol, which is about seven miles off the Fair; he was to bring it on the Tuesday morning, and put it into Mr. Messing's field, which was a friend of mine. The next morning about six o'clock, I took a bridle and saddle tosee if the mare was there, and I found her there I then came to my uncle's at Knighton; he asked me where I was going, and I said, I was going to see a friend at London. He said, I think you ride your mare too hard; don't ride her so hard. Then I went to Northampton, and staid there all night, and came to London about eight o'clock the next day, and put her up at Riding-house-lane; and on the Friday following, I went through Smithfield, and this horse-dealer Webb, whom I had seen on the road, asked me to go into a house to have something to drink, and tie my horse up with his, which I did; and I called for some beer, and after that I had some liquors, and ram and water, until I was very much intoxicated, and this horse-dealer pulled out ever so many bank notes, and said, now I have got plenty of money, what would you like for your horse; and another horse-dealer pulled out ten guineas in gold, and I refused it, and I came out, and wanted by horse to go away, and they wanted me to have more liquor, and I said no, I would not have any more, and another said pay my reckoning before you go, and I refused; and the man said, give me the horse; and he tied it up at the Ram; and I was quite intoxicated in liquor, and did not know what I did.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

London Jury, before Mr.Common Serjeant.

701. JAMES MAGRAH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Fossey , in the King's highway, on the 12th of June , for putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, one cloak, value 3s. the property of Mary Parker .

MARY FOSSEY. I am a widow . I was robbed of a cloak, which belonged to my landlady, Mary Parker . I live at Brackless-street, Barbican. I had been along way to the other end of the Town, to Oxford-street, to see a friend; it was on the 12th of June. I came home very late, between twelve and one; I could not get away before; it was a beautiful moon-light morning. I never saw the prisoner until he came up to me, which was at the top of Cow-lane, Smithfield ; I had not been making merry, nor any thing of that sort. At the top of Cow-lane, the prisoner came up to me, as I was going along, he came putting his hand on my shoulder, and I told him to go along about his business, and he would not go for some time; and I said, what do you want, what do you mean; if you don't go, I will screem out, and he immediately said hush; he immediately threw me down on the pavement; I don't think he was in liquor; he uatied my clerk at that time; it was tied before that time. I was down; but I could not struggle; I screamed out, and he heard a coach coming, so he ran off. I screamed out, and the coachman jumped off his box a good hit before the coach came up, and the coachman asked me what was the matter. The prisoner took the cloak with him; it was worth very little, it was not worth more than two or three shillings. He was puremed; I left the coachman, and ran after the prisoner, to see if I could find him; the prisoner had got out of sight. I went down as far as Snow-hill, and there saw him. I went down Hoster-lane, and saw him at the bottom of Snow-hill; I am positive he was the same man. I then gave the alarm; I saw him talking to three women, and I went up to him; I did not see my cloak. I charged him with the cloak, and asked him what he had done with it; and he said, he had got no cloak. I have neverseen it since. Then two of the three women went away directly, as fast as they could get away. I am very positive and confident that the prisoner is the man; he went a little way, and I said, if you do not give me my cloak, I will charge the watch with you; and then he walked on a little bit, and then ran away again; but he was secured that night.

PATRICK CARNEY. I am a watchman, and apprehended the prisoner. The coachman the last witness spoke of, is not here. I took the prisoner at the foot of Holborn-bridge, in Swan-yard; there was a crowd there, and when I went by, I heard of the robbery, and followed the prisoner, and when I was following him, he ran across Snow-hill into Cock lane; he might have heard the charge. I sprang my rattle after him up Cock-lane, and he was not stopped there; but ran up one Mr. Munn's yard, up Cock-lane; I and the City patrole went into the yard, and secured him; he said nothing.

-HORTON. I am a City patrole. I assisted the last witness in securing the prisoner at the bar. The charge was for robbing the woman. He was on his all fours in Mr. Munn's yards. I secured him. I then brought him to the watchhouse; I went back and saw the woman in the watchhouse, where there were ten or eleven people, and she pointed out the prisoner directly.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lords and Gentlemen, I hope you will take into consideration my doleful situation, to be confined in a prison under irons for what I am not guilty of; I have been at work these twelve weeks past with Mr. Hemmings, who, if called upon, can give me a good character. On leaving my work on Tuesday evening, I proceeded to my lodging at Mr. Fitzeraid's, near John-street; but having a few words with him. I resolved to take lodgings else where, and for that purpose I went out of his house at twelve o'clock at night. Wherefore meeting with this woman, whom, to the best of my knowledge, I never saw before, she accused me of knocking her down, and taking her handkerchief from her some time before. Now, my lords and gentlemen of the jury, I hope you will take these few lines into consideration, as being in a strange Country, destitute of friends to speak for me, and I have no more to add.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

702. JOHN HARRISON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , a bay mare, value 10l. the property of Willonghby M'Ghie esq.

WILLOUGHBY M'GHIE ESQ. I had a mare poney; it was at grass at West-end, near Hampetend , on the premises of Mr. Harrington, the milk-man. In consequence of a letter from my brother. I went to the White Horse livery stables, in the City-road, on the 17th of last month, about ten in the morning;I found the poney there; how it had been brought there, I don't know. This was on a Monday; I am sure the poney I saw there, was mine.

THOMAS M'GHIE ESQ. I am the brother of the last witness. I know this poney. I know where it was at grass; I saw it at grass on Sunday, the 16th, about three o'clock in the afternoon. I saw it on the Monday morning following, about half past nine, or a quarter before ten; I saw it at the White Horse livery stables, in the City-road, when I rode into Town. While I remained there, the prisoner at the bar came for the poney; the hostler said something to me. I then spoke to the prisoner; I asked him where he got the poney he rode on that morning; that was just at the stable door. I pointed to the poney; he must know what poney I meant; he then said, he bought it on the Hampstead-road. I asked him of whom; and he said, of a butcher. I said it was my brother's poney. I think he said he bought it that morning at half past five, or half past six. After we stood a short time, he offered to give it up, on condition of my giving him the bridle and saddle; I did not do that. We stood talking to the hostler; and then he said, he would fetch the butcher. I told him he had better stay until my brother came, because he knew more about it. He said, the butcher was a fat man, with a green coat; he did not know his name. I think that was what he said. I am sure he said, he did not know his name. I asked him how he came to buy a poney of a man he did not know; and he said, he bought it, cheap, and gave six guineas and a half for it. I asked him to stay until my brother came. When my brother came, he said, he would hang him; then my brother sent for an officer; he said, he would pay any man who would go for an officer; he said that aloud in the yard. Great numbers of persons were assembled in the yard at this time. I beeckoned the prisoner to go, as the people said let the poor fellow go. I did not wish him to be hanged. He went before the officer came; I did not see him go; in the crowd he went away.

SAMUEL JOYCE . I am assistant to the hostler at the White Horse livery stables. I look at the prisoner at the bar; he brought the poney in question, himself, at about half past six o'clock; I had seen him twice before; he ordered a quartern of corn, and two pennyworth of beaus for the poney, as another person would do; he went awayin about a quarter of an hour afterwards. I never saw the poney before. I was there when he came back. The younger Mr. M'Ghie rode in about half past nine. When the prisoner first came in, I said, you have a pretty poney there; he said, yes, what do you think I gave for it; I said, I don't know. In the result he told me he gave ten pounds ten shillings for sandle bridle and all. I should think it was worth that. I had seen him twice in the week previous; he was in the Star public-house.

JOHN-. I am hostler. I was not at the stables when the prisoner was taken. A person came into the yard, and said, a person wanted to see me. I went, and took the officer with me to the Angel in Tabernacle-walk, about an hundred yards across the way. I asked the landlord if any one wanted me, and I saw the prisoner outside the house in the street; he was going to speak to me, and then I told the officer he was the man, and he apprehended him.

BERNARD GLEED. I am the officer that took the prisoner into custody. I asked him where he bought the poney. I told him what I took him for, on suspicion of stealing Mr. M'Ghie's poney. I asked him where he bought it; and he said, by Primrose-hill, of a butcher; he said, he gave six pounds ten shillings in the whole for it. I asked him if he had any receipt to shew for it; and he said, none I asked him if he knew the man he bought it of; and he said, no. I searched him, and in his waistcoat he had a few halfpence, and in his coat pocket I found a pair of spurs.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, and I let of this man, and asked him what time the Yorkshire coach would come; and he said, he did not know any particular time. He was walking before me; and he said, are you going down to Yorkshire; and I yes; and he said. I had better ride the poney down, and I paid him six pounds ten shillings for it; there were plenty of people passing, and I paid him the six pounds ten shillings, and he did not tell me where he lived, and I did not inquire. I brought it to the White Horse, and put it up, and I remained there a little time, and the gentleman was there, and he said this is my poney, and he sent for his brother, and he came. The young gentleman told me to go away, and I went away, and when I came back, I was taken.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

703. JAMES HAWKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , a silver watch, value 5l. three gold seals, value 2l. 15s. and a watch-key, value 5s. the property of Francis Fox , from his person .

FRANCIS FOX. I was at St. Paul's at the time of the possession of the charity children. My watch-ribbon and seals were hanging out. I was standing in the crowd, and perceiving my seals moving, I justanily felt for my watch, and found it was gone. I had not observed the prisoner near me. I immediately looked on my right hand side, and saw the prisoner, with my watch in his hand. I immediately seized him, and grasped his hand in which were the watch and seals, and delivered him to an officer.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I happened to be near Mr. Fox, on the 13th. I had observed the prisoner in the morning at about ten o'clock, standing at the end of Cheapside and Paternoster-row; there were two more boys with him at the same time. I saw the prisoner attempt a great number of gentlemen's pockets. He tried the prosecutor's watch once without success; the second time he drew it, and I look him with the watch.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined two years , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

704. JAMES KINGSTON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , three seals, value 2l. 14s. and one key, value 6s. the property of William Hulm , from his person.

WILLIAM HULM. I lost this property on the 27th of June, the ribbon was cut with a pair of scissors, and the watch left behind. I was in Aldersgate-street , and I was looking at the fire, which had been there that morning. I crossed over the street just to look at the ruins. I felt my coat bound very tight, and I immediately looked down, and saw the seals in one of this boy's hands, and the scissors in the other; he immediately threw them down, and I hold him fast while I stooped to pick them up; my ribbon had been cut. I delivered the boy to an officer.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined two years , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

705. JOHN LEWES was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , a coat, value 2l. a shirt, value 9s. and a gown, value 15s. the property of John Dale in the dwelling-house of James Clayton .

JOHN DALE . I am a labouring man . On the 8th of June last, I lodged at No. 5, Rope-maker's-fields , the house of James Clayton . I have known the prisoner between five and six years; he has been a shipmate with me. I took him home to sleep with me at my lodgings on the night previous to the day in the indictment. I went out the next morning, leaving him at my lodgings, and I left the things on the table, that he might get his breakfast. I left the clothes named in the indictment in the room in my chest, which was not locked. When I returned, the prisoner was gone, and my room door was locked, and the key was left with the landlady; I have never recovered my clothes again.

DANIEL WATTS I live in Cable-street, St. George's in the East. The prisoner offered to sell me a blue coat, and white gown. The coat had yellow buttons, as the prosecutor has described it. I observed the size of the coat, and thought it was one that would it Dale. I asked him if the coat was his own; he said, it was. I asked him what made him sell it, and he said, he was very much distressed, and he said, the gown was his girls; I bought them of him. I saw him again afterwards. I told him go to some regular clothe's shop, and they could give him more than I could. He said he sold the coat to an old woman in Rosemary-lane; he said, he sold it for eight shillings, and some gin.

JOHN LINES . I am headbaraugh of Limehouse. I apprehended the prisoner by the desire of the prosecutor. He acknowledged stealing the things, and said, he supposed he should be transported.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

706. JOSEPH SPURR was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June , a hat value 3s. a pocket book, value ls. two banks notes for payment of 5l. each value 10l. and two other bank notes, value 2l. the property of John Wallis , from his person .

JOHN WALLIS . On the night of the 3rd of June, about eleven o'clock, I was in the Cooper's Arms public house; being fatigued, I felt a sleep. When I awoke, my hat and pocket-book were gone.

JASSE TAYLOR. I am servant at the Cooper's Arms. The prisoner at the bat was the only man who was in that room beside the prosecutor. The hat was lying on the table, and after the prisoner was gone, the hat was missing.

DAVID YOUNG . On going to the prisoners house we found the hat lying on a chair.

THOMAS THOMPSON . I am an officer. On the 5th of June, between nine and ten at night, there came a knock at Mr. Newton's door, No. 56. St. John street, and the pocket book was thrown into the hall by some person with a note in it.

(property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked against something in the privy, and I found it was this hat, and so I took it.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

707. JOHN PREMERY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of June , two pounds and two ounces weight of tea, value 6s. the property of the East. India Company .

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am an assistant elder at the Cutler street warehouse. The prisoner was also in the service of the company. On the 29th of June, the prisoner was up stairs repairing the wood work of a chest of tea, and on my going up to him, I observed him put the lead of the chest down quick. I asked him if that chest was open; he looked me in the face, and said, no. I immediately examined the chest, and the lead was cut, and that some tea was missing. I took the prisoner into the next room, and the quantity of tea stated in the indictment was found on him, in one pocket, there were two empty-bags. He has been in the service of the company twenty five years.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

708. JAMES GLOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , two pieces of linen dowlas, value 4s. and a shilling , the property of Richard Rothwell , and others.

HENRY FENN . I am warehouseman to the procutors; they are wholesale linen merchants , in the City. The prisoner has been for the last twelve months employed as their porter . We have a warehouse on the basement. While I was in the privy on the day in the indictment, the prisoner came down to the basement story, and took the two pieces of dowlas up stairs. I watched him to see what he did with them, and he wrapped them up, and put them into the cart, which was at the door, and with which he was going out. He drove the cart away, and I went down into the warehouse, where I missed the two pieces of dowlas. Upon this, I followed the cart; I followed it to Fore street; the prisoner was with it. I toldhim he had two pieces of linen dowlas he ought not to have; he said it was the first time he did such a thing, and it should be the last. I told him to bring it back, which he did.

DANIEL BENJAMIN LEADBETTER. I apprehended the prisoner, and found a great many remnans of bits, and patterns at his lodgings.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

709. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for sealing, on the 6th of July , four gowns, value 2l. and an apron, value 1s. the property of Sarah Wanklin .

SARAH WANKLIN . I live in the Mineries. I sent my son with some clothes on the day in the indictment, having mangled them.

THOMAS WANKLIN . My mother sent me with these clothes about half past nine in the evening; I was to take them to Mrs. Smith's, the corner of Haydon street, in the Minories . The prisoner came up to me at Mrs. Smith's door, and asked for the things, saying he was going to Mrs. Smiths, and he would take them up stairs. I gave him the things and gave him a card of my mothers address. I then left him. I did not stay to see where he went. I next saw him before the sitting alderman, on the Monday; he was in custody then.

CHARLES STUBBING . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner came to pledge part of the propety at our house. I sent for an officer, and had him taken into custody; and the part of the property was found in his possession; it was a quarter past ten in the evening.

DAVID M'COMBIE. I found the property on the prisoner, and the card the little boy gave him.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined two years , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

710. MARIA GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , fourteen yards of printed calico, value 1l. 8s. the property of William Thomas Watson and James Watson , privately in their shop .

WILLIAM THOMAS WATSON . I am a linen-draper , at 42, Ludgate-hill . I had been out, and on my return home, I found the prisoner in custody.

GEORGE SMITH . I am shopman to the prosecutors. The prisoner came into the shop between five and six, and asked to look at some printed cotton; I shewed her a great many patters; she was in the shop a great length of time, and Trueman, another shopman, was in the shop. She quitted she shop without purchasing anything. In consequencs of suspicion, I followed her, and on bringing her back, the calico in question fell from her; it was worth twenty eight shillings; I delivered her into the custody of an officer.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined two years , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

711. JOHN NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , four pairs of stockings, value 12s. the property of Robert Romanis .

ROBERT ROMANIS. All I know is the constable brought this young fellow into my shop, with four pairs of stockings.

JAMES BAKER . I am a constable, and saw the prisoner take these pairs of stockings from the outside of the prosecutor's shop. I immediately apprehended the prisoner; but the other made his escape.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined one month , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

712. GEORGE NEWTON was indicted for stealing. on the 1st of June , a jacket, value 10s. and a pair of trowsers, value 10s. the property of John Nott .

JOHN NOTT . The property in question was hanging up inside my door.

JOHN BROWN. I am shopman to the prosecutor. I was in the shop, and somebody cut the string that goes outside of the clothes, and confines them; I immediately looked through the window, and saw the prisoner at the bar leaning against a post close by; he then passed and repassed seven times, and at last he took the property in question, and ran; I ran after him, and hallooed stop thief, and saw him drop the clothes, and I followed him, and I took him into castody.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

713. ROBERT BLACKWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , eight yards and three quarters of printed cotton, value 16s. the property of Finney Ludefield .

ROBERT BALL . I was assisting Mr. Ludefield on the day in question. The cotton in question was hanging at the door. In consequence of some information given me, I missed it.

THOMAS JOYCE . I saw the prisoner take this print, and gave the people of the shop information.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one year , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

714. JOSEPH LEVI was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , two coats, value 2l. 10s. and a walstcoat, value 10s. the property of John Archer Stevens , in his dwelling house.

JOHN ARCHER STEVENS . I live in Well's street, Whitechapel . The prisoner at the bar was contending with my servant at my gate about a quarter before eight in the morning of the day in the indictment.

PHORE STOUD. I am servant to Mrs. Stephens. On the 10th of June, in the morning, at about a quarter before eight o'clock, I discovered the prisoner in my master's Counting-house; that Counting-house is a part of the dwelling-house; it is the back parlour. The prisoner was stoopingdown when I saw him, and the clothes in question, which bad previously been hanging on a nail at the other side of the room, were close to him. He ran to get out at the gate, but I stopped him.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I made a mistake, and instead of going into Mr. Davis's house, I went into Mr. Stevens's; I was never in the room, but knocked in the entry, and the servants came out to me, and that is all I have got to say. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

715. RICHARD FREEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , two shoes, value 8s. the property of Thomas Haylett .

THOMAS HAYLETT . I am a shoe-maker , and live at Saffron-hill . I was talking to a person, a neighbour of mine, at his door, and saw the prisoner come out of my shop with something in a handkerchief; I went to him, and asked him what he had got to sell, he said, it was no matter, and it would do another time. He was walking up the hill, when I went after him, and he threw the property away. I stopped him, and asked him what was that covered up in the handkerchief; he made no answer; but kicked my legs, and tried to trip me up. I secured him, and gave him to an officer. I picked up the shoes, they were odd ones.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

716. THOMAS CULLIVER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Buckland , about the hour of five in the forenoon, of the 29th of May ,(the said James Buckland , and other persons, being therein,) and stealing therein, three table-spoons, value 30s. four teaspoons, value 20s. one pair of sugar-tongs, value 10s. one reading-glass, value 15s. one shirt, value 3s. one waistcoat, value 5s. twelve pairs of stockings, value 20s. four pounds weight of currants, value 4s. two pounds weight of tea, value 15s. two gollons of brandy, value 50s. two bottles, value 4d. twenty pounds weight of sugar, value 22s. and ten shillings in copper monies , the property of the said James Buckland .

JAMES BUCKLAND . I keep a public-house . On the morning of the 29th of May, I was awakened at five o'clock, by my pot-boy. When I came down stairs, I found the doors were open; the street door and the bar door locks had been picked, and the lock of one of the tills was picked; the other till was not locked. I found no instruments. I missed three table-spoon, and four tea-spoons; two were marked J S B; one spoon was an old one, with a crest to it; that was some sort of a bird. I also lost one teaspoon marked J B three others marked J S A, they are mine, and the sugar tongs were marked J A B, and were belonging to my wife's first husband. I missed the money out of both tills; there was a great quantity of halfpence and farthings to the amount of nine or ten shillings. I saw these things the night before, before I went to bed. It was past two o'clock before I went to bed that morning, and I left these things in the cupboard in the bar. There was a silver mounted reading glass in the till, which was gone, and a patent cork-screw. I found a handkerchief, and a great number of things tied up in it, in the passage; among the things in that handkerchief, were two pieces of cheese, a piece of bacon, four pounds of currants, two pounds of tea, a shirt, and a waistcoat, and about a dozen pair of shoes, which were old, and brought down stairs to be repaired. There is a mark T C on the handkerchief. The prisoner had lodged in my house nearly a year and a half; he always went by the name of Thomas Culliver ; he lodged at the top of the house. The shirt, waistcoat, and shoes are not here. In consequence of this, I took the bundle into the bar, and also the two bottles; there were about two pound of tea tied up in a silk handkerchief, and some tobacco twisted up in an old newspaper. When I took this back, I found the mark on the handkerchief, and I suspected by the T C that it was the prisoner's handkerchief, and I took a constable, and took the prisoner in the City.

EDWARD BARNES. I am pot-boy to the prosecutor. When I awaked on the morning in question, in was about five o'clock; when I got to the bottom of the stairs, I heard a noise, and when I came into the passage a man struck me there; I saw his arm; but not his face. I heard the voice. He asked who I was; I could see the back of another man. I am sure there were two men; it was morning light, it was day light. I could not see who they were; I did not know the voice of the man; I don't think I ever heard it before. I had lived at the prosecutor's house about twelve months. I well know the prisoner's voice; I am sure he was not the man who struck me. I went up stairs, and called my master. When I came back, they were gone. I was not many minutes up stairs, as soon as we could get some young men up, we came out directly. There were people in the house when I went to bed the night before.

ELIZABETH ORCHIN. I am a washer-woman. I have washed for the prisoner. The handkerchief was brought to me to know if I knew it; and I said yes. They asked me what mark it had on it, and I knew it by the letter T; it was marked with T C; but I had always noticed the letter T, because it was marked so crookedly and badly. On the Sunday he had fetched away a shirt, a waistcoat, a pair of gaiters, and this handkerchief; I knew that to be it, because he had five handkerchiefs, and I had three of them, and he took away this one; I had had it three weeks. This was the smallest handkerchief he had belonging to him.

Q. Are you positive sure that is the handkerchief he took away-A. Yes, from that T, and if it was not for that, I should not know it.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief was never mine; I never had a small white pocket handkerchief. I lodged with the prosecutor a year and a half, and I should wish to know if he knew any thing ofmy character. I would wish to ask the lad whether he knew any harm by me all the time he was there?

Richard Gale. I never heard any thing amiss of him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

717. WILLIAM M'LAREN and ANDREW DONNELLY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Winter , esq ; about the hour of four in the afternoon of the 25th of May , ( Frances Winter , spinster, and other persons being therein,) and stealing, one gown, value 5s. one petticoat, value 5s. one habit shirt, value 10s. one sash, value 6s. and one handkerchief, value 5s. the the property of the said Frances Winter ; and one gown, value 5s. the property of Mary Wise , spinster .

MARY WISE . I am a servant to Mr. John Winter . On Saturday, the 25th, I missed some linen, between four and half past five o'clock, from the house-keeper's room; that faces the street, there is an area before it, and it is on the basement floor; there are steps down to the area; the gate of the area is never locked in the day time. I left the house-keeper's room at four o'clock, and the window was shut down; the door was not locked. I then went into the kitchen, and retured at half past five; when I returned again the window was open, and the iron bar was wrenched; it was an upright bar; there was a broom in the room within side the window, on the ironing-board; the handle of it was lodged on the ledge of the window; I knew the broom; it had been in the outer cellar for sweeping the coals up. All the family were in the house at this time; there were two men servants and two maid servants, besides myself. My young mistress was in the house; I am certain Miss Winter was at home, because I immediately went up stairs, and told her; she had not been out all the afternoon; I had not seen her in the house during that time from four to half past five; I had seen her about four o'clock, when I came out of the house-keeper's room; she was not ill, and there was nothing to prevent her from going out. Persons of the family might go into the house-keeper's room while I was in the kitchen, without my knowing it. This bar was wrenched from the screws which fastened it to the wood; the bars were so close together that the broom would not have gone between them. I missed all the articles named in the indictment; they had been placed in such a situation that a person with the broom might reach them out at the window. I saw some of them again; I saw the two gowns on the Monday following, at Marlborough-street.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am footman to Mr. Winter. I was at home on this day that Mary Wise says that these things had been taken away. I had not been into the house-keeper's room. In consequence of what Mary Wise told me, I went round to different pawnbrokers, and at last to Mr. Buriows, in St. Giles's; I got there between seven and eight, I found the tallest prisoner M'Laren there; he was in a back place where other people were pledging other things, he was in one of these boxes; I don't know what he had there, or what he wanted, except by the information of other persons.

JAMES NEIGHBOUR . I am journeyman to Mr. Burrowes, the pawnbroker. The prisoner M'Laren came into a box in our shop, on the Saturday evening, between seven and eight o'clock; he offered two gowns to pledge; I wrote the tickets, and the money was counted out to him, but he did not have it; he gave me the name of Emery, he gave me that as his own name. As I was reckoning the money, the last witness came in, he saw those gowns, and claimed them. M'Laren was detained by me while Phillips went for an officer.

JOHN DAVIS. I and Hern took the prisoner M'Laren into custody.

JOHN HERN . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

SAMUEL FUEZMAN . After the last examination, M'Laren's sister brought me a note; in consequence of which, I went in pursuit of Donnelly; I could not find him; but he heard he was wanted, and he came, and delivered himself up, saying, he was conscious of his innocence of the robbery, and did not wish to avoid the charge.

CATHERINE RIDEY . The last witness came to my house after Donnelly; but he was not there. There was a bag shoved into my bar by a lad named Tim Tweeney ; it was not either of the prisoners. I kicked it out into the tap-room, and I don't know what became of it afterward.

M'Laren's Defence. I came by the property by coming into Mrs. Riley's house; I had a pint or two of beer, and sat down until about five or six o'clock, when Donnelly coming in picking up a bag in the door-way; he and I examined it, and it had the two gowns in it, which I went to pledge. I told the constable that if he would go with me to Mrs. Riley's he would find what I said was true.

Donnelly was not put on his Defence.

CORNELIOUS CROSSBY. I was in the house when two lads came in with a bag; they asked me to go into the yard with them, and they pulled the gowns out of the bag, and shewed them to me, and wanted me to buy them; I did not like to buy them, and they put them into the bag again, and they threw the bag into Mrs. Riley's bar.

M'LAREN, GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

DONNELLY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

718. WILLIAM RAINE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , a silver tea-pot stand, value 30s. a silver salt-sellar, value 5s. three silver tea-spoons, value 6s. one silver salt-spoon, value 1s. and one plated tea-pot, value 5s. the property of John Lutt , esq. in his dwelling-house .

JOHN WEST. On the 11th of June last, about half past ten in the morning, I went from my room on the basement to the water-closit in the front area. After being there a few minutes, I heard a person come down the area steps, and I supposed it to be some trade's person. In a minute or two, I returned to my room, and found the door unlocked; I hadleft it locked, with the key in it. When I opened the door, insted of its going back as usual, it recoiled upon my arm with some force, which naturally caused me to look behind the door, and there was the prisoner; I looked at him for a moment; I did not know him before. I said to him, what do you want; he said nothing. I said, what do you do here then; says he, I want to speak to Mr. Webbe. I did not know a Mr. Webbe, and I said, there is no such person lives here; and that is not your business; to which he made no reply. He had got the two corners of his apron held up. I said what have you got in your apron; he said, nothing. I said it is a lie, you have got some of my plate. I then called another person. I took the prisoner into the middle of the room, and told him to put down what he had got in his apron; he did, and it was the plate in question. I sent for an officer, and gave him into custody.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgement Respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

719. MARY HAMPTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , in the dwelling-house of John Harlow , since deceased, two bags, value 2s. nineteen shillings in monies numbered, one 5l. bank note, and ten 1l. bank notes , the property of the said John Harlow .

SARAH HARLOW . The prisoner at the bar lived servant with us a fortnight and three days. She left me on the 15th of June, without having told me it was her intention to leave me. I missed the money in question from a drawer, where I had seen it the Friday afternoon previous.

ANN HARLOW . I am the daughter of the last witness. I put the prisoner to bed on the night previous to her abscounding; she was rather intoxicated; I had no knowledge of her intending to leave the house. The money had been kept in the back dining-room. In the morning that she was gone, the lock was about three parts up, and the top of the cellavet was strained, and was very much crushed under the lock.

THOMAS HARLOW . On the 29th of June, in consequence of information given to me by a sister of mine, I went to a public-house where I saw the prisoner. I sat down opposite to her in the same settle. I questioned her about the money; but she denied all knowledge of it. I sent for an officer, and had her apprehended.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it, and know nothing at all about it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

720. THOMAS CLAYTON and JOHN CLAYTON were indicted, for feloniously assaulting John Hill , on the King's highway, on the 1st of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one watch, value 3l.3s. one watch chain, value 3l.3s. and one seal, value 2l.2s. his property.

JOHN HILL . On the 1st of June, I and my wife went to Whitechapel market , about ten o'clock, to buy a bit of meat. My mistress went to ask the price of it. Directly as she past me, the prisoner Thomas came and ran his head against my body. The small one is Thomas; and at that moment I felt my watch drawn from me. It was a sort of tortoise-shell case, and had Britannia and a ship in pins upon it. When I felt that, I saw Thomas Clayton throw his hand behind him, and there were two others in black coats came up at the same time. They came up close behind him, close to him. I never saw my watch after that. There was no body near Thomas when I felt my watch go from me. I then seized Thomas. I said, you are the person who has robbed me of my watch. In the space of about half a minute he held up his hands, and said, see here, I have not got any watch. I told him that he should go to the watch-house, and then the other two went away. Then the tallest of the two, who is now the other prisoner, came up again, and said, I am sure he is a respectable young man; he would not rob you of your watch. I had Thomas taken to the watch-house; and when he got there, he was well known. John was taken on the Tuesday following. At that time, Saturday he was not taken; but I described his person. He went away before the officer came up; but he was apprehended in consequence of my description. My watch was never discovered from that time to this.

SARAH HILL. I am with my husband. On the 1st of June, I was at Whitechapel market; I went up to ask the price of a bit of beef. I turned round to ask my husband if he would have it; and I thought John Clayton was talking to my husband; that is the tallest of the two. I thought he was talking to him. He was looking at him full in the face, and I looked at him for half a minute, and found they were not speaking, and with that I went up to him. It was at the side of the shop. There were two large lamps outside. I could distinguish his dress, and every thing, and he came before the Lord Mayor in the clothes; that man was John. I have not the least doubt about his being the person. I went up to my husband in the presence of the two prisoners, and asked him whether he had lost any thing. He said, yes; this lad had drawn my watch. He then had hold of the least prisoner, Thomas. Then the eldest got hold of me, and said; do you think a decent lad like him, could rob your husband of his watch; a decent lad like him. He is like a trad-sman's son. He was dressed as he is now, only he had a short white apron, and he looked like a working lad in a tradesman's shop. My husband told him to keep off; for if he did not, he should charge somebody with him. He said that to the tall one. Then Mr. Le Fevre came up and took the little one, and the big one turned up Whitechapel. My husband asked the lad where John lived; the little one did not speak, and my husband and Le Fevre took him to the watch-house; we were in the lower part of Whitechapel. I have no doubt whatever of them, by the lamps.

THOMAS LE FEVRE . I am a headborough belonging to the parish of St Matthew, Bethnal Green. I was in Whitechapel market on the 1st of June, about ten o'clock. I heard a person cry watch; he called watch louder than I speak. I was within a few yards of him and ran up, and he had hold of Thomas Clay ton. Mr. Thomas Hill said, that that lad run his head into his body and drawed out his watch. John Clayton, I believe was, then gone. Mr. Hill said, there had been two more; but they were gone off. We went after the other two; but did not find them.

Thomas Clayton 's Defence. I was going home to my father's house, and I was shoved against this man, and he laid hold of me and shook me; and said, I had robbed him of his watch, and I was searched, and no watch was found.

John Clayton 's Defence. I am innocent of the crime that is charged against me, I was at different a place.

SUSAN ASHTON . I am servant to Mr. Roberts, the publican, who keeps the Jane Shore , in Shoreditch. I know the prisoner John Clayton . I have seen him at my master's house several times. The ast time I saw him there was on Whit Saturday. That is the Saturday before Whit Sunday. Greenwich fair was on the Monday following. The prisoner John was at our house about twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour before ten. Henry Matthews was with him, and another young man, whose name I can't bring to recollection. I am sure the name of one was Henry Matthews. He staid from about a quarter or twenty minutes to ten, to about half past eleven. He never went out to my knowledge during that time.

JOSHUA BRIDGET . I am a shoe-maker, and live in Halfmoon-alley, Bishopsgate-street. I know the prisoner John; but no more than by just speaking to him. I know the Jane Shore public house, in Shoreditch. I remember the last night that I was in company with him, was at that house. It was on the 1st of June, and a Saturday night. I first saw him about twenty minutes before ten, and he stopped there till half past eleven. I did not see any one else but him and me at that time. There was a young man afterwards joined us, named Henry Matthews. The prisoner and I were drinking together for about five minutes. and then Henry Matthews came in. Then we sat down and all drank together. Just before I came in the half hour chimes was just a going. The last witness was there all the time in the next box; I knew her name; it is Susan Ashton ; she is servant in the house, she attends that laproom. The prisoner did not leave the room during the time I have spoken of.

HENRY MATTHEWS . I am a Willow hat weaver, I happened to be in the Jane Shore public house, on the 1st of June last. I saw John Clayton there. Joshua, the last witness joined our company. I saw John, about twenty minutes or a quarter of an hour before ten that night, and I remained there until about half after eleven. To my knowledge John never quitted the house during that time.

JOHN CLAYTON GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

THOMAS CLAYTON GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

721. JOHN LYON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July , a watch, value 30s. a seal, value 1d. and a key, value 1d. the property of Samuel Moses , from his person .

SAMUEL MOSRS . I am a general dealer . I lost my watch on the day in the indictment; but I was so drunk that I don't know how I lost it.

RICHARD TRIVET . Coming down Bishopsgate-street, about eleven o'clock at night, on the day of the indictment, I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw the prisoner run across the street from the prosecutor, and the watchman caught hold of him, but he got away. I endeavoured to stop him, but failed just then. He ran to the end of the Old Bethlem, and there I caught hold of him. In the scuffle my had was knockad off, and on stooping to pick it up, he got away again, and ran towards Bishopsgate-street, and the officer Sapwell caught hold of him.

SARAH TNIVET . I am the wife of the last witness. As the prisoner was running past me, he threw something against the church wall, which was the watch I afterwards picked up.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I took charge of the prisoner and the property.

(Property produced.)

Proseculor. I ca'nt swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

722. JOHN EARL was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , two shillings and nine-pence, the property of Samuel Beard , from his person .

SAMUEL BEARD . I was buying a basket of fish on the morning of the day of the indictment, at Billingsgate market , and I felt my pocket give a jink. I turned round directly, and saw the prisoner close to me. I went to lay hold of him, and he ran away. I pursued him, and he dropped some of the money in Dark House-lane. I lost two shillings and nine-pence in copper. On examination, I found my pocket was cut. I secured him, and gave him in custody to an officer.

THOMAS JACOB . I received charge of the prisoner; he said, he was pursuaded to do it by another boy.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Confined six months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

723. ELIZABETH STONE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , a tea-spoon, value 3s. the property of Samuel Mobbs .

SAMUEL MOBBS . I keep the Red Bull, St. Aub's- court, Dean-street, Soho . The prisoner came into my house on the 7th of June, about nine o'clock in the morning; she asked me for half a pint of beer. My wife informed me that she missed a spoon. I immediately pursued the prisoner,and brought her back, and found the spoon on her. I gave her into the charge of an officer.

GUILTY , aged 40

Confined Fourteen Days and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

724. JOHN WILLING was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , ten yards of floorcloth, value 49. the property of John Piggott , privately in his shop .

JOHN PIGGOTT. I live at No. 49, Judd street,Brunswick square . I am an upholsterer . I can only speak to the property.

JAMES MARTIN . I am a linen draper, and live immediately opposite to the prosecuter's shop. I saw the prisoner go to his shop door, and take his floor cloth; he did not go within the shop. I immediately pursued him and caught him, and he dropped the floor cloth. I gave him in charge to the beadle.

GEORGE WHITEHAIR . I received charge of the prisoner, and the property.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Three Months and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

725. MARY ANN KILLFOYE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , an umbrella, value 18s. the property of Thomas Brimson , privately in his shop .

THOMAS BRIMSON . I am an umbrella manufacturer ; my shop is No.10, Plumber's-row, City-road . On the day in the indictment, I was standing at a neighbour's door opposite my house, and I saw the prisoner come from my shop, with an umbrella in her hand. I took her back to the shop, and took the umbrella from her, and gave her into the custody of an officer; it had my ticket of price on it, marked twenty-nine shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was passing, I saw the umbrella on the ground, and I asked a gentleman passing it it was his, and he said it was not; so I took it up, and I was going along with it when the prosecutor stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

726. WILLIAM BOWERS was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Beard , in a certain passage near the King's highway, for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a bank token, value 3s. and a penny , the property of the said George Beard.

GEORGE BEARD . On the 10th of July , I was down the Adelphi , with a child o my master's, whom I was taking down to see the water; it was in the dark archway under the Adelphi; I had a basket, the handle of which was round my neck. The prisoner, and two other boys older than he is, met me; I could not see their faces; but I knew the prisoner by his wooden leg. They shoved the basket down over my face, and took the three-shilling piece out of my pocket. After they did it, I began to cry, and told me to husk, and hold my tongue, and they would give me another. Bowers said, if you will stop a minute, I will go and get a penny candle, and look for it, and if I can't find it, I will go home to my mother, and get another three-shilling piece for it. I followed him, and Read took him into custody.

WILLIAM READ . I am a watchman of St. Martin's parish, and took the prisoner into custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

727. JAMES HICKEY and MORRIS HEALEY were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Gardener , in the King's highway, on the 7th of July , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one coat, value 2l. one hat, value 6s. one three-shilling bank token, and one shilling , his property.

JAMES GARDENER . I was robbed on last Sunday night week, between eleven and twelve at night; I was coming out of Mr. Cavenagh's house, the Black Horse, in George street, St. Giles's , to go home; I was alone; I met four or five fellows, a little way from the Black Horse; it was in the middle of the top of another street; they did not overtake me; I met them; four or five surrounded me; they shoved me about, and shoved me off the parhway, and took the hat off my head, my coat from my back, and took also a three shilling piece from my waistcoat pocket; they did not take my waistcoat; they took also a shilling in silver from my pocket; they did not knock me down. I called out for assistance, and it happened that there was no watchmen convenient, or any person by; Mr. Cavenagh came from the public-house, and siezed one of them; he seized Healey; he took him to the watchhouse. I neither got my coat, hat, nor money, again. I had observed that Healey was one of those that pushed me. I pointed him out. I can take upon myself to say, I saw Hickey run away from behind me; he helped to take my coat off, and ran away. I was a little tipsey, not much. I had never seen Hickey or Hesley before. I saw Hickey in the watchhouse when I went there, the same night; he was brought to the watchhouse before I got there. I did not see him that night; but I saw him the next morning.

Prisoner Hickney. Q Did I take the coat forcibley from you - A. Yes, you are a person who helped to take it off.

Prisoner Hickey. Q. I will ask the witness if I spoke a word to him - A. Yes; he insulted me, and he shoved me about, and wanted me to fight him in the street; I did not fight with him.

JOHN CAVENAGH . I keep the Black Horse public-house. Gardener left my house at about half past eleven, he was somewhat in liquor. I believe he had three or four glasses of grog, and I should suppose he was two or three hours at my house.

Q. After he had left the house to go away, did you hear any noise - A. I heard there was a row in the street, and a man called out for assistance. My servant's name is John Owen . I rushed out with my rattle in my hand, and sprung it. I saw seme men in the street; I saw Morris, Healey, and Gardner there; I saw four, five, or six more about him; he was calling out. I did not see what any of the men did to him; he had his coat and hat off when I came out. I saw Healey; he was not near Gardener; he was about four yards from him; he was squaring at Gardener at the time, and I asked Gardener who took his coat, and he told me, that they stripped him of his coat and hat. I said who, and he pointed out Haley, as one of the party who hustled him. He did not mention his money at that time. I siezed Healey, and called watch, and the watchman came up, only one watchman came, and I delivered Haley into his charge, and sent him to the watchhouse. Idid not see any thing of Hickey. I followed him to where I was told he went into; I found him there; it was in a cook's shop, about forty yards from the house where I live. With the assistance of a watchman I took him to the watchhouse; not the first watchman that I sent Healey by. I saw no coat with Healey; he had not a coat. I returned with my rattle the second time. I first went out without a rattle and siezed Healey, and finding he had not the coat, I let him go. Then I took hold of another man, and finding he had not got the coat, I returned to the man who was pointed out to me. Healey was squaring the second time, and not the first.

JOHN OWEN . I am a servant to Mr. Cavenagh. I remember Gardener being at our house; he was rather in liquor. I heard no noise until I went to put up the shutters, at a little after eleven o'clock; it was about ten minutes after Gardener had left the house; I heard a man sing out in the street for assistance; it was this young man Gardener; I saw a great number of men about him. I ran, and told my master; he jumped out with the rattle; I went after him. I saw one of the prisoners run down the street with a coat in his hand; I ran after him; I saw him go into the cook's shop; he then had the coat under his arm; I did not follow him into the shop, but I stood at the door; I called for a watchman, and a watchman came in the course of five minutes, and then I went up to my master, and told him where the man was that took the coat. I staid at the door a little white; but not until the watchman came up. My master came, and we met the watchman, and then went to the cook's shop, and searched the house, and found the prisoner Hickey pretending to be asleep up on the garret stairs, with his clothes on. We did not find the coat. We took him into custody, and gave him in charge of a watchman. I am sure he is the man who ran down the street with the coat. I saw nothing of Healey.

Prisoner Hickey. Q. Did you see me take the coat from Gardener's person - A. No. I was within a yard of him when he started with the coat, and I am sure of it.

John Cavenagh . Re-examined. I went after Hickey, and found him on the top stair case, as high as he could go, lying down, asleep seemingly.

TIMOTHY LANE. I am a watchman. I took Hickey in the two pair of stairs; I first saw him lying on the landing of the two pair of stairs; Mr. Gamble said, that was the man. Cavenagh took him to the watchhouse.

JAMES CORDERY . I am a watchman; but was not on duty that night. I was standing next door to the cook's shop, and saw Hickey run past with a coat in his arms; he went into the cook's shop with it; I did not follow him. What became of him and the coat, I don't know.

Prisoner Hickey. Q. Was it a coat, a bundle, or what - A. it was a coat; it hung on his arm; I saw it was a coat by the flaps of it.

Hickey's Defence. I went to this gentleman's house to have a pint of beer, and when I was returing, I saw the prosecutor in a row with a parcel of men, and he pulled his coat off to fight, and he gave it away to a person, and he ran away with it. When I went home, the door was fast, and so I laid down on the stairs, and some time after I had been asleep, the watchman and Mr. Cavenagh came, and awakened me; and I told them I had no coat and hat, and the house was searched, and they were not found, and I had no place to put them.

Healey's Defence. I was at Mr. Cavenagh's house, and by the same score I owed Mr. Cavenagh two-pence halfpenny, which I paid him, and after that, I and this other young man went out together, and saw this man, the prosecutor, and I saw a man with a coat in his arms; but I know nothing at all about it; I am paite innocent of it.

John Cavenagh . Re-examined. I know Healey; he had been to my house that night, and had left it about an hour before Gardener; I did not see Hickey, I have no recollection of him; I rather think Gardener was capable of going home.

JURY. Q. Was Gardener putting himself in a position to fight - A. No; he did not appear like a man who was fighting at all. When the prosecutor accused Healey of having robbed him, Healey squared at him.

James Gardener. Re-examined. The coat was pulled off me; I did not pull it off to fight; I did not put myself in any position to fight, nor any thing of the kind.

HICKEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

HEALEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

728. JOHN CAPSEY and WILLIAM LEWIS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Catherine Lucas , in a certain field or open place, near to the King's Highway, for putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, the several articles mentioned in the last indictment , the property of the Rev. William Parker Clerk .

CATHERINE LUCAS. I am servant to Mr. Parker. On the 27th of last June , I was going to Newington, about twenty minutes before twelve; my master's daughter was with me. I had a band-box, a bundle, and an umbrella. I met three men; they were strangers. I know the two prisoners; they are two of the men; Capsey caught the bundle off the bandbox; he went a few steps, and it fell, then it dropped. I went and tried to pick it up. He gave me a push, and I slipped down. He got it up again and ran away; I ran after him a little way. I did not overtake him. The other man, Lewis, asked me what I wanted; and I said I wanted my bundle, and I would have it. He said no more. He seemed to smile; he did not prevent me from running; and then he and the other ran after Capsey, and I came back again. I saw Lewis and the other go after Capsey. I then went on to Newington. They went on Islington way. I next saw the prisoners at about twenty minutes before two o'clock. They were then taken into custody. When I got across the fields, almost to Newington, I met a young man. He asked me if I was frightened at the cows, and I said no; but that I had been pushed down by two men. I told him what had happened, and he went after them. I can't recollect what was in the bundle. There were about six pairs of stockings; they belonged to Miss Parker, and she was with me. Therewere focks, but I can't recollect what else. There were shoes, a pocket handkerchief, a shift, a night gown, and a night cap. They all belonged to Miss Parker. There were some other things which I have not mentioned; there was nothing of my own in the bundle. I was to take them to Dr. Gascoigne's. Miss Parker was going there on a visit; she is eight years old; it is about twenty minutes or half an hours walk. When I was pushed, and slipped down, the bundle was close to me at the time he pushed me; he picked the bundle up, it was then close to me. When I saw them again, it was about two hours after. I knew them again, and I am sure Capsey is the man that took the bundle of the box.

JURY. Did the prisoners speak together before the assault was made. - A. I did not hear them talk; they were as close together as persons usually are, who are in company with each other, and the man who asked me what I wanted saw the other run.

Prisoner Lewis. Was I within ten yards of you when it happened - A. They were all together when I saw them.

Lewis. Did I run the same way as the others - A. Yes.

Lewis. Did I not say I would foilow the man and get the bundle back - A. No.

Capsey. I wish to know whether it was I that shoved her - A. Yes.

BENJAMEN CLARKE. On the day in the indictment, I was in a field near Paradice Row, in a field facing the church. Before the young woman came up to me, I saw the prisoners and another with them. They were coming over Kingsland-road, and they passed me as I was milking a cow. I first saw them in the road, and then in the field. That was the field the young woman complained of being robbed in. It was the same field in which I was; and about seventy or eighty yards from the spot where I stood. They were in company with them; I saw them all in company together in the road also, looking into a watch-maker's shop. They seemed to be persons loitering along, and not walking like regular passengers. Their manner was such as to call my attention to them, and it did. The young woman came up to me; I asked her if she was afraid of the cows; and she said no, she had been knocked down by three men. In consequence of that I pursued the men. They were then out of my sight; but I got sight of them again in about a quarter of an hour. I got sight of them by Cannonbury House. I saw them all three stop under a tree. I got near to them. I believe they took an apron and put the bundle in it; for I saw them doing something with the bundle under the tree with an apron. A servant of Dr. Gascoigne's came after me in the pursuit. I got near to them almost by High-street, Islington, and they were both taken. I was present when they were stopped. I am quite sure they were two of those persons that I had noticed before.

JOHN LOCKE. I am servant to Dr. Gascoigne; I followed the last witness in pursuit of these men. I came up to them, just by Cannonbury House. I was not up with him before the cry of stop thief. One was stopped by a man who could not hold him, and I assisted him; I seized Lewis, and gave him and the bundle to an officer. The prisoner Lewis said he was running after us.

Capsey's Defence. I never saw this man Lewis before in my life.

Lewis's Defence. I was coming from my uncles at Stoke Newington, and I met three men, and asked them the way to Islington, and one of them told me to follow my nose; and then one of them hallooed out, that I might follow them if I liked, or something similar to that, and I did follow them; but I know no more of the robbery than the child unborn.

CAPSEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

LEWIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

729. CHARLES NORMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , a coat, value 3l. the property of John Henry , Duke of Rutland , privately in his coach-house .

PETER HAYES . I am second coachman to the Duke of Rutland. His coach house is in Dover Yard . Between two and three o'clock in the afternoon of the day in the indictment, I was in my room over the stables. I heard a woman ballon out stop thief, and I ran down stairs immediately, and missed my box coat off the coach box, which was in the coach house. I went into the street and saw the prisoner in Piccadilly. He had nothing with him. I saw my coat again afterwards. It was brought to me by a man who is not here. The prisoner was secured, and that is all I know about it.

ANNA MARIA SHORE. I live in Dover Yard. On the 6th of June, in consequence of something my sister said to me; I ran down stairs into Berkley-street. My sister was just passing the window of my room when she spoke. That window commands a view of the prosecutors stable. In cousequence of of what she said she saw, I ran down stairs and saw the prisoner going towards Piccadilly, with a great coat on his left arm. I raised an alarm, and he threw it into a cart of brooms.

GUILTY, aged 62.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined three months , and fined ls.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

730. JOHN DONNOVAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Matthew Mead , in the King's highway, on the 20th of June , for putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one bank dollar, and a three-shilling piece , his property.

MATTHEW MEAD . I am a sailor . On the 20th of June, about six o'clock, I was in a public-house in Butcher-row, East Smithfield; I was in the skittle ground, and the prisoner saw me change a one-pound note, and put the change in my pocket; I went out quite sober. While I was making water up a court, the prisoner came up to me, whipped his hand into my pocket, and took out the money in question; he ran away directly; I seized him, and made him deliver up the money, and then he ran away again. I pursued him, and cried stop thief, and he was stopped.

JOSEPH ROSH. I stopped the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all a planned thing to make a property of me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined three months , and fined ls.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

731. JANE WARREN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , one bank dollar, five three shilling bank tokens, five eighteen-penny bank tokens, and two shillings , the property of Benjamin Barret .

BENJAMIN BARRET . I keep the Royal Grove, Spring Gardens . The prisoner at the bar was a servant of mine. About one o'clock in the morning of the 5th of June, I marked all the money in my till; there were three-shilling pieces, eighteen-penny pieces, and I believe some shillings; there were about three pounds in silver all together; I carefully locked the till, and took the key away with me. I then retired to bed. I was the last person up in the house. In the morning I missed the quantity of silver in question. I found the till unlocked, and I found a mark as if a knife or something of that kind had been put in to slip the lock back. I had all my servants searched; but nothing was found on them. I sent for an officer, who accompanied my eldest daughter up stairs, and they will describe what they saw.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS. I am a constable, and I found the money in question at the bottom of the prisoner's box.

TABITHA BARRET . Corroborated the account of the last witness.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not put the money in the box, though I know who did.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

732. AARON DILLON and JAMES DILLON were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , a jacket, value 15s. a waistcoat, value 7s. a pair of pamaloons, value 10s. a pair of trowsers, value 3s. and a shirt, value 4s. the property of David Houston .

DAVID HOUSTON. I lost these things on the night of the 19th, from my ship, the Brittannia, lying in the Pool; they had been in a chest in the half deck; the chest was not locked. The things must have been taken in the night.

HOWARD LEWIS . I keep a clothes's shop, and was a dealer in Marine stores, and so forth. I have known the prisoners these three years. I got a pair of trowsers from the prisoner James Dillon; he told me they were up stairs, in Aaron's hearing, and I waited below while he fetched them; as soon as I got them, I paid for the beer we had, and I went and acquainted an officer.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE. I produce the trowsers which I received from Lewis.

JAMES WILLIAMS. I keep a clothes shop opposite the Town Hall at Poplar. I produce the remainder of the articles named in the indictment, which I bought from a person named Ann Gibbins .

Aaron's Dillon's Defence. I bought these things of Ann Gibbins .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

733. RICHARD CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of June , a trunk, value 18s. the property of Thomas Lane and Allan Billing .

ALLAN BILLING . On the day in the indictment, in consequence of some information, I missed a red trunk from outside my door, and I pursued and overtook the prisoner in Catherine-street, in the Strand, with the trunk under his arm rolled up in an apron; I immediately secured him, and brought him back.

CHARLES SKINNER. I directed the prosecutor's atteation to the prisoner, as he had a trunk under his arm, and as it was close to the prosecutor's shop.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined one month , and fined ls.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

734. EDWARD BUNDAY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of June , ten pounds weight of pork, value 5s. the property of Michael Hudson and John Hudson .

JOHN HUDSON. I am a cheesemonger . This lot of pork was hanging on the outside of the shop. I saw the prisoner come and take it. I immediately went out, and called out to him three times; bring that pork back; but he never minded me. I followed him and brought him back.

Prisoner's Defence. I have had a wife sick for ten months. I have been out of employment myself, and I did it for fair want and distress.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

735. WILLIAM NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June , twenty-four yards of printed cotton, value 2l. 4s. the property of Richard Taylor .

ROBERT HAWKES. On the 28th of June, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was in my master's shop. A person said something; I immediately ran out of the shop and saw the prisoner cross Piccadilly, with the printed cotton is question, under his arm. I immediately pursued him. He ran round a flour waggon, and I immediately saw the priat upon the pavement. I called stop thief after the prisoner, and he was stopped.

NORMAN CADBURY . I pursued the prisoner, hearing the cry of stop thief. I overtook him, and he tripped me up. I got up and followed him again, and tripped him up and secured him.

THOMAS JACKSON . I saw the prisoner take the print in question.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and saw a person running, and I ran too, and I know nothing at all about the robbery.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

736. WILLIAM GOODWIN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , a silver medal, value 8s. the property of John Bronghton .

JOHN BROUGHTON. I went into a booth in the fair, at Tothill Fields . between three and four o'clock in the morning, of the 5th of June; I was quite sober. The prisoner came in after I was there; he caught hold with my ribbon in my medal, and called me a b-r of a guardsman, and asked who authorised me to wear a medal. I told him, persons who knew my deserts, and who had a better right to do so, than he had to call me such a name. Almost directly I discoverd that the medal was gone from the ribbon, I told him to give it me; and he said, he'd be dam'd if he did. It could be only a good whipping, and that he had hait many a time, and did not care for. I offered him five shillings to give me the medal back. He said, very well; give me five shillings, and I'll give it you; but I knew better than that. Then I told him I would give him five shillings if he would come into the next booth; but he would not; so I went and sat down. I told him that I durst not go home without it. He then went out, and came back again, and asked if there was no other reward for it; and I told him there was not, a constable was sent for at this time.

WILLIAM BLEADEN, and CATHERINE BOOTH,

corroborated the account of the last witness.

Prisoner's Defence. I have served his Majesty in the Marines, and wore a medal before ever he did.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

737. WILLIAM CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , two bank tokens, value 6s. one other bank token, value 1s. 6d. and one shilling, the property of John Ready , from his person .

JOHN READY. About six o'clock in the evening of the day of the indictment, I was at the Black Lion public-house, at Kelburn . I had some beer, and fell asleep there. When I was awakened, I missed my money; it was eight shillings and sixpence, consisting of two three shillings pieces, a one and six-penny piece, and a shilling. I have seen one three shilling piece, to which I can swear. I know it, because there is a hole close to the edge of it. I saw it the next day at Hatton Garden.

WILLIAM COOKE . I saw the prisoner fidling at the prossecutor's pocket, and when I saw the prisoner do so, I suspected him. He then went out, leaving his hat on the seat, and came back and sat down in about five minutes.

JAMES BROWN. I was sent for to the Black Lion. I took the prisoner into custody, and on searching him, I found three eighteen-penny pieces, and a few halfpence. As I was going along, my man tread upon the heel of his shoe, which accidentally came off, and I found two three shilling pieces, one of which had a hole in it near the edge.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

738. CHARLOTTE WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , a quilt, value 4s. two pairs of stockings, value 3s. two aprons, value 1s. and two handkerchiefs, value 1s. the property of Patrick Manning , from the person of Hannah, his wife .

HANNAH MANNING . I am the wife Patrick Manning. I remember the Saturday night in question. This child was walking with me on one side, and another was walking with me on the other. There were three aprons, two handkerchiefs and a quilt. The prisoner came up to me, pitying me having two children. Then she went round and snatched the bundle away. I followed her, but did not catch her that night. I am sure she was the woman. Some of the neighbours told me to go for an officer, which I did.

The prisoner called the following witness.

MRS. MALEY. On the 7th of June, I lived in Grasshopper-court. Her general character was honest and just as far as I know. She occupied a room jointly with me, and she slept with me. On Saturday night the 8th of June, I went to bed at ten o'clock, and she came into bed at half past ten o'clock, and she cever went out of the room until the Sabbath day, when she went to Church.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

739. JOHN ENGMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , two eighteen-penny bank tokens, and seven shillings, the property of William Bear , from his person .

WILLIAM BEAR. I was at Billingsgate , on the morning of the day mentioned in the indictment; about eight o'clock, I was getting a buttered roll for my breakfast, and while I was standing still, the prisoner came up to me, and took ten shillings out of my coat pocket; I both saw him, and felt him; I immediately seized him, and he dropped eight and sixpence into my hand; and dropped an eighteen-penny piece into his own trowsers.

GEORGE TYLER . I apprehended the prisoner, and took the money out of his shoe; he had a three shilling piece, and some halfpence, belouging to himself.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was near the man, so help me Jesus Christ Almighty.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined three months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder

740. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of July , a quilt, value 5s. the property of James Chitty .

MARY ANN CHITTY . The prisoner came into my back room, and took the quilt of my bed; I heard a noise in the next room; I opened the door and saw the prisoner, between the bed and the drawers, with the quilt in his apron; I asked him who he wanted? and he made a blundering kind of answer, and tried to get away, but I held him fast on the stairs, untilthe man of the house came to my assistance.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY ,aged 54.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

741. ELEANOR LOYALL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , a bed, value 1l. two blankets, value 3s. two sheets, value 4s. one counterpane, value 3s. one flat iron, value 6d. two pillows, value 3s. and two pillow cases, value 6d. the property of Thomas Jenkins .

SARAH JENKINS . The prisoner was a lodger of our's, she quitted me six weeks ago, on the, 8th of last month, and then I missed the property in question. I questioned her when I met her about the property, and she said, she had pawned it, and she would take it out at quarter day. With that, I could not bear myself, and tore my hair of my head. I went to Aldgate watch-house, and got an officer, and he came, and took her.

THOMAS HILL . I produce two blankets and a bed; I took in one of the blankets myself.

THOMAS BENNET . I am journeyman to Mr. Mathews, pawnbroker, in the Minories. I produce two sheets, one pawned on the 5th, and the other on the 7th of June, by the prisoner. I lent two shillings on one, and two shillings and three-pence on the other.

WILLIAM TOWNSEND . I produce a counterpane, pawned on the 7th of June, I lent one shilling and sixpence on it. I took it in of the prisoner at the bar.

JOHN NEALE . I produce two pillows, and the pillow-cases with them, which I took in on the 13th of May, from the prisoner at the bar, for thirteen shillings.

JONATHAN RAY . I apprehended the prisoner, and traced the goods to the several pawnbroker's.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a widow , and left with three fatherless children in great distress. I pledged these things with an intention of redeeming them. My prosecutrtx entered the room with a false key when I was absent, and detained me when I returned.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

742. JAMES BEDDINGTON was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of May , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Samuel Lewis , from his person .

SAMUEL LEWIS. I am a pawnbroker . On the 31st of May, I was on London-bridge , in the afternoon; I felt something at my pocket; I turned round, and saw my handkerchief in the prisoner's hand.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated, and did not know what I was about.

WILLIAM WARTERS. He certainly was very drunk.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined three months , and whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

743. JOHN PEACOCK was indicted for stealing' on the 19th of June , a shirt, value 6s. the property of Richard Searle ; and a shawl, value 2s. the property of Julia Shuttleworth .

RICHARD SEARLE. On the 19th of June last, at about eleven o'clock in the morning, I was getting my spirits up from the cellar, when my wife called me, telling me a man had gone up stairs. On my going to her, the man had gone out, and she pointed the prisoner out to me. I brought him back, and found the property in question on him.

MARY ANN SEARLE . I saw the prisoner coming down our stairs, and I called my husband. The prisoner went out of the house; my husband followed him and brought him back.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been a sailor, and was in the greatest distress; I have been in several engagements, and cutting out, and in cutting out a french frigate under Commodore Linsey, I fell off the ship side, and cut my head on the side of our boat; after that I was rather incapable of doing regular duty, and was put in port; after some time, my ship was paid off, and I came to London in hopes of getting some employment. I found that every where there was a want of work, and I could get none; at last. I bethought myself of offering to eater on board the Tender; I went down, and presented myself to the officer on duty, who hearing my distress, ordered me a day's provision. The next morning, the regulating captain examined me, and said, old man, you will not do; you are two old; with a heavy heart I went on shore again, with no other prospect before me than that of famishing in the street; my reflections overcome me, and I sat down on Tower Hill, and my lord, I am sorry to say, I was unmanly enough to cry. While I was in this situation an old ship-mate came by, he asked me how I got on; and I told him, there was no work to be got any where, and I was starving. He said, never mind, I have got a little money, and will see what we can do with that; with that he took me to a public-house, and we had some beer, and he gave me some gin, which on account of my head, and my stomach being empty, took such an effect of me, that I was driven to take the prosecutor's property. This my lord, I assure you, is the truth.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

744. JAMES WELDON was indicted for bigamy .

JAMES BARLOW . I am deputy clerk of the parish of St. Giles's Without Cripplegate. I produce the parish register of that parish. I turn to the year 1793, and find an entry of marriage there, "James Weldon was married in this Church, by banns, to Esther Bay , by me W. Manning, in the presence of John Bay and John Weldon."

JOHN BAY. I know the prisoner at the bar; he is my son-inn-law; he was married to my daughter Esther. I look at this book, and one of the signatures to the entry, "John Bay," is my hand-writing.

ITHIEL PRICE. I am clerk of St. Dunstan's parish, Stepney. I produce the marriage register; I havethe register of the marriage between James Weldon and Jane Fleming . " James Weldon of this parish, widower, and Jane Fleming, of Mile-end, Old Town, were married in this Church, by hanus, by me Charles Henry Prescott , Master of Arts, Curate, this eleventh day of November, 52nd of the King."

JOHN WELDON. I am the brother of the prisoner. I was present when he was married to Esther Bay.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined one month , and fined ls.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbot.

745. THOMAS GLOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , seven glasses, value 4s. five knives, value 1s. five forks, value 1s. one towel, value 6d. one spoon, value 2s. and two glass crewets, value 1s. the property of John Jackson Coutte , and William Thorne .

JAMES SPOONER . I know the prisoner since last Christmas; I am head waiter at the Freemason's Tavern. On the 27th of June, there was a large entertainment at our house, and the next day, I missed a silver spoon. The prisoner was an under-waiter , and I immediately suspected him. We had him apprehended, and on searching his lodgings, we found the property named in the indictment, which belongs to my masters.

WILLIAM SALMON . I had some conversation with the prisoner; he wrote down his direction where he lodged, and there I found the property stated in the indictment.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

746. GEORGE GILLINS and JOHN KEYS were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of June , two live tame ducks, value 3s. the property of Edwin Nichols .

ELIZABETH NICHOLS . I saw these two ducks safe on the Sunday morning at five o'clock, by the side of the pond, on Chealsea-common , at the back of our house; I returned at six, and missed them. I saw them the next day at Queen-square.

JAMES LEAPER . I stopped the prisoners with these ducks on Chelsea-common, between five and six o'clock in the morning; Keys, threw the ducks over a garden wall, and made off. I shewed Mrs. Nichols the ducks, and she owned them. I apprehended Keys afterwards. I secured Gillings at the time.

KEYS GUILTY , aged 18

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

GILLINS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

747. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , a coat, value 3s. 6d. the property of John Lightfoot , and a coat, value 1s. 6d. the property of Thomas-Ashworth .

JOHN LIGHTFOOT. I saw the prisoner take these things from my master's door; I followed him, and called stop thief. When he had got between thirty and forty yards, he dropped the things; I passed over them, and went on, and seized him; and I brought him and the property back.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined two months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

748. JAMES MAPPHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of June , two shillings , the property of George Jones .

GEORGE JONES . I live at No. 110, Whitecross-street. I gave some marked shillings to Brock the officer one Friday evening; and directed him to have them laid out at my shop. The prisoner was my shopman ; I am a cheesemonger . I found five of the shillings in the till, and got the other two from the prisoner's pocket. I only gave Brock seven; all of them were marked alike.

ELIZABETH COLLINS. I received the seven shillings from Thomas Brock; and I went to the prosecutor's shop, and laid out six of them; I bought a pig's face, a bit of bacon, and some butter; I gave the seventh shilling to Mrs. Brock. I saw the prisoner put them all six into the till.

MARIA BROCK . I am the wife of Thomas Brock . I went to the prosecutor's shop, and bought some cheese with the marked shilling, the last witness gave me.

(The shillings produced, and identified.)

GUILTY . aged 21.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

749. WILLIAM BERGIN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , half a ton of lead, value 15l. the property of Randal Aborrow , affixed to a house of his .

RANDAL ABURROW. I have a house, No. 3, Staining-lane . On the morning in question, I receiv ed an alarm from Mr. Viney's apprentice, and I went to the house; it had been unoccupied for some time. I put the key to the door, and found it was open. When I went to the top of the house, I found about half a ton weight of lead gone; afterwards in cousequence of information, I found some lead at the Cresent, in Jewen-street; I took that lead home to the house, in Staining-lane, and found it fitted the place exactly in the nail holes, and every thing else; the lead is here.

JOHN YOUNG . I am apprentice to Mr. Viney, a working goldsmith, No. 5, Staining-lane. On the morning of the 6th of July, I went to bathe, in Peerless-pool, and returned about seven o'clock, to Staining-lane. While I was at my master's door, I saw the prisoner and another man come out of No.3, loaded with lead; I knew the house was unoccupied. I followed them for a great way, but at last I lost them.

STEPHEN ARNAULD . I am servant to Mr. Reeves a pawnbroker, at the corner of Redcross-street; I was at home on the morning of the 1st of July; I observed two men taking some lead into Warner's foundery.

JOHN ROWE . I am in the service of Messrs. Warners, they are founders, in the Cresent, Jewen-street.In the morning of Monday the 6th of July, at about half past seven, the prisoner brought some lead, which was afterwards given to Mr. Aburrow; it was a hundred weight, two quarters and seventeen pounds, he wanted lead pipe in exchange. We usually buy lead of any one who brings it; but we don't buy any for money, unless from persons we very well know. I had known the prisoner a short time. He had brought old lead, and taken new for it. He said, he wanted thirty feet of three quarters pipe. The prisoner came again after we had seen Mr. Aburrow. I did not stop the prisoner when he came again, and it was after Mr. Aburrow claimed the lead as his.

JAMES LAING . I am in the service of Mrs. Warner. I was present when Mr. Aburrow claimed this lead; it was first measured by Mr. Robert Warner . Two of our men were sent to Mr. Aburrow's to fetch it back with a truck.

JOHN HAND . I am clerk to Messrs. Warners. I saw the prisoner come to our warehouse on the 6th of July, about seven o'clock in the morning. That lead was afterwards given to Mr. Aburrow.

CHARLES DANYEN . I am in the employ of Messrs. Warner. I went with this lead to Mr. Aburrow's, and staid to see whether it fitted, and it did; I told our clerks that it fitted, and yet it was sent for back.

Mr. Aburrow. Messrs. Warners were a little rough because I would not give it them up again.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

750. RICHARD LOCK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Gwillim , about the hour of two in the night of the 9th of July , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therein, four copper lids, value 10s. one copper tea-kettle, value 7s. five window curtains. value 5s. 6d. one silver tea-spoon, value 2s. 6d. one plated caddy-spoon, value 6d. one thermoineter, value 1l. two tablecloths, value 3s. one cotton umbrella, value 2s. 6d. one gown, value 1s. five bottles, value 10d. one brass ballance, value 1s. half a pound weight of tea, value 3s. twelve pounds weight of tobacco, value 2s. 6d. and eighty farthing, the property of the said Ann Gwilliam ; and a shawl, value 1s. the property of Lydia Mellish .

SECOND COUNT. Charging the prisoner with feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of the prosecutrix, she and others being therein, about the hour of five in the forenoon, of the 10th of July, and stealing the articles before mentioned.

ANN GIWILLIM . I keep the Weaver's Arms, Bell-court, Grubb-street . I was in bed on the night in question, the last, except my daughter; I fastened up the house about a quarter past one. I got up at about half past six in the morning. When I got up and was going down stairs, I found the door on the second stair case fastened, and I could not get down. I never found any obstruction before. At last, I opened it, and a parcel of tobacco pipes flew but; it was secured with a staple. When I went stairs, my bar door stood wide open; the two doors were wide open; the skittle-ground door was open, and one of the back doors was open. I found seven tiles taken off the roof of the skittle ground. and I supposed they must have dropped throuh the rafters; there was no other way, because every other place was safe; for the skittle ground is next an alley, and they climbed up, and knocked down a new brick or two, where it was just repaired. When they got through the roof, they must have climbed to a high window, the screw of which is not perfect, and that is the way that I suppose they must have got in; for on the outside doors, there was no violence; they had opened them.

LYDIA MELLISH, I am servant to the last witness. I know no farther, than that my shawl was taken with the rest of the things.

ANN MITCHELL GWILLIN . I went to bed between one and two; I saw my mother make the house fast. I did not get up until after my mother found the house was broken open. I know no more,than that I locked the bar up the evening previous to the robbery; and it was broken the next morning.

WILLIAM SHIRES. I belong to the public office Bow-street. On the morning of the 10th of July, about half past six, I was coming down the City-road, and I heard a cry of stop thief; I looked down Old-street Road, and saw three men running; the prisoner was one of them, and I apprehended him. I took him to the watch-house, and starched him; I found a picklock key on him, a silver tea-spoon, a caddy-spoon, and one shilling and eight pence, all in farthings, in a silk handkerchief. I went to the house which had been robbed, and brought the servant girl down to Worship-street; and she said she could swear to the shawl which was round the prisoner's neck.

THOMAS WOODCOCK. I am headborough of the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. At about twenty minutes after six, on the morning in question, I was waiting at the corner of Agnes Terrace, when the prisoner, and two more passed me. I heard the prisoner make use of these words, if the cart had been there half an hour sooner, we should had the whole. That gave me a suspicion that all was not right; one of them had a bag with four copper saucepan covers, and other things in it. I followed them up to the Nelson, in Old street, and there asked the one with the bag what he had got; and he immediately put himself in an attitude of fighting; but after he found who I was, he said, I might have the things, and they all three ran off. I pursued them, and called stop thief. The thermometer was afterwards found in a privy in Hoxton.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

751. HENRY PHILLIPS was indicted for that he, on the 12th of March , one piece of satin, containing thirty three yards, value 7l. one other piece of sat in, containing forty yards, value 6l. one other piece of sattin, containing thirty six yards and a quarter, value 9l. one other piece of sattin, containing forty eight yards and three quarters, value 6l. one other piece of sattin, containing twenty three yards,value 4l. oneother piece of sattin, containing forty five yards, value 10l. one piece of black modesilk, containing forty one and a half ells, value 6l. one other piece of black mode silk, containing forty eight yards, value 4l. the property of James Stinger , Henry Topham , Thomas James , and William Tate ; by a certain ill disposed person unknown, then lately feloniously stolen, of the same ill disposed person unlawfully did receive, and have, he well knowing the same to have been feloniously stolen .

THOMAS JAMES . I am one of the prosecutors; we are wholesale silk mercers , in Cheapside; and our warehouse extend backwards into Old Change.

JOSEPH FOLDER . I am in the employment of the prosecutors. On the morning of Tuesday the 12th of March, the silk in question was stolen from the back part of their warehouse, in the Old Change.

WILLIAM MOSS. I keep the George, at Stratford. On the Morning of Tuesday the 12th of March, at about ten o'clock, the prisoner came to my house, and ordered some brandy and water; in about half an hour, he was joined by another person, who had a canvass bag; I did not see that they joined company at first, but they did afterwards. They were in company the best part of the day, and went away in the evening, in a returned pest chaise, to the three Nuns, at Aldgate; I did not see which took the bundle.

RICHARD MULLEY. I keep the three Nuns, at Aldgate. On the evening of Thesday the 12th of March, the prisoner came to our house, in one of our chaise; he had another person with him. they had some liquor, and the prisoner gave me a parcel, requesting me to take care of it. He then went out with the person in whose company he had come. I had a suspicion that all was not right, and I sent for Mr. Ray the officer; Mr. Ray came, and went into the back parlour, where the parcel was. The prisoner came in in a short time, and I asked him if he was going to take the parcel away he went towards the door of the room where it was, but turned back directly, and went out, and Mr. Ray followed him, and brought him back.

JONATHAN RAY . I am an officer of Portsokenward. I was standing near the door in the room, where these goods were; the prisoner came towrads the parcel, and then turned quickly round, and went out of the house; I suppose it was by knowing of me, I had not spoken to him. The moment he clapped eyes on me, he went out; I immediately followed him, and brought him back.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

MR. ARABIN, as counsel for the prisoner, entered into an ingenious address to the jury, in his defence; and commened a good deal upon the prisoner's conduct, as neither being extraordinary, or remarkable.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined two years , and fined 100l.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

752. RICHARD RANKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of July , a gander, value 5s. and two geese, value 5s. the property of Thomas Littlewood .

THOMAS LITTLEWOOD . I am a farmer at Hendon . I locked these geese up myself, in a cart-house, the evening before I missed them; there was a gander amongts them, with a black spot under his right wing. The next morning my man give me an alarm, in consequence of that, I came towards London to trace them, and Mr. Henson shewed them to me at Kenfish Town; he also shewed me a horse-picker, and a knife, which had been in my stable the night before, and which he said he took from the prisoner. On the knife, were feathers, and blood.

JOHN HENSON . I am a constable; I was in the Back-lane, at about twenty minutes before five in the morning of the 6th of June; I saw the prisoner, and another man in that lane, resting two bags; they were bloody. I asked them what they had got, and the prisoner spoke civily, and said, geese; on examining them, I found that the geese were warm. I then told them that they were my prisoners, and the other man struck at me, and made his escape. The prisoner behaved very civily, and I thought it my duty to take him to the watch-house, as the geese were warm. He said they were his own, and that he lived on Barnet-common. The prosecutor came soon after to the watch-house, and owned the geese.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

753. JOHN FISHER was indicated for bigamy .

REV. RICHARD HENRY CHAPMAN. I produce the registry of the prisoner's marriage, to Mary Arlett . at Maryhome Chruch on the 15th of June, 1812; they were married by licence.

SARAH REVEL . I am the sister of Mrs. Fisher, formerly Mary Arlett. I look at the prisoner, I know him very well; he counted my sister to my knowledge, some time before he married heri was then the wife of William Cutterel , a corporal in the 2nd regiment of Life Guards, who gave her away. The prisoner left my sister about November last; she is show in court.

WILLIAM HAMMOND . I am the parish clerk of Paddington; I produce the registry of the prisoner's marriage, in the name of John Ingram ; described as a batchelor, to Ruth Elcock , spinster. I was witness to the ceremony, and they were married by the Rev. Mr. Pickering, perpetual curate. The pew opener, Sarah Asthn , was another witness, but she died last Monday.

MARY JONES . I know Ruth Elcock , she is a fellow servant of mine; she passed as a married woman since October last, and went by the name of Mrs. Ingram; she and the prisoner did not live together. I know the prisoner by the name of Fisher; he said he did not like that name, and so he changed it to Ingram.

WILLIAM CHADWELL . I aprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. In the beginning of November 1812, my first wife left her home with all the childs clothes, and every thing she could lay held of and two pounds she got of me, and left me only just enough to put on in the morning. I put an advertisement in the paper, stating, that I would not be answerable for any debts she might contract, as she had absented herself from me a long time previous.

(The prisoner here produced the Morning Post ofthe 1st of April, 1816, in which the advertisement to which he alleded, was inserted.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

754. WILLIAM PAWSEY was indicated for stealing, on the 29th of June , three pewter pots, value 3s. and a brush, value 1s. the property of James Henshaw .

JAMES HENSHAW . I am a publican , and keep the Cumberland's Head, in Bath-street, City Road . I lost these pots on the 29th.

WILLIAM WHITEHEAD. I am servant to the prosecutor; I stopped the prisoner going out of my master's house, on the day in the indictment; in consequence of suspicion, I found on him one of the pots in question; and on searching his house, we found the other two, and the brush.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge it.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

755. ALEXANDER RAYNER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , a coat, value 4s. the property of William Acton .

WILLIAM ACTON . On the 11th of June last, I lost this coat from the top of my cellar stairs. I found it on the prisoner immediately after missing it. I sent for an officer, and had him taken into custody.

JOHN BROOKES . I saw the prisoner take this coat into the back yard, and put it on. When I came up to him, he began to pull it off again, and cried out it was his own.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

756. MICHAEL SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , a coat, value 15s. the property of Sir James Graham , bart.

ROBERT SURMAN. I am footman to Sir James Graham ; he lives at No. 1, Portland-place . I lost this coat on the 4th of July; I got up in the morning of that day, and cleaned my stibes and knives, and unlocked the area gate; I then went for some knives. I had left the over night; and while I was gone, the prisoner came in, and took the great coat in question off a peg in the servant's hall; he went out, and I followed him, in consequence of information, and seized him; I brought him back with the coat, and sent for an officer.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

757. JOHN WILLIAMS and MARY MILLER were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , a bed-tick, value 10s. thirty pounds weight of flocks, value 5s. two sheets, value 5s. one blanket, value 3s. one counterpane, value 5s. one candlestick, value 4s. one tea-board, value 5s. one tea-kettle, value 1s. three chair-covers, value 2s. one bolster, value 12s. two pillows, value 5s. two pillow-cases, value 1s. one tinder-box, value 2d. three knives, value 4d. three forks, value 4d. two table-spoons, value 6d. two tea-spoons, value 2d. and one frying-pan, value 6d. the property of William Reece Williams . in a lodging-room; and four handkerchiefs, value 2s. one plate, value 1d. one milk-pot, value 1d. and one painafore, value 6d. the property of the said William Reece Williams .

WILLIAM REECE WILLIAMS . I am a labourer ; I live at No. 3, Paradice-row, Bethnal Green . At the latter end of May, the female prisoner came to my wife to get a lodging. We were to have four shillings per week for the lodging. My wife knows more about it than I do.

CHARLOTTE REECE WILLIAMS . I let this lodging to the female prisoner; I let her the two pair of stairs front room furnished; she was to have the use of the things in the indictment. The man passed as her husband when he came. He went down into the Country with some gentleman's horses. The female prisoner went away, and left the door of the room locked. On examining the room, we missed the articles named in the indictment, that were let to them, and the other articles that were not let were missing from my room.

HENRY SOWERBY . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a sheet; I took it in pawn from a female; but I don't know that it was the female prisoner.

WILLIAM RICHARDSON . I apprehended the prisoner.

JOHN POPHAM . I am a broker. The female prisoner brought some things to me to sell.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

758. JOHN MAXWELL was indicted for stealing on the 2nd of July , a bed. value 2l. a b lster, value 3s. a pillow, value 2s. two blankets, value 2s. one sheet, value 1s. the property of Jane Goodfield , widow ; in a lodging-room .

JANE WOODFIELD . I keep a public-house in Essex-street, in the Strand . The prisoner was a lodger of mine; this bed and bed clothes were let to him to sleep on. We missed them on the day in the indictment.

JOHN ELSMORE . I am a watchman in the parish of St. Dunstan's. Fleet-street. About three o'clock in the morning of the 2nd of July, I stopped the prisoner with a large bundle, and asked him what he had there; he said, nothing more than his own property. I asked him where he was going; and he said home. I asked him where he got the property; and he made no answer. On that account, I took him to the watchhouse, and found that the bundle consisted of the property in question.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

759. EDWARD SPRING was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of June , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Robert Adamson , from his person .

ROBERT ADAMSON. I was in Wych-street , about three o'clock in the afternoon; I observed the prisoner and some others pressing close to me. I put my hand to my pocket, and immediately raised my handkerchief. A young man gave me some information, and pointed to the two persons who had passed me, of whom the prisoner was one; I laid hold of the prisoner, as I was told he was the receiver, and on searching him, I found my handkerchief; the other made his escape.

THOMAS DREW . I saw the other man who was with the prisoner make an attempt at the prosecutor's handkerchief; and in a second attempt he succeeded in taking it, and gave it to the prisoner, who put it into his bosom, and rushed with considerable force past the prosecutor. I immediately gave the prosecutor information, and he secared the prisoner, and he was taken to Bow-street.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

760. MOSEN LEVI was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , a handkerchief, value 6s. the property of William Kerville , from his person .

WILLIAM KERVILLE . I am headborough of Shoreditch. I lost my handkerchief while I was on duty at Bow-fair . I was looking at one of the shows, about three o'clock in the afternoon, and I felt something at my pocket; it did not strike me at first that my pocket was picked; but in a moment or two afterwards, I searched the pocket, and found the handkerchief was gone. I saw the prisoner making off in a direction from me, and I thought it right to secure him. I searched him, and found the handkerchief in his bosom.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up, and had not had it in my hand two minutes.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

761. JOHN LACEY was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of June , five pounds weight of cheese, value 3s. the property of George Harris , from the person of Ann Waddington .

GEORGE HARRIS. I am a cheese-monger , at 107, Shoreditch. On the day in the indictment, I sent two cheeses to a gentleman in Hackney-road, by a person named Ann Waddington ; she had not been gone long before she returned with only one cheese.

ANN WADDINGTON . I am thirteen years of age. On my way with these cheeses, I set the basket down to rest, and I requested the prisoner to help it up on my shoulder again, which he did; but in doing so, he took one of the cheeses out, and ran off; but a gentleman went after him, and brought him back.

WILLIAM LOVETT . I stopped the prisoner with the cheese.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

762. ELIZABETH TATHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , five handkerchief, value 2s. three pairs of stockings, value 2s. one shawl, value 2s. one sheet, value 3s. and one ring, value 2s. the property of Nathaniel Norman .

FRANCES NORMAN . I lost these things about four months ago. The prisoner at that time was a servant of mine. I took her in to help me as a washerwoman. I was ill, and was oblidged to lie down. and I left her in the charge of these things. When I got up again, she was gone, and the things were missing. I met her about two months ago, and got from her two duplicates of part of the things. I could not stop her then; but she was apprehended afterwards, and then I came forward.

JOHN GARROD . I am a pawabroker. I live in Hereford-place, Commercial-road. I produce five handkerchiefs, three pairs of stockings, a shawl, a sheet, and a ring, which were all pawned by a female, whom I believe to be the prisoner, but I am not sure. The duplicates for these things were procured from the prisoner.

GUILTY . aged 26.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

763. EDWARD TUCKER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of June , ten pounds weight of mutton, value 6s. the property of John Shearman .

JOHN SHERMAN. On the 13th of June last, I was opening my parlour door, and saw a man issuing from the area; he held his head down low as if to escape observation from the windows. I called the servants at the top of the stairs, but none of them answered. I then went to follow the person, and the prisoner walking very rapidly, with something bulky under his coat; I pursued him without my hat, not at all knowing what he had got. He turned his head round, and seeing somebody following him without a hat, he set off running, as fast as ever he could run; I run after him, but finding I could not gain upon him, I called out stop thief. Just as he turned the corner of Duke-street, that goes into Castle-street, he dropped something from him, which I discovered to be a leg of mutton. The prisoner was stopped. and brought back, pale, and breathless; I gave him in charge to an officer. This leg of mutton had been hanging in the area.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I took charge of the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

764. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , a hat, value 6s. the property of Joseph Hudson .

ANN HUDSON . This hat had been on our parlour table about eight o'clock; the passage door was men. and I heard a footstep; I heared into the parlour almost directly; and there was an old hat on the chair, and the hat in question was gone.

ANN MOUNTAIN . I live next door to the prosecutrix. About eight o'clock in the morning of the day in the indictment, the prisoner was coming into the house where I live, but on seeing of me, turned out again.

SAMUEL MILLER. I apprehended the prisoner, on the day in the indictment, at the Princess of Wales, commonly called, Black Hell, in Wentworth-street; he had this hat on his head.

JAMES ROSS. I am a batter, I can swear to my having sold that hat to the prosecutor.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

765. RICHARD KEATS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , twenty yards of printed cotton, value 1l. the property of Thomas Weatherhead , and John Sparrow Benstead .

JOHN SPARROW BENSTEAD . I am in partnership with Thomas Weatherhead . Between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, of Saturday the 21st of June, I was in my shop, and a woman told me, that a man had stolen a piece of print from my door; she pointed out the prisoner, whom I took into custody, but he had not the print; he had given it to another man.

MARTHA TABRUM . I saw the prisoner and another man standing by the prosecutor's shop; and I saw the prisoner take the cotton in quession, and give it to another man. The prisoner first cut the strings which confined it.

JAMES HANDCOCK. I took the prisoner into custody.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

766. GEORGE STORY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , four pounds weight of indigo, value 1l. 1s. the property of James Jones .

JAMES JONES I am a silk dyer ; I live at No. 37, Booth-street, Spital-fields . The prisoner was my apprentice . On the evening of the day in the indictment, one of my men shewed me some indigo, and gave me some information.

WILLIAM NORTON . I am in the employ of the prosecutor. On going into my master's loft, over the dye-house, on the day in the indictment, I found a handkerchief, containing the indigo in question. The prisoner observing that I had discovered it, immediately came up, and took it away, and threw it into the stoke-hole. On getting it back. I found it contained this indigo, which is my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

767. JAMES RIDDLE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of June , a cart, value 7l. the property of William Gowing .

WILLIAM GOWING . I am a baker and corn chandler . I lost my cart from Cuizons Mews, Chelseacommon . I owed a gentleman of the name of Jones, a small sum of money, for which he came to my house; I told him I had lost my cart, and he gave me some information.

HENRY JAMES JONES, I let some premises situated at No. 1, Prospect-place, to the prisoner at the bar James Riddle . On the 4th of June, I found him and another man at work, taking a cart to pieces in the stable; it was taken entirely to pieces. I sent for an officer, and had the prisoner taken into custody; the other man got off.

RICHARD HACK . I was with Mr. Jones, and saw the prisoner in the act of pulling the cart to pieces.

GEORGE POPLE . I apprehended the prisoner. I took the cart into custody, it was completely in pieces.

William Gowing . I saw this cart, and am sure it was my property.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

768. JAMES PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , two live pigs, value 1l. 15s. the property of John Beagen .

JOHN BEAGEN. I live at Teddington , my pigs were safe the night before the day in the indictment; the next morning they was missing.

GEORGE CHAPMAN . I am a bricklayer; this man came by me, with the two pigs, and I asked him if they were to sell; he said they were, and wanted twenty one shillings for the larger. He did not take the money then. I bid him nineteen shillings, and he went away; but he came afterwards and took the nineteen shillings; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM CARTER . I bought the other pig of the prisoner, I gave sixteen shillings for it. The prisoner said he bought it at Brentford market, with five others, which he had sold.

CHARLES GAMMON . I apprehended the prisoner.

John Beagen. I have seen these two pigs of which the witnesses have been speaking; they are my property.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

769. JAMES NELSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , a bridle, value 10s. the property of Samuel Ringer .

SAMUEL RINGER. I am a harness-maker , and live in Dean-street, Soho . James Nelson came to me on the morning of the 10th of June; I knew no more of him than having served in the same regiment with him. After he had been gone an hour and a half, I missed the bridle in question. I searched several pawnbroker's and I at last found it at Simmons' in Monmouth-street.

THOMAS PEWTNER . I am with Mr. Simmons, the pawnbroker. I took this bridle in from the prisoner, on the day in the indictment, and lent him five shillings on it.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the bridle, before I saw it at the magistrates.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

770. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , a hat, value 4s. the property of Richard Bowden .

HENRY HEATH. I am an apprentice to Mr. Bowden, he is a hatter , at 166, Shoreduch. I lost a hat on the 21st of June, at about half past nine in the evening; it was about a foot within the shop door on a stand.

WILLIAM BARRETT. I saw the prisoner and another on the evening of the day in the indictment; they made several attempts at several shops, and at last, I saw the prisoner take this hat. I pursued him; he dropped the hat, and I secured him.

GEORGE WOODROFFE . I picked up the hat the other boy escaped.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was going for an errand for my mother, and I saw a parcel of boys running, and I ran.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined one month , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

771. PETER KIMMER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 7s. the property of George Martin , and David Stephens .

WILLIAM JAMES . I am shopman to the prosecutors; they are linen-drapers , in Blandford-street, Manchester-square . On Saturday, the 6th of July, about one o'clock, I pursued the prisoner, in consequense of some information, and stopped him with the print in question in his possession; it had been just outside the door a few minutes previous.

WILLIAM NEWITT . I took charge of the prisoner and the property.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

772. WILLIAM DUNCAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of May , a watch, value 30s. a seal, value 6d. two shirts, value 4s. one seven-shilling piece, and four one-pound bank notes , the property of Andrew Owen .

ANDREW OWEN. I am a sailor . I lost this property on the 30th of May. I belonged to the Tom Pipes ' smack. The mate and I went on shore, leav-the prisoner on board; she was lying on the mud at Gun Dock . When I came back, the prisoner was gone, and this property. He never returned to the ship. I afterwards met him walking along the Canal in the East India Docks, and I called a man to help me to take him, and I found one of my shirts on his back, and my watch-chain on his person; the watch was gone.

(Shirt and chain produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. That chain is mine, and I bought it off Yarmouth-roads.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

773. JOSEPH COYSH and JOHN DYCKE were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , a piece of mahogany, value 30s. the property of John Semple , and Alexander Semple .

ALEXANDER SEMPLE . I am a dealer in mahogany ; John Semple is a partner of mine. Coysh was employed by me. I was not aware of this robbery until immediately after it was committed.

THOMAS ADAMS . I am a cabinet-maker; I live in Upper Rathbone-place. On the morning that this took place, I was directed by my employers to be in Newman-street, to assist in putting a coffin into a house. I went for that purpose, and I observed Dycke standing by Mr. Semple's yard. After that, I saw him come out of the yard with a piece of mahogany on his shoulder; I heard him say to the other prisoner, that he would call and pay for it at nine o'clock the next morning. I went after Dycke, and secured him, and brought him back to the prosecutor's house.

Alexander Semple . Re-examined. Coysh had not any authority to sell any goods until the clerk came. The clerk has power to sell. Coysh said that this was to be paid for the next morning at nine o'clock. I sent for an officer; the prisoners were taken into custody.

Cross-examined by MR. CHALLONER. Dycke had dealt with us before; he was a slab merchant.

JOSEPH BERRY. Dycke had never been a customer to the house for a whole piece of mahogany like this.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Goysh's Defence. I was coming to work, and I met this man in Wardour-street, and he said, he was going to our yard; I told him the clerk was not come; he said, he had an order for a pillar and claw table to be finished in a hurry. He asked me could not I let him have a piece, for he wanted to send it to the turner's immediately; I told him that was almost more than I dare do; but I would let him have it, and he must come and pay for it the next morning at nine o'clock, which he said, he would.

Dycke's Defence. This man said he would let me have this piece of mahogany; I told him I had an order for a pillar and claw table to be finished immediately. I told him I wanted to send the piece for the pillar to the turner's that morning; so he let me have it, and I intended to come the next morning, as I had promised.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

774. ANTHONY MURPHEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , a coat, value 10s. the property of Robert Moss .

ROBERT MOSS. On the 9th of this month, I was repairing the pavement by Whitechapel , and my coat lay close to where I was at work. A personcame to me, and asked me if I had lost any thing; I turned my head round to see, and missed my coat. I saw the prisoner running with it under his arm.

JOHN BOUTLE . I pursued the prisoner, and stopped him, with the coat under his arm.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 13.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

775. SAMUEL JAMES was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of June , a pair of scales, value 3s. the property of Cornelius Norris .

CORNELIUS NORRIS. I am a furniture broker , in Leather-lane, Holborn . I lost these things from my door, at about a quarter before nine on the evening of the day in the indictment.

JOHN MATTHEWS. I saw the prisoner snatch up something from the stall, and run with it; I pursued him, and stopped him; he then put it down, and squatted over it. On my removing it, I found it was the scales. I brought him and the property back to the prosecutor's.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined six months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

776. DANIEL HAGGARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , a hat, value 5s. and a cocoa-nut, value 6d. the property of Henry Kendall .

HENRY KENDALL . I am a ship owner . I lost this hat on the 21st of June. In landing my trunks at the West India Dock Basin, the prisoner seemed very officious in assisting. I desired him repeatedly to desist, as I did not want his assistance. He left the place, and abused me exceedingly. As we were opening our trunks, and getting them ready for the inspection of the officers, my younger son put down the hat in question, with a cocoa-nut in it. After we had shut the trunks again, he missed the hat and cocoa-nut; at that instant a labouring man said there is a man has just ran up the lane with a hat, and my younger son immediately went after him, and secured him; it was the prisoner, and he had the cocoa-nut and the hat on him. A constable came, and I gave him in charge.

HENRY KENDALL , JUN. I ran after the prisoner, and secured him, with the property on him.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one year , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

777. ANN ALESWORTH was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , nine pairs of stockings, value 1l. 7s. the property of Thomas Garton .

SUSANNAH GARTON . I live at No. 9, Worship-street . On the 17th of June, about five o'clock, I was standing at the front door talking to a person, when my daughter came and told me that the prisoner (who was a lodger) had taken a parcel of stockings off one of the shelves.

MARY ANN GARTON . I am the daughter of the last witness. I saw the prisoner take this parcel of stockings off the shelf; she did not see me.

JOHN CROSSWELL . I am an officer. On the 17th of June, I was sent for to the prosecutor's house. I found the stockings in question concealed behind the water-but.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

778. JAMES WELLS and MATILDA MAT-TERSON were indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of April , a sheet, value 2s. and twenty pounds weight of feathers, value 10s. the property of James Pearce , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH PEARCE . I live at No. 108, Whitecross-street, St. Luke's . My husband's name is James Pearce . I let the lodgings to the prisoners at the bar; they took the lodging as man and wife; they came some time in the latter end of March last; they were to pay four shillings per week; they did not quit the lodging at all. I missed the property while they were inhabiting the lodging. The indictment was wrong at the last Sessions, and we were obliged to have a fresh one this Sessions. On the day in the indictment, they left their child crying in the room, and I went up to see what was the matter with it, and then I discovered the bed cut open, and the feathers all about the room.

AMELIA JONES . I lived in George-yard, Lombard-street, and Matterson's mother lodged at our house, and she sent me to pawn the street. I gave the ticket and the money to her; I also pawned a flat iron for her.

GEORGE GILLETT. I am a pawnbroker, and produce the flat iron and sheet, pawned by the last witness.

ROBERT LOCK. I apprehended the prisoner Matterson.

MATTERSON, GUILTY , aged 27.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

WELLS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

779. ELEANOR WALLIS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , two pillows, value 6s. two sheets, value 3s. three pillow-cases, value 2s. two curtains, value 2s. one blanket, value 3s. and two irons, value 1s. the property of Thomas Read , in a lodging-room .

THOMAS READ . I live at No. 2, Ironmonger-row, Old-street, St. Luke's. On the 13th of October last, I let a lodging to the prisoner and her husband, at four shillings and sixpence a week. On the 19th of June, they quitted the lodging, and we missed the property of ours which was in question; but we found the duplicates for it in one of the drawers.

WILLIAM SHORTHOSE. My property was taken from my room; I have the second floor, and I lost the watch.

MARY SHORTHOSE . My husband's silver watch was taken off the mantle piece; it was taken on the 19th of June; I never found it again; I also lost a pair of ear-rings, a piece of patchwork, and a shirt.

ROBERT LOCK. I was sent for to take the prisonerinto custody. I found the tickets for all the articles in the indictment in her drawer.

THOMAS WALKER . On the 19th of June, the prisoner pledged this watch, and on the 22nd, the prosecutor redeemed it.

WILLIAM BROCK . On the 11th of June, I took a pair of gold ear-rings from the prisoner at the bar.

JAMES WALTER . I am a shopman to Mr. Fothergill. I produce a shirt, pledged on the 17th of June for one shilling and sixpence, by the prisoner at the bar.

GEORGE GILLETT. I produce a piece of patchwork, pledged by the prisoner, on the 8th of June.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I pledged the things. but I intended to replace them.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined fourteen days , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

780. JAMES INWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of July , from the person of James Butler , one book, value 1s. one purse, value 2s. three ten pound bank-notes, four five pound bank-notes, and ten one pound bank-notes , his property.

JAMES BUTLER. I had the care of about two hundred and fifty pigs, leaving Bristol; I sold about twenty of them coming along the road, and on the other side of Staines , I saw the prisoner, who accosted me; I had about sixty pounds about me. The prisoner was present at the sale of a tired pig of mine, and I believe there, he saw my money; I had two assistants to help me to drive my pigs. I fell into conversation with the prisoner; I got tired, and he told me I had better sit down on the road side, and rest myself; and a coach or chaise would presently come past; he knew all the drivers, and he would get me a lift; I might get on a coach, and overtake my men with the pigs. I was induced to sit down by the road side, I fell asleep; the prisoner awakened me when a coach came up. I did not get into the coach, but I afterwards got into a waggon; the prisoner would not get in; after that I missed my money; I sent work back to Staines, and the next day the prisoner was apprehended.

JAMES BARNES . I am one of the horse patroles, belonging to Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner in a gig, on the day after the robbery; William Lloyd , and Mr. Wright were in the gig. I took the prisoner into custody. I got a book, which was dropped by the prisoner, and which belongs to the prosecutor, and he said he had thrown the money out of the gig, as he came along.

JAMES DINGLE , I am one of the horse patroles. I saw the prisoner drop that book out of the gig. None of the money has been recovered.

GEORGE PEARCE. I picked the book up. I saw the prisoner the night before with a good deal of paper in a green silk netted purse; he treated me. He was with a woman.

JAMES PEVEV . I am a linen draper at Staines. The prisoner bought goods to the amount of five pounds, four shillings and ten pence, at my father's shop, on the 2nd of July. There was a woman with him.

James Butler. I had that book in my possession; it is a Roman Catholic prayer book; my purse was a green silk netted purse.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

781. WILLIAM TRISTRAM was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of June , one child's hat, value 3s. one frock, value 6d. one pair of trowsers, value 6d. and one pinafore, value 3d. the property of Luke Buttress , from the person of Charles Buttress .

LUKE BUTTRESS. I live at No. 34, in the City-road. I have a child named Charles Buttress , about four years and a half old. I saw that child with all its wearing apparel perfect, on the day in the indictment, at dinner time; my dinner time is between twelve and one. I came home again at nine o'clock at night, and then I was informed that the child had been almost entirely stripped.

ANN SHIMMEL. I have a son; I sent him on an errand on the day in the indictment; he was gone a long time, longer than he ought to have been gone, and a man came after him, and said a child had been stript, and all the clothes had been found, except the hat. I told the man my son was not at home. I went to the prisoner's mothers appartment about ten o'clock at night, and found him there. When I first went to the house, the mother was coming to the door.

JOSEPH PRINCE. I am a constable of St. Lukes. I went to the prisoner's mothers house, I found the prisoner there, and I acquainted him with my business; I told him I came to take him, for stripping Mrs. Buttres's child; he began to cry; he said he was very sorry for what he had done. I searched the place, and the mother of the prisoner, chucked the hat out of the window. I picked that hat up under the window outside, and it was claimed by Mr. Buttress, as his child's hat.

GEORGE SHIMMELL, I am not thirteen years old, I know the prisoner at the bar, I have not known him long; I knew him for about a month before he was taken up. I know Mr. Buttress and his little boy. The prisoner asked the little boy to come along with him; the little boy was in a frock and trowsers. He took him into Brown-street, and into a new empty house; he took off the little boys clothes, and said he wanted to look at them; the little boy began to cry, and the prisoner said he would put them on again, for he only wanted to look at them. He then gave them to me to run across the road with them; he was to receive them again; I was frightened, and let them fall; there were some boys playing, and they run after me; I ran away, and the prisoner met me in Whitecross-street. I had nothing to do with the hat. I told this story to the officer.

RICHARD LAWLESS . I am an officer, I received the charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. That boy stripped the child.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined two years , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

782. JAMES SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , two brick hammers, value 4s. and two trowels, value 6d. the property of William Grimsdall ; two squares, value 3s. one chisel, value 4d. one hammer, value 9d. and one trowel, value 6d. the property of James Cox ; one crow-bar, value 2s. 6d. the property of Edward Pool ; one bevil, value 1s. one square, value 1s. two iron pins and limes, value 6d. two trowels value 1s. 6d. one bag, value 6d. two saws, value 6d. the property of George Gears ; six steel masons tools, value 4s. the property of John Phillips , and two bags, value 5s. the property of Thomas Papworth .

WILLIAM GRIMSDALL. I am a bricklayer . I was employed with other men on a job at the greenhouse, in Kensington Gardens ; we used to leave our tools there of a night. In consequence of missing them, we determined to watch. On the night of the 27th of June, I watched in company with James Cox; we were in a lane near the green-house; presently the prisoner passed me, and I knew it was he. He then went directly to the door which was fast. He then got rather out of my sight, but got through a semicircle which was over the green-house door. We then heard the ratling of tools, and the tools in question were then thrown out; we picked the tools up, and when the prisoner came out, we seized him.

JAMES COX. I was posted in this place on the night in question, and saw what the last witness has described.

STEPHEN TANNER. I am a patrole of Bow-street. I was in the inside of the wall on the night in question. The prisoner and another person came up on the outside of the wall, and were disputing which should get over, and at last the prisoner got over. They delivered the prisoner into my charge afterwards.

(Property produced, and sworn to by the several owners named in the indictment.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was locked out of my lodgings, and I went to this place to sleep.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

783. SOPHIA BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , from the person of Wil liam Jones , fourteen shillings in monies numbered, and thirteen one-pound bank notes , the property of the said William Jones .

THE particulars of this case are too indecent for insertion.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

784. ROBERT YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , a coat, value 1l. 10s. the property of Richard Price , from his person .

RICHARD PRICE. I drive the Gosport coach . On the evening of the 24th of June, I came into the Bell and Crown tap, about eight o'clock; I had the surtout coat in question on my arm, and I put it on the back of my chair. In about ten minutes I missed it. The prisoner had been in the room, and he was then gone.

JOHN ROBERTS. I saw the prisoner bring the coat into a public-house in little Gray's-inn-lane Read and another officer came in, and laid hold of him, saying, you are the man we have been looking for.

CHARLES COOKE . I apprehended the prisoner, in company with Read, and he had the coat with him.

WILLIAM READ , SENIOR. I produce the coat.

(Property sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

785. PARNELD GOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , a watch, value 40s. a coat, value 10s. a hat, value 3s. and a handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Patrick Grady , from his person .

THE particulars of this case are two indelicate to be inserted.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex Jury, Before Mr. Valliant.

786. GEORGE MARSHALL , JOHN KITE , and WILLIAM RUSH , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of Ellis Ward , from his person .

ELLIS WARD . I was in Bow fa ir, on the day in the indictment, looking at Saunder's show. A person tapped me on the shoulder, and said, is this your handkerchief? and the handkerchief he shewed me, was mine.

GEORGE WOODROFFE. I was in the fair, on the 6th of June, at about seven o'clock in the evening; I observed the two prisoners, Marshall and Kite, very active for about hour and a half, in trying gentlemen's pockets. I watched them, and Kite, the middle prisoner, in passing Mr. Ward. pointed with his finger, and looked at Marshall; I thought that that signal meant there was a handkerchief there; Marshall immediately came up; the prisoner Rush was a little forward, and Kite beckoned him back. Kite then stood directly behind the prosecutor, with Marshall on his left hand, and Rush on his right; then with his right hand, he took the prosecutor's handkerchief, and put it under the flap of his own coat, I then took hold of Kite and Marshall, and Locke the officer who was with me, catched hold of Rush; Rush seemed to have been doing nothing but following them; I don't think he appeared to take any part in the transaction.

ROBERT LOCK . Corroborated the testimony of the last witness.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

RUSH, NOT GUILTY .

MARSHALL GUILTY , aged 14.

KITE GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined two months , and whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Valliant.

787. ISAAC SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , one handkerchief, value 2s. 6d. the property of Robert Habgood , from his person .

ROBERT HABGOOD . I did not perceive my pocket was picked, until the officer told me of it.

JOHN CARLISLE. I am a City officer. I was at Bow fair , on the 6th of June; I saw the prisoner in company with two little boys; I was close to him. He shoved the two little boys up against the prosecutor's pocket, and I heard him say, go it, to one of them; neither of the boys appeared to be nine years old; the boys seemed rather timid; and the prisoner seemed very angry, and kept shoving them. Then one of the boys, put his little fingers to the pocket, and raised the handkerchief. The prisoner then pulled the boy back, and got close up behind the gentleman himself; he then took the handkerchief out of the pocket, and clapped it into his own waistcoat. I immediately seized him, and the little ones run away.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Valliant.

788. SARAH JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of June , seven yards of leno, value 4s. the property of John Wilder .

CHARLES JAMES . I am in the employ of the prosecutor. In the evening of the day in the indictment, the prisoner came into our shop, and I saw her put the muslin in question into her pocket, and she was making off with it, when I stopped her. I gave he into the custody of Armstrong the officer.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through the greatest distress.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Valliant.

789. MICHAEL LYNCH and MARY LYNCH were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , from the person of Samuel Whitehead , two handkerchiefs, value 8s. one neckcloth, value 2s. two pairs of earrings, value 40s. one snuff box, value 5s. one brooch, value 2s. eighty three silver buttons, value 30s. nine pieces of foreign gold coin, value 3l. 12s. twelve pieces of foreign silver coin, value 40s. and a two-pound bank note , his property.

SAMUEL WHITEHEAD . I belong to the Royal East India Company's artillery ; I know the prisoner, and his wife. When I came on shore on the 21st of June at Billingsgate; I came to the India house, to get my discharge filled up. After that, I went to a public-house, to inquire for the master at arms of the vessel in which I had come; the prisoner told me he knew him, and knew where he lived; and he lived at his house at Poplar. Then we went to the prisoner's house at Poplar, in a hackney coach; when we got there, I paid the coachman, and the coach was discharged. The prisoner then took my things up stairs, and he assigned the one pair of stairs room, as my lodging. He then ordered half a gallon of beer, and I went up stairs to lay down. I went up stairs to lay down, being extremely tired; I had the property in question on my person when I lay down. When I awakened, I missed the property, and called out; nobody answered, and I went down stairs. I saw the prisoner Michael Lynch , and I asked him if he had taken anything out of my pocket? and I told him what I had lost; and he said you b-y thief, you have lost nothing in my house; and he said he knew nothing about the property, but offered to lend me a pound. The next day I saw some of my property.

GEORGE SIMPSON . I know that Douglas the master at arms did not lodge with the prisoner; he lodged with me.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE. In consequence of information; I went after the prisoners, I saw them on the day after the day in the indictment, in Leadenhall-street. I saw them go into a silversmiths shop, and in passing the door, I heard something rattle in the scales; with that I went into the shop, and saw five pieces of foreign silver coin in the scales, and I took the prisoners into custody. The man prisoner said he would go and fetch the man that employed him to sell them; but I would not let him. The female prisoner said, that her husband knew nothing at all about it; and that the prosecutor had given her the foreign coin, to get changed.

THOMAS GRIFFIN . I was shopman to Mr. Masey, he is a silversmith; I was at home when the prisoner and his wife came into our shop, The male prisoner produced the silver coins, which the last witness got from the scale, to me to sell for the value, as bullion. All together, they were worth about seventeen shillings.

(The property produced and sworn to.)

Mary Lynch pleaded coverture.

MICHAEL LYNCH GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Life .

MARY LYNCH NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

790. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , from the person of James Crow , three ten-pound bank notes, and one two-pound bank note , his property.

JAMES CROW. I lost the notes in question, at the Blue posts, in Berwick-street , but how I don't know; I either lost them there, or between that and Oxford-street . I met some people who began to joke with me, and said, how do you do Jack, and all that; and after that I missed my money, and two minutes before that I had it in my breeches pocket, all in a bunch.

THOMAS ASPINAL . I am a clerk to Messrs. Drummond and Co. I made a payment to the prosecutor, of three ten-pounds notes, the numbers and dates of which as as follows; Nos. 5548 5549 5550; each dated the 13th of December 1815; I also paid him a two-pound note, No. 5551, dated the 19th of January.

JAMES BARRATT. I keep the Turks Head, in George-street, Bloomsbury. On the 20th of January between eleven and twelve, the prisoner gave me a ten pound note, which I sent my daughter to get changed; I indorsed the note, so as to know it again.

SUSAN BARRATT . I took this note to get change, and gave the small notes to my father.

WILLIAM-. I am an accountant at the Bank of England. I have three ten-pound notes; I have one to which the witness Barratt swears; No. 5548, dated the 13th of December, 1815; itwas paid in by Fry and Co. bankers, on the 24th of January, 1816.

James Barratt . That is the note the prisoner paid to me.

DAVID JONES . I am a silversmith. I received the note 5550, some five or six months ago; I am not positive that the prisoner paid it to me; but there are the words George Smith , on the face of it.

SAMUEL FURZEMAN . I apprehended the prisoner. He acknowledged he had changed a ten-pound note at Mr. Barratt's.

JOHN DAVIS. I am a constable of St. Giles'. The prisoner at the bar told me, that the ten-pound note he exchanged at Mr. Barratts, he had won at cribbage of a person who had lost between three and four pounds, and to whom he gave the difference.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

791. THOMAS AYRES , WILLIAM WHITE , and HENRY PLATT , were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of June , a handkerchief, value 4d. and nine-pence halipenny in copper money, the property of Thomas Nightingale , from his person .

THOMAS NIGHTINGALE . I was going towards Webber-square , between one and two o'clock in the morning of the day in the indictment, perfectly sober; my brother, John Houndle was with me; we were overtaken by the prisoners, two came and pushed me on one side, and a third stumbled before me; my brother-in-law immediately said, he is picking your pocket. I then caught hold of one of them, and my brother exclaimed, stick to him, I have got this one; the third was then coming towards me, when I seized him; we secured them all three, and they turned out to be the prisoners at the bar.

JOHN HOUNDLE . I was behind, and saw Ayres put his hand into my brother-in-law's pocket, and take out the handkerchief, containing the halfpence. The watchman came up, and we secured them all three.

THOMAS HEATH . I am the watchman, and assisted on securing the prisoners.

WILLIAM COX . I searched the prisoners, and found a picklock key on White.

AYRES, GUILTY , aged 20.

WHITE, GUILTY , aged 40.

PLATT, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

792. JOHN ALLPORT was indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of June , a goose, value 4s. and a duck, value 2s. the property of Thomas Bresnal .

THOMAS BRESNAL . I live at Chelsea , and keep poultry in my cellar. At six o'clock in the morning of the day in the indictment, I found my cellar door split open, and missed my goose and duck. In consequence of information, I went to the watch-house, where I found the prisoner in custody, and there also I saw my goose, and duck.

JOSEPH HOBSON . I stopped the prisoner about half past twelve at night, in the middle of the road, in Sloane-street, and I found he had this duck.

HUBH HASTINGS. As the prisoner was going along, he dropped the goose, and I picked it up; it was killed.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined two months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

793. DANIEL COGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , two pairs of stockings, value 5s. and a handkerchief, value 5s. the property of Thomas Farrell .

THOMAS FARRELL. I belong to the 12th regiment of foot . I found this property in the prisoner's possession. I was at the General Howard, in Jewsrow, Chelsea. The prisoner had taken these things in his handkerchief, in his bosom; and I stopped him.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through the greatest distress.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Fined 1s. and discharged

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

794. THOMAS DAVIS and WILLIAM SWAINE were indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , four shirts, value 20s. one jacket, value 30s. one haversack, value 2s. and one pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of John Disman ; and one shirt, value 5s. the property of John M'Nicholas .

JOHN DISMAN, I have been in the employ of the Commissonary General . The two prisoners were travelling with me, between Dover and Canterbury, on the 2nd of June, about one o'clock in the middle of the day. I got very ill on the road, and Swaine said he would carry my haversack for me. I was obliged to go slow; we were on the other side of a Village on the road, and I gave him a dollar, telling both of them to walk on before me, to the first public house in the Village, I never saw them after that, until I saw them on the 10th of June, in a public house, in Spital-fields; there Swaine jumped up on the table. when I asked for my haversack, and said he knew nothing at all about it. I then perceived that Davis had one of my shirts on his person, and he said his own shirt had got dirty, and he thought it was no harm to borrow mine. They had the haversack with them, and I had an officer sent for. The haversack and the shirt, were all of the things I ever got back.

DAVIS GUILTY , aged 23.

SWAINE GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

795. ANDREW MILLS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , a waistcoat, value 2s. the property of Henry Cohen .

HENRY COHEN . I am a salesman ; I live in Rosemary-lane . I lost a waistcoat on the 9th of July; that waistcoat was on the counter inside the shop. The prisoner and another man came into the shop together. After they had gone out of the shop, I missed the waistcoat. I went after them, and found it on the prisoner. I gave him into the custody of an officer.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined one month , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

796. THOMAS VAUGHAN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of March , a watch, value 14l. and a seal, value 1l. the property of George Townsend , from his person .

GEORGE TOWNSEND . On the 17th of March last, the prisoner and I lived fellow servants with Messrs. John and George Townsend , grocers, in Shoreditch. That night I came home rather intoxicated; the prisoner let me in. I discovered the next morning that I had lost my watch, and presumed my pocket had been picked in the street; I never suspected the prisoner.

THOMAS FITZGERALD . I am a merchant. The prisoner came to my house, about six weeks back; he understood that there was a ship of my brother's going to America; he wished to go in her, and I told him what the lowest terms would be. He told me he had a very valuable watch, which he was endeavouring to dispose off; but he could not get any thing near its value for it. He shewed it to me. I asked him where he got it? he said, that instead of spending his wages, he had saved up enough to purchase it. I spoke to my brother about it, and then took, the watch to Mr. M'Laughlin, a watchmaker, near our house, who was to say what the full value of it was; he said, the watch was worth fifteen pounds. The passage money on board my brother's ship was to be thirteen pounds, and I gave the prisoner the difference of two pounds. The watch hung in Mr. M'Laughlin's window after that.

HUGH M'LAUGHLIN. I am a watch-maker. I was asked the value of the watch. I told Mr. Fitzgerald he might safely give fifteen pounds for it. After that it hung in my window for disposal.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I went to the shop of the last witness, and there got the watch.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG. On the 3rd of July, I went on board the vessel of the Coast of Essex, and there apprehended the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

797. GEORGE HENNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , thirteen books, value 2l. the property of Harry Phillips .

HARRY PHILLIPS . I am an auctioneer . The books in question were deposited with others in an uninhabited house. Mrs. Bird, the sister of the prisoner, was allowed to sleep in that house. I had considerable confidence in her integrity and honesty, and have now. The prisoner has gone there to see her.

SAMUEL BADRICK . The prisoner employed me to pawn these books. I returned the money to him.

SARAH BIRD . I did not steal these books.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

798. JOSEPH READ and JOHN PULLEN were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of June , two bridles, value 15s . the property of William Newman .

WILLIAM NEWMAN . I am a harness manufacturer . I lost these bridles from my door, on the day in the indictment. I don't know who stole them.

SAMUEL JOHNSON. Read brought these bridles to me to sell, and asked fifteen shillings for them. I told him I would give him ten shillings, provided I knew that they were honestly come by; he could not convince me of that, and I would not give them to him. At nine o'clock at night, the other prisoner came, and wanted either the money or the bridles. I then had them both taken into custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Read's Defence. Pullen employed me to go and sell them. I knew nothing at all of where he got them; he has been a backney coachman, and I thought they were his own property.

PULLEN, GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined three months , and whipped .

READ, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

799. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 3rd of July , twelve plates, value 3s. 6d. the property of Jesse Phillips .

JESSE PHILLIPS. I keep an earthen-ware-shop . I was in the back part of my shop on the day in the indictment, and in consequence of some information which my son gave me, I went forwards, and saw the prisoner taking away the plates in question from my door. On seeing me, he directly threw them down, and broke them; but I secured him.

THOMAS PHILLIPS. I saw the prisoner and another man lurking about my father's door, and presently the other man took the plates, and gave them to the prisoner; I immediately called my father.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

800. ROBERT CALL was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , thirty shillings in monies numbered , the property of William Apted .

WILLIAM APTED. I gave the prisoner this money to take to my wife; he never took it.

COURT. That is no felony; it is merely a breach of trust.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

801. WILLIAM SHERWOOD and GEORGE PHIPPS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , a gold watch, value 5l. one other watch, value 10s. a gold chain, value 1l. a gold seal, value 10s a gold key, value 5s. a coat, value 1l. six waistcoats, value 1l. five pair of pantaloons, value 2l. twelve linen shirts, value 6l. and one pair of sheets, value 1l. the property of William South .

WILLIAM SOUTH . I am second mate of the West India ship Hayward. After our leaving Jamaica, we found the prisoner Sherwood on board our ship; he had come on board, and concealed himself; he came home with us. I lost my property after we were moored off Blackwall . About half past twelve on the night of the day in the indictment, we discovered another black man between decks, who was a stranger; he said, he belonged to a ship alongside. The next morning, on our calling all hands on deck, the prisoner Sherwood was absent. My property was then missed from my trunk. I never saw the other prisoner unless he was the man I found between decks, and that, I cannot take upon myself to swear.

DAVID FLEMMING . I am a watch-maker, and live in Shadwell High-street. On the 6th of this month, Sherwood brought me the two watches, and told me they wanted repairing. I examined them, and told him that the gold one did not want any thing doing to it; I wound it up, and set it to time, and he put it in his pocket. He then asked how much the metal one would come to repairing; I told him fourteen shillings. He then produced four dollar pieces in gold, and wanted change. I told him he had better keep his gold, and pay for the watch when it was done. He told me he was steward of a ship. After some talk, he went away; I can swear to the watch.

EMANUEL HARRIS . I am a jew-salesman. I bought the gold watch of the prisoner Phipps; I gave him a suit of clothes and thirty shillings in money for it.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

SHERWOOD, GUILTY , aged 22.

PHIPPS, GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

802. MARY ANN TURNER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , a sheet, value 8s. the property of Elizabeth Baldwin .

ELIZABETH BALDWIN . I take in washing ; I live in Chelsea . I lost this sheet on the 11th of June. I suspected the prisoner; she was a lodger of mine.

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this sheet with me, on the 12th of June.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined six months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

803. JAMES WOOLFE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , two hats, value 10s. the property of Daniel Gardiner .

DANIEL GARDINER. I am a hatter , in Chiswell-street . I lost these hats last Wednesday week; they were hanging at the door.

WILLIAM YATES. I saw the prisoner and another lad at the prosecutor's door on the day in the indictment. Presently I saw the prisoner run by with a new hat on; he was without one before. I immediately secured him, and he threw the hat off. The other boy got off with another.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 14.

Sent to the Philanthropic Society .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

804. JOHN WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , a wooden pail, value 3s. and a trowel, value 1s. the property of William Bessant ; and a trowel, value 2s. and a brush, value 2s. the property of Richard Thomas .

WILLIAM BESSANT. I am a plasterer ; I live at No.6, Chapel-row, Spa Fields. My trowel and pail were taken out of a building at Islington . Richard Thomas lost his trowel and brush; they were left in the building the over night.

CHARLES POOSLEY . I am a floor-cloth manufacturer, close to this building. I saw the prisoner come out with these things on the evening of the day in the indictment, and I stopped him.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

805. SAMUEL BURR was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of June , two gold seals, value 24s. and one watch-key, value 6s. the property of William Henry Whitby , from his person .

WILLIAM HENRY WHITBY . I was in Bow-fair in the afternoon of the day in the indictment. I felt my ribbon cut, and immediately missed my seals; seeing the prisoner walking away in a suspicious manner, I seized him, and he exclaimed it is not me sir, and he dropped the seals. We found a clasp knife on him.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 14.

Confined two months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

806. THOMAS REED , WILLIAM GRAYNER , and DAVID WILLIAMS , were indicted for stealing, fourteen pounds weight of lead, value 2s. 4d. the property of John Wilson , and fixed to a building of his ; and JANE EDGCOMBE was indicted for receiving and buying the same, knowing it to be stolen .

THERE was no legal evidence against the principals, in this case, and consequently none against the accessary.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

807. JOHN TROW was indicted for stealing on the 11th of July , one table spoon, value 15s. the property of Charles Cottington .

CHARLES COTTINGTON. I keep the Olive Branch in Grays-inn-lane . The prisoner had half a pint of beer in my house in the morning of the day in the indictment. About half an hour after he was gone, a silver spoon was missed; I immediately went tothe nearest pawnbrokers, which was Mr. Nicholls, and there I found that Mr. Nicholl had detained the prisoner with the spoon. We took him to Hatton Garden.

THOMAS NICHOLLS . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Grays-inn-lane. At about ten o'clock in the morning of Thursday week, the prisoner came to my house, and offered the table spoon in question; I detained him, and then the prosecutor came to my house.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

808. FREDERICK SMITH was indicted for grand larceny .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was found

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

809. SAMUEL TUFFELL was indicted for stealing on the 10th of July , twelve skains of worsted, value 5s. the property of James Hamlin .

JAMES HAMLIN . I saw the prisoner robbing me of this worsted; he worked for me. I saw him helping himself to it; he had no business at all with it. I asked him if he had got enough, and then sent for an officer.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

810. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of June , two hundred and forty yards of printed cotton, value 12l. the property of William Rickarby .

THOMAS GARDINER. I am shopman to Mr. Rickarby. In consequence of some information which I received on the day in the indictment from a young lady, I went out of my master's shop, and saw the prisoner going away with the print in question, which had been outside the door. A man who saw me running after him, ran round another way, and stopped him. I had him taken to Marlborough-street.

JOHN HOLT . I stopped the prisoner; he dropped the print.

THOMAS FOY. I am an officer of Marlborough-street. The prisoner and the property were delivered into my custody.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one year , and whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

811. ROBERT HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , a pocket-book, value 2d. a spoon, value 2d. three gowns, value 8s. two pairs of stays, value, 4s. one silk scarf, value 10s. one silk spencer, value 10s. three habit shirts, value 3s. one shift, value 2s. two pairs of stockings, value 2s. three handkerchiefs, value 1s. one apron, value 6d. one shawl value 3s. and one cannister, value 2d. the property of Maria Knight .

The prosecutrix not appearing, the prisoner was found

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

812. JOHN FOWLER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , six one-pound bank notes, and one dollar, the property of William M'Colloch , one dollar, one five-pound bank note, and a one-pound bank note , the property of John Emery .

JOHN EMERY . I and my shipmate M'Colloch, entrusted the prisoner to take care of this money for us.

COURT. That is no felony, it is merely a breach of trust.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

813. ROBERT BURROWS was indicted for stealing, on the 22nd of March , one bed, value 3l. one bolster, value 6s. two pillows, value 6s. two sheets, value 5s. two blankets, value 6s. two pillow cases, value 18d. two flat irons, value 1s. one candlestick, value 6d. and one pair of rings, value 6d. the property of Robert Phillips , in a lodging-room .

ROBERT PHILLIPS. I live at 15, Charles-street Long Acre . I let a lodging to the prisoner, on the 18th of March last, furnished. The things mentioned in the indictment, were a part of the furniture. They were missing. He and his wife lodged together.

THOMAS HEDGES . I am a pawnbroker, I took in the bolster, pillows, and pillow cases, of the prisoner's wife.

WILLIAM NEWLEY . I took in two sheets, and a pillow case, from the prisoner's wife.

SAMUEL LACK . I apprehended the prisoner; he gave me the duplicates for the property.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined three months , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

814. BENJAMIN BLUNDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , in the dwelling-house of William Serle , one 5l. bank note , the property of Mary Martin .

MARY MARTIN . On the 18th of June, I lost a five-pound note; it was in the kitchen; it was my own; I kept it in a small desk in the kitchen; that desk was not locked. I missed it at about half past four. I enquired of the other servants. The prisoner was our fish-monger's boy . I learned that the prisoner had been there; I saw him going out of the door; he had brought fish. Nobody was in the kitchen when he came out. When I missed the note, I went to the boy's master, to enquire of the boy's character; the boy was not to be found. I then returned home. I got a constable at one o'clock, and took him up suspicion, at his mother's house. I told him it would be better for him to confess, and if he would, I would forgive him. In consequence of some information, we went and found the note.

PETER GUST . I am a constable of St. George's Hanover-square. On the 18th of June, the prosecutrix applied to me. I apprehended the prisoner in consequence of what she told me. I got the note from him. I had a conversation with him before Mrs.Martin spoke to him. I asked him if he had seen a five-pound note, and he said, he had not. I asked him where he had been in the course of the day, and he said, only to a cobler, I asked him where he got his dinner, and he said in the street. He said, he had some provision given him at a gentleman's house. This is the note. Afterwards he said, he would shew me where the note was, and he gave it to me.

JOHN BOWEN. I am a poulterer. I gave this note to Mrs. Martin. I always endorse my notes with the name of the person from whom I receive them. I had endorsed this with the name of "Hasherton;" this is my hand-writing.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

815. JOHN HEANEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , one tame pigeon, value 1s. a pair of shoes, value 3s. a pair of stockings value 2s. a pair of boots, value 6s. a towel, value 6d. and an umbrella, value 4s. the property of William Pinion .

WILLIAM PINION . On the night of the 6th of July, I went to bed at one o'clock. In the course of the night, the house was broken open, and the property in question was taken out.

THOMAS PINION. Corroborated the account of the last witness.

CHARLES JEAKES. In consequence of information I found the pigeon on the Sunday morning.

ANN GORDON. My husband deals in pigeons. We bought one between eight and nine o'clock in the morning of Sunday the 7th of July.

THOMAS BALLARD. I saw the prisoner come out of Pinion's yard, about four in the morning of the 7th

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

816. MARY HARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , three table cloths, value 2l. four pairs of sheets, value 4l. two pillows cases, value 5s. fourteen shirts, value 10l. two window curtains, value 1l. and fifteen pieces of bed furniture, value 2l. the property of Daniel Birkett , in his dwelling-house .

The prosecutors could not prove the parish in this case.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Park.

817. WILLIAM BATTEN and WILLIAM JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , two watches, value 3l. the property of Samuel Taylor , in the dwelling-house of Thomas James .

SAMUEL TAYLOR . When I went out in the morning of the day in the indictment, I left these two watches hanging over my mantle piece, in the room where I and my wife lodged; on my return, they were gone.

HANNAH TAYLOR . I am the wife of the last witness. I left the watches in question hanging up in our room at about eight o'clock in the morning; and when I came home, they were gone. I had locked the door.

THOMAS JAMES. I am the landlord of the house. Batten lodged with me. I discovered that the key of his door, opened that of the prosecutors. The passage up stairs, is through my workshop, and nobody could go up stairs without my seeing them. I did not see any stranger go up on the day in the indictment.

JAMES GILLMORE . In consequence of information, I took up Barten; after that, I apprehended his wife; and afterwards I caused Jones to be apprehended; Smithers apprehended him. I asked Jones where the watches were, and he said he had sold one to a person whom he did not recollect; and he said he had sold the other to his brother, and his brother had pawned it at Knightsbridge.

RICHARD SMITHERS. I apprehended Jones. Batten denied all knowledge of the watch.

HENRY POWEL. One of the watches was pledged with me by Jones.

HUGH GAMBLE. The other watch was pledged with me, but I don't know by whom.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Abbott.

818. THOMAS DOVER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Brownsett , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 28th of June , with intent to steal, and for burglariously stealing therin, a pair of sheets, value 10s. sixteen towels, value 8s. two jackets, value 2s. one pillow-case, value 6d. and one bag, value 6d. the property of Amelia, the wife of James Scott.

AMELIA SCOTT . I am a washer-woman , and live at 432, Edgware-road ; I live in the house of Sarah Brownsett. In the course of the night of the 28th of June, a washhouse in the back yard was broken open, and these things were taken out of it; they belonged to Charles Kayes , esq. and were entrusted to me to be washed. On the morning of the 29th, I saw the things at Mary-le-bone watchhouse.

DENNIS WARD . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner with the property in question, at about three o'clock in the morning of the 29th; I took him to the watchhouse; it was then quite light.

SARAH BROWNSETT . The house was all secured the night before.

(Property produced, and sworn to.)

GUILTY, aged 15,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Confined one year , and fined 1s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Park.